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Can Diabetics Eat Bologna

Can Diabetics Eat Ham?

Can Diabetics Eat Ham?

Michelle Kerns writes for a variety of print and online publications and specializes in literature and science topics. She has served as a book columnist since 2008 and is a member of the National Book Critics Circle. Kerns studied English literature and neurology at UC Davis. Sliced ham on a bed of lettuce.Photo Credit: DAJ/amana images/Getty Images A balanced diabetic meal plan should include between 2 and 5 ounces of protein-rich foods daily, says the American Diabetes Association. Poultry, fish, shellfish, dried beans and legumes, soy, nuts, seeds, eggs, beef and cuts of pork such as ham can all contribute to this recommendation, though some choices are healthier than others. Talk to your doctor or a dietitian if you need help planning a diet that can help you manage diabetes. A serving of fresh ham prepared without glaze or sauce does not contain any carbohydrates and has a glycemic index of 0. This ham will not affect a diabetic's blood glucose and can help maintain a steady blood sugar level. However, prepackaged lunch meat ham, sugar-glazed hams or honey-baked hams may contain between 4 and 15 grams of carbohydrates per serving. The ADA advises diabetics to check the nutrition label for carbohydrate information before eating any meat products that may have added carbohydrates. It's important for a diabetic to limit his intake of sodium. Diabetics have an increased risk of developing high blood pressure and should consume no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium each day, according to the Cleveland Clinic. A typical slice of regular ham can contain 320 milligrams of sodium, or over 20 percent of a diabetic's daily limit. If you choose to eat ham, look for low-sodium brands or cook your own fresh ham without adding salt or high-sodium seasoning blends. In 2011, an Continue reading >>

5 Foods Which Most Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetics Are Eating But Should Completely Avoid

5 Foods Which Most Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetics Are Eating But Should Completely Avoid

The basic idea of the Renal or Diabetic diet for Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients is to, " keep the levels of electrolytes, minerals, and fluid in your body balanced," according to Medline Plus. Most of the time the Renal and Diabetic diets are rather straight-forward, right? Lists and charts of foods to avoid are handed out at Doctors' offices, Dialysis Centers, and are easily accessible online. Yet what happens when your diet restrictions are not as clear, and harmful foods which you thought were manageable, sneak into your diet? Recommended Reading: High Levels Of Sodium And Saturated Fat May Be Hidden In Recipes Frequently Used By CKD Patients You should keep in mind that nutrition needs vary from person to person depending on body size, activity, the stage of Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes and other health concerns. However, the following are often restricted foods that creep into Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients' Renal and Diabetic diets. Recommended Reading: The Big "Fat" Surprise About Saturated Fat And Its Real Effects On CKD, Diabetics And Others At Risk 1.) Processed Deli Meat: You are hungry and you grab what you consider to be a healthy dish - a bologna sandwich or a chicken salad using cold cuts. Did you make the best lunch choice for your Renal or Diabetic diet? You may be surprised to learn that you in fact did not. Processed meats can be a significant source of sodium, nitrate and phosphorus, all of which are bad for Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients. Instead choose leaner fresh meats such as roasted chicken or lean pork chops which are lower in harmful minerals as well as a better source of protein. Recommended Reading: Unprecedented Food And Drug Administration Ban Set To Hit The Chronic Kidney Disease Community 2. Continue reading >>

Can Bologna Make Sugar High?

Can Bologna Make Sugar High?

I know this is a crazy question, but can Bologna make your sugar high? I know it's a protein and doesn't have many if any carbs in it. My daughter is a type 1 diabetic and she wanted a bologna sandwich. Adding up the carbs for the bread and chips she got 3 units and her sugar was still 206 two hours after.... show more I know this is a crazy question, but can Bologna make your sugar high? I know it's a protein and doesn't have many if any carbs in it. My daughter is a type 1 diabetic and she wanted a bologna sandwich. Adding up the carbs for the bread and chips she got 3 units and her sugar was still 206 two hours after. I was wondering if it's the Bologna? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Source(s): Two Weeks Diabetes Cure - Source(s): Delicious Paleo Recipes Cookbook : May be the bologna since everyone reacts differently. Most processed meats have a lot of spices and sugar added. But one slice ought not to do too much harm. The chips and bread are carbs (and the chips are also high in sodium, have no nutritional value, better if she'd have celery and cucumber sticks). I wish they made bread that they cut in far thinner slices so you could have 2 slices but only get the carb load of one-current-slice. I get this bread that has only 12 grams per slice. Maybe next time see if she will eat bologna roll-ups (with celery or cucumber or only a thin slice of bread inside the bologna). Or try making an open-faced bologna sammie--skip the top bread slice (cutting her carb load in half). It shouldn't be. A slice of bologna has only 2 g carbs and 0 sugar, but does have 6 g fat. It was probably the bread and chips. Read the label on the bologna. All processed meats have added sugars and fillers that can create a carbohydrate count. This must be factored in when making Continue reading >>

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

NEW! Download our free grocery shopping companions: Free Foods – a guide to foods that won’t impact your blood sugar 15 Carbs Snack List – a mega-list of great snack ideas What’s the best snack for someone with diabetes? A snack with few carbs! (There are some exceptions. If you are planning on working out or have low blood sugar, than some carbohydrates may be beneficial.) Here are our top 23 favorite low-carb snacks in no particular order: Peanut butter Cheddar cheese String cheese Cottage cheese Broccoli with melted cheese Salad with free veggies and low-carb dressing Tomato and mozzarella salad Celery with peanut butter Fresh strawberries or blueberries with low-fat plain yogurt Veggies with hummus Cucumbers with olive-oil and rice vinegar Carrot sticks Snap peas with Caesar dressing Green beans cooked and cooled with lemon juice Nuts Sauteed Spinach Pickles Rotisserie chicken Deli meat Pepperoni and cheese Beef jerky Hard boiled eggs What are your favorites? You can get more snack ideas in our recipes forum, diabetes cookbook, and the Simply Cooking blog. Further reading on diabetes diet: Read more about low blood glucose/sugar (hypoglycemia), low-carb diet, snacks. Continue reading >>

Healthy Tips For Hot Dogs And Hamburgers

Healthy Tips For Hot Dogs And Hamburgers

Diabetic Living / Food to Eat / Nutrition Yes, you can eat hot dogs and hamburgers on your diabetic diet. Just follow a few tips and tricks, and start enjoying these barbecue favorites guilt-free. By Hope S. Warshaw, R.D., CDE; Photos by Scott Little During the warmer months, your social calendar is likely to be sprinkled with cookouts, visits to street fairs, or pool parties where the grill is a-sizzle. And the main course, of course, is hot dogs, sausages, or hamburgers. "Nothing tastes better than a hot dog downed during an inning of baseball or a brat at the Polish polka festival," says Patti Urbanski, M.Ed., R.D., CDE, a dietitian and diabetes educator at the Duluth Family Practice Center in Minnesota who also has type 1 diabetes. Fortunately, you can relish these rituals without ruining your diabetes meal plan. Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutrition , Portion Control Hamburger meat, by government standards, is fresh or frozen ground beef without anything else added and can contain no more than 30 percent fat by weight. At the supermarket, hamburger meat is labeled with its percentage of lean meat and percentage of fat, such as 80/20 or 93/7. Not so at a friend's barbecue or a ballpark grill. Here are some good rules of thumb: -- A 3-ounce serving of cooked meat is just right -- there's no need to pile on extra patties or order a large burger unless you share. -- Get your hamburgers cooked how you like them (as long as the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees F for safety) because the fat content doesn't differ much based on doneness. -- Spread condiments gingerly, but feel free to use a generous amount of this low-calorie flavor enhancer: mustard. Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutrition , Portion Control Today's Continue reading >>

Alternative To White Bread And Bologna Sandwiches?

Alternative To White Bread And Bologna Sandwiches?

Alternative to white bread and bologna sandwiches? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Alternative to white bread and bologna sandwiches? My nephew is 38 and disabled. He has always eaten white bread, mayo, bologna sandwiches, mac and cheese, hamburger helper and chips. Not much else. He doesn't like chicken. After older my sister passed away on Monday he went to stay with my younger sister. She fed him just hamburger patties, no one ate or wanted any sides, at that point he had not eaten in 24 hrs. Tuesday morning she tested his bs and it was 201. By late Tuesday afternoon he had not eaten again. He wanted bologna sandwich and she doesn't have those foods in the house. (she just had a heart attack and bypass and they have been even better about their diet) So now I have a disabled 38yo that will not only have to deal with loss of his mom but his regular diet as well. Neither of us can feed that to him. We just can't. We can't afford right now to buy separate foods for him and we don't have that in the house. He also has gout, high blood pressure- which he is on lisinopril for. I'll start him on dr appts next week if we can get in. We are hoping to get him in an apartment up closer to us, and we will take turns checking in on him daily. I need ideas. I need to know those low carb tricks. All foods that he eats must be microwaveable ONLY. No cooking in a pan on the stove. He'll only have $200 a month in food stamps, plus what we can get at a food pantry. We might be able to help him with a few groceries but we don't have tons of extra cash either. I'm thinking I might have to do bulk cooking for him. Cook up 2lbs of hamburger in Continue reading >>

Does Your Bologna Have A First Name? It May Be D-i-a-b-e-t-e-s

Does Your Bologna Have A First Name? It May Be D-i-a-b-e-t-e-s

Does Your Bologna Have A First Name? It May Be D-I-A-B-E-T-E-S A new study finds that processed products such as bologna and hot dogs can increase your risk of type 2 diabetes by almost half, and that by getting your protein from other rich sources such as nuts, whole grains and dairy low in fat, it will actually have the reverse effect. A daily serving of 50 grams of processed meat, equivalent to one hot dog or sausage or two slices of bacon, was associated with a 51% increased risk of diabetes . Researchers from Harvard looked at 20 years of data from men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, 28 years of data from women in the Nurses' Health Study I, and 14 years of data from women in the Nurses' Health Study II, which involved more than 200,000 participants in all and a total of 442,101 people's history were analyzed, including 28,228 who developed diabetes while participating in one of the studies. After adjusting for lifestyle and dietary risk factors, the researchers determined that a daily 100 gram serving (about the size of a deck of cards) of unprocessed red meat was associated with a 19% increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Among people who ate one daily serving of red meat, substituting one serving of whole grains per day reduced the risk of diabetes by 23%. Substitutingn uts resulted in a 21% lower risk, and substituting a low-fat dairy product, a 17% lower risk. Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology, said in a Harvard news release: "Clearly, the results from this study have huge public health implications given the rising type 2 diabetes epidemic and increasing consumption of red meats worldwide. The good news is that such troubling risk factors can be offset by swapping red meat for a healthier protein." United States food guidelines t Continue reading >>

What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

Through twenty-five years of working with people with diabetes, when they come in for diabetes education, their first question is most often “What can I eat (or drink).” The next question is often, “What can’t I eat (or drink)? In this article, we will explore what foods are best to eat when you have just been diagnosed with Pre-Diabetes, and Type 2 Diabetes, and what foods are best avoided. Quick Links (click to jump to specific section) There is no other guide available on the internet that will guide you through the best foods to choose, and the best foods to avoid. Take heed, as some foods in the American diet are detrimental. These are also the same foods that Americans are addicted to. On occasion, you will be able to eat from the foods to avoid list, such as on a holiday, or your birthday. It shouldn’t become a regular occurrence to eat foods that are best avoided if you have Pre-Diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes. Also, eating healthier throughout your lifespan, can prevent Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes from ever surfacing at all. Starting to eat a healthy diet can help you to reverse your Pre-Diabetes, along with regular physical activity, and sometimes medication (most often Metformin). You can either get Type 2 Diabetes in good control, or you can reverse it to a Pre-Diabetes state in some cases, if you work on healthy lifestyle changes. Though it’s not always possible to reverse Type 2 Diabetes, it is certainly worth a shot. My new book to come out soon, entitled, “The Practical Guide for the Reversal of Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes,” published by The Diabetes Council, will explore this topic in depth. Stay tuned! Eating appropriate foods Knowing which foods to eat, and which ones to avoid, can help you to manage your blood sugars, and avoid Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

9 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

People with diabetes have high blood sugar levels because their bodies don’t make or use insulin effectively. If you are a diabetic, you should watch what you eat and how much you eat. Reducing calories is essential in diabetes management. Making wise food choices, however, can help you keep your blood sugar level within your target range. While moderation is important in many cases, there are some food items you may want to eliminate from your diet altogether. © 2016 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Meat (1 ounce = 7 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbohydrate, fat varies) One ounce of meat is about the size of your thumb; 3 ounces is the size of a deck of cards. No more thant 3 ounces of protein at a meal is recommended. (Try to eat meats from this page only; unfortunately, this means nothing fried.) Very Lean Meat Choices (0-1g fat/ounce and 35 calories) Poultry: Chicken or turkey (white meat, no skin), Cornish hen (no skin). Fish: Fresh or frozen cod, flounder, haddock, halibut, trout, lox, tuna fresh or canned in water. Shellfish: Clams, crab, lobster, scallops, shrimp. Game: Duck or pheasant (no skin), venison, buffalo, ostrich. Cheese: Fat-free (less than 1 gram of fat/ounce), low fat cottage cheese. Other: Processed sandwich meats with less than 1 gram fat or less/ounce, such as: deli thin, shaved meats chipped beef, turkey ham egg whites (2) egg substitutes, plain hot dogs, fat free sausage, fat free or less than 1 gram fat/ounce Lean Meat Choices (3g fat/ounce and 55 calories) Beef: USDA Select or Choice grades trimmed of fat such as round, sirloin, flank steak, tenderloin, roast (rib, chuck, rump); steak (T-bone, porter house, cubed); ground round. Pork: Lean pork such as fresh ham, canned, cured, or boiled ham, Canadian bacon, tenderloin, center loin chop. Lamb: Roast, chop or leg. Veal: Leap chop, roast. Poultry: Chicken, turkey (dark meat, no skin), chicken (white meat, with skin), domestic duck or goose (well-drained of fat, no skin). Fish: Herring (uncreamed or smoked), Oysters, Salmon (fresh or canned), catfish, Sardines (canned), tuna (canned in oil, drained). Game: Goose (no skin, rabbit). Cheese: 4.5% fat cottage cheese, grated parmesan, cheeses with 3 grams of fat or less/ounce. Other: Hot dogs with 3 grams of fat or less per ounce. Processed sand Continue reading >>

Bologna, Pork Nutrition Facts & Calories

Bologna, Pork Nutrition Facts & Calories

For best results, be sure to enable the option to PRINT BACKGROUND IMAGES in the following browsers: - Firefox (File > Page Setup > Format & Options) - Internet Explorer 6/7 (Tools > Internet Options > Advanced > Printing) - In Internet Explorer 7 you will need to adjust the default "Shrink To Fit" setting. (Go File > Print Preview > adjust the Shrink To Fit dropdown to 100%.) - Mac Safari (Click print below > Copies & Pages > Safari) Note: Printing via Mac Firefox is currently not supported. Print this Page For best results, be sure to enable the option to PRINT BACKGROUND IMAGES in the following browsers: - Firefox (File > Page Setup > Format & Options) - Internet Explorer 6/7 (Tools > Internet Options > Advanced > Printing) - In Internet Explorer 7 you will need to adjust the default "Shrink To Fit" setting. (Go File > Print Preview > adjust the Shrink To Fit dropdown to 100%.) - Mac Safari (Click print below > Copies & Pages > Safari) Note: Printing via Mac Firefox is currently not supported. This feature requires Flash player to be installed in your browser. Download the player here. NUTRITIONAL TARGET MAP The Nutritional Target Map allows you to see at a glance how foods line up with your nutritional and weight-management goals. The closer a food is to the right edge of the map, the more essential nutrients per calorie it contains. For a more nutritious diet, select foods that fall on the right half of the map. The closer a food is to the top edge of the map, the more likely it is to fill you up with fewer calories. If you want to restrict your caloric intake without feeling hungry, choose foods from the top half of the map. Foods that are close to the bottom edge are more calorie-dense. If you want to increase your calorie intake without getting too full, choose Continue reading >>

How To Choose Healthier Lunch Meat, And 6 Ingredients To Avoid

How To Choose Healthier Lunch Meat, And 6 Ingredients To Avoid

This post was originally published in June 2014 and has been updated. A sandwich with a couple of slices of turkey and cheese is a cheap and quick-to-prepare brown-bag lunch, but the health warnings are clear: processed meats have been linked to increased risk of cancers, diabetes and heart disease.A new statement from a World Health Organization research agency classified processed meat including bacon, hot dogs and lunch meats like salami as carcinogenic. It also found that eating 50 grams daily increases the risk of colorectal cancer by 18 per cent. Yikes. Should we avoid processed and deli meats altogether, or are there any deli meats that are safe to eat? Wecontacted Joy McCarthy , holistic nutritionist, author and owner of Joyous Health for her thoughts on the subject and how consumers can make wiser choices. What do you make of the statement from the World Health Organization linkingprocessed meats tocancer? As long as you source good-quality meat then eating it once per week is not going to increase your risk for cancer. Good-quality meat means grass-fed and/or certified organic. Also worth considering is an animals nutritional profile is the direct result of what that animal eats. Therefore, factory-farmed animals raised on grains such as soy that may be GMO and treated with pesticides will have a different nutritional makeup than cows grazing on a pasture. It is important to eat a predominantly plant-based diet to counterbalance any negative effects of meat consumption. More fibre in ones diet means less likelihood for cancer. Related:7 popular, healthy seeds and how to use them Which is healthier: chicken, ham, turkey, bologna or roast beef? Is there a huge nutritional difference between each? Bologna is basically cooked sausage made of cured beef, pork or a Continue reading >>

Can Two Bologna Sandwiches Give Me Diabetes?

Can Two Bologna Sandwiches Give Me Diabetes?

Can two bologna sandwiches give me diabetes? I just ate one bologna sandwich 2 or 3 hours ago and now im eating another one . I heard the white bread im eating contains alot of carbohydrates. Due to the fact that I eat two bologna sandwiches everyday can the carbohydrates within the bread raise my blood sugar and in the long run give me diabetes? And Im a... show more I just ate one bologna sandwich 2 or 3 hours ago and now im eating another one . I heard the white bread im eating contains alot of carbohydrates. Due to the fact that I eat two bologna sandwiches everyday can the carbohydrates within the bread raise my blood sugar and in the long run give me diabetes? And Im a slim 22 yr old male who has normal blood pressure and all the above. Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Source(s): Reverse Diabetes Without Drugs : Source(s): Reverse Any Diabetes Easily : Diabetes (Type 2 anyway) usually develops over a rather long period. It's not a contagious or infectious disease that can be "caught" it's more of a lifestyle condition. It's commendable that you're concerned about your diet and your health in general. You'd do well to get some simple information about diabetes. You could take a diabetes education course offered by hospitals or wellness centers. If you're truly worried, you could check in with a doctor, get information and a blood test, and obtain a prescription for a blood glucose meter and some test strips. The meter is often given away free, but the test strips are quite expensive 75 to a dollar each. You could ask the doctor for a referral to a registered dietician, who can map out a diet plan for you to keep your carbohydrates and your total calories in a normal range. Carbohydrates in moderation are a necessary part of a decent diet. They supply e Continue reading >>

Dr. Gourmet Says... Eat - Don't Eat : Bologna

Dr. Gourmet Says... Eat - Don't Eat : Bologna

Let me begin by saying that I am not a fan of bologna. I don't buy luncheon meats because I like my food to be processed as little as possible. That said, I am in the minority and there's lots of folks out there not giving up their bologna. I realized this when talking to a patient the other day and was admittedly at a loss to know whether there was an alternative. Since Oscar Mayer is the name in B-O-L-O-G-N-A I looked at their products. Their 98% Fat Free Bologna made with turkey is plain and simple just that -- bologna. It's pretty difficult to tell the difference in a blind taste testing between this and regular bologna. The texture is the same the flavor the same and the price is pretty much the same. I am sure that there are professional bologna tasters who could discern the difference ("Hmm... I detect notes of sage with a lemony finish"). I am not one of them, and considering that a slice of this stuff is only 25 calories, a half gram of fat and NO saturated fat, it's your B-O-L-O-G-N-A choice hands down. Keep in mind that all bologna contains a fair amount of sodium at 240 - 300 mg per slice. This was true with the turkey product and the other two other Oscar Mayer products (hey if you're gonna test, test the gold standard). A slice of regular bologna has a whopping 90 calories, 8 grams of fat and 3 grams of saturated fat. Same thickness, same texture, same flavor as the one made with turkey. Their Beef Light Bologna is slightly thicker and in the blind tasting I thought it was the regular product because of this. It's lighter but still 60 calories, 4 grams of fat and 1.5 grams of saturated fat but still no difference in taste from the other two. In case I might have not gotten the real essence of the bologna they were also tested in sandwiches (bread and ligh Continue reading >>

Bologna Meat For Dogs 101 Can Dogs Eat Bologna Meat?

Bologna Meat For Dogs 101 Can Dogs Eat Bologna Meat?

Many people make bologna meat a staple in their sandwiches every day, but can dogs eat bologna meat as well, and is bologna meat for dogs safe to consume? What are the benefits of giving bologna sausage to dogs, and are there any side effects? Lets take a look at the evidence and dig deeper. If youve been wondering, can I give my dog bologna meat, the answer is YES dogs can eat bolognasausage with no problems as long as its given in moderation. It cannot be a staple in your dogs diet mostly due to some questionable contents in it. Bologna meat in general is not a healthy or nutritional snack for dogs or humans. However, dogs do love the taste of it and given as an occasional treat, bologna for dogs is totally safe. That being said, there are a few things you should know about this product. Bologna meat or bologna sausage (sometimes referred to as baloney) originated in the Italian city of Bologna, but there it is called mortadella . The most common variety of bolognais a thick sausage sprinkled with fats, pistachios and peppercorns. We are far more familiar with bologna as a luncheon meat appropriate for sandwiches. In the US, bologna sausage is part of the same category as hot dogs , made as meat paste. This is what American bologna sausage looks like: Due to the way its made, American bologna is sometimes referred to as mystery meat because it is a combination of meat ingredients turned into a paste. Although the result may be tasty, its not filled with the most nutritious ingredients. Generally, its best to avoid bologna meatif your goal is a healthy and nutrient-dense diet for your dog. As most other processed meats (pastrami, salami, hot dogs, etc.) it has been modified through many different processes to enhance and preserve the flavor. Studies have shown that pr Continue reading >>

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