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Can Diabetics Eat Bread And Pasta

What Kind Of Bread Is Best For Diabetics?

What Kind Of Bread Is Best For Diabetics?

Diabetes and bread… So many questions come up about good ‘ol bread. And not surprisingly because it's a staple food that we've all grown up on. Toast for breakfast, sandwiches for lunch, a side of bread for dinner, it's a pretty common practice right? But if you're diabetic, should bread get the cut? Is it okay to eat? Are there certain types of breads that are better than others? These are all great questions so let's dig in and go over this together now. If you have any questions, just leave them at the bottom of the post and we'll chat about it. JUMP TO MENU: What Kind of Bread Is Best? | Wheat & Rye Breads | Sourdough Bread | Does Cutting Bread Help? | Making Low Carb Breads At Home | Is Bread Better Than Cereal? | Low Carb Bread Options You Can Buy | Free Bread Baking Class What Kind Of Bread Is Best For A Diabetic? We've recently covered the types of flours that are best for diabetes, so before we dig in and talk about breads, let's briefly look at the flour cheat sheet. See how everything above coconut flour goes up from 30 g net carbs and above, which is really getting up there. In reality, the best breads for you to eat are ones made from flaxseed, almond, chickpea or coconut flour, which are a bit more difficult to come by. Of course, the simplest way to overcome this is to make your own. But, I understand that not everyone wants to make their own, and thankfully, there are quite a number of companies that supply great low carb bread options you can buy. Whole Wheat & Rye Bread and Diabetes It's often recommended that you eat whole grains instead of the white stuff and it's true, whole grains are a better choice because they are complex carbs, rather than simple carbs. But, when you take the whole grain and grind it into a flour, it changes the way your bo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet Success

Diabetes Diet Success

I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 4 years ago when I was 36. I noticed I'd get up to go to the bathroom a couple of times a night, something I'd never done before, and that was the trigger that something was wrong. My doctor ordered lab work, and then I knew. My grandmother had type 2 diabetes, my uncle has it, and now I do. I'm Italian, and I grew up eating rich Italian foods such as ravioli and other homemade pastas. For someone who loves to eat, finding out I had diabetes felt like a cruel trick. But after I was diagnosed, I completely changed my diet and lifestyle. I went to the American Diabetes Association web site, looked up what foods I could eat, and started eating only low-carb foods. I counted carbs: 15 carbs for every snack and 45 for meals. I gave up bread, pasta, even most cheeses. And though I'm not a big exerciser, I got on the treadmill for 30 minutes every night. I lost 50 pounds in about 4 months. The weight just fell off of me. My A1c [a test that shows blood sugar control] went down, and I felt great. But then after 6 months, I got burned out. I missed the big homemade Italian meals my mother and grandmother used to make. So I started cheating on the weekends. Monday morning I'd be back to counting carbs and eating lots of vegetables and protein. But I'd gain a few pounds over the weekend, and lose them during the week. This yo-yoing wasn't healthy. Eventually I just went back to eating whatever food I wanted, like pizza, cheeseburgers, and fries. My A1c shot up to 10. I started getting neuropathy in my feet -- it feels like you have a blister on the inside rather than the outside of your foot. I even had pains in the upper part of my stomach, and I knew I needed to do something. Now I'm trying to eat healthier and lose the weight I gained back. Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes?

Yes, you can eat pasta if you have diabetes. Pasta is a source of carbohydrate with 1/3 cup cooked pasta containing 15 grams of carbohydrate (1 carb choice). One third cup of pasta is not a lot of pasta therefore a couple suggestions are to: 1) use two or three of your carbohydrate servings for pasta (2/3 to 1 cup of pasta); and 2) add low carbohydrate vegetables such as cooked, broccoli, carrots, zucchini squash, and green beans to your pasta dish to increase the volume of food without adding more carbohydrate to your meal. Serve your pasta and steamed vegetables with a lean protein choice (baked fish, beef tenderloin, or boneless, skinless chicken breast. You can most definitely eat pasta if you are diabetic. However there are specific guidelines you should follow in order to keep blood sugars normal: Use whole wheat pasta that is enriched with fiber. This will slow down the digestion and not cause your blood sugars to rise as rapidly. Choose a lean meat or protein to accompany the pasta. Be sure to watch portion control and do not exceed 30-45 gm Carb from your pasta. Usually 2/3 cup pasta is a great portion! Be sure to meet with a Registered Dietitian to calculate exactly how many Carbs per meal you should consume. Think comforting bowls of pasta are off the menu because you have diabetes? Think again. Whole-grain pastas are a great source of B vitamins and fiber, and reduce inflammation in the blood vessels. However, this food does come with a couple warning flags. First, overcooking pasta raises its glycemic load (follow the package directions and pull the pasta off the heat when it's al dente). Second, beware of portion size. A good bet is to pair 1/2 to 1 cup of cooked pasta with a bevy of vegetables and a bit of lean protein and healthy fat for a dish that's ea Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Spaghetti?

Can A Diabetic Eat Spaghetti?

After a diabetes diagnosis, your may fear you have to give up your favorite carbohydrate-rich meals like spaghetti and other pastas. Although it’s true that you need to keep careful watch over how many carbs, calories and fat you take in, you can accommodate an occasional serving of spaghetti. Make sure your eating is always within the context of a healthy, carb-balanced meal plan and that you are following the advice of your doctor or dietitian. You can also make small changes to your traditional spaghetti dish that make it just as palatable but reduce the impact on your blood sugar. Video of the Day Is Spaghetti OK? “The short answer to the pasta question is yes, you can eat pasta,” writes registered dietitian Cindy Moore on EatBetterAmerica.com. People with diabetes do not need to give up their favorite spaghetti meals. In fact, it’s important to have carbohydrates such as pasta at each meal. The “but” is you must ensure you are adhering the eating plan created by your doctor or dietitian. Spaghetti is “carbalicious,” and eating too much can spike your blood sugar. To keep it balanced, be sure to always eat the appropriate amount of carbohydrate servings when you have spaghetti. The nutrition facts on the spaghetti package will tell you how many carbohydrates are in a serving. A cup of cooked plain spaghetti without sauce has roughly 43 g of carbohydrates. If that’s more than your allowance of carbohydrates per meal, you can reduce your portion size, to 1/3 or 2/3 of a cup. Remember that the sauce will add more carbohydrates — close to 18 g for a typical 1/2 cup of tomato-based sauce. In addition, if you make meatballs with carbohydrate-containing items like breadcrumbs, that’s an additional carbohydrate source you need to account for. Choosing Continue reading >>

What To Eat If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

What To Eat If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you’re probably wondering what to eat to keep your blood sugar levels in check. The good news is you don’t have to give up your favorite foods. A diabetes diet, like most healthy diets, is all about controlling portions and consuming a wide array of vegetables, fresh fruits, whole grains, nuts and seeds, lean protein, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats. Watch Your Carb Intake When managing type 2 diabetes, it’s important to understand that not all foods are created equal: Some will affect your blood sugar levels more than others. Carbohydrates, in particular, break down into glucose quickly, which spikes your blood sugar levels. Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables. “In general, carbohydrates should be limited to approximately 30 to 60 grams (g) per meal to prevent high blood glucose levels,” says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, a certified diabetes educator in Franklin, New Jersey. Once you’ve learned to manage your carb portions, try balancing your meals with lean protein and healthy fats, which digest slowly and keep your blood sugar steady after meals. Use the Healthy Plate Method So what does a healthy diabetes diet look like? It’s simple, says Palinski-Wade. Just use the healthy plate method: Fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables (like spinach, carrots, and other greens), a quarter of your plate with lean protein (such as grilled chicken, fish, lean beef, or pork), and a quarter of your plate with starchy foods (like whole grain bread, brown rice, or whole wheat pasta). Below is a sample meal plan to get you started. Breakfast Ideal Meal: ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese + 1 tbsp chopped walnuts + 1 cup fresh fruit salad Why it Continue reading >>

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

One of my favorite foods is pasta. I think I could eat pasta every day and never tire of it. And when I’ve had a rough day, nothing comforts me as much as a plate of pasta with butter (or trans-fat-free margarine), Parmesan cheese, and freshly ground black pepper. Yet pasta is much maligned in the diabetes world. I’ve noticed that people who have diabetes become very passionate when discussing this food. There’s the camp that is indignant at the idea that pasta even exists — it spikes up blood glucose, causes weight gain, and may just be responsible for global warming (OK, that’s an exaggeration). There’s another camp who still eats pasta, but feels horribly guilty for doing so, and will swear with their right hand in the air that, “I really only ate a half a cup” (and 99% of the time, it’s just not the case). I don’t mean to trivialize the subject. Pasta can be tricky to fit into one’s diabetes eating plan. But not because it sends blood glucose levels to the moon. My belief (and you’re welcome to disagree with me) is that most of us struggle with portion control. It’s been engrained in us that pasta is a main dish: that it should be piled high on the plate and smothered in red sauce, with a crusty, buttery slice of garlic bread resting on the side. This is where the problems come in. Here’s what I mean. Take a look at the calories and carbs in the pasta meal that I just mentioned: 3 cups of pasta: 135 grams of carbohydrate, 663 calories 1 cup of sauce: 30 grams of carbohydrate, 185 calories 1 slice of garlic bread: 24 grams of carbohydrate, 170 calories Total: 189 grams of carbohydrate, 1,018 calories If you dine in an Italian restaurant and manage to clean your plate, you’ll consume even more carbohydrate and calories. When you look at p Continue reading >>

Diabetics & Pasta

Diabetics & Pasta

Most individuals with diabetes are fearful of the great Italian meal simply because of pasta's infamously high carbohydrate content. Nonetheless, with proper meal planning, pasta can be safely incorporated into a diabetic diet. The key is to limit the portion size and to select pastas made from high-fiber whole grains. Diabetes and Carbohydrates Individuals living with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes must monitor their carbohydrate intake in order to control their blood sugar. Excessive intake of carbohydrates can lead to hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar. When an individual's blood sugar runs high for an extended period of time, it can lead to other medical complications such as compromised eyesight and kidney disease. To avoid hyperglycemia and associated diseases, diabetics should moderate, but not eliminate, their intake of carbohydrate-containing foods, such as pasta. Carbohydrate Content of Pasta As a member of the grains food group, pasta contains a significant amount of starch, a complex form of carbohydrate. One diabetic serving of pasta is 1/3 cup of cooked pasta, or the equivalent of 15 grams of carbohydrate. One serving of pasta also contains fiber, another complex carbohydrate which helps to control blood sugar. Whole-wheat pasta contains the most fiber: roughly 3 to 5 grams of fiber per serving. Incorporating Pasta into a Healthy Diabetic Diet According to the American Diabetes Association, most diabetics may consume 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. As a carbohydate-containing food, pasta is safe to consume when following a diabetic diet; however, because 1/3 cup equals 15 grams of carbohydrate, the amount of pasta in one meal should not exceed 1 cup, or 45 grams of carbohydrate. Additional sauces such as marinara and Alfredo contain minimal amounts of Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. White Bread Refined starches — white bread, white rice, white pasta, and anything made with white flour — act a lot like sugar once the body starts to digest them. Therefore, just like sugar, refined starches interfere with glucose control and should be avoided by those with diabetes. Whole grains are a better choice because they’re richer in fiber and generally cause a slower, steadier rise in blood sugar. Instead of white bread or a bagel for breakfast, opt for a toasted whole grain English Muffin (topped with a slice of reduced-fat cheese or scrambled egg for protein). At lunch and dinner, replace white carbs with healthier whole grain options such as brown or wild rice, barley, quinoa, and whole-wheat bread to minimize the impact on your blood sugar. Even high-quality, whole grain starches elevate blood glucose to some degree, so it’s still important to limit portions — stick with ½ to ¾ cup cooked grains or just 1 slice of bread at meals. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Reversed: Removing Bread And Pasta From Diets Could Be Cure

Type 2 Diabetes Reversed: Removing Bread And Pasta From Diets Could Be Cure

They say slashing consumption of rice, potatoes and sugar has the potential to halt one of Britain’s biggest health epidemics.Switching to a healthier lifestyle could save the cash-strapped NHS £10 billion a year - the amount spent treating the condition - and change people’s lives in just 12 months. New data from Diabetes.co.uk, the world’s largest community of sufferers, reveals 7,000 Type 2 patients using a low refined carbohydrate dietary programme saved £6.9 million on medication in a year. The startling statistics are revealed in a new book published today which aims to make millions of Britons happier and healthier. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Consultant cardiologist and co-author Dr Aseem Malhotra said: “Extrapolate this across the UK population suffering with Type 2 and we could save hundreds of millions in the use of medication alone.”He added: “Type 2 is a condition you want to avoid at all costs. Simple diet changes have rapid and substantial benefits not just for patients with Type 2 but for high blood pressure and heart disease too "Not only does it significantly increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure and reduce life expectancy by up to 15 years but more than half of patients report chronic pain at levels similar to those with terminal cancer and a quarter suffer from depression, fatigue, sleep disturbance physical and emotional disability. “The good news is it’s entirely preventable - but also reversible - and simple dietary changes through cutting refined carbohydrates can at the very least help patients come off medications.” His “manifest Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Know What to Avoid Diabetes requires daily maintenance, including monitoring your blood sugar, eating a healthy diet, exercising, and of course staying on top of any complications with your heart, eyes, and other organs. Controlling your weight is another key aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight, losing some weight — even just 10 to 15 pounds — can help improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, reduce triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, and lower your blood pressure. A healthy diet for diabetes will help you manage your weight and lead you toward foods that have a positive effect on your glucose levels, while guiding you away from those foods that are likely to cause dangerous spikes in your blood sugar. Learn which nine foods you should steer clear of if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Best Pasta For Diabetics

Best Pasta For Diabetics

We ALL love pasta, right?! It's just one of those foods that is such a comfort food. I know for me it's always been like that BUT I also know that because it is such a comfort food it is VERY easy to over eat it! Seriously…I know there have been times when I've eaten an enormous bowl and still gone back for more. SOund familiar? But when you're a diabetic it's not really possible to eat an enormous bowl of pasta because you will soon see your blood sugar sky rocketing. And even if you're not diabetic, you will soon see those pounds stacking on if you over consume the carbs! So let's go over some facts and talk about the best pasta options for diabetics. Pasta Nutrition Facts Let's compare the nutrition facts for 1 serving of pasta. One serving is equivalent to half a cup. As you can see from these comparisons there is between 18-22 g total carbs and between 15-20 net carbs. If you're confused about carb counting, check out our easy tutorial over here. Realistic Serving Sizes These images show the reality of pasta servings. The first one is only half a cup and as you can see it doesn't really amount to much when put on a normal sized dinner plate. Then we have what might be someones typical serving of pasta (if not more). In the second image we see about 3 times as much, so 3 serves of white spaghetti like this amounts to 64.8 g total carbohydrates. Too Many Carbs I love using visual comparisons because it really lets you see the difference. While you could try to justify that eating whole wheat spaghetti would be okay with 2 serves being around 30 g net carbs, over the long term this is just too many carbs and you will find you can't control your blood sugar properly. So What's The Best Pasta For Diabetics? Sure, the traditional pasta might not be the best pasta for d Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes

Having diabetes does NOT mean that if you like or love pasta, you will now have to give it up…nope, it does not. It DOES however mean that you should be choosier about the types of pasta you eat, your portion size and maybe how often you include pasta with your meals. We all need carbohydrates in our diet—it provides our bodies with the necessary fuel to keep us going. The critical question is how much and what kind of carbohydrate. Whole Grain Pasta versus Regular Pasta Whole grain pasta in general has lower calories, more fiber and more nutrients than regular pasta made from refined flour. Refining strips fiber, vitamins and minerals from the grain (usually wheat grain) and in return, you get a softer, smoother texture. 1 serving (1 cup) of whole grain pasta contains 174 calories, 37 grams of carbohydrate and 6.3 grams of fiber as compared to a serving of regular pasta with 221 calories, 43 grams of carbohydrate and 3 grams of fiber. That extra fiber in whole grain pasta (with fewer carbohydrates) can slow down the absorption of sugars from your digestive tract and this can mean that your blood sugars will not spike as much as they might with regular pasta. In addition, whole wheat pasta has a glycemic load of 15 while regular pasta has a glycemic load of 23. In both whole wheat pasta and regular pasta, about 80% of the calories are derived from carbohydrates.[1], [2] Put all this together and serving for serving, whole grain pasta gives you more fiber, more nutrients, fewer calories and fewer carbohydrates than regular pasta, making whole grain pasta a better choice, overall. Also, you can always opt for non-wheat based pasta such as corn, quinoa or rice-based pastas. I advise you to read the following diet tips for diabetes: Portion Size All the numbers given ab Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

By Brandon May Bread is perhaps one of the most widely used types of food on the planet. It can also be a food that poses a health risk for people with diabetes. Despite the risk, bread can be one of the hardest foods to give up. Fortunately, there are breads on the market that don't raise blood sugar to extreme levels. Whole-grain breads with high-fiber ingredients, like oats and bran, may be the best option for people with diabetes. Making bread at home with specific, diabetes-friendly ingredients may also help reduce the impact bread has on blood sugar levels. The role of nutrition in controlling diabetes Diabetes has two main types: type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes have difficulty producing insulin, which is a hormone that "captures" blood sugar (or glucose) and transfers it into cells. Glucose is the preferred energy source for cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes is also the easier form to prevent and manage with lifestyle changes and medication. According to the World Health Organization, over 422 million people have type 2 diabetes worldwide. In the earlier phase of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, but cells have become insensitive to its effects. This is sometimes due to poor diet, genetics, and lifestyle habits. Because of this, cells can't access blood sugar following a meal. Nutrition plays a crucial role in diabetes control. It's only through putting proper dietary planning into practice that good blood sugar management can be accomplished. A good diet must also be combined with lifestyle changes and medication. A carbohydrate is one of the three major nutrients essential to human health. However, carbohydrates also raise blood sugar and can reduce effective diabetes control. This Continue reading >>

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