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Can Diabetics Eat Blue Cheese Dressing

Salad Dressing - Carbohydrate And Calories - Diabetes Forums

Salad Dressing - Carbohydrate And Calories - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Just curious what types of salad dressing folks use? I've got a blue cheese that's 2 gm carbs per serving. I've also got a ranch that's 1 gm carb per serving. I spent the evening looking at salad dressing labels. I really make my own, olive oil and balsamic with spices, get some good fat in there to help me get enough calories since I have subtracted so many carbs. I don't have a copy with me, but someone had one in the recipe thing--has olive oil, red wine vinegar, splenda and ??? It tastes like the old dark red french or Catalina that Jerry's used to serve (not the orange stuff). It is really good and not a lot of carbs considering how good it is. Look under recipes. If it isn't there, let me know and I will try to find my copy. Vinaigrette: oil, vinegar or lemon juice ( normally 3 parts oil to one of vinegar) mustard, herbs, garlic etc no carbs I like the taste of Ken's Italian Dressing with aged romano. It has 1g of carbs per 2 tablespoons. I prefer vinegar/oil based dressings to cream-based, so I generally either make my own balsamic vinaigarette at home or buy the "Good Seasons" Italian and make it at home. I'd think any type you prefer that isn't sweet would be fine. As with any food though, its best to test and see what you tolerate best. I'll use any of the commercial dressings. Not the "lite" ones. The amount of dressing I use on a salad is not enough to jog my BS. I still haven't figured out exactly what "ranch" is. I'll use any of the commercial dressings. Not the "lite" ones. The amount of dressing I use on a salad is not enough to jog my BS. I still haven't figured out exactly w Continue reading >>

Best Blue Cheese Dressing?

Best Blue Cheese Dressing?

Trying to get away from buying lunch at work's cafeteria so often.... 4/5 days, It is a salad with blue cheese dressing... figure that I should be able to bring that to work for a fraction of the cost. One of the hold-ups has been finding a blue cheese dressing that I like as well as restaurant blue cheese dressings... Most of the ones that I've tried from my local grocer just don't compare. Confirmed Transcription of HNF4- (MODY1) [Nov. 2011] Current Dx: IGT / Pre-Diabetic - Controlled with just Diet and Exercise 3/2012: 5.3% 10/2012:4.7% 4/2013:4.9% 6/2014:5.3% Daily Supplements: Multi-Vitamin, Magnesium, Vitamin D, & CoQ10, (Occasionally: ALA & EPO) I really like the Newman's Own Blue Cheese Dressing. Two tablespoons have 2 Carbs and it's 95% fats so nice for my diet plan. It's not as good as the restaurant ones, but the best I've been able to find. You can make your own blue cheese dressing. Personally, I would get some Maytag blue cheese (I get it because it's local) and then find a good ranch dressing mix to make (not from a bottle) and pour it over the blue cheese. You should be able to make up a weeks worth without it spoiling. Alternately, this recipe has a ton of positive reviews. "I thought you said your dog does not bite!" --The Pink Panther Strikes Again (My favorite movie of all time). I make my own. There are too many dubious oils and additives in bottled dressings. In a small mixing bowl, stir together the yogurt and mayonnaise until smooth. Mix in the vinegar, salt, and sugar, and season well with freshly ground black pepper Stir in the blue cheese and Worcestershire sauce (if using), and refrigerate until ready to serve. Or combine all ingredients in blender bottle and shake well. I usually make it in the blender bottle to mix it in. Very easy and any Continue reading >>

Is Cheese Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Cheese Safe For People With Diabetes?

Compared with many other foods, cheese is high in fat and calories and may not be an obvious choice for someone with diabetes. Cheese and diabetes can, however, be a healthful combination. Cheese lovers can enjoy a wide variety of cheeses without elevating blood sugar, raising blood pressure, or gaining weight. For diabetes-friendly meals or snacks, people should choose healthful cheeses and serve them with foods that are rich in fiber and low in calories. Can people with diabetes eat cheese? People with diabetes can safely eat cheese as part of a balanced, healthful diet. Just as with other foods, moderation is the key. A diet mainly consisting of cheese is unhealthy for anyone. When selecting cheeses, people with diabetes need to consider a few things: Calories Cheese is very high in calories and fat. Though calorie content varies among cheese varieties, people with diabetes should avoid overindulging in cheese. Type 2 diabetes is linked with obesity, and losing just a few pounds can reduce the risk of diabetes. There are several steps that people with diabetes can take to help them eat cheese without gaining weight: stick to small servings choose lower-calorie cheeses use cheese as a source of flavor rather than as the main course Saturated fat Cheese is high in saturated fat compared with many other foods. In small quantities, saturated fat is harmless and can actually be beneficial to the body. But excessive intake of saturated fats is linked to weight gain, high cholesterol, gallbladder problems, and heart disease. The American Heart Association recommend a diet that contains no more than 5-6 percent saturated fat. That means that in a 2,000 calorie diet, no more than 120 calories or 13 grams (g) should come from saturated fats. Other experts advise no more than 1 Continue reading >>

Recipe - Chopped Salad With Blue Cheese Dressing - Recipes For Diabetics

Recipe - Chopped Salad With Blue Cheese Dressing - Recipes For Diabetics

medium green bell pepper, seeded and diced teaspoon (5 ml) well-drained capers (optional) Combine the lettuce, cucumber, tomato, celery, radishes, bell pepper, and carrot in a large salad bowl. Lightly toss. In a small bowl, whisk together dressing ingredients. Drizzle over salad and toss lightly to coat. 44 calories (28% calories from fat), 2 g protein, 2 g total fat (0.6 g saturated fat), 7 g carbohydrates, 2 g dietary fiber, 2 mg cholesterol, 78 mg sodium There are no reviews for this recipe. Log in or register to review this recipe. Join our eNewsletter and receive diabetes recipes, news, and treatment updates. Please indicate which of the following treatments you take for Type 2 Diabetes Meal-time Insulin (novolog, apidra or Humalog) Diabetes is a serious disease requiring professional medical attention. The information and recipes on this site, although as accurate and timely as feasibly possible, should not be considered as medical advice, nor as a substitute for the same. All recipes and menus are provided with the implied understanding that directions for exchange sizes will be strictly adhered to, and that blood glucose levels can be affected by not following individualized dietary guidelines as directed by your physician and/or healthcare team. Continue reading >>

The Best Of The Light Salad Dressings

The Best Of The Light Salad Dressings

Ahh, salads. Cool, colorful, crispy, and super-healthy ... sometimes. The truth is that not all salads are created equal, nutritionally speaking. There are basically two nutrition issues with salads: Are they packed with high-nutrition, low-calorie goodies? Are they loaded down with fatty, higher-calorie dressings? Obviously, you want the answer to the first question to be a resounding "YES!" and the answer to the second to be "No way!" Start building your better salad with darker-colored greens, like spinach, romaine lettuce, and chicory, which tend to have the biggest dose of important nutrients and phytochemicals. You can also tip the nutrition scales by adding other nutrient-rich fruits and veggies to your salad (kidney beans, carrots, broccoli, tomatoes, etc.). Once you've put together a nutrient-rich salad, the trick is not to make it a high-fat one by adding fatty extras like croutons and cheese, or by drenching it with high-fat dressing. If you follow that rule, eating plenty of salads not only adds nutrition but helps to keep your diet and you -- low in fat. "The bottom line is that low-fat diets that are loaded with vegetables and fruits and other high-fiber, low-calorie foods may indeed help keep the pounds off," says Bonnie Liebman, MS, nutritionist for the Center for Science in the Public Interest. Liebman puts regular salad dressing in the same category as other fat-filled "extras" like mayonnaise, cream cheese and butter. If you aren't convinced, consider these numbers: Just 2 tablespoons of Girard's regular Caesar dressing has 150 calories and 15 grams of fat. Just 2 tablespoons of Wishbone Chunky Blue Cheese has 160 calories and 17 grams of fat. Just 2 tablespoons of Hidden Valley Ranch contains has 140 calories and 14 grams of fat. So what kind of dres Continue reading >>

Kitchen Tips For Diabetes-friendly Recipes

Kitchen Tips For Diabetes-friendly Recipes

Kitchen Tips for Diabetes-Friendly Recipes There's no need to toss out your favorite recipes after a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Try these fixes that modify the ingredients while keeping the flavor. Medically Reviewed by Maureen Namkoong, RD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . A diabetes-friendly diet includes plenty of fiber-packed veggies. A diabetes diagnosis doesnt have to trigger an overhaul of your kitchen nor do you have to be a world class chef to enjoy modifications of the meals you love. What you will need is a little extra knowledge about the best ingredients and cooking methods for a diabetes-friendly diet. The key is finding a way to use fewer high-fat, high-calorie ingredients, and to build flavor with other techniques, says Jennifer Stack, RD, CDE , associate professor of culinary science at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, and author of The Diabetes Friendly Kitchen . Here are some suggestions: Invest in the right tools.It all starts with the right equipment. Cooking healthy meals at home is a lot easier when you have a few basic tools, says Stack. Sharp knives both a large chefs knife and a small paring knife make it easy to cut fresh vegetables and lean protein. Stack also recommends purchasing a julienne peeler for slicing vegetables into appealing noodle-shaped pieces. For an added bonus, invest in a large cutting board, some quality cookware, and a cast iron pan; it conducts heat, making cooking a whole lot easier, she says. Try new cooking techniques. One of the best ways to adhere to a diabetes-friendly diet is to use non-frying methods of cooking and to replace saturated fats (like butter) wi Continue reading >>

Low-carb Blue Cheese Dressing (dip)

Low-carb Blue Cheese Dressing (dip)

by Harper and Annissa Slusher Leave a Comment This low-Carb Blue Cheese Dressing (Dip) adds savory creaminess to any salad, but with fewer carbs than most purchased blue cheese dressings. This dressing can be part of a low-carb, keto, Atkins, diabetic, gluten-free. grain-free or Banting diet. Disclaimer: Some of the links on this site are affiliate links which means we make a small commission from any sales to help keep the recipes coming! You do not pay any more. Thank you for your support! Blue cheese dressing has always been my favorite dressing. To me, there almost is no other dressing. There is something about that pungent cheese that draws me in and keeps me pouring it on! Dont stop at salad with this Low-Carb Blue Cheese dressing. One of my favorite ways to enjoy this dressing is on a good steak. This dressing can also be used as a dip for veggies. Its ability to cool the mouth makes it a perfect compliment to spicy hot foods like chicken wings. I even love to spoon it over cooked broccoli. As much as I love blue cheese and I love making cheese, Ive never actually tried to make blue cheese. Part of the reason I havent made this cheese is because the process is very sensitive. If its not aged very carefully, one could end up with a smelly spoiled mess. This would be heartbreaking thing to happen to something youve waited 3-6 months to enjoy! Another reason Ive never made blue cheese lies with the potency of the Penicillium Roquefort spores that are used to make the cheese. Apparently these potent spores can linger and contaminate other cheeses. Cheddar-Blue, anyone? Not a big deal, if you love blue cheese, but not everyone in my family is on the same page. There really isnt any need to make blue cheese. There are so many fine varieties on the market. You can use Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, in many ways your diet is your medicine. As diabetes educators, we help patients understand what food and beverage choices are best to avoid. When foods are high in carbohydrates, fat and sodium, they increase your risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight gain, heart disease and uncontrolled sugar . Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Sweetened drinks. These include regular pop/soda, fruit punches and iced teas. These are loaded with sugar and calories, and they usually have little or no nutritional value. Instead, try infusing plain water with different berries and fruits so you can enjoy the natural sweetness. “Designer” or specialty coffee drinks – including frappuccinos or cappuccinos. That “once a day special treat” can add up to lots of extra sugar, calories and saturated fat. Instead, go for straight java, either black, with artificial sweetener or a small splash of skim milk. Whole milk. It has too much fat, which can lead to weight gain. Switch to 2 percent, 1 percent – or even better: skim milk. Keep in mind that one cup of skim milk has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you don’t like milk or are lactose intolerant, you can drink almond milk, rice milk or soy milk instead—but remember to get the low sugar varieties. Hot dogs. These grilled little favorites are still high in saturated fat and sodium—yes, that even includes turkey dogs! Try to avoid them or eat them only occasionally. Packaged lunch meats. These are also high in saturated fat and sodium. Check your deli for low sodium meats—or better yet use sliced meat that you’ve roasted at home to make your sandwic Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Lemony Salad Dressing Recipe

Diabetes-friendly Lemony Salad Dressing Recipe

Diabetes-Friendly Lemony Salad Dressing Recipe Diabetes-Friendly Lemony Salad Dressing Recipe *The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calorie a day is used for general nutrition advice. Instead of stressing out over ruining a healthy salad with an unhealthy dressing, make this diabetes-friendly salad dressing recipe to pour over those greens. It's also vegetarian and vegan. It's a simpledressing recipe with ingredients that have been found to be beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes. I love salads and eat them a lot. I even have salads for breakfast. I use this go-to lemony healthy salad dressing recipe most of the time. It's fast, easy, and flavorful. I can quickly mix it up in a cup and pour it over a large salad.SeeWhy This Salad Dressing Is a Healthy Choice, below, after the instructions to this recipe. Juice of 1/2 to 1 lemon, according to taste, including pulp 1 garlic clove (or more to taste) smashed with a garlic press (seeNote, below) In a small bowl or measuring cup, whisk together the juice and pulp of 1/2 to 1 whole lemon, according to taste, 2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, 1 smashed garlic clove, and salt and pepper to taste. Taste the salad dressing. If the taste is too strong, add a tablespoon of water. Repeat until you get the flavor you desire. Remember, you want it to be a bit strong since it will be poured over the greens and tossed Note:If you do not have a garlic press, you can chop up the garlic, sprinkle with a pinch of salt, and smash with a fork. To maximize the health properties of garlic, crush or smash it at room temperature and allow it to sit for 15 minutes. Try this recipe with lime juice, add a pinch of chili powder or a chili powder spice mixture. My favo Continue reading >>

Creamy Blue Cheese Dressing Recipe - Eatingwell

Creamy Blue Cheese Dressing Recipe - Eatingwell

It was absolutely delicious! Finally, a blue cheese dressing that doesn't break the calorie bank! The one problem I am having is it becomes runny within 24 hours. I followed the directions EXACTLY. I also tried cutting milk down to just a splash. It's still runny. What am I doing wrong? I just made this dressing and WOW so tasty. Can't wait to try tomorrow after it has time to settle together. I will definitely make this againPros: Easy to make and normal ingredients great low cal recipereal easy, quick recipe that tastes really good. you can use more/less milk to get a different consistency or add more cheese after for a stronger flavor. i made it with buttermilk blue cheese, ff milk/yogurt, and reduced fat mayo for 27 cal per 2 tbsp. you can't beat that for a gourmet bleu cheese in your kitchen. Pros: quick, easyCons: dairy products for people with lactose issues will never buy blue cheese dressing againI add the blue cheese crumbles to my salad separately; this way my hubby and I can go as strong or light as we like on the blue cheese flavor. It is amazingly good and easy to make. Pros: creamy, full flavor, rich Continue reading >>

The Healthiest And Unhealthiest Salad Dressings

The Healthiest And Unhealthiest Salad Dressings

07/11/2013 11:11 am ETUpdatedDec 06, 2017 The Healthiest and Unhealthiest Salad Dressings Choosing salad over a sandwich or burger always makes for a healthier lunch, right? Thanks to hefty portion sizes, extravagant toppings, and certain brand name salad dressings that pack up to 200 calories and 20 grams of fat per serving, this may not always be the case. We tracked down nutrition information for the leading store-bought brands of ranch, thousand island, Caesar, and Italian/ vinaigrette salad dressings, and ranked them each, leading up to the one that has the most fat and calories (Credit: wikipedia commons). Click here to see The Unhealthiest Salad Dressings Further, most people tend to ignore their salad dressing's reported serving size, which is usually only two tablespoons. If the only way you can enjoy a salad is by drenching it in a cup of dressing, then you may not be getting the healthiest lunch you can. Click here to see The Healthiest Salad Dressings While you should remain wary of store-brand salad dressings with high fat and calorie contents, nutritionists remind salad-lovers not to shy away from fat altogether, and warn that low-calorie or low-fat dressings may not always be a healthier option than their full-fat counterparts. Nutritionish Keri Glassman cautions that what "light" dressings save on calories and fat they often more than make up for in sodium and sugar. We also ranked these same varieties of dressings according to which ones had the least fat and calories. While these may appear to be healthy alternatives, the sodium level is worth paying attention to. Glassman further asserts that "light" and "fat free" dressings are often the most common places to find high fructose corn syrup which she deems a "diet no-no." Further, low-fat salad dressi Continue reading >>

Blue Cheese Dressing

Blue Cheese Dressing

1/2 cup plain brown cow yogurt (or 3 tablespoons of buttermilk & 3 tablespoons of sour cream) In a small mixing bowl, stir together the wet ingredients. Mix in the dry ingredients. Stir in the blue cheese. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Difficulty: Easy | Total Time: Under 5 mins | Active Time: Tart, cooling plain yogurt adds a pleasant tang to this salad-bar staple. What to buy: Look for Brown Cow whole-milk plain organic yogurt. Most organic brands that have cream on top . They are better for you because they contain less stabilizers. Side Note: If youre using yogurt thats not very tangy, you may need to add a little more vinegar. All rights reserved.No part of this website may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, nor by any means, without explicit written permission from the author. The information provided herein should not be construed as a health care diagnosis,treatment regimen, or any other prescribed health care advice or instruction. This information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. The information is provided with the understanding that the author does not engage in the practice of medicine or any other health care profession and does not enter into a health care practitioner/patient relationship with its readers. This website is not intended to provide specific medical advice. The author does not adviseor recommend to its readers treatment or action with regard to matters relating to their health or well-being other than to suggest that readers consult appropriate health care professionals in such matters. All content contained in this book is for general information and educational purposes only. Please consult with your health practitioner before considering any therapy or ther Continue reading >>

7 Healthiest Salad Dressings For Weight Loss

7 Healthiest Salad Dressings For Weight Loss

7 Healthiest Salad Dressings for Weight Loss Smart Tips for Choosing a Healthy Salad Dressing Salads make a healthy foundation for any diet, but its all too easy to block their nutritional punch by drizzling on the wrong salad dressing and other toppings. At the same time, to keep you in love with lettuce and other leafy greens, you want choices that tantalize your taste buds, says Judy Caplan, RD, author of GoBeFull: Eight Keys to Healthy Living and a dietitian in private practice in Vienna, Virginia. Although its always the best option to whip up healthy salad dressings at home from vinegar, herbs, and a healthy oil , it is also easy enough to find a healthy, tasty store-bought kind if you read the nutritional facts label carefully. Caplan generally recommends buying healthy salad dressings with fewer than 45 calories per tablespoon (tbsp), and measuring your portions carefully, though she'll go above that limit if it's for the right healthy fat. She says it is equally important to watch out for fat and added sugars on the label fewer than 5 grams (g) of sugar per serving is best, with less always being better. Of course, the body needs fat to function, and there are several fats used in the best salad dressings that provide amazing health benefits, including: Monounsaturated Fatty Acids(MUFAs)These are found in olive, canola, and peanut oil, as well as in avocados and most nuts. Polyunsaturated Fats(PUFAs)These are found inother plant-based oils, like safflower, corn, sunflower, soybean, sesame, and cottonseed oils. omega-3 fats are polyunsaturated fats that are necessary for proper cell function. When planning a healthy diet, its important to avoid bad fats, such as trans-fat and saturated fat. Instead choose the MUFAs and PUFAs. Check the Nutrition Facts label and Continue reading >>

What Salad Dressing Is Ok For The Atkins Diet?

What Salad Dressing Is Ok For The Atkins Diet?

What Salad Dressing Is OK for the Atkins Diet? Written by Michelle Kerns; Updated June 22, 2017 Most low-sugar versions of commercial salad dressings are acceptable on the Atkins Diet. Allowable Vegetables in the Dukan Diet Cruise Phase Atkins followers begin their diet by eating only animal-based protein, non-starchy vegetables, fats and oils. Jazz up these dietary staples -- in the initial phase and later on in the program -- with low-carb salad dressing. Both commercial and homemade salad dressings are allowed in every phase of the plan, as long as they conform to the basic guidelines outlined in phase one. Commercial salad dressing is allowed in phase one, also known as the induction phase, as long as it doesn't have sugar and contains 2 grams or less of net carbohydrates in each one- to two-tablespoon serving. To calculate a commercial salad dressing's net carbohydrate total, subtract the grams of fiber per serving from the total number of carbohydrate grams in each serving. To identify hidden sources of sugar in a salad dressing, search the ingredients list for malt syrup, maltose, dextrose, fructose, corn syrup, lactose or fruit juice concentrates, advises "Today's Dietitian." Prepare your own Atkins-appropriate Caesar salad dressing with less fat and fewer calories per serving than commercially available Caesar-style dressings. Simply blend mayonnaise, lemon juice, anchovy paste, extra virgin olive oil, Parmesan cheese and seasonings like garlic, mustard and hot sauce. Be sure to use low- or no-sugar-added mayonnaise, or make your own to create the base of the dressing. For blue cheese dressing with less than 1 gram of net carbohydrates, use homemade or low-sugar mayonnaise, heavy cream, sour cream and lemon juice along with crumbled blue cheese. Season the mix Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Cheese With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can I Eat Cheese With Type 2 Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, your body does not metabolize carbohydrates properly, and you have high blood sugar. A healthy diet is an important part of managing your blood sugar levels and preventing diabetes complications. In moderation, cheese can be a regular part of a sensible diet for individuals with this health condition. Video of the Day Following a healthy diet for individuals with diabetes includes consuming controlled amounts of carbohydrates throughout the day. You might have 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates at your meals, and 15 grams of carbohydrates at snacks. An ounce of mozzarella or cheddar each provides less than 1 gram of carbohydrates. For lunch, you could have a whole-grain wrap with cheese and a large apple. As a snack, you could have blue cheese with walnuts and a small piece of fruit. Diabetes, Cheese and Weight Obesity is a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes. If you have type-2 diabetes and are obese, losing weight can help. Cheese is a high-calorie food, so limit your portion sizes. An ounce of cheddar cheese contains 113 calories. Reduce your calorie consumption by selecting reduced-fat or fat-free cheese instead. An ounce of nonfat cheddar cheese contains 44 calories. To promote weight loss, eat your cheese with low-calorie foods. Have low-fat string cheese and grapes for a snack, or melt shredded nonfat cheddar cheese onto steamed broccoli for a side dish. Cheese and Sodium One main concern with cheese is its high sodium content. An ounce of cheddar cheese has 174 milligrams of sodium. Individuals with diabetes are already at risk for heart disease and kidney disease, and a high-sodium diet further increases the risk. Those with diabetes should have no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. An ounce of low-sodium cheddar cheese has only Continue reading >>

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