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Can Diabetics Eat Buttered Popcorn

Diabetes? Pick Popcorn Over Potato Chips

Diabetes? Pick Popcorn Over Potato Chips

Move over, potato chips. Who doesn’t love a bowl of hot, crunchy popcorn? It’s one of my favorite snacks for several reasons: It’s a healthy whole grain. It’s fairly low in calories. It’s easy and quick to make. You can season it many different ways. Chips Versus Popcorn When you compare the nutritional values of popcorn to potato chips, popcorn comes out way ahead. A little 1-ounce bag of potato chips has 150 calories, 15 grams of carbs, 10 grams of fat, and 150 grams of sodium. One cup of air-popped popcorn has just 31 calories, 6 grams of carbohydrates, less than 1 gram of fat, and 0 grams of sodium. Even when popped in oil, a cup of popcorn has only 55 calories. So dig in to three cups of popcorn. It’s a nutritious, satisfying snack with fewer than 100 calories. Make It Healthy Forget the bags of already-popped corn in the supermarket snack aisle. They often have extra fat and sodium. Some “light” microwavable popcorn products are fine, but it’s easy and cheaper to pop your own: Use the microwave oven. Place two tablespoons of popcorn in a brown paper bag. Fold the bag shut twice. Microwave for 2 to 3 minutes until the popping stops. Use the stove top. Heat two teaspoons canola oil in a heavy-bottomed pan on medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, add two tablespoons of kernels. Cover the pot and shake gently for 2 to 3 minutes until the popping has slowed. Use a hot air popcorn popper. Just follow the machine’s instructions. You won’t need to use any oil to pop the corn. Season It Your Way Instead of melted butter, drizzle the popped corn with olive oil (my favorite healthy oil). A little oil helps seasonings stick to the popcorn. If you’re watching calories, skip the oil, or use an oil mister so a little goes a long way. Try these zesty seas Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Popcorn is one of life's little snacking pleasures -- after all, who could imagine going to see a flick without stopping by the snack counter for a small bucket? While people with diabetes should try to avoid the highly salted and buttery versions, popcorn can still be safely incorporated into the diabetic diet. Popcorn has high fiber and a low glycemic load compared to many other snack foods, so as long as it is consumed in moderation it makes a healthy addition to the diabetic diet. Nutritional Content of Popcorn Like any whole grain source of carbohydrate, air-popped and unprocessed popcorn is an excellent source of nutrients for individuals with diabetes. Most "light" popcorns contain 80 to 100 calories and 3 grams of fiber per serving. Because it is made from corn, which is a whole grain, popcorn does not impact blood sugar levels as dramatically as other sugary snack foods. In fact, one serving of popcorn has a glycemic load that is 2 to 4 times lower than other snack foods, such as raisins, graham crackers, or potato chips. The Diabetic Portion Size of Popcorn According to the American Diabetes Association, one diabetic portion size of popcorn equals 3 cups of popped popcorn, or approximately 15 grams of carbohydrates. Because individuals with diabetes can consume between 15 and 30 grams of carbohydrate for snacks, no more than two servings or 6 cups of popcorn should be consumed at one time. Most individual, 1 ounce bags of microwave popcorn bags contain approximately 21 grams of carbohydrate, making these portions perfect for individuals with diabetes. Choosing the Right Popcorn Individuals with diabetes must be mindful of the type of popcorn they consume because many versions have added fats, sugars and salts. When selecting popcorn at the grocery store, indiv Continue reading >>

Is Eating Popcorn Bad For You? (all You Need To Know)

Is Eating Popcorn Bad For You? (all You Need To Know)

However, you may have noticed that it is considered a healthy snack in some cases. There are diets that recommend it if you’re looking for something to keep you feeling full throughout the day. It’s recommended as a substitution when you want something while watching a movie or when cravings start to overpower you. So, is it bad for you or is it really something that you can enjoy? It’s difficult to tell when looking at face value. Here’s a look at the details to help you decide whether it’s going to be good for you. We’ll also look at the best types of popcorn to eat to avoid health problems. Both Sides of the Argument Have It Right Let’s start by making one thing clear: both sides of the popcorn argument have it right. It’s not the most straight forward option when it comes to losing weight or focusing on a healthy lifestyle. Sure enough, some popcorn is bad for you. At the same time, it can be one of the best things that you add to your diet. It really depends on the way you make it and any flavorings that you add to it. While there are good options, you also need to consider the amount that you eat. This isn’t going to be something that you replace your meals with. There is a lack of nutrients and some empty calories, but a little every now and then probably isn’t going to affect your health completely. Research has shown that in moderation, certain types of popcorn can be good for you! This research is something that you’ll need to keep in mind as we go through the rest of this article. Following a healthy and balanced diet will help you put your health first at all times. There Are Some Nutrients in Popcorn Popcorn isn’t completely nutrient free. When you opt for the air-popped popcorn—the stuff that you make yourself in your popcorn mach Continue reading >>

Movie Snacks: The Ugly Diet Truth

Movie Snacks: The Ugly Diet Truth

Headed to the movies this weekend? If you’re planning to snack, beware. For many a moviegoer, the popcorn and candy are part of the whole cinematic experience. But they may derail your diet if you go overboard. But with a little creativity and planning, you can nosh without terminating your calorie budget. Here's how. Movie Popcorn The nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) first blew the whistle on movie theater popcorn in a 1994 report that showed movie theater popcorn as being full of artery-clogging fat. "Immediately, there were changes," says Jayne Hurley, RD, a CSPI nutritionist. "Many theaters switched to healthier oil within weeks, but through the years they have gone back to old unhealthy coconut oil," Hurley says. The CSPI revisited the popcorn issue again in 2009 – and things seem to have gone from bad to worse. Movie theater popcorn contains anywhere from 400 to 1,200 calories, not to mention one to three days' worth of artery-clogging saturated fat and a whopping 1,500 milligrams of sodium. And if the intrepid concession stand employee manages to up-sell you (say by adding some candy or sugary soda to go with that popcorn), then your calories will keep on going Up. The latest report updates the organization's infamous 1994 exposé with new nutritional information on the movie snacks offered by America's three largest movie chains: Regal, AMC, and Cinemark. “The biggest change is that the third largest theater chain – Cinemark -- is popping their popcorn in heart-healthy canola oil, while the other two are still using coconut oil, which means you're getting an amazing amount of saturated fat in popcorn,” Hurley tells WebMD. Hurley gives coconut oil an XXX rating when it comes to health. “Cinemark deserves credit for switching Continue reading >>

6 Facts About Popcorn And Diabetes (#good Or Bad ?)

6 Facts About Popcorn And Diabetes (#good Or Bad ?)

Researches report that popcorn is rich of fitonutrient. It also contains polyphenol twice more than a portion of fruit. If we eat popcorn only during cinema time, it means we miss one of the healthiest seeds. We can eat 3 cups of popcorn for gaining 99 calorie and 4 gram fiber. Sponsors Link 6 Connections between Popcorn and Diabetes Patients: 1. Whole Grain. Inside of these whole seeds, there are parts called germ, bran and endosperm. The germ contains healthy oil, vitamin E, protein, a lot of vitamin B, and mineral. Meanwhile, the bran contains a lot of fiber, vitamin B, mineral, protein, and antioxidant. And in endosperm we can find flour content that is rich of protein and fiber. As popcorn is made of corn seeds. People who eat popcorn automatically consume 250% more whole seeds than people who do not eat popcorn. 2. Rich of Fiber. In popcorn contains 4 gram of diet fiber. These 4 gram of diet fiber can be gained in 4 cups of popcorn. Most popcorn is consumed more than 4 cups so that it can meet the 25 gram fiber intake in women and 38 gram fiber intake in men. The regular intake of fiber can decrease the risk of cardiovascular or heart disease. It also levels down the cholesterol in our blood and decrease the risk of suffering diabetes type 2 because it flows our blood flow well. 3. Polyphenols. There is high antioxidant found in popcorn. It is indeed higher than expected. The antioxidant in popcorn is in the form of polyphenols. It is in the corn skin that is not peeled when popcorn is cooked. Peeling skin corn when it is cooked becomes popcorn will reduce the benefit of polyphenols. The sufficient intake of polyphenols is beneficial to prevent our body from heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Polyphenols is powerful to prevent us from free radicals and reduce th Continue reading >>

Is Popcorn A Healthy Choice For Diabetics?

Is Popcorn A Healthy Choice For Diabetics?

Question: Can individuals with diabetes eat popcorn? Answer: Yes, yes and yes. Does that answer your question? Popcorn is a whole grain and could potentially be a fantastic addition to any healthy eating plan. It's a great source of fiber, and you can eat a good amount (3 cups per serving), which can be a satisfying, filling snack. However, popcorn is typically prepared in excessive amounts of oil and topped with salt and butter. Adding these toppings transforms popcorn from a light and healthy snack into a food product you want to avoid. While plenty of us can eat air-popped popcorn without toppings, most people like to accessorize and jazz up their popcorn. My compromise is to make air-popped (or if you don't have an air-popper, put 1/4 cup of kernels in a brown paper lunch bag, roll down the top, and microwave for approximately 2 minutes), and then garnish it with small amounts of your favorite toppings. Popular ideas include olive oil and dried herbs, small drizzles of butter and a sprinkle of seasonings, such as chili powder, cinnamon, Italian seasoning. For an out-of-the-box idea, try grated Parmesan cheese. Yummy! NOTE: After consuming popcorn, subsequent blood glucose levels vary by the individual. You may need to adjust portion sizes, depending on how your body reacts. Be sure to review any concerns you have about your diet with your physician. If you are issued a new prescription, ask your pharmacist or physician about possible drug-food interactions. If potential interactions exist, you may need to remove that particular food item from your diet. Our content does not constitute medical or other professional advice, is not intended to be a substitute for professional diagnosis or treatment, and does not create a physician-patient relationship. Please seek the Continue reading >>

11 Grab-and-go Snacks For Type 2 Diabetes

11 Grab-and-go Snacks For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 12 Snacks for Type 2 Diabetes When a case of the mid-afternoon munchies strikes, it can be tempting to reach for unhealthy snacks like chips, cookies, or a candy bar. But doing so is a surefire way to derail a day of healthy eating. The good news: Snacks don't have to be your diet downfall — they can actually help you stick with your diabetes meal plan as long as you choose wisely, says Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE, author of The Diabetes Comfort Food Diet. Healthy options can curb hunger and provide a boost of energy to get you through your day. The key is to plan ahead and keep the right snacks on hand so you aren't tempted to hit the vending machine. Cipullo usually recommends snacks that contain a mix of carbohydrates, protein, and healthy fats. The winning combination will fill you up and digest slowly in your body, helping to keep your blood sugar levels steady. Read on to discover 12 tasty, on-the-go options that you can stash in your bag or desk drawer so you’ll always have a satisfying snack on standby. Continue reading >>

Is Popcorn Good For Weight Loss?

Is Popcorn Good For Weight Loss?

You may be wondering if popcorn is a healthy snack if you're trying to lose weight. On one hand, it's high in fiber and low in calories compared to most snack foods. But, if you douse it in butter—a la movie theatres—then you may be getting more calories than you bargained for. Snacking itself is not a bad thing—it can fuel you until your next meal and also can be a great place to get in some food groups you're missing in your other meals. But some snacks, like popcorn, are better than others and the best snacks to eat are low in calories, high in nutrition and help keep you full for a long time. Of all the possible snack foods out there, popcorn stands out near the top of the list. Now, popcorn has gotten a bad rep from the movie-theater variety—loaded with calories and weird ingredients thanks to the ginormous portion sizes and "buttery" topping. • It's a whole grain: The term "whole grain" may bring to mind loaves of bread flecked with bran or a bowl of oatmeal, but popcorn also counts. In fact, popcorn eaters get 250% more whole grains in their diet than people who don't eat popcorn. And like other whole grains, crunchy popcorn is high in fiber (women need 25 grams and men need 38 grams in their diets daily). • It's got stellar nutrition stats: Not only is popcorn high in fiber, it even delivers some protein. A 1-ounce serving (about 3½ cups) has 4 grams of fiber, almost 4 grams of protein and clocks in at 110 calories. This combination makes it a snack with staying power. • Popcorn has antioxidants: It may be surprising, but popcorn is chock-full of polyphenols, the same compounds found in berries and tea that are linked to heart health and a lowered cancer risk. • It's low in calories: Popcorn is filled with air (think about how small the kernels Continue reading >>

Is Popcorn Bad For Dogs? Movie Nights Might Be Fun For Your Pet But Is Popcorn Too?

Is Popcorn Bad For Dogs? Movie Nights Might Be Fun For Your Pet But Is Popcorn Too?

Can Dogs Eat Popcorn? Dogs can eat popcorn and you both can enjoy the movie with popcorn. But, you may have come across Google, and Yahoo answers that popcorn is bad for dogs. Popcorn is bad for dogs only when pet parents are lazy. Yes, popcorn is not the diet plan which humans consume in their routine life. The facts of popcorn and the intake cycle goes well for dogs too. As humans dogs also should not be fed with popcorn more often. Popcorn and dogs are just like fever and human. Dogs can be fed with popcorn only on occasions. A little bit confusing, whether to serve popcorn to your dogs or not, right? I will share all my Sasha’s experience to you folks with popcorn diet! Can Dogs Eat popcorn! Is popcorn bad for dogs? Dogs can share your popcorn without any debates. But, you should serve unflavoured, air-popped popcorns to your dog. How can the popcorn be sold with no salt, butter, and air popped? But, it does exist. Some commercial pet food producers prepare the special popcorns which are safe and approved by FDA for your dogs. Dogs must not eat popcorn with salt, spices, butter and cheese. Some pet parents share the human popcorn to their dogs. But, it doesn’t share the love for their dogs but choking hazard too. A crew of pet owners, serve human popcorns to their dogs due to laziness. However, pet owners with laziness and no knowledge on their lovable dogs serve human popcorns to their dogs. Sure, you are not among the crew as you afford time for your dog. Many pet parents are not aware of the fact that how to pick the popcorn for their dogs. I will instruct you for purchasing dog popcorn to your next best movie time! Can Dogs eat air-popped popcorn? It’s the must! Dogs can eat air-popped popcorn. I would recommend only air-popped popcorn for your lovable dog Continue reading >>

9 Reasons You Need Popcorn In Your Diet

9 Reasons You Need Popcorn In Your Diet

It has few calories—if you pop it the right way iStock/PeopleImages When we talk about the benefits of eating popcorn, we’re talking about air-popped popcorn, not the fatty, butter-drenched stuff you get at the movies. The Center for Science in the Public Interest found that the medium and large popcorn sizes at Regal theaters each had 1,200 calories and 60 grams of saturated fat. A large popcorn at AMC wasn’t much better (1,030 calories and 57 grams of saturated fat). The healthiest type of popcorn is air-popped, which only has 30 calories. You can use a hot air popper or try this hack: Put 3-4 tablespoons of kernels in a brown paper bag, fold the top of the bag twice to make sure it’s closed, and then microwave for two minutes, or until there’s only a few seconds between pops. (Related: This fascinating infographic explains why popcorn pops.) Popcorn could be healthier than fruits and vegetables iStock/OJO_Images Yep, you read that right. Scientists from the University of Scranton found that popcorn is loaded polyphenols, compounds found in plants that act as antioxidants and can reduce inflammation. Polyphenols are heavily diluted in fruits and vegetables, which are 90 percent water. Yet popcorn is made up of about 4 percent water, so the polyphenols are more highly concentrated, especially in the hulls (the hard shells that get stuck in your teeth). One serving of popcorn can contain up to 300 mg of polyphenols, or 13 percent of the average American’s daily intake. Fruits account for 255 mg of polyphenols per day, and vegetables bring in even less (218 mg per day). That said, popcorn doesn’t have many other vitamins and nutrients, so it can’t completely replace fruits and veggies in your diet. From Merrill Lynch iStock/freemixer One of the many power Continue reading >>

Can Hamsters Eat Popcorn – A Keeping Hamsters Healthy Guide

Can Hamsters Eat Popcorn – A Keeping Hamsters Healthy Guide

Can Hamsters Eat Popcorn is part of our ‘keeping your hamster healthy’ series. Find out if an when it’s okay to share popcorn with your tiny friend If you’ve ever done an internet search for “hamster,” you may have come across some adorable images of hamsters filling their cheek pouches with nuts, seeds, veggies, and other foodstuffs. You may have even seen some pictures of hamsters eating traditionally human foods, such as popcorn. Popcorn, hamsters…wait, hamsters can have popcorn? You might be surprised that hamsters can indeed have popcorn, but only when it’s plain, fully popped, and in moderation, of course. In this article, we’ll tell you everything that you need to know about safely sharing popcorn with your “Hammie”. Is popcorn safe for hamsters? Yes, popcorn is safe for hamsters, but as we mentioned, only if it’s plain and fully popped. You should also take care to give popcorn in moderation. When feeding any type of treat, your pet should get the bulk of their calories from their regularly scheduled meals. Feeding lots of treats or an imbalanced diet can result in your hamster having nutritional deficiencies. Furthermore, the popcorn should be air-popped. According to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), studies have shown that the coating commonly found on the inside of microwave popcorn bags may contain unhealthy chemical compounds. Is popcorn bad for hamsters? Popcorn has its merits as a snack for humans and hamsters alike, but there are some limitations. Popcorn (or any other snack, for that matter) that is loaded with salty, sugary, buttery, and (delicious) fattening toppings lends extra calories and fat to both your and your hamster’s diet. Just as humans are prone to weight gain and health problems after consumi Continue reading >>

Why (& How) You Should Be Eating Popcorn For Breakfast

Why (& How) You Should Be Eating Popcorn For Breakfast

♦ 27  Save If you Google "popcorn breakfast cereal" (which I've done many, many times), you'll find lots of chatter about popcorn as the O.G. breakfast cereal. (Editor's Note: And since the original publication of this article, the New York Times reported evidence that English colonists—believed to have been introduced to puffed corn in February of 1630 by the Wampanoag Indians—ate it for breakfast with milk and sugar "as the first puffed cereal.") On many web forums and myth-buster sites, you'll hear tell of rumors that, way back in the nineteenth century, people were pouring milk over popped corn: ye olde Corn Pops. One primary piece of evidence for this speculation comes from Laura Ingall Wilder's Farmer Boy, set in the 1850s: You can fill a glass to the brim with milk and fill another glass of the same size brim full of popcorn, and then you can put all the popcorn kernel by kernel into the milk and the milk will not run over. You cannot do this with bread. Popcorn and milk are the only two things that will go into the same place. Then, too, they are good to eat. (You'll also come across a few recipes for "popcorn cereal," which consist of two ingredients and a methodology I'm sure you can intuit.) I'm not here to verify or refute these popcorn myths. Instead, I'm here to tell you that even if these myths are just plain bogus, there's a good idea there regardless. Pouring milk over popcorn as-is might not be a smart choice: If you've ever interacted with damp popcorn, you can imagine how quickly it would sog and mush if you intentionally soaked it. But what if you used kettle or caramel corn—where sugar syrup acts as a "raincoat" to protect it from the milk—instead? The popcorn would soften, its hard edges subsiding, while the outsides would remain crun Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Popcorn: Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Diabetes And Popcorn: Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Popcorns are one of the most popular snacks across the globe. However, one of the frequently asked questions by those who suffer from diabetes is “Is Popcorn Healthy for Diabetes?” Well, diabetes is a complicated condition and several precautions need to be maintained by those suffering from it. If certain precautions and recommendations are followed, popcorn can be considered a healthy snack option for diabetes. However, an expert advice is always recommended on “can a diabetic eat popcorn or not”?. In this article, we shall explore the relationship between diabetes and popcorn and whether consuming popcorn is healthy for those suffering from diabetes. Health Facts Related to Popcorn Before we get into the details of the relationship between popcorn and diabetes, let us see a few facts related to our favorite snack: Popcorns are a rich source of various minerals and vitamins namely Vitamin A, B6, E, thiamin, niacin, riboflavin, amongst a host of other minerals. It is a rich source of whole-grain which our body requires. As otherwise believed, popcorn can be a very healthy snack and fresh popcorns do not contain too many calories. If you take 5 cups of this delicious and easy to make snack, you are in taking only 100-150 calories. It is a rich source of both fiber as well as protein. The snack is a rich source of minerals such as potassium, magnesium, copper, as well as zinc. It is a rich source of antioxidants due to the presence of polyphenols. Finally, popcorns do not contain too much of carbohydrates. They only contain about 6 grams of the carbs. Health Benefits of Popcorn for Diabetes Patients Extremely nutritious popcorns are a very healthy snacking option. Let us look into some of the health benefits which popcorns have to offer to those suffering from di Continue reading >>

Nutritional Information

Nutritional Information

Popcorn Nutrition Facts Popcorn is a whole grain that is 100-percent unprocessed with no additional additives, hidden ingredients, or GMOs. Additionally, popcorn is relatively high in fiber and has a good glycemic index (GI) of 55. [1] In fact, one serving of popcorn can provide about 70-percent of an individual’s recommended daily intake of whole grain. It contains no cholesterol, it is virtually fat-free (only 0.1 g per cup) and contains only 100 to 150 calories in a serving of five popped cups. Popcorn also contains a number of essential vitamins including: folate, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, pantothenic acid and vitamins B6, A, E and K. [2] A serving of popcorn contains about 8-percent of the daily value of iron, with lesser amounts of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium and zinc. [3] Popcorn is a good snack for diabetics as it does not impact blood sugar levels. [4] Additionally, the USDA Agricultural Research Service says “low GI diets have proven health benefits. They improve both glucose and lipid levels in people with type 1, as well as type 2, diabetes. Because they are slowly absorbed, they help in weight control because they help control appetite and delay hunger. Fiber is good for diabetics because research suggests that it helps to control blood sugar levels by slowing gastric emptying.” [5] Popcorn is FDA approved for consumption and its packaging is also approved for consumer use. It's hard to believe a snack food that tastes so good can actually be good for you! But it’s true, and there’s more good news! Air-popped popcorn has only 30 calories per cup; oil-popped popcorn has only 35 calories per cup. When lightly buttered, popcorn contains about 80 calories per cup. Popcorn is a whole grain, making it a good-for-you f Continue reading >>

Can Dogs Eat Popcorn?

Can Dogs Eat Popcorn?

We know a lot of people wonder “Can my dog eat popcorn?” Can you believe this is among our most frequently asked questions? The answer is Yes, they can! As long as it’s unsalted, unbuttered, and just a few pieces. Table scraps, food from our table, and similar “people” foods have become demonized over the last few decades by commercial kibble companies that want you to believe that only their products (processed commercial pebbles of “meat” in a bag or can) are safe and nutritious. Recent scientific research is now showing that this is simply not true. In fact, some processed, commercial dog foods have been linked to recalls and toxins (see our videos below). While there are a few human foods that are off limits for dogs, most are actually nutritious and safe, which is why we choose to make healthy, fresh food for dogs using only USDA certified ingredients fit for humans – the same food you would eat! Check us out online justfoodfordogs.com call (866-726-9509), and switch your loved dog onto our food today! Popcorn is a cooked corn kernel, a starch and contributes approximately 3.5 kcal (calories) per gram. Thus, popcorn will add calories to your dogs’ daily allowance, so too much popcorn at one time can be bad. Furthermore, some kernels don’t ‘pop’, and can cause tooth damage, become lodged in the mouth and cause infections, dental disease, or cause an upset stomach. So – like with anything else, just a few pieces in moderation, and always be careful, monitor your dog for any problems, and see your vet for regular examinations. For more information on what you can’t feed your dog and the possible toxins in commercial kibble, please watch these videos featuring Dr. John Tegzes, a board certified veterinary toxicologist and professor at Wester Continue reading >>

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