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Can Diabetics Eat Arborio Rice

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Diet plays an important role in staying healthy, especially for people with diabetes. Many people wonder whether high-carbohydrate foods such as rice are healthy to eat. This article will explain how to count carbohydrates, how to incorporate rice into the diet, and what the healthy alternatives to rice are. Diabetes basics Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases where the body does not adequately produce insulin, use insulin properly, or both. Insulin plays a crucial role in allowing blood sugar to enter the cells and be used for energy. There are two main types: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes have abnormally high levels of blood sugar. This can damage many organs in the body if left untreated. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommend the following steps to manage diabetes: making healthy choices in eating engaging in regular physical activity or exercise taking medications, if required A nutritious diet is important in keeping blood sugar levels at a healthy level. The healthy range is 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter mg/dL before meals or below 180 mg/dL after meals, according to the American Diabetes Association. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin. Various insulin delivery systems and protocols are used to manage blood sugar levels both between and at meal times. People with type 2 diabetes often manage their condition with diet and exercise, and with medications as needed to keep their blood sugar levels within the target range. These medications vary in how they work. People with diabetes will have different treatment plans, and they will respond to food, exercise, and medication differently. It is important that people consult with a doctor to get personalized recommendations on target blood suga Continue reading >>

Stocking Your Healthful Kitchen (part 4)

Stocking Your Healthful Kitchen (part 4)

Little by little, your kitchen is starting to shape up! Youve got the equipment, hopefully youve got a stove (!), and now youre filling up your cupboards or pantry with some of the essentials. Who knows? You might soon be ready for your own cooking show! I hope its obvious that my suggestions of essentials to have on hand should be tailored to your own tastes and dietary needs. For example, if you cant stand black beans, you certainly dont need to have them in your cupboard. The idea is to have the items that you like (and that are good for you) within arms reach. OK, lets continue this week, well focus on grains. Heres where you can have some fun and shake things up a little there are a lot of grains to choose from. No longer do you have to rely on the same boring white pasta or white rice. Not that I have anything against pasta and rice, but its good to expand your horizons a bit and try something new. Brown rice. I can almost hear you say, But it takes too long to cook! Its true brown rice does take a little longer to cook than white rice, but the results are worth it. The difference between brown and white rice is that brown rice retains its outer layers (bran and germ); white rice is stripped of these layers. Leaving the outer layers on not only gives brown rice a richer, nuttier flavor, it also helps preserve some of the nutrients that would normally be stripped away, such as fiber, B vitamins, selenium, and magnesium. And brown rice counts as a whole grain. Eating whole grains may lower your risk of heart disease , obesity, and Type 2 diabetes . Rice is a staple of so many diets around the world (in Thailand, the word for to eat actually means to eat rice.) You can purchase rice in bulk, in bags, or in boxes. If you buy boxed rice, try to avoid varieties that ha Continue reading >>

Risotto. Experiment | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Risotto. Experiment | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community After a tip from a low carber friend who swears she can tolerate arborio rice I've made a risotto mixed peppers and mushroom. I started off with butter and at the end of cooking time stirred a dollop of cream cheese and a godly handful of cheese...tested before eating at 5.8. And two hours later only 6.9...this frankly surprised me. But she says the butter cream cheese and cheese prevents the spike...and although risotto sounds strange for breakfast (admittedly) a bit late. Was so creamy. I couldn't wait to try it...I shall have this for tea in a little larger portion....its lovely when you find a food that doesn't spike you...god if I eat porrige. I can zip up into the teens! Ah but! Not wishing to spoil your joy, did you keep testing until your levels came back to 5.8? You may have missed the spike. Just ran off quick tp test and I'm 5.9 now that's 2 and a half hours from eating...I was very sceptical. Tested every hour...I can't quite believe it Knowing my luck will have later and it won't be the same. Admittedly it was not a big portion In the intetests of anyone who may read this and be tempted to try....the risotto is now firmly back on the forbidden list of foods for me...I did have a larger portion for supper. @bluetit was quite right to warn me.....there I was happily munching away....1 hour later I was 9.8...oh dear....well we live and learn don't we. In the intetests of anyone who may read this and be tempted to try....the risotto is now firmly back on the forbidden list of foods for me...I did have a larger portion for supper. @bluetit was quite right to warn me.....there I was happily munching away....1 hour later I was 9.8...oh dear....w Continue reading >>

A List Of Carbohydrates That You Can Eat When You Are A Type 2 Diabetic

A List Of Carbohydrates That You Can Eat When You Are A Type 2 Diabetic

Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all known cases of diabetes, according to the International Diabetes Federation. Type 2 diabetes occurs most often in overweight people over the age of 40. However, it is becoming more prevalent among younger populations with the rise in obesity. Treatment involves diet, exercise and oral medication. Carbohydrates in food have a great impact on blood sugar; knowing what foods contain carbohydrates can help you manage your diabetes. Video of the Day Starches contain carbohydrates, fiber and B vitamins. A serving of starch contains 80 calories and 15 g of carbohydrate. Examples of starch foods and serving sizes you can eat include 1 slice of bread, 1 oz. of a bagel, 1/2 of an English muffin, a hamburger or hot dog roll, 3/4 cup of cold cereal, 1/2 cup of hot cereal, 5 crackers, 1/2 cup of peas or corn, 1/3 cup of pasta, rice or couscous, 3 oz. baked potato and 3 cups of air-popped popcorn. For better blood sugar control, choose more whole-grain starches. Fiber in whole-grains decreases the rate of digestion allowing for a slower release of sugar into the bloodstream. Fruits provide carbohydrate, fiber, vitamin C, potassium and folate. A typical serving of contains 60 calories and 15 g of carbohydrate. Fruit choices and serving sizes type 2 diabetics can eat include a small apple or orange, 1 cup of cantaloupe, 2 small plums, 1/2 cup of applesauce, 1 kiwi, 1 medium peach, 1/2 a large pear, 17 grapes, 4 oz. banana, 1/2 cup of unsweetened canned fruit, 2 tbsp. of raisins, 3 prunes, 1/2 cup apple or orange juice and 1/3 cup prune or cranberry juice. Whole fruit makes a better choice than the juice because of its fiber content. In addition to helping control blood sugar, fiber in fruit also helps manage hunger better than the ju Continue reading >>

An Alternative To Rice For Diabetics

An Alternative To Rice For Diabetics

(From the author’s blog, “Behind the Bamboo Veil”) Day 1: Coming to terms At age 50, I discovered that I have become a diabetic. I didn’t really realize what it meant to be a diabetic, only that my blood sugar level was “higher than the norm.” What I understand, from the underpinnings of many subsequent consultations and conversations with my endocrinologist, is that once a diabetic, always a diabetic. My goal should be to control the blood sugar levels from reaching extreme highs. Yet as I struggle to maintain some form of equilibrium, it can happen that blood sugar levels may drop precariously low as well. So perhaps the right way to phrase it is that my goal should be to control the blood sugar levels from reaching extremes of highs or lows, period. Sigh, the horror stories of severe diabetes. From possible blindness to amputation due to gangrene and cuts that wouldn’t heal, from renal failure to kidney transplants to death due to multiple organ failure and cardiac arrest… Sigh, the paradox of diabetes. Weight gain—is it a symptom or a result of the condition? Sigh, the painful truth about diabetes, especially Type II diabetes mellitus: While genetics encourages a predisposition to it, diet and level of activity are the early determinants. So now that I am a certified diabetic, it really was pretty much of my own doing! Of course, nearly 20 years of therapy and psychiatric medication pushed me along and helped the condition blossom. Of course, that my mother died at 87 of complications that developed from diabetes put me at risk for developing the same disease. Of course, that I eat as much rice as a construction worker after a hard day must have given me more spare tires than a car had any right to have. Of course, that I drink very socially, and v Continue reading >>

Arborio Rice Nutrition

Arborio Rice Nutrition

Jill Corleone is a registered dietitian and health coach who has been writing and lecturing on diet and health for more than 15 years. Her work has been featured on the Huffington Post, Diabetes Self-Management and in the book "Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation," edited by John R. Bach, M.D. Corleone holds a Bachelor of Science in nutrition. Arborio rice is a type of sticky rice that does not lose its bite.Photo Credit: piyato/iStock/Getty Images Grown only in Italy, arborio rice is what makes your favorite risotto dish creamy and delicious. The extra creaminess is credited to its high starch content. Although it is starchier than traditional long-grain white rice, the extra starch does not mean it's higher in carbs. Decipher the nutritional content of arborio rice to determine how this grain fits into your healthy eating plan. Although arborio rice contains some protein and fat, almost 90 percent of the calories in the rice comes from its carbohydrate content. A 1/4-cup uncooked serving contains 38 grams of carbs, 4 grams of protein; and 0.5 grams of fat. Its carb content is very similar to long-grain white rice, which has 37 grams of carbs in a 1/4-cup serving. Arborio rice is a better source of fiber, however, with 2 grams per serving compared with 0.6 grams in long-grain rice. Fiber in food helps with hunger control, and getting more in your diet may lower your risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity. Calorie-wise, arborio rice has about the same amount of calories as other types of rice, with 170 calories per 1/4-cup uncooked serving. If you follow a 2,000-calorie diet, that's less than 10 percent of your daily calorie needs. Most Americans eat too many calories, which is why there is an obesity epidemic, according to the Dietary Guidelines for America Continue reading >>

Rices Grainy Goodness Gluten Free And Nutrient Dense, Its Part Of Any Healthful Diet

Rices Grainy Goodness Gluten Free And Nutrient Dense, Its Part Of Any Healthful Diet

Rices Grainy Goodness Gluten Free and Nutrient Dense, Its Part of Any Healthful Diet Good diet and good health go together like, well, white on riceor black, red, or brown, for that matter. Gluten free, full of high-quality protein, and considered one of the least allergenic foods you can serve, rice is an integral part of any healthful diet. U.S. Production and Consumption Statistics Rice was first cultivated thousands of years ago in the area between India and China, arriving in North America in the late 1600s and becoming a major crop for the colonists.1 Today, more than 20 billion pounds of rice are produced each year in six states (Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Texas), and 85% of the rice consumed in the United States is also grown here. While rice consumption has doubled in the United States over the last 20 years, it currently stands at about 26 to 27 lbs per person per year, still far below some Asian and Latin American countries, where consumption can range from 80 to 180 lbs per capita.2 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 2001-2002 showed that 18.2% of adults consumed rice (white or brown); however, the data also revealed that only 1.3% consumed brown rice.3 The overwhelming majority of the rice consumed in the United States is still enriched long-grain white rice, but the growing emphasis on the importance of whole grains in the diet has resulted in a 22% increase in sales of brown rice since 2006. All forms of riceparticularly brown and wildare nutrient dense, so they fit into a healthful diet, says Hope Barkoukis, PhD, RD, LD, an associate professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. (See notes on wild rice in The Many Faces of Rice sidebar below.) Enriched long-grain white Continue reading >>

Which Rice Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Which Rice Is Best For People With Diabetes?

If you have type 2 diabetes, you may be familiar with the glycemic index and that foods with a low glycemic index are best for managing your disease. Knowing which foods have a low value can be confusing at times, but now a new study my help consumers make a choice concerning at least one food: rice. Which rice is best for people with diabetes? People with diabetes can eat rice The glycemic index is a tool to measure a food's effect on blood sugar. Generally, foods with a glycemic index of 55 or less are considered low (good), while values of 56 to 69 are medium and those 70 or higher are high (bad) glycemic index values. Foods with a high glycemic index make a person's blood sugar levels rise and fluctuate, which can increase the chance of getting diabetes and also make managing type 2 diabetes a challenge. Some of the items typically placed in the high glycemic index category include white bread (see "Best and Worst Breads for Diabetes"), baked goods, pasta, and rice. However, not all rice has a high glycemic index value, and indeed some varieties fall into the low category. Investigators from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and CSIRO's Food Futures Flagship evaluated 235 varieties of rice and discovered that the glycemic index values ranged from 48 to 92. That means people with diabetes have healthful options when it comes to choosing rice as part of their diet. Investigators also discovered that the main gene associated with glycemic index in all the varieties is the Waxy gene. This information will allow rice breeders to develop more varieties of rice with low glycemic index values and expand the options for people with type 2 diabetes. According to Dr. Melissa Fitzgerald, who headed the IRRI group, "Rice varieties like India's most widely grown ri Continue reading >>

Risotto Rice Problem

Risotto Rice Problem

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I had just ONE cooked tablespoon of risotto rice cooked in with loads of green veg, olive oil, garlic, herbs and beef. And I spiked to 9.2 :shock: even just plain boiled rice doesnt affect me that much. Any ideas before I cross this one off my list of foods? The type of rice usually used for risotto (Aborio for example)has a relatively high GI of about 69and has a GLof 36 for 150g cooked portion. When you cook it for a longish time then it becomes very soft, the starch is 'released', making it very easy to absorb. Basmati , cooked al dente has a lower GI and GL .(GL range 18-28 for 150g) I don't even attempt risotto , insulin or not! Lucy, you can make a seriously nice risotto using cauliflower rice, you just need to think 'back to front' - first you need to make the sauce, quite thick, for example if you make a mushroom risotto: Fry onion until golden, add sliced mushrooms, fry until lightly brown, add dried porcini mushrooms (if you use them they need soaking in water first), add philadelphia cheese or double cream, finely chopped parsley, a little finely grated lemon peel. This will give you a thick, slightly gooey sauce. Grate a raw cauliflower to resemble rice grains, cook in the microwave on high for about 5 - 6 minutes, add a few splashes of Maggi liquid seasoning, little bit of salt and butter and stir into the mushroom sauce, top with freshly grated parmesan. Do the same with a ham and leek risotto, etc - it really does make a lovely risotto that doesnt taste like cauliflower at all. Continue reading >>

Is Rice Good For Diabetics?

Is Rice Good For Diabetics?

Rice has received some negative publicity lately regarding its effects on the development of diabetes. A large study, published this March in the British Medical Journal, found that regular eaters of white rice were significanty more likely to develop type-2 diabetes than people who rarely consume the food. The study found that the risk of developing diabetes was 55% higher for Asian populations and 12% higher for western populations in those who consume 3 to 4 servings of white rice a day compared to those who rarely consumed white rice. The results are controversial however because most countries that consume large amounts of rice actually have a very low diabetes incidence, suggesting that if white rice consumption is a risk factor for diabetes, it is much less important than other established risk factors such as a sedentary lifestyle and obesity. Brown rice consumption on the other hand generally shows an inverse association with diabetes risk. For example, a Harvard study, published in 2010, found that two servings of brown rice a week cut the risk of developing type-2 diabetes by about 11%. The differing results between brown and white rice are likely due to the lower GI, and more favourable nutrient profile of brown rice. When compared to potatoes, white rice has a similar GI, but lower amounts of magnesium and fiber, two components that are beneficial for diabetic patients. 100 grams of cooked white rice has no dietary fiber and only 8mg of magnesium compared to 1.8g of fiber and 20mg of magnesium in the same amount of boiled potatoes. In contrast, brown rice has 1.8g of fiber and an impressive 43mg of magnesium. This doesn’t necessarily mean that white rice should be avoided altogether however regular eaters of white rice should ensure that they get adequate Continue reading >>

Is Rice Ok To Eat If You Have Diabetes?

Is Rice Ok To Eat If You Have Diabetes?

If you randomly surveyed 100 people and asked them, “Which do you think is healthier: white or brown rice?” there’s a good chance that at least 90 will respond “white.” Have you ever been to an Asian restaurant that offers both white and brown rice? Which do you usually order? Do you mostly choose brown, thinking that it’s the much healthier option? There’s good reason to believe the hype that brown rice is much healthier than white. Marketers of brown rice brands have succeeded in spreading the propaganda that brown rice is far superior, nutritionally to white. And to be fair, brown rice is healthier than white rice. The processing of brown rice only removes the hull of the kernel, leaving most of the nutrition profile intact; when white rice is milled--and polished--a vast amount of nutrition is lost in the processing. White rice, which, before processing, is brown, contains approximately 60 percent less iron than brown, as well as half the phosphorous, manganese and dietary fiber. Almost all the Vitamin B6 is lost in the processing from brown to white. It’s easy to see why, then, nutritionists highly urge those trying to lose weight and control their blood sugar levels to replace white rice with brown. Improving your diabetes? Rice is rice (unless it’s Miracle Rice) Because of brown rice’s superior nutrition profile, it’s no wonder many health gurus offer what they believe is immutable advice: to reduce your chance of developing Type 2 diabetes--or to improve your diabetes if you already have it--switch from white rice to brown. But on the glycemic index (GI) scale, the measure by which a specific food raises blood sugar levels once it’s digested (and within two to three hours after), how much difference is there between the two? One would thi Continue reading >>

Risotto(italian Arborio Rice) Recipe

Risotto(italian Arborio Rice) Recipe

Risotto(Italian Arborio Rice) Recipe from the diabetic recipe collection at InformationAboutDiabetes.comIngredients: 2 tsp Virgin olive oil1 small Onion, chopped1 cup Italian Arborio rice2 cup Vegetables stock1/4 tsp SaltPepper to taste2 tbsp Parmesan OR2 tbsp Romano cheese In a medium-size non-stick saucepan, heat oil and saute onion untiltender. Add rice and cook, until, stirring, 2 or 3 minutes. Addstock and salt. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer 20 minutes.Remove from heat. Turn rice into a warm dish and season with pepper.Garnish with cheese.NOTE: This is a basic risotto rice . Many ingredients may be added,such as green onion, peas, sliced mushrooms, clams, shrimp, leanhamburger or chicken.Food Exchanges per serving: 2 STRACH/BREAD EXCHANGES + (if meat, fishor a vegetable is added, be sure to include these exchanges).CAL: 136; CHO: 1mg; CAR: 26g; PRO: 3g; SOD: 107mg; FAT: 2g;Source: Light & Easy Diabetic Cuisine by Betty MarksBrought to you and yours via Nancy O'Brion her Meal-Master.- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Preparation Time: 0:00 Risotto(Italian Arborio Rice) Recipe provided for you by InformationAboutDiabetes.com Is this Risotto(Italian Arborio Rice) Recipe Suitable for Diabetics? This Risotto(Italian Arborio Rice) recipe comes from our category which lists diabetic Rice recipes. As we are unaware of your individual diabetic concerns & the guidelines your doctor has given you, we really can`t say with any degree of certainty that this Risotto(Italian Arborio Rice) recipe is suitable for you. Even taking that into account, as someone labelled it as `diabetic` it should indicate that it, at the very least, meets the basic specification for the label `diabetic`, being low in fat and carbs and therefore, should be better for your health than a normal rec Continue reading >>

Spring Risotto | Diabetic Living Online

Spring Risotto | Diabetic Living Online

In a large saucepan, heat oil over medium heat. Add fennel and garlic; cook about 5 minutes or until fennel is tender, stirring occasionally. Add the uncooked rice. Cook about 5 minutes or until rice is golden brown, stirring frequently. Remove from heat. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, bring broth and the water to boiling. Add green beans, if using. Cover and cook for 5 minutes. Add asparagus, if using. Cover and cook for 2 to 3 minutes more or just until vegetables are tender. Using a slotted spoon, transfer vegetables to a bowl, reserving broth mixture in saucepan. Set vegetables aside. Reduce heat; cover and keep broth mixture simmering. Carefully stir 1 cup of the broth mixture into the rice mixture. Cook, stirring frequently, over medium heat until liquid is absorbed. Stir another 1 cup of the broth mixture into the rice mixture. Continue to cook, stirring frequently, until liquid is absorbed. Add another 1 cup of the broth mixture, 1/2 cup at a time, stirring frequently until the broth is absorbed. (This should take 18 to 20 minutes total.) Stir in the remaining broth mixture. Cook and stir until rice is slightly firm (al dente) and creamy. Stir in cooked asparagus and/or beans, the arugula, radishes, parsley, and mint. Serve immediately. PER SERVING: 125 cal., 2 g total fat 227 mg sodium, 24 g carb. (2 g fiber), 3 g pro. Continue reading >>

The Diabetic's Guide To Eating Rice

The Diabetic's Guide To Eating Rice

Replace white rice with brown If White Rice were to be a contestant on “Let’s Get These Blood Sugars Soaring” it would receive a standing ovation. It has a high score on the Glycemic Index - a list that grades foods according to how much they screw up your blood sugar. It’s naturally good at helping people develop diabetes. Each additional servings of white rice a week increases your chance of developing diabetes by 10%. That’s eating more than 4 servings a week, and it’s no laughing matter, considering how common white rice is. Fried rice at the chinese restaurant? White. Favorite cajun dirty rice at the family reunion? White. Mexican rice at your aunt’s house? White. Rice and veggies steamer bag in the frozen food isle? Yup, white again. Not to mention the plethora of rice pastas and gluten free breads that rely on this cheap, processed and refined grain. Brown rice is actually white rice that has not be stripped of its nutrients and refined. Two of those nutrients are fiber and magnesium - both of which have been shown to regulate blood sugar. Studies have shown that replacing white rice with brown rice even helps reduce the likelihood of developing diabetes. Eat less rice overall for best blood sugar control Replacing all white rice with brown rice is a good idea - reduces diabetes risk by 16%. Eating less rice overall is best - replacing rice with other grains reduces diabetes risk by 36%. Did you know a serving of rice is ½ cup? Here are some ways to make that half cup be enough. Instead of filling your plate with brown rice and sprinkling in some veggies, eat a plateful of veggies sprinkled with ½ cup of brown rice. Want even better control? Adapt a habit from our south of the border friends and serve beans whenever you eat brown rice. And since 5 Continue reading >>

The Rice Story Diabetic Health Clinic

The Rice Story Diabetic Health Clinic

Rice is one of the most consumed foods in the world. Mainly Asian countries are the big consumers. Interestingly as they get wealthier their rice consumption slows. The consumption ofmeat and dairy increases. Rice is the seed of the grass species Oryza sativa (Asian rice) or Oryza glaberrima (African rice). As a cereal grain, it is the most widely consumed staple food for a large part of the worlds human population, especially in Asia. It is the agricultural commodity with the third-highest worldwide production, after sugar cane and maize, according to 2012 FAOSTAT data. Rice is the most important grain with regard to human nutrition and caloric intake, providing more than one fifth of the calories consumed worldwide by humans.Chinese legends attribute the domestication of rice to Shennong, the legendary Emperor of China and inventor of Chinese agriculture. Genetic evidence has shown that rice originates from a single domestication thousands of years ago in the Pearl River valley region of China.Previously, archaeological evidence had suggested that rice was domesticated in the Yangtze River valley region in China. From East Asia, rice was spread to Southeast and South Asia.Rice was introduced to Europe through Western Asia, and to the Americas through European colonisation. Rice can come in many shapes, colours and sizes.There are many varieties of rice and culinary preferences tend to vary regionally. In some areas such as the Far East or Spain, there is a preference for softer and stickier varieties.In Australia as with most western countries the preference is for refined white rice. The reason for this is because over many years we have been sold white rice.It is easier for the food factories because it keep longer and we have simply become accustomed to the taste Continue reading >>

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