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Can Diabetics Eat Bananas

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas

Even diabetics should eat at least two servings of fruit per day, and bananas are one healthful way of filling that requirement. One extra-small banana contains 8 percent of the daily value for potassium, a mineral that can help you control your blood pressure. It also provides you with 2 grams of fiber and 12 percent of the daily value for vitamin C. As long as you're careful to eat them with meals, and account for their carbohydrate content in your daily meal plan, they can remain a part of your diet. Carbohydrate Counting The recommended serving size for bananas for diabetics is one extra-small banana, which is a banana that is no more than 6 inches long. A banana of this size contains 19 grams of carbohydrates, which is about a third of the 45 grams to 60 grams of carbohydrates most diabetics can consume in each meal. Glycemic Index Foods that are low on the glycemic index cause less of a rise in blood sugar levels than foods that are higher on the glycemic index. A banana that is a bit green is lower on the glycemic index than a riper banana. If you eat a banana, which is a medium glycemic index food, eat it along with foods that are low on the glycemic index or with foods that contain little or no carbohydrate, as this will help keep your blood sugar from spiking. Foods low on the glycemic index include nuts, non-starchy vegetables and beans. Meat, fish, poultry, cheese and eggs are examples of foods that contain very little carbohydrate. Fruits that have a lower glycemic index include raw apples, cherries and grapefruit, and those that have a higher glycemic index include dried dates and watermelon. Create Your Plate The American Diabetes Association's Create Your Plate method allows you to control your blood sugar without worrying about counting carbohydrates. Y Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Bananas If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Bananas If I Have Diabetes?

Knowledge is power. But, it can be dangerous too. The wrong kind of knowledge, I mean. The wrong information – when you think something is true, but, in fact, the truth lies elsewhere. Like the case of bananas and diabetes – can diabetics eat bananas? A case of gross misinterpretation and lack of proper knowledge. But worry not, we are here to take care of that. Banana – A Brief A fruit so ‘everyday’ (and delicious) that there wouldn’t be a soul that doesn’t like it. Botanically speaking, banana is a berry. In certain nations, the bananas that are used for cooking are called plantains. Usually elongated and curved, the soft flesh is rich in starch and is covered with a rind that can be yellow, green or brownish-red. Banana is grown in over 135 countries worldwide. The fruit is also cultivated for its fiber, banana wine, and banana beer. There is no distinct difference between bananas and plantains, except that plantains tend to be a little firmer and starchier. Yes, banana is a lip-smacking fruit that improves any dish that you add it to. It has superb benefits and helps prevent numerous diseases. But… …is that the case with diabetes too? Let’s find out. Diabetes And Bananas – The Connection Why bananas? The fruit is considered to be one of the healthiest and most potent. What does it have to do anything with diabetes? Why the link? Let’s have a glance at diabetes – it is a condition where your body cannot efficiently use the insulin that it produces. This ultimately leads to the accumulation of glucose in your blood, resulting in high blood sugar. And now, for the link – the average banana contains about 30 grams of carbohydrates. And most of these carbs come from sugars. Hence, the connection. The larger the banana, the more the sugars. So, Continue reading >>

Bananas And Diabetes

Bananas And Diabetes

Diabetics have to be very careful about their intake of sugar. Having too much or too little can cause upsetting side effects such as hypoglycemia. One common offender of blood sugar problems can be bananas. Because they are high in carbohydrates, they increase blood sugar more so than many other fruits. Many dietitians will tell diabetics not to eat bananas; however, they can be acceptable as long as they are consumed in moderation. The body will convert carbohydrates into glucose in order to provide energy to the entire body. This also causes the pancreas to secrete insulin so that glucose can be absorbed by all the cells in the body. Diabetics should pay careful attention to something called the glycemic index. This tells them how much a particular food will impact blood sugar levels. If a food has a high glycemic index, blood sugar and insulin levels will go up faster and higher. Obviously, diabetics need to stay away from these foods as often as possible. Bananas have a higher glycemic index than apples, for instance. However, all things considered, they are still relatively low. Researchers also found that the more ripe banana, the higher its glycemic index. This is thought to be because the starch makes up about 80 to 90% of its carbohydrates. As the banana gets riper, it changes to free more sugars. Although bananas have been thought to be a bad guy in the diabetic diet, they can be consumed in moderation as long as the patient is consistently monitoring their blood sugar levels as they should be. Eating some protein with the banana, such as yogurt or eggs, can help to prevent any blood sugar spikes. The information provided on battlediabetes.com is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a patient/site visitor and his/her health p Continue reading >>

What Fruits Can A Diabetic Eat?

What Fruits Can A Diabetic Eat?

Diabetics often ask whether it is safe for them to eat large quantities of fruit. Many diabetic patients avoid eating fruit because they are worried that the high sugar content found in most fruits will worsen their condition. Fortunately, there are many fruits a diabetic can enjoy which do not significantly affect blood glucose levels, in fact certain fruits may actually improve glucose control and insulin sensitivity over time. Good Fruits For Diabetics Fiber rich foods are generally safe for diabetics to eat because they tend to have a lower glycemic index (GI) and therefore do not spike blood sugar levels to the same extent as high GI foods. This is because fiber delays the emptying of stomach contents into the small intestine which slows down the absorption of sugar into the blood stream. Fiber rich fruits tend to be fruits with edible skins and seeds as it is these parts of the fruit that are highest in fiber. Fruits high in fiber include (fiber content in brackets): passion fruit (10.4%), raspberries (6.5%), apples (2.5%), pears (2.1%), apricots (2.1%), blueberries (2.7%), kiwifruit (2.1%), strawberries (2.0%), pomegranates (3.4%), and avocados (6.7%). 3 Foods to Throw Out Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com The avocado is not only high in fiber, but is also a rich source of monounsaturated fat. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends a diet high in monounsaturated fat as it can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease which is more common in diabetics than the general population. There is also some evidence that a diet rich in monounsaturated fat can improve glycemic control. Fruits high in fructose, and those with high fructose to glucose ratios are also beneficial to diabetics because fructose does not requ Continue reading >>

Is Banana Beneficial For Diabetics

Is Banana Beneficial For Diabetics

Good news for the diabetic sweet tooth! The American Diabetes Association has announced that you can eat almost any fruit, even bananas. And the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends a daily consumption of between 1½ – 2 cups of fruit daily, while the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases cites bananas with other fruits that diabetics can safely add to their diets. It is recommended that the consumption of fruit be distributed at regular times during the day in order to prevent sudden elevation in levels of blood sugar. But don’t forget the carbohydrates in fruits, and be sure to count them when you’re planning your meal. Click here to find the best method to cure your diabetes naturally The Concern About Carbs Diabetics must be vigilant about the type and the amount of carbohydrates they consume. By utilizing the insulin hormone, your body breaks down carbs and converts them to glucose, providing energy and fueling cells. However, diabetics have problems with insulin, which may cause abnormally high glucose levels to flow through the bloodstream. Since almost all fruit contains a large number of carbohydrates, eating too many can dump an amount of glucose greater than the body can process. Even so, carbs are an invaluable nutrient that our bodies need to survive. The key is to manage them properly within the special dietary needs of a diabetic. The Beneficial Banana According to the USDA, bananas are America’s favorite fruit. This is good because they’re very beneficial as well. Bananas have a low calorie count but are high in vitamin C, vitamin B6, potassium, and fiber. The fiber helps keep you feeling full and satisfies your cravings, Vitamin C enhances the immune system, Vitamin B6 boosts your mood, and potassium helps contr Continue reading >>

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

When you have diabetes, it is important to keep blood sugar levels as stable as possible. Good blood sugar control can help prevent or slow the progression of some of the main medical complications of diabetes (1, 2). For this reason, avoiding or minimizing foods that cause big blood sugar spikes is essential. Despite being a healthy fruit, bananas are pretty high in both carbs and sugar, the main nutrients that raise blood sugar levels. So, should you be eating bananas if you have diabetes? How do they affect your blood sugar? If you have diabetes, being aware of the amount and type of carbs in your diet is important. This is because carbs raise your blood sugar level more than other nutrients, which means they can greatly affect your blood sugar control. When blood sugar rises in non-diabetic people, the body produces insulin. It helps the body move sugar out of the blood and into the cells where it's used or stored. However, this process doesn't work as it should in diabetics. Instead, either the body doesn't produce enough insulin or the cells are resistant to the insulin that is made. If not managed properly, this can result in high-carb foods causing big blood sugar spikes or constantly high blood sugar levels, both of which are bad for your health. 93% of the calories in bananas come from carbs. These carbs are in the form of sugar, starch and fiber (3). A single medium-sized banana contains 14 grams of sugar and 6 grams of starch (3). Bananas are high in carbs, which cause blood sugar levels to rise more than other nutrients. In addition to starch and sugar, a medium-sized banana contains 3 grams of fiber. Everyone, including diabetics, should eat adequate amounts of dietary fiber due to its potential health benefits. However, fiber is especially important for p Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

How To Fit Banana In A Diabetic Diet?

How To Fit Banana In A Diabetic Diet?

Bananas are sweet and soft, with a rich, heavy texture. The inner fruit is ready to eat straight from the peel, or added to a high-fiber cereal. Understand the nutritional benefit of the banana to help you determine where to fit banana in a diabetic diet. Although fruits contain natural sugar, the vitamins and minerals are a necessity to maintain your health. Account for the carbohydrate content accordingly for the best blood sugar results. Avoiding fruits such as bananas can be detrimental to your health. Bananas are known as a super food due to the nutrient concentration. Native Environment and Retail Selection Bananas and plantains are from the same family and are native to tropical areas. The intense heat helps to encourage fruit production. Environments with cold weather and little rain will prevent the trees and fruit from reaching optimal growth conditions. Grow bananas in South America, Hawaii and tropical regions where the dry season lasts less than 1/4 of the year. Purchasing bananas from a retail store can be overwhelming. Green bananas are slightly under ripe. The skin turns bright yellow as the banana ripens. Within a day or two, a bunch that is still slightly green will be yellow and ready to eat. Avoid bananas that are heavily bruised or damaged. Calories, Fat and Carbohydrates A medium banana that is 7 to 8 inches long contains 105 calories and a negligible amount of fat. A medium fruit’s 27 g of carbohydrates are contributed from 3 g of dietary fiber, 14 g of sugar and 10 g of other carbohydrates. The balance of low calories, low fat and good quality carbohydrates makes it a great energy source, but the fruit will metabolize quickly and create a rapid blood sugar response. The rapid response makes banana an ideal quick treatment for blood sugar lows. Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

​​​​when To Eat Bananas And Is It Suitable For Everyone?

​​​​when To Eat Bananas And Is It Suitable For Everyone?

The Dietetics Department at Tiong Bahru Community Health Centre, a member of the SingHealth group, explains when you should eat bananas and if it's OK for everyone, including people with diabetes, to eat them.​  ​Bananas Continued from previous page. Ms Peggy Tan, Dietitian, Tiong Bahru Community Health Centre, a member of the SingHealth group​, explains why bananas are good for you and when you should eat them. When is the best time to eat bananas? The best time to eat bananas depends on your nutritional needs and preference. Generally, the taste and nutritional value of bananas change as they ripen. Newly-ripened bananas tend to be less sweet than well-ripened bananas because the starch hasn't fully broken down into simple sugars. The upside to eating newly-ripened bananas is that you stay full for longer and enjoy the benefits of the resistant starch therein. On the other hand, a well-ripened banana with some dark patches on the skin is easier to digest and may give you the energy boost you require before playing sports. Can everyone eat bananas? Some medical conditions can result in people having a high level of potassium in the blood. In that case, it will be wise to refrain from taking bananas. And contrary to popular belief, a person with diabetes can eat bananas as long as the carbohydrate contents are accounted for. Article contributed by the ​ Tiong Bahru Community Health Centre​. Tiong Bahru Community Health Centre (CHC)​ strives to bring about convenient health services to the community. It is helmed b​y a team of experienced nurses and allied healthcare professionals to support and complement GPs in their management of patients with chronic conditions. Main services include Digital Diabetic Retinopathy Photography, Diabetic Foot Screening, Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Bananas?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Bananas?

Are bananas good or bad for diabetes? SHOULD PEOPLE WITH DIABETES EAT BANANAS? Do bananas contain a lot of sugar? Banana is the fruit with the highest amount of sugar. What does banana provide, besides being very rich in sugar? Besides being rich in carbohydrates, the bananas are also one of the richest fruits in potassium and magnesium, Because of the richness in these minerals, eating bananas is very suitable for people with hypertension, heart problems, athletes, gastritis, digestive ulcers, etc. Can people with diabetes can eat bananas? People with diabetes can eat bananas, but with care not to combine it with other foods rich in carbohydrates. For example, after a meal with bread, pasta, potatoes or rice, it is not recommended to choose a banana for dessert so as not to increase the carbohydrate content of the meal. When it is not advisable to eat bananas, which dessert are people with diabetes recommended to eat? In such cases, it would be preferable a yogurt as dessert or fruit with few carbohydrates, such as strawberries, blackberries, medlar, kiwi or tangerine. More information on bananas in the listing above. Other interesting articles This material is for informational purposes only. In case of doubt, consult the doctor. "Botanical" is not responsible for damages caused by self-medication. Continue reading >>

Bananas For Diabetes: Good Or Bad?

Bananas For Diabetes: Good Or Bad?

Bananas for diabetes. Are you curious to know whether they are a good or bad fruit to include in your diet? Glad you asked. Because while eating bananas are commonly thought of as being a “healthy,” when you have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, there's a bit more to the story. Let's explore bananas together now. JUMP TO: Bananas as a common fruit | Nutrition facts | The downfalls of fructose | Green vs. ripe bananas | Glycemic index | Potassium sources comparison | Conclusion Bananas: a popular common fruit As we all know, bananas are a popular fruit, well known for their bright yellow peel and unique boomerang shape. People from all across the world consume bananas. And as suggested above, bananas are often considered a health food because they are relatively low in calories and rich in minerals like potassium, plus they’re an easy snack to grab on the go. Still, while they may provide various health benefits for the general population, the question still remains: are they really a healthy choice for people with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? To find out, let’s start by taking a peek at the nutrition facts. Banana Nutrition Facts For one medium-sized ripe banana: Calories: 105 Total carbohydrates: 26.9g Protein: 1.20g Fat: 0.39g Fiber: 3.1g With only about 1 gram of protein and less than a gram of fat, it’s pretty easy to see that the dominant macronutrient in a banana is… carbohydrates. The carbohydrate content of one medium banana is a whopping 26.9 grams (beware of the oncoming blood sugar spikes)! Foods with a higher carb count can sometimes be “balanced out” if they also contain a high amount of dietary fiber, which reduces the overall net carbs of a food (the available carbs for digestion). But unfortunately, bananas aren’t rich in fiber. Just Continue reading >>

Fruit And Diabetes

Fruit And Diabetes

Everyone should be eating more fruit and vegetables. You're probably aware of the five a day target, and this is equally important if you’re living with diabetes or if you’re not. You might think you think that the sugar content of fruit means that you can’t eat it. But, the sugar in fruit is natural, and is not this type of sugar we need to cut down on. This is different to the added sugar in drinks, chocolate, cakes and biscuits, as well as in fruit juices and honey. The amount of carbohydrate you eat has the biggest effect on your blood glucose levels and considering a portion of fruit contains about 15–20g carbs, a chocolate muffin has 55g carbs and a small bar of chocolate has 30g carbs it is better to reduce your intake of the chocolate, cakes and other snacks than the fruit itself to help manage your blood glucose levels. It is very unlikely that you need to reduce your fruit intake but you could keep a food diary to check how often and how much fruit you are eating. Some people find that it is easy to overdo the dried fruit, grapes and tropical fruits. If you consider a serving of dried fruit is a tablespoon and packs in 20.8g carbs, 20.8g total sugar and 82 calories you can see how easily this happens. An apple on the other hand, which takes a while to eat, contains only 11.8g carbs, 11.8g sugar and 47 calories. Be mindful of your serving sizes too – bananas in supermarkets now seem to be supersize with a large banana containing 27.8g carbs, 25.1g sugar and 114 calories. But, most people need to cut down on foods with added sugars rather than fruit – a large banana is still better for you than a a standard chocolate bar, which contains 27.9g carbohydrate, 27.8g sugars and a staggering 260 calories. Why do I need to be careful about fruit juices and Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Patients Eat Naturally Occurring Sugar Products Like Sugarcane, Bananas (with High Sugar Content), Etc.?

Can Diabetes Patients Eat Naturally Occurring Sugar Products Like Sugarcane, Bananas (with High Sugar Content), Etc.?

There are several problems with consuming these foods at all. One if that human beings in general tend to underestimate consumption and to overestimate caloric expenditure. It's a natural, inbuilt safeguard against starvation. Overconsumption interferes with blood sugar control. The other problem is that the amount of carbohydrate from any source that can be tolerated without raising blood sugar levels temporarily is quite small, less than 12 grams in most cases. For a few minutes, blood glucose exceeds 10 mmol/L or so. The reason that is a concern is that high sugar levels engender insulin resistance. Even if you are insulin deficient, you can become insulin resistant, so that your body not only does not make enough insulin it cannot use the insulin it has (natural or injected). It's possible to have both type 1 and type 2 diabetes due to poor diet management. Disciplined diabetics can eat these foods in small amounts but it takes unusual willpower. High blood sugar levels have long-term effects and it is essential to avoid them. Hello. It's advisable to eat those fruits occasionally and in small portions. Like half a banana, a slice of mango. Fruits like Apple, watermelon, pear, papaya, pineapple, etc are best suited for diabetics as it has low glycemic index. I recommend you to go through the glycemic index table for foods. It's much essential for diabetics. Any fruit should be taken in moderate amounts only. Hope this helps. Thanks. For decades, we believed that diabetics should avoid sugars at all costs, due to a wrong interpretation of early (1903?) research done on dogs whose pancreas had been surgically removed and were then fed either a diet high in fat or high in sugar, resulting in enormous diarrhea when fed fat since the pancreas also makes the enzym lipase Continue reading >>

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