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Can Diabetics Eat Apples And Oranges?

Which Fruit We Diabetic Can Eat ??

Which Fruit We Diabetic Can Eat ??

Avoid fruits containing high starch like mango and banana,etc.other fruits can be taken in small amts. according to ur diet planning.(consume covering part of fruit also as it is good source of dietary fibres which prevents rapid swings in sugar level and also beneficial for heart.e.g. In case of apple,consume covering part with pulp of fruit) Eat all citrus fruits safely in moderation. Mango grapes etc you can eat in moderation mixed with CURD (should not be FAT FREE). I eat almost every fruit except banana. Amongst CITRUS fruit i find that KINO does kick my sugars up (because it's containing so much of juice as compared to orange) so i walk around after eating KINO. Best practice is EAT TO YOUR METER and then eat anything Hi , Fruits contents Fructose . Water Melon , Papaya , Apple can solve your desire for consuming fruits , but it must be always little . Do not consume the whole papeya , as it will increase your glucose . You consult your dietcian or your Doctor , who can guide you . Always consume little piece of the fruit but not the whole fruit. Karan (Pravakar) I think all the above are good answers. However I feel fruits should be encouraged if they help you to reduce the intake of carbohydrates. For example, instead of a breakfast of parathas or bread, if you have a moderate glass of orange juice, it is certainly beneficial because it does not contain fats it gives you vitamins and fibres... I think your suggestion is good for breakfast instead Parathas and bread orange but not glass of orange. Without of juice orange just to eat in fresh. Regards, Ponnumon Very essential for diabetic patients is the fruit Jam(like black berry) and this is the season for it. The seed of this if dried, ground and if taken on empty stomach is very helpful. Other fruits such as A Continue reading >>

Should You Eat Fruit On An Empty Stomach?

Should You Eat Fruit On An Empty Stomach?

Claim: Fruit must be eaten on an empty stomach in order for the body to absorb it properly. Example: [Collected via e-mail, March 2009] EATING FRUIT We all think eating fruits means just buying fruits, cutting it and just popping it into our mouths. It’s not as easy as you think. It’s important to know how and when to eat. What is the correct way of eating fruits? IT MEANS NOT EATING FRUITS AFTER YOUR MEALS! * FRUITS SHOULD BE EATEN ON AN EMPTY STOMACH. If you eat fruit like that, it will play a major role to detoxify your system, supplying you with a great deal of energy for weight loss and other life activities. FRUIT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT FOOD. Let’s say you eat two slices of bread and then a slice of fruit. The slice of fruit is ready to go straight through the stomach into the intestines, but it is prevented from doing so. In the meantime the whole meal rots and ferments and turns to acid. The minute the fruit comes into contact with the food in the stomach and digestive juices, the entire mass of food begins to spoil. So please eat your fruits on an empty stomach or before your meals! You have heard people complaining – every time I eat water-melon I burp, when I eat durian my stomach bloats up, when I eat a banana I feel like running to the toilet etc – actually all this will not arise if you eat the fruit on an empty stomach. The fruit mixes with the putrefying other food and produces gas and hence you will bloat! Graying hair, balding, nervous outburst, and dark circles under the eyes all these will not happen if you take fruits on an empty stomach. There is no such thing as some fruits, like orange and lemon are acidic, because all fruits become alkaline in our body, according to Dr. Herbert Shelton who did research on this matter. If you have master Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Ex-Diabetic Sidebar: When I was diabetic, my doctors and the hospital's dietitian told me that I would have to avoid fruits. I found that kind of strange, especially, since some of my hospital meals included applesauce, tangerine slices and orange juice! Avoiding fruits was difficult for me because I had a "sweet tooth" -- a strong craving for sweets. Being diabetic, my body craved sugar and I loved sweets -- not just fruits -- I loved apple pie, brownies, chocolate chip cookies, and ice cream. During my research, I discovered how to stop the cravings (see below). I also learned that eating some whole fruit can be beneficial, despite the sugar content in most fruits. Why? Because it's better to eat an apple than some cookies or ice cream to satisfy your craving for something sweet! :-) In addition, studies have shown that the nutrients within most fruits (e.g. antioxidants, Vitamin C, fiber, water) can help prevent and reverse the damage to blood vessels and body tissues caused by Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and other similar diseases. The key is to make sure that you follow an effective reverse diabetes nutritional program such as the one defined in the "Death to Diabetes" 10-Step Reverse Diabetes Wellness Program. Most whole fruits are on the moderate to low end of the Glycemic Index (GI), making them a pretty good choice for most people with diabetes. Many fruits are also packed with vitamins A and C, as well as water,fiber and antioxidants (flavonoids) such as catechin, quercetin, and anthocyanidin. Top 10 Fruits | Reverse Diabetes The following is a list of the top 10 fruits that most diabetics can eat because, for most diabetics, these fruits don't cause large or sustained blood glucose spikes. As a result, eating these fruits can help to satisfy your sweet to Continue reading >>

Eating Fruit As A Diabetic

Eating Fruit As A Diabetic

There is a common assumption among many that fruit is not an okay choice for people with diabetes. People have formed the idea that diabetics should steer clear of fruits because these foods contain high sugar levels like fructose. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases says eating fruit when you have diabetes is healthy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) reports that as long as you are not allergic to fruit, you can eat whatever fruit you want. Over 420 million people worldwide have diabetes. More than 29 million people in the US have been diagnosed with diabetes. Plus, there are new studies in China promoting the health benefits of consuming fruit, even if you are diabetic. Researchers, led by Huaidong Du of the University of Oxford in the UK, studied 500,000 people in China, patients with diabetes and without, and found that eating fruit did not negatively affect diabetics when the portions were done in moderation. The participants of the China Kadoorie BioBank study were between the ages of 30 and 79. The study lasted for seven years. Medical News Today reports, “The team found that people who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study and consumed fresh fruit in high amounts had a significantly lower risk of diabetes.” People that may have diabetes running in their family can rest assured that eating fruits every day can reduce your risk of developing diabetes by 12%. The health benefits of eating fruit daily are endless. Eating fruit every day lower relative risk of dying early, reduce heart trouble, stroke, kidney diseases, and eye diseases. The health benefits attributed to eating fruit are possible because fruit is full of fiber and antioxidants. Research from the China Kadoorie BioBank shows that people with dia Continue reading >>

Apples Could Reduce Risk Of Diabetes: Eating Fruit Twice A Week Could Cut Chance Of Developing Type 2 By 23%

Apples Could Reduce Risk Of Diabetes: Eating Fruit Twice A Week Could Cut Chance Of Developing Type 2 By 23%

Drinking more fruit juice was linked to an increased risk of developing the condition Study is the first to look at the effects of different types of fruit on diabetes risk Previous studies have linked anthocyanins found in berries and grapes to lowered heart attack risk An apple a day could keep diabetes away, according to a new report. Research showed that eating whole fruits - particularly blueberries, grapes and apples - was ‘significantly associated’ with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. However, drinking more fruit juice was linked to an increased risk of developing the condition, reports the British Medical Journal. The study is the first to look at the effects of different types of fruit on diabetes risk. Professor Qi Sun, of Brigham Women’s Hospital in the United States, said: “While fruits are recommended as a measure for diabetes prevention, previous studies have found mixed results for total fruit consumption. “Our findings provide novel evidence suggesting that certain fruits may be especially beneficial for lowering diabetes risk.” Researchers looked at data from more than 187,000 people, gathered between 1984 and 2008. More than 12,000 of these developed diabetes during the study period. The researchers looked at overall fruit consumption, as well as consumption of individual fruits. These were grapes or raisins, peaches, plums, apricots, prunes, bananas, cantaloupe melon, apples or pears, oranges, grapefruit, strawberries and blueberries. They also looked at consumption of apple, orange, grapefruit, and “other” fruit juices. People who ate at least two servings each week of certain whole fruits - particularly blueberries, grapes, and apples - reduced their risk for type 2 diabetes by as much as 23% in comparison to those who ate less than Continue reading >>

Can Dogs Eat Oranges?

Can Dogs Eat Oranges?

Dogs aren’t always all about the meat; some will even go crazier for fruit! A few well-known healthy fruits for dogs include blueberries, bananas and apples. You may even see these fruits as ingredients in your dog’s food and treats. Not only can some fruits promote better health in your pet, but can also become a favorite snack thanks to their sweet and delicious flavors. However, not all fruits are safe for dogs to eat. Some dangerous foods for dogs, like grapes and avocados can be poisonous to your pet. So where do oranges fit in on the safe-for-dogs fruit list? To put the answer simply: “Dogs can eat oranges and the sweetness is not an issue, as natural sugars fed with fiber are safe,” says Stephanie Liff, DVM and partner at Brooklyn Cares Veterinary Hospital in New York. When it comes to how much of an orange your dog should eat, Liff suggests smaller dogs have between 1/4 to 1/3 of a whole moderate sized orange and that larger dogs can eat an entire one. “There is not really a limit to how much vitamin C a pet can have because it is water soluble and excess levels are urinated out and don’t accumulate in the body,” says Liffs. The Benefits of Oranges for Dogs Vitamin C is an important nutrient for us pet parents, so you would imagine that your pet could reap some of those same benefits from a bite of an orange. “In some dogs, extreme exercise or stress can overwhelm the liver’s capacity to make vitamin C,” shares Christine Keyserling, DVM at The Animal Medical Center in NYC. “In these cases, it may be beneficial to provide additional vitamin C supplementation, however, for most pets, it’s not required.” The nutrients in oranges can have a positive effect on a dog’s immune system. Additionally, Liff says, that a dose of Vitamin C can be Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Candy Not only do high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Learn to satisfy your sweet tooth by snacking on high-quality carbohydrates such as fresh fruit. Apples, berries, pears, grapes, and oranges all have sweet, juicy flavors and are packed with fiber to help slow the absorption of glucose, making them a much better choice for blood sugar control. When snacking on fruit, pair it with a protein food, such as a string cheese, nonfat yogurt, or handful of nuts, to further reduce the impact on your blood sugar. (For more sweet ideas, see my list of 20 Low-Sugar Snack ideas). Continue reading >>

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

There’s compelling evidence supporting the notion that high-fructose diets are responsible for most chronic disease; insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and obesity in particular Many fruits are very high in fructose, up to 50X the sugar that most of the fruits our ancestors were exposed to due to consistent hybridization over the past century for sweetness Therefore most fruits are best limited or avoided if you have insulin/leptin resistance as determined by struggling with your weight, or, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease or cancer According to a new study, certain kinds of whole fruits—particularly blueberries, grapes, prunes and apples—may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes Consumption of fruit juices, on the other hand, was found to have greater risk. Those who drank one or more servings of fruit juice each day had a 21 percent higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to the others I believe most will benefit from restricting their fructose to 25 grams a day; and as little as 15 grams a day if you’re diabetic or have chronic health issues. This includes fructose from whole fruits By Dr. Mercola You're probably well-familiarized with my controversial stance on fructose. Compelling evidence shows that fructose is, by far, more harmful to your health than other sugars—especially when it's removed from whole fruits and highly processed and genetically modified, such as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in most processed foods. I've also, as a general rule, warned you of eating too much fruit, as many fruits can be quite high in fructose. This has caused some confusion and consternation among many readers, as fruit has long been promoted as an important part of a healthy diet. That said, there are considerations to take into account when it comes to Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

One More Reason You Should Eat Fruit, Not Drink It

One More Reason You Should Eat Fruit, Not Drink It

Greatist News examines and explains the trends and studies making headlines in fitness, health, and happiness. Check out all the news here. Photo: Eser Aygün A team of scientists from Britain, Singapore, and the Harvard School of Public Health have found that while eating fruit lowers the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, drinking fruit (in the form of juice) actually increases it . The study, which surveyed nearly 190,000 Britons over 24 years, found that blueberries were the best option, with three servings per week cutting the risk of diabetes by 26 percent. Grapes and apples also substantially lowered the risk of diabetes, while bananas, plums, and peaches had a negligible effect. Three weekly servings of fruit juice, on the other hand, upped the risk by eight percent. Despite its convenience, juice is a far less healthy option than a real piece of fruit. Not only does the juicing process destroy a number of fruits’ beneficial compounds and antioxidants, it removes nearly all of the natural fiber . All the sugar with none of the fiber? No, thanks — fiber carries a myriad of digestive benefits and is crucial for slowing the absorption of the fruit’s sugar and keeping its glycemic index low. This, the scientists hypothesized, may be why juice increases the risk of diabetes, and why a high intake of fruit juice has been linked to childhood obesity . It’s important to note that while it’s often marketed as healthy and natural, juice is not a low-calorie beverage. Just eight ounces of regular orange juice, for instance, contains over 110 calories, the equivalent of almost two oranges. However, you won’t feel as filled up, because the juice doesn’t contain any fiber. Don’t fall into the trap of thinking that the calories are worth the vitamins — a sin Continue reading >>

Fruit List For Diabetics

Fruit List For Diabetics

Often people suffering from diabetes avoid fruits out of fear that the sugar present in fruits could push up their blood sugar level. However, this is a false conception. Most fruits, specifically fruits rich in fibers, are beneficial for reducing the blood sugar level. Sugar present in fruits is usually in the form of fructose. Unlike other forms of sugar, such as sucrose, fructose has low glucemic index. Minimal insulin is needed for the metabolism of fructose. Intake of this fruit sugar is not associated with sudden surge of the blood sugar level. Studies have shown that by reducing cholesterol and triglyceride production, fructose could protect us from diseases such as arteriosclerosis, which leads to heart diseases and stroke. Diabetes bad food includes those that have high glycemic indexes for glucose- which includes those foods that are high in saturated fats and uncontrollably high amounts of sugar in any of its forms- especially sugar from milk. Which brings us back to our main concern- what kinds of fruits can a diabetic eat? Fruits for diabetics are usually those fruits that have high fiber content and have low sugar content. If we take these criteria and apply it, the first fruit that would come to mind would be the high and mighty avocado. But beware; the large avocados have a lot of calories in it- so if you buy the large avocado from florida, make sure you regulate your calorie intake for the rest of the day. Diabetics should NOT eat cooked fruit. Always eat raw fruits in order to reap the benefits. Here's a list of fruits that are beneficial for Diabetics. Any type of wild or organic berry - Seasons: Range All Year Blueberries, Elderberries, Blackberries, Gooseberries, Strawberries etc. There are loads to choose from. You can find their respective season Continue reading >>

How Much Fruit Should You Eat Every Day?

How Much Fruit Should You Eat Every Day?

Eating a balanced diet means incorporating lean proteins, good complex carbs, an abundance of veggies, and the natural sweetness of fruit to your meals. Fruit, aka nature’s candy, makes up one of the healthiest and most delicious food groups. It’s one of the first swaps I tell my clients to make when they’re trying to regulate excess sugar in their diets. Fruit brings more to the table than what refined sugar offers up. All fruit is low in calories and sodium, packed with fiber, vitamins, and nutrients. That’s reason enough to start loading up on fruit! So if fruit really is this amazing, can we ever eat too much of it? Are there any downsides to eating too much fruit? The Greatness That Is Fruit Fruit is packed with potassium, vitamin C, phytochemicals, and folate to help lower blood pressure, keep our immune systems healthy, and even keep cancer away. Plus, according to one review of over 150,000 women and 36,000 men without chronic diseases, a “greater consumption of whole fruits – especially blueberries, grapes, and apples” was “associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes”. One of my favorite reasons for loading up on fruit (besides satisfying my sweet tooth) is dietary fiber. Did you know that the average adult only gets 15 g of fiber every day, despite us needing between 21-38 g of daily fiber? The dietary fiber in fruit: Reduces cholesterol levels Lowers risks of heart disease Promotes proper bowel function Reduces diverticulosis Provides a feeling of fullness so we don’t overeat May reduce the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes You’ll enjoy the most fiber when you eat your fruit with the skins on. So What’s So Bad About Fruit?! If fruit is as great as I’ve been praising, can we gorge on fruit baskets? Sugar comes in several forms s Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

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