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Can Diabetics Eat Acorn Squash

Stuffed Acorn Squash

Stuffed Acorn Squash

Try this dish in place of stuffing or as a vegetable side dish this Thanksgiving. You can also enjoy it any other night for dinner. It's packed with flavor and nutritious ingredients. 2 medium acorn squash (about 1 pounds each), halved widthwise and seeded 2 3-ounce links apple chicken sausage, cooked and diced cup fat-free, reduced sodium chicken broth Coat a baking pan with non-stick cooking spray and place squash cut-side down in the pan. Add about an inch of water and bake for 30 minutes. While the squash is baking, add olive oil to a saut pan over medium-high heat. Saut mushrooms and chicken sausage until golden brown. Add kale, salt (optional) and pepper and saut until kale is wilted, about 5-7 minutes. Add the chicken broth and cornbread stuffing to the mushroom mixture and simmer until all of the liquid is absorbed. Remove squash from the oven. Turn the squash over in the pan so the cut side is up. Fill each squash with of the mushroom mixture then return to the oven. Bake for 15 minutes. Chef Tip: If you cant find kale, you can substitute spinach in this recipe. Continue reading >>

Squash Is Mostly Starchy Carbohydrates But Insulin-regulating - Upi.com

Squash Is Mostly Starchy Carbohydrates But Insulin-regulating - Upi.com

SANTA MONICA, Calif., Nov. 9 (UPI) -- Squash is mostly starchy carbohydrates but studies show it has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic properties, a U.S. food expert says. "Squash includes both winter and summer varieties, some examples include, zucchini from the summer and butternut, buttercup, acorn, pumpkin and kabocha from winter," Phil Lempert , a food industry analyst, trend watcher and creator of supermarketguru.com, said in a statement. "Many of the carbs in winter starch come from polysaccharides found in the cell walls. These polysaccharides include pectins -- specially structured polysaccharides that in winter squash often include special chains of D-galacturonic acid called homogalacturonan. An increasing number of animal studies now show that these starch-related components in winter squash have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, as well as anti-diabetic and insulin-regulating properties." Although the squash is botanically classified as a fruit, many consider it a vegetable for culinary purposes. The carotenoids, including lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-cryptoxanthin, give many squash its signature orange color and are good for eye health. Squash contains vitamin C, potassium, fiber, manganese and folate, omega-3 fatty acids, B vitamins and copper. Most varieties of squash start out green and turn orange when ripe but some are actually ripe when green. When choosing for cooking or baking, look for fruits that are heavy for their size with a hard shell, Lempert advised. Continue reading >>

Parmesan-topped Acorn Squash

Parmesan-topped Acorn Squash

You are here: Home / Side Dishes / Parmesan-Topped Acorn Squash Every time I go to the store, I seem to come home with another variety of winter squash. I love butternut, buttercup, pumpkin, hubbard, spaghetti and sweet dumpling, just to name a few. I especially love acorn squash. This recipe is super-easy to prepare and is a tasty accompaniment to pork tenderloin. I really enjoy pork and winter squash together for some reason. The toughest part of this recipe is cutting the squash in half and its really not that difficult. Get yourself a heavy chefs knife and youll be fine. If you are lucky enough to have fresh sage, use it. Buy whole nutmeg if you can and grate it with a microplane. The flavor is so much nicer than using pre-ground nutmeg from a jar. You can probably find whole nutmeg in the specialty spices section of your grocery store. Enjoy an acorn squash recipe that doesnt involve brown sugar for a change! And if youre lucky enough to find buttercup squash at the market, try Buttercup Squash Soup . Preheat the oven to 350F. Coat a 13- x 9-inch baking dish with cooking spray. Place squash halves, cut side down in dish. Cover loosely with foil and bake for 30 minutes. In a small bowl, combine olive oil, sage, salt, nutmeg and pepper. Carefully cut each squash half into three wedges and set in baking dish, skin side down. Brush olive oil mixture on all fleshy sides of squash. Cover and bake about 20 more minutes or until squash pierces easily with a fork. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and serve immediately. Serving size:2 wedges Calories:115 Fat:6g Saturated fat:1g Carbohydrates:16g Sugar:0g Sodium:158mg Fiber:2g Protein:2g Cholesterol:2mg Continue reading >>

Diabetics Rejoice!: Baked & Stuffed Acorn Squash

Diabetics Rejoice!: Baked & Stuffed Acorn Squash

Winter squash abound at the grocery and farmer's market these days. They are delicious roasted in the oven and make an excellent side or main dish. They are considered a starchy vegetable but are much more glycemic-friendly than potatoes or rice, plus they are rich in beta-carotene, high in fiber and are a good source of other vitamins and minerals, such as potassium, vitamins C & B and magnesium. Acorn squash is typically green in color, but other colorful varieties are now available and worth sampling. Some others to look for are carnival, delicata (or sweet potato squash) and golden acorn. In this recipe, I used carnival squash which is a small, multi-colored member of the acorn family. The flesh is golden and mildly sweet when roasted. Because of it's colorful exterior and heart shape, it makes a spectacular presentation on the plate. The combination of smoky sausage, seasoned spinach and creamy fresh mozzarella is a wonderful and satisfying meal on a cold night. So, celebrate the late autumn harvest and eat a squash! 1 sausage patty, cooked and chopped (meat or vegetarian) 1 ounce fresh mozzarella, cut into small cubes 1. Preheat oven to 375-degrees. Cut squash in half. Scoop out and discard seeds. Drizzle olive oil onto baking sheet and place squash, cut side down, onto baking sheet. Bake for 40-45 minutes until tender when pierced with a fork. 2. Meanwhile, place chopped spinach in small sauce pan and add about cup water. Bring to a boil and cook for 4 minutes. Add garlic and continue cooking for another 3 minutes. Drain any remaining water and season with salt and pepper. Add sausage and stir to combine. 3. When tender, remove squash from oven and turn over. Season each half with a little salt & pepper. Add cubed mozzarella to spinach mixture and stir. Divide s Continue reading >>

Oven-roasted Squash With Garlic & Parsley Recipe - Eatingwell

Oven-roasted Squash With Garlic & Parsley Recipe - Eatingwell

Toss squash with 4 teaspoons oil, salt and teaspoon pepper. Spread evenly on a large baking sheet. Roast, stirring occasionally, until tender throughout and lightly browned, 30 to 45 minutes (depending on the variety of squash). Heat the remaining 2 teaspoons oil in a small skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant but not brown, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Toss the roasted squash with the garlic and parsley. Taste, adjust the seasoning and serve. Make Ahead Tip: Cut squash up to 1 day ahead; store airtight in the refrigerator. Kitchen Tip: Make it easier to cut a pumpkin, acorn squash or other winter squash: pierce in several places with a fork; microwave on High for 45 to 60 seconds. Use a large sharp knife to cut in half. Remove the seeds and stringy fibers with a spoon. Cut Down on Dishes: A rimmed baking sheet is great for everything from roasting to catching accidental drips and spills. For effortless cleanup and to keep your baking sheets in tip-top shape, line them with a layer of foil before each use. Thank you for sharing this easy recipe. It is so tasty. My company asked for the recipe. I did increase the parsley as I had extra. Very easy and surprisingly tasty!!! I will definitely make again!!! So Easy and Delicous...even for non squash lovers!We made this with butternut squash for our Christmas Eve dinner and this was the most loved dish of the night!!! Forget the potatoes, I'll just make a double batch of these next year! SOOOOOO good...even people that don't really like squash and/or the kids loved it!! My 3 year old kept asking for more!!Pros: Quick, Flavorful, Great for EntertainingCons: You need to have fresh parsley on hand, dried just doesn't come close. PerfectThis was a perfect addition to our Christmas Eve dinner. It was Continue reading >>

Healthy Foods For Pregnancy: Why You Need Acorn Squash In Your Prenatal Diet

Healthy Foods For Pregnancy: Why You Need Acorn Squash In Your Prenatal Diet

Workouts, recipes, health, and pregnancy tips for your healthiest pregnancy Healthy Foods for Pregnancy: Why You Need Acorn Squash in Your Prenatal Diet Squash is one of the healthiest foods a mum-to-be can consume during her pregnancy. With our summer squash staples (zucchini and yellow squash) now out of season, pregnant mamas need a new squash to prepare for chillier autumn days. The tasty acorn squash (higher in nutrient content than summer squash) is in season beginning in early fall through winter, and can be prepared a variety of ways! It also has quite a few health benefits for pregnant mamas, including some beauty benefits, too. Lets dive deeper into what makes this gorgeous, fall-hued food so good for you. Copyright: mickeymousehouse64 / 123RF Stock Photo Vitamin A is abundant in the acorn squash! A 4 squash has about 30% of what you need in a day. (Pregnant women need 770 mcg/day of Vitamin A .) The most vision development is happening from week 4 of pregnancy (when the optic nerves form) up until week 26 when your babys eyes are almost fully formed. They can even open their eyelids in utero! Its important to get your daily dose of Vitamin A during this period so that your babys eyes can be formed as well as possible. Vitamin A can also help prevent cataracts and other degeneration of the eyes later in life for you it also gives you beautiful skin that heals well (which will come in handy after delivery.) Acorn squash has complex carbohydrates that can help stabilize and regulate blood sugar. It also has a good supply of B-vitamins and dietary fiber that also play a key role in our blood sugar regulation. Vitamin C gives your immune system a boost Vitamin C makes your body create more white blood cells that have the task of defending your body from certain i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Health Benefits Of Acorn Squash Plus A Recipe

Diabetes Diet: Health Benefits Of Acorn Squash Plus A Recipe

Diabetes Diet: Health Benefits of Acorn Squash Plus A Recipe The green, heavily ridged acorn squash is plentiful in the marketplace this time of year. Though it has a high glycemic index rank of 75, eaten in moderation acorn squash provides a slew of nutrients beneficial for people with diabetes. One of the primary components of acorn squash is dietary fiber. A single serving contains nine fiber grams, more than a third of our daily requirement. Fiber is especially helpful for those with type 2 diabetes since it slows digestion and helps maintain stable glucose levels . The nutrients in acorn squash benefit three other diabetes concerns as well: Acorn squash is an excellent source of vitamin C, so vital for our immune system. Vitamin C stimulates the production of infection fighting white blood cells, and functions as an antioxidant, protecting us from the onset of problems such as cardiovascular disease. The high levels of vitamin A and beta carotene in acorn squash support our eyes health, helping to prevent vision problems such as cataracts and macular degeneration. We need an adequate intake of potassium to maintain normal blood pressure, and acorn squash provides plenty of this mineral; plus, the magnesium in acorn squash helps our body effectively utilize potassium. Acorn squash also contains a mix of minerals for strong bones, its vitamin A promotes vibrant skin, and the antioxidants neutralize cell damaging free radicals associated with premature aging, and various illnesses. One way to enjoy the taste and nutritional benefits of acorn squash is to bake it with a few veggies, spices, herbsand some couscous. The prep time for this recipe could be anywhere from 15 to 60 minutes, depending on your mincing, measuring, and mixing skills. 1 medium acorn squash, halve Continue reading >>

What Are Good Vegetable Choices If I Have Diabetes?

What Are Good Vegetable Choices If I Have Diabetes?

What are good vegetable choices if I have diabetes? Looking for a diabetes-friendly food? Follow Popeye's example. Spinach, kale, chard, and other leafy greens are loaded with vitamins, such as folate; minerals, such as magnesium; a range of phytonutrients; and insoluble fiber -- all of which have virtually no impact on your blood sugar level. Mark Hyman, MD, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, calls leafy greens "free foods," which means you should eat as many of them as you can. Bonus: The fiber in leafy greens will slow absorption of any carbohydrates (e.g., potatoes or bread) they're paired with, resulting in a healthier overall glycemic load. Asparagus is a good vegetable choice because it is high in vitamins A and C, low in fat, and a good source of fiber. Another great option is any type of squash. Squash can be eaten year-round because there are winter varieties as well as summer ones. Summer squash has soft outer rinds (like zucchini). Winter squash has hard outer rinds (like pumpkin). Squash contains vitamin A, vitamin C, some B vitamins, iron, and calcium. Winter squash is especially high in vitamin A. Whether you serve steamed or grilled zucchini (squash) as a side dish or as a main part of your meal, it's a very nutritious addition to your menu planning. Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the bodys inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes ... is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that a Continue reading >>

Butternut Squash - Good Or Bad?

Butternut Squash - Good Or Bad?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I eat quite a bit of butternut squash tonight, because I thought it was low-carb (it is in the Collins carb book), but when I found it in the Fat, Calorie and Carb Bible, it said it was much higher. I've googled it, but every site seems to have a different carb value for it. Can anyone give me a definitive carb content for 100g? As far as its effect on me, my BGs were in single figures (just) after 2 hours and on their way down within three, so not ideal, but certainly not the worst thing I've eaten recently! I guess I'll try a smaller portion in future, but it would be good to know the carb value so I can work out my insulin better. Collins carb counter gives 2 g carb per 100 g - negligible. What do you eat with it to raise your BG ????????????? I would stick with the Calorie Carb & Fat Bible. (2010) Butternut Squash. Baked. Average........7.4g carbs per 100g. Fairly high for a Veg. This one similar......8.3g per 100g. (2011) We have had too many examples of the Collins Gem Books having glaring mistakes in them over the years. I no longer trust them as they don't even answer e-mails asking about the discrepancy...seems they want your money but after that you are on your own ! Very poor customer service....... So....CC&FB for me every time, it's one I trust. Google "nutrition info" for a food and you'll usually find the FDA site which is pretty good. You jst have to know to remove the fibre from your calculation. Americans have it in with the carbs[which chemically it is, but it's not digestible] Butternut squash is a good source of fiber and potassium too, my wife makes a mean soup and its absolutely delicious. I like them sliced and drizzled with Ol Continue reading >>

Sweet Roasted Acorn Squash Flowers

Sweet Roasted Acorn Squash Flowers

October 8, 2012 | Home > In the News > Healthy Kids >Sweet Roasted Acorn Squash Flowers A year ago, my kids couldnt have even told you what an acorn squash looked like! I cantbelievewe havent been eating them every fall. Acorn squash is easy to cook, and so delicious! The only difficult part about it is cutting it! In fact, I couldnt cut this one at all. I had to get my husband to do it. But- AFTER the cutting, the rest is a breeze. One good reason to include Acorn Squash, as well as other winter squashes in your families diet is winter squash hasStarch-like components in winter squash have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, as well as anti-diabetic and insulin-regulating properties. ( source ) What are you waiting for! They are ready to harvest, and priced to sell right now! First of all, if you are unfamiliar, an Acorn Squash looks like this: Once you have your squash , turn it on its side and cut cross-ways, so you get the flower shaped slices. Then, scrape the seeds out from the inside of each slice, and arrange on parchment paper on a baking sheet: Drizzle the top with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and Parmesancheese . Then bake at 425 degrees for 30 minutes. When your squash is tender, its easy to eat with a fork. The fleshseparatesfrom the skin super easy. Dont let this fall pass without letting your kids try this delicious dish! Continue reading >>

Seasonal Eats: Winter Squash

Seasonal Eats: Winter Squash

By Tracey Neithercott; recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN Candy has ruined October. Instead of anticipating the month's harvest, most people focus on the annual candy-corn-and-mini-Snickers binge that comes with Halloween. That's a shame, since there's a much healthier way to treat your sweet tooth: by cooking up some succulent seasonal squash. A rainbow of squashhunter green, peachy tan, tangerine, jade, and buttercreamis available at most markets and is a good source of key nutrients like beta-carotene, vitamins A and C, potassium, and fiber. Winter squash, the tougher-skinned sister to summer squash like zucchini, is harvested in September and October and can keep through January. No matter its variety, a good winter squash should feel heavy for its size and be free from any cuts, breaks, or soft spots. To make sure your squash is as tasty on New Year's Day as it is on Halloween, store it in a dry room cooled to about 40 or 50 degrees. "Traditionally, people would store [squash] in their old farmhouse in the bedroom. People would keep them under the bed. Those conditions are best for squash," says Ryan Voiland, owner of Red Fire Farm in Granby, Mass., who has been growing squash for decades. The condition of the squash is also an important factor in how well it stores. "Unless you want to eat it right away, you don't want any nicks," Voiland says. Before you head to your local market to shop for squash, note that there are differences among varieties. "There are probably hundreds, or more than hundreds, of different varieties of squash," says Voiland. "Different varieties have different characteristics. Some are moister. I'd consider the butternut to be a very moist squash. Other varieties are drier. The kabocha is dry and almost flaky inside." If you've tried squash bef Continue reading >>

7 Incredible Benefits Of Acorn Squash

7 Incredible Benefits Of Acorn Squash

The health benefits of acorn squash include a boosted immune system, prevention of certain types of cancer , improved vision, protection of the skin , strengthening of the bones, reduced blood pressure, maintained fluid balance, regulated blood sugar and cholesterol, improved digestion , and proper circulation. Acorn squash are aptly named because when fully grown, they look quite similar to large acorns, except they are green and heavily ridged around the exterior. The scientific name of acorn squash is Cucurbita pepo (var. turbinata). They are also commonly known as pepper squash or Des Moines Squash. Although they are considered a winter squash in terms of seasonality and the time when they are eaten/reach maturity, they belong to the same species as summer squashes. Both the flesh and the trumpet flowers that grow from the top of the squash are edible, although the leaves and flowers are more commonly eaten in countries such as the Philippines. Acorn squash, like most other squash varieties, can be baked, sauteed, steamed, stuffed or mixed in with other meat and vegetable dishes. Historically, acorn squash was frequently used by Native Americans, as it originated in North and Central America. It has spread across the world, thanks to the European explorers who took the squash seeds back to their lands and began to cultivate this hearty and nutritious fruit. Besides the delicious taste and the harsh conditions in which acorn squash can grow, it is also more nutrient-dense than any of its other summer squash relatives, making it an invaluable part of a healthy and balanced diet. Lets take a closer look at this dark green fruit and find out what makes it such a healthy and nutritious food source. As mentioned above, acorn squash is extremely nutrient-dense for its siz Continue reading >>

Healthy Facts About Acorn Squash

Healthy Facts About Acorn Squash

Acorn squash is a good source of vitamin C. Acorn squash is a small variety of winter squash named for its resemblance to a large acorn. Its firm, yellow-orange flesh has a mellow, sweet flavor that pairs well in dishes containing bacon, garlic, maple syrup or spices such as sage or nutmeg. Like its close cousins butternut squash and spaghetti squash, acorn squash is more nutrient-dense than all types of summer squash. Acorn squash is rich in vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber and antioxidant compounds. A diet with a high intake of the nutrients provided by acorn squash may decrease the risk of a number of serious medical conditions. Acorn squash contains vitamin A, niacin, folate, thiamine and vitamin B-6, but it is an especially good source of vitamin C. A 1/2-cup serving of cooked, cubed acorn squash provides approximately 20 percent of the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C for healthy adults following a 2,000-calorie diet. Adequate vitamin C intake promotes the health of the immune and skeletal systems and may help prevent hypertension, heart disease, cancer and osteoarthritis. The vitamin C content of foods is degraded by exposure to air, light, heat and water. To maximize the amount of vitamin C you receive from acorn squash, use the vegetable three to four days after purchase and cut it only right before cooking. Steam or bake the squash instead of boiling it to keep vitamin C from being lost in the cooking water. Each 1/2-cup serving of acorn squash contains 13 percent of the recommended daily allowance of potassium and 11 percent of the RDA of magnesium. As both a mineral and an electrolyte, potassium plays a vital role in muscle contraction and in maintaining the body's water balance. Magnesium regulates potassium levels, strengthens bones and teeth and Continue reading >>

Top 7 Acorn Squash Nutrition Benefits

Top 7 Acorn Squash Nutrition Benefits

Current: Top 7 Acorn Squash Nutrition Benefits Dr. Axe on Facebook619 Dr. Axe on Twitter16 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest275 Share on Email Print Article Rebekah EdwardsJanuary 31, 2017June 14, 2017 What looks like an acorn but tastes like a squash and helps your body fight disease? The answer is simple: the acorn squash.Named for its acorn-like shape, the acorn squash is part of the Cucurbita family of vegetables known for itsdisease-fighting and immunity-boosting properties. Acorn squash nutrition, like butternut squash nutrition , ispacked with an incredible number of essential nutrients and is part of a diet that can reduce your risk for a number of very dangerous diseases, such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease. Its been around for several hundred years as one of the staple foods of many Native American tribes, so if youre late to the game, thats OK.Find out why acorn squash nutrition may just turn out to be one of your new favorite foods. 1. High in Antioxidants to Fight Free Radical Damage Youve heard it over and over: Its important to eat foods high in antioxidants . But have you ever stopped to ask why? Free radicals are uncharged molecules that are created by the body during various processes and because of environmental and dietary factors. Their presence is not bad in moderation, as theyre part of the bodys way of detoxifying. However, in the current culture of many countries in the world, like the United States, increasingly unhealthy diets and environmental exposure to endocrine disruptors mean that many people have an exceptionally high amount of free radicals within their bodies. Because these molecules are unstable, free radicals can potentially wreak havoc on your health. Theyre linked to many di Continue reading >>

Wild Rice And Apple Stuffed Acorn Squash

Wild Rice And Apple Stuffed Acorn Squash

Diabetes & You > Recipes > Wild Rice and Apple Stuffed Acorn Squash The sweetness of the apple here complements the delicate flavours of squash, celery and thyme. For convenience, use leftover or canned wild rice and omit step 1. In glass or metal bowl, cover wild rice with 1 cup (500 mL) boiling water. Let sit covered for 1 hour until kernels pop, and then drain water. Brush inside of each squash half with 1/2 tsp (2 mL) canola oil. Place squash, flat side down, on parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake for 30 minutes or until squash is tender. Five minutes before squash finish cooking, prepare stuffing. In nonstick skillet, saut onion, garlic and celery in remaining canola oil over medium-high heat for about 3 minutes. Add apple; cook for 2 minutes. Add rice and thyme; mix well. Remove squash from oven and stuff with wild rice blend. Serve. Recipe courtesy of canolainfo.org , featured in the Canadian Diabetes Associations 2014 Healthy Living Calendar. To download the latest recipes, visit diabetes.ca/calendar . Continue reading >>

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