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Can Diabetics Eat Chicken Nuggets

Life After Being Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes

Life After Being Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes

Glucose Screening It is probably not news to you that somewhere between 24 and 28 weeks pregnant women undergo the glucose screening. Basically, you drink a cup of sugar water and then they test your blood to see if your body is producing enough insulin to handle the sugar. For women without diabetes, your pancreas is usually able to produce enough insulin to keep up with your sugar intake. However, during pregnancy, your pancreas has to work double time and it is not always up to the job. If you would like more information regarding the test, there are plenty of good websites, including this one. When I went in for the screening I just had this gut feeling that it would come back positive. I wasn't super high but it was high enough to have to go to the next testing. I cried! Even though I had a feeling it was coming I was still distraught for the next 12 hours or so. Then I got a chance to talk to a friend about it (who also had GD) and she assured me that it would not be the end of the world. Here is my story that I hope will make you feel the same way. Glucose Tolerance Test If you test positive in your first glucose test, you get to go back for the second one. You will probably have to take at least a half day off of work because it takes over 3 hours. You will get your blood taken 4 times: 1st - When you arrive at the doctor. You will have been fasting so it is your fasting blood sugar level. The goal is for this level to be under 95. Then you get to drink the mix. 2nd - One hour later. Your goal is to be under 180. 3rd - One hour later (or 2 hours after your glucose drink). Your goal is to be under 155. 4th - One hour later/3 hours after your glucose mix. Your goal is to be under 140. The testing was fairly easy all things considered. The nurses there are super pr Continue reading >>

Eating Well At Fast Food Restaurants

Eating Well At Fast Food Restaurants

Here’s a little secret for those of you looking to eat right: Fast food restaurants don’t have to be your enemy. That’s right, those brightly lit temples paying tributes to burgers, and fries, and nuggets can provide decent meals if you’re in a rush. The key, as always, is to be careful and informed about the choices you make. No one-possibly not even the restaurants themselves-will say you should eat fast foot three times a day, seven days a week. And it’s best to prepare your own healthy food at home as often as you can. But people with diabetes are all-too-familiar with compromise. We have to compromise to live, given how demanding this condition can be. And the restaurants themselves have made the task easier in recent years. They have added more and healthier options. They have made nutrition facts more easily available. They aren’t charities, of course-the job of these chains is still to sell you as much fattening food as possible-but the situation is better than it used to be. Here’s a list of six of the healthiest meals from major fast-food chains. I’ve arranged them based on amount of carbs, going from lowest to highest. Carbohydrates aren’t the only important nutrition information, of course, but they are how most people with diabetes calculate insulin dosage, and they do have the most direct impact on blood sugar. A couple of disclaimers before we begin. First, these meals are not, by most standards, “low-carbohydrate.” They should be thought of as lower or moderate carb. Second, you can always go to a restaurant and order a plain green salad, without dressing, and be healthy. My goal here is to point out actual menu items that you might want to eat.. All of the figures are taken from the chains’ respective websites, which means they s Continue reading >>

Does Your Child Spike From Mcdonald's Chicken Nuggets?

Does Your Child Spike From Mcdonald's Chicken Nuggets?

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Does your child spike from McDonald's chicken nuggets? We were running in all directions last night and didn't have a chance to get dinner until a bit later than normal. We stopped at McDonald's, and my son -- who eats more than you can imagine for such a shrimpy 10 year old -- consumed 20 chicken nuggets. He had an apple for a snack. We bolused for the nuggets and apple, and everything seemed great as he headed to bet. Two hours later, he was in the 300's. I don't recall a fat spike from nuggets before, but then again, usually we eat earlier and there is some "activity" (moving around) that might help keep his blood sugar in check. This spike was more like a pizza spike. I haven't, but since we are new to pumping, I'll keep my eye out on it. From 4 or 6 nuggets, no, but from 20, I'd expect to have problems myself. I don't eat meat so it's not something I've ever thought about - but I'd expect spikes from anything from McDonalds eaten in sufficient quantity. She has never eaten that many, but has eaten 10 a few times. We have always use a 3 hour extended bolus for meals like that with 50% up front. That is one of the best things about a pump. A lot of people wait a long time to start using the extended boluses, but there is no reason to. You have to experiment a bit to see what works. If he starts to go high, you can cancel and give the remainder right away. Since you didn't say he went low first, maybe a higher % up front would work. If it doesn't, then a temp basal increase would be the next option. My son didn't start having fat spikes from McDonald's until he was around 10ish. He tends to go low an hour after McDonalds and then spike a few hours later....we t Continue reading >>

Gd Help! I Don't Understand Gestational Diabetes

Gd Help! I Don't Understand Gestational Diabetes

GD help! I don't understand Gestational Diabetes Well, I got my results at my OB appointment yesterday. So, I have gestational diabetes. I know its not the end of the world, but I cried anyways. I didn't want to hear it. As much as I'm grateful to be monitored. I don't like being classified as "High Risk". I was prescribed a blood glucose meter and supplies for 4 months. I have to check my glucose 4 times a day, once before I eat in the morning and then after each meal. I've been messing around a bit and it tends to make no sense. I see a dietician tomorrow for a meal plan. But, I'm sure they lower sugar and carb intake. For lunch: I had chicken nuggets, french fries and about 20oz of soda. (Yeah, I know BAD!) Well my glucose read was 136 one hour after I ate. Which was good. For Dinner: I had whole wheat spaghetti noodles, Sauce, ground turkey. (2 portions) 8oz glass of milk. My glucose read was 146 after 1 hour. Which was bad. Needs to be under 140. Morning Fast read was 68. Which was good. Breakfast: 1 cup honey bunches cereal, 8oz 2% milk, slice of whole wheat toast with lite butter. My glucose read was 145 after 1 hour. Which was bad. (Makes me think Milk might be an issue.) I'm going to try skim. What do you think? Has milk been an issue for you before? Are you told your glucose should be under 140 an hour after eating? And why didn't soda make mine go out the roof? Milk has two things that will make your levels go up. One it has lactose-the milk in sugar, the second is the protein which can elevate your sugar but protein is prefered as it tends to give you a sustained level. The soda would give you a quick high and a low that comes as equally quick. I would try the skim. It should help but it is by far the healthier choice. Although I would prefer to have extra Continue reading >>

Healthy Homemade Chicken Nuggets

Healthy Homemade Chicken Nuggets

This Healthy Homemade Chicken Nuggets recipe is the low-carb, grain-free chicken nuggets recipe youve been waiting for! Theyre a much healthier choice than traditional chicken nuggets and they taste even better! What if I told you that you could recreate the classic flavor of chicken nuggets in the convenience of your own kitchen with just a few easy-to-find ingredients? Even better, the Healthy Homemade Chicken Nuggets will be full of flavor, low in carbs, and taste really, REALLY good! I know it sounds a bit too good to be true, but its not. I have to admit that ever since I created this Healthy Homemade Chicken Nuggets recipe, Ive made them at least once a week. Its kind of hard not to when they taste as good as they do! I especially love that they contain only six ingredients (chicken breasts, almond flour, Italian seasoning, extra virgin olive oil, salt, and pepper) and theyre all wholesome ingredients. No fillers, additives, or artificial flavorings! I dont know if youve seen the ingredients list for some of the popular chicken nuggets out there, but theyre scary! The chicken nuggets from a popular fast food restaurant contain a whopping 40 (thats not a typo!) ingredients thats just way too many ingredients for a food that should be so simple. Whats also nice is these chicken nuggets are completely gluten-free since they use almond flour as the breading instead of breadcrumbs. This makes them a great menu choice for those who either have to or choose to avoid gluten in their diet. Who knew chicken nuggets could be such a perfect food choice for so many people? Healthy Homemade Chicken Nuggets in only 40 minutes While they may not be as fast as pulling up to a drive-through window, these healthy chicken nuggets are ready in just about 40 minutes! 15 minutes of pre Continue reading >>

Mcdonald Carbs - Carbohydrate And Calories - Diabetes Forums

Mcdonald Carbs - Carbohydrate And Calories - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hi! Im new here, so as i was able to see thers no subjeckt like this! So, i have diabetes for 6 months now and im in remision, age 20! I calculate carbs every day and eat about 150-200g for glucose lvl about 6.5 (120 on american). I saw that mcdonnalds food have pretty much carbs especially frise! Anybody have experiance to share with mcdonald food?! (Thanks, and sorry for my bad english...) McDonalds is not food. It is food-like, but I don't consider any of it food. There's nothing healthy about it. The carbs included are like pure sugar. They will spike your BGs; however, the high fat will slow this down and lead you to believe things are fine. Seriously. Avoid all fast food chains as much as you can. +1 on avoiding fast food as a general rule... maybe OK as an occasional "treat" but once you get used to "real" healthy food, fast food will not taste so good anyway If you must go there is nutrition info available here: McDonald's :: Our Food :: Nutritionally Calculator Same as most of these places you can get fairly healthy if you are careful... they do have salads if you avoid the dressings, baco-bits etc... trouble is they use that nutritional empty iceburg lettuce I especially love the way they now pretend to cater for the health conscious and offer choices for children like apple slices... with caramel dip! If I eat at McDonald's, i'll usually get 6 piece chicken nuggets (no dipping sauce) and side salad. There are 47 carbs in a Big Mac, 18 gms carbs in chicken nuggets, 72 carbs in Fish-Filet, 68 carbs in large fry, 28 carbs in the grilled chicken wrap. So..if you ate a big mac and fries Continue reading >>

Is Kfc Ok To Eat? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Is Kfc Ok To Eat? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Yesterday I found myself at a 'fun park' here in Bangkok with my kids for their cousins birthday party. Walking around in the heat and hungry from not eating much (still trying to suss what's good and not good to eat) I tried to find something to satisfy my hunger. Being Thailand almost everything is deep fried! (When there's not a proper restaurant to eat in) Eventually I found a KFC and was hit with a dilemma should I or shouldn't I eat there. Having no real choice I ordered a three piece chicken + salad. At a loss I just scrapped off the chicken skin and the tasty covering it comes with. My question is: Would it be ok from time to time to eat KFC chicken. p.s. Sorry, but I'm not interested in the PETA angle, thanks KFC or Macdonald's is fine as long as you watch the carbs. Fat won't affect your BG. So be careful with baked beans ( full of sugar). buns and fries ( full of starch) Noodles also need watching. Meat, fish and veggies are ok for Bg even if fried. The crispy coating on KFC is made from flour, so you were probably right not to eat it. Actually the carbs are not that high in KFC, according to my carb book, 2 pieces have about 14 carbs. Personally I find that the fat content is the bad thing, 2 pieces 23gms. Until recently a high percentage of the fats in KFC has been transfats, legislation/pressure in the US and some parts of Europe including the UK has lead to a change to using healthier cooking oils ( only in the last year) but I don't know if they have done that in Bangkok as oil is sourced locally! I tried to find the answer, couldn't find it but did find this quote from the Scotsman in 2007 At KFC, a large chicken and fries meal in Hun Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Recipes For Kids: Comfort Foods

Diabetes-friendly Recipes For Kids: Comfort Foods

Diabetes-friendly Recipes for Kids: Comfort Foods Macaroni and Cheese, Chicken Nuggets, and Enchiladas If your child has type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, you already know what his or her food preferences areyour child may happily eat whatever you make for dinner or he or she may be an extremely picky eater. Incorporating comfort foods that are diabetes-friendly can help boost your child's nutrition as well as help with managing diabetes. Although children with diabetes must balance what they eat with the insulin they take, their food choices aren't limited. They can incorporate a variety of foods and flavors into their meal plan. When a child has diabetes, it does impact the rest of your family, so it is important to have healthy food options in the house and for everyone to sit down at the table to eat meals together. To get your child more involved with eating well, make food preparation and shopping a fun family project. Ask your child for suggestions for meals and try to follow through with them. Macaroni and cheese, chicken nuggets, and enchiladas, are some of the most popular kids' meals. From a health standpoint, however, these dishes are traditionally loaded with calories and fat. Below, we show you how to cut the fat and increase the nutritional value of these family favorites. (Recipe courtesy of Kraft Diabetic Choices) 1/4 pound Velveeta Light (reduced fat pasteurized prepared cheese product), cut up 1 8-ounce package Kraft Free Shredded Non-Fat Cheddar Cheese 2 cups (8 ounces) elbow macaroni, cooked and drained Melt 1 tablespoon of the butter in a large saucepan on low heat. Blend in flour and salt; cook and stir 1 minute. Gradually add the milk; cook, stirring constantly, until thickened. Add prepared cheese product and 1 1/2 cups of the shredded cheese Continue reading >>

What Can A Diabetic Eat At Mcdonald's?

What Can A Diabetic Eat At Mcdonald's?

The average fast food meal provides as many as 1,000 calories, according to the American Diabetes Association. Because diabetics need to limit their intake of calories, fat and sugar to control their blood sugar levels, eating at McDonald's may prove challenging. Fortunately, you may fit the occasional fast food meal into a balanced diet if you make your choices wisely. Video of the Day The McDonald's website provides downloadable lists of ingredients and nutritional values for each menu item, as well as a list of sample diabetic-friendly menus. If you prefer to design your own meal, an interactive tool calculates the nutritional value of your menu selections, including calories, fat, sugar and carbohydrate content. Based on your nutritionist's guidelines, use the nutrition information to determine if your food selections fit into your daily allotment of calories and carbohydrates. In general, 20 percent of the calories in your meal should come from protein, 40 to 60 percent from carbohydrates and no more than 30 percent from fat, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians. McDonald's offers several diabetic-friendly breakfast choices. An Egg McMuffin sandwich provides 300 calories, 30 grams of carbohydrates, 18 grams of protein and 12 grams of fat, according to the restaurant's website. A Fruit ’n Yogurt Parfait with a plain English Muffin contains 310 calories, 57 grams of carbohydrates, 9 grams of protein and 5 grams of fat. To lower fat intake and boost your protein, ask for your sandwich to be made using egg whites instead of whole eggs. If your daily calorie allotment allows it, add one cup of skim milk to your breakfast. Otherwise, drink plain coffee or water, neither of which adds calories to your meal. A McDonald's salad or sandwich can fit into a Continue reading >>

Mcdonalds!!!! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Mcdonalds!!!! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community The dreaded asda shop tomorrow, which means McDonalds after. My daughter always seems to spike afterwards, never tried splitting doses before but I think I'll give it a go tomorrow. Anyone done this for McDonalds before??!! Does it work??!! We don't have Mcdonalds very often but you've brought my craving for McChicken nuggets back now!! I really wanted some the other day but somehow ended up with a Cumberland sausage from the deli counter in Tesco instead!! Hahaha!! I know I'm sorting out all her carb counts for tomorrow and trying not to drool too much thinking about chicken nuggets McD is a deffo split bolus job ( for me ) --- I have one about once every 6 months but doing 50% of the dose 10 min before and the remaining 50% about 1 hour after eating usually prevents a big spike and a big post meal dip McD is a deffo split bolus job ( for me ) --- I have one about once every 6 months but doing 50% of the dose 10 min before and the remaining 50% about 1 hour after eating usually prevents a big spike and a big post meal dip Thanks that's really helpful. She's only two so she just needs 3 units to cover her meal. Thinking of doing 2 units then 1 an hour after? no way of knowing if she will eat or not on the day ........ but splitting a dose will help with the high fat content... no way of knowing if she will eat or not on the day ........ but splitting a dose will help with the high fat content... I've got no doubt she will eat it! She's not been allowed one for a while. Ye Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Diabetic-friendly Options At Your Favorite Fast Food Chains

Diabetic-friendly Options At Your Favorite Fast Food Chains

For those people living with diabetes, developing an effective diet plan is one of the most important aspects of their overall treatment plan. Most find that preparing their own meals is the most effective method. However, it can be really, really difficult to avoid swinging through the drive through on a really busy day. Luckily, there are some fast-food options which are diabetic-friendly! Did you know that fast food chains offer some healthy options for diabetics? keep a few things in mind before making your order: Choose whole grains when possible Choose a meal that provides a variety of food groups in moderate amounts Look for items that have non-starchy vegetables Don’t add any extra salt to your meal Choose a meal that is not high in trans or saturated fats Don’t order the large size (Are you interested in participating in a clinical trial? Click here to sign up for one of our diabetes clinical trials in Port Orange, FL.) Order Out Smart Most fast food restaurants provide detailed nutritional information on all of their menu items. Be sure that you take the time to review this information before making your decision. We recommend sticking to menu items that don’t exceed: 400 total calories 20 grams of fat 800 milligrams of sodium per serving Wendy’s Our Recommended Order for Diabetics: The half-size order of Apple Pecan Chicken Salad. This delicious salad is not only healthy, but it’s also quite filling. Please note that Wendy’s Apple Pecan Chicken Salad is served with pecans and pomegranate dressing. Thirsty? Skip on the sugary soda and order an unsweetened iced tea. Nutritional Information: 340 calories 18 g of total fat (4.5 g of saturated fat) 60 mg of cholesterol 700 mg of sodium 29 g of carbohydrates (22 g of sugar, 4 g of fiber) 19 g of protein Continue reading >>

7 Chicken Recipes For Diabetics

7 Chicken Recipes For Diabetics

Onions and leeks are from the same family, but they taste different. Leeks are sweeter and milder than onions. In this recipe, chicken is glazed in Dijon mustard and roasted with a fusion of leeks, onions, garlic, and shallots. According to a 2015 animal study , onions lower high blood sugar levels when given with the diabetes drug metformin. 3. Oven-Fried Parmesan Chicken Drumsticks Think you cant bite into a fried chicken leg if you have diabetes? Think again! The chicken drumsticks in this recipe are coated in a savory Parmesan cheese and breadcrumb crust. Theyre oven-baked instead of fried. Chicken drumsticks are higher in fat than chicken breasts, so be sure to balance your meal with low-fat sides. Drumsticks are still a great source of protein and much cheaper to buy. This recipe brings to mind apple-picking in early fall, but its tasty any time of year. Tart green apples and thyme are the perfect complements for boneless, skinless chicken breasts. Since the fiber in apples is a good carb that doesnt raise blood sugar levels, you can rest assured youre eating a healthy meal. A great roast chicken is a staple in many recipe arsenals. Its the perfect meal option for an elegant dinner party or a casual family dinner. For this recipe, apples, onions, garlic, and spices are stuffed into the cavity of a whole chicken. The chicken then gets an olive oil rub-down and is roasted to moist perfection. Make sure to peel off the skin before eating the meat. Use the leftovers to create a healthy chicken salad made with Greek yogurt and celery. 6. Marinated Grilled Chicken with Zucchini If youve got raw chicken in the fridge, a bumper crop of zucchini, and a grill, then youve got the makings of a healthy dinner. After being marinated in a blend of clementine orange juice, olive Continue reading >>

Mcdonald’s Meal Choices For People With Diabetes

Mcdonald’s Meal Choices For People With Diabetes

McDonald’s Meal Choices for People with Diabetes McDonalds has a special menu for people with diabetes. If you are going to eat at McDonalds at least you can make better choices by reviewing their Chart for People with Diabetes. But beware, the carbs that are listed are Carbohydrate Choices not Carbohydrates in grams. So each carbohydrate listed is equal to 15 grams of carbohydrates. Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Meals For Diabetes-savvy Dining

Best And Worst Meals For Diabetes-savvy Dining

Balance Your Choices When you have type 2 diabetes, you need to eat a good mix of protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats. So what's a well-balanced dinner? A power breakfast? The following meal examples can help you make better choices. Some people find it helps to count carbs. Keep in mind recommendations from your doctor or nutritionist, too. The Count: 2,060 calories, 276 g carbs No food is off-limits with diabetes, but this brunch will blow your carb and calorie budget in a hurry. Experts suggest that meals for people with diabetes should have 45-75 grams of carbohydrates, depending on individual goals. Your body weight, activity, and medications all matter. This meal packs enough carbs for four to five meals. The Count: 294 calories, 40 g carbs This quick meal delivers protein in a scrambled egg, and just 40 carbs, mostly from fiber-rich oatmeal and blueberries. Fiber slows digestion to help prevent blood sugar spikes. People with diabetes need to watch all types of carbs: cereal, bread, rice, pasta, starchy veggies, sweets, fruit, milk, and yogurt. Spread your total carbs across the day. The Count: 1,760 calories, 183 g carbs. Before one bite of burrito, you can get 98 grams of carbs and 810 calories in a basket of chips and salsa. If you're trying to slim down and eat less sodium, like many people with diabetes, the burrito adds 950 calories. You also get way more than a whole day's worth of sodium. The Count: 443 calories, 48 g carbs Lean beef and black beans make this Mexican dish a good option for a diabetic diet. The fiber in the beans can help lower blood cholesterol and control blood sugar. Go heavy on the veggies and light on cheese. Enjoy 10 small corn chips (1 ounce) with a little guacamole. The Count: 2,510 calories, 83 g carbs This classic Southern m Continue reading >>

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