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Can Diabetics Drink Tea

List Of 9 Best Healthy Drinks For Diabetics

List Of 9 Best Healthy Drinks For Diabetics

Overview Diabetes brings about many restrictions in a person’s the life affected by it. In the case of diet, the restrictions are more severe. The meals for diabetes, breakfast for diabetics, and snacks for diabetics, all have to be prepared and planned to keep the health restrictions and requirements in mind. Diabetic patients just can consume 1 can of soda or 1 glass of chilled soft drink since these are high in sugar and calorie that promote weight gain and increase blood glucose level – that is extremely harmful to type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. But this doesn’t mean that diabetic patients should avoid all refreshing beverages. Delicious herbal teas, infused water, milkshakes and green tea are best healthy drinks for diabetics that are low in calories and rich in antioxidants. In this article, we at VKool.com will show you top 9 healthy drinks for diabetics. Read on and include them in your diet. 9 Best Healthy Drinks For Diabetics You Should Know I. Best Drinks For Diabetics 1. Drinks For Diabetics – Coffee According to a 2006 study, moderate consumption of both decaffeinated and caffeinated coffee may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in middle-aged and younger women [1]. However, overconsumption of coffee can raise blood sugar level. Coffee contains the compound Chlorogenic acid, which helps to delay the glucose absorption into the bloodstream and curb type 2 diabetes. Along with that, coffee has no carbohydrates and calorie, which make it become one of the best drinks for diabetics. Thus, you should enjoy 1-2 cups of coffee a day without sugar and milk. This is because adding sugar, milk or cream to coffee may increase the overall calorie count and affect the levels of blood sugar. Read also: Home remedies for diabetes in men and women 2. Drinks F Continue reading >>

Two Herbal Teas That Can Help Lower Blood Sugar

Two Herbal Teas That Can Help Lower Blood Sugar

And they taste pretty good too! In an age of pharmaceuticals we tend to forget that there are things like herbal teas that can help improve our diabetes. Herbal teas are gaining popularity in the United States and this could be due to the infusion of Western and Eastern Medicine techniques being blended together more often. So what type of herbs are in herbal teas for diabetes control? There are a few but I’m going to give you the two most popularly utilized herbal teas for diabetes control. Bilberry Tea – Never heard of it? Well maybe you know the Bilberry by it’s more popular American name of the Huckleberry. Bilberry herbal tea is known as the most effective herbal tea in aiding diabetes for those who are not insulin dependent. So mainly we’re talking about those with type 2 diabetes benefiting from Bilberry tea. The reason why Bilberry tea is so effective in lowering blood sugar levels is because it contains something called glucoquinine which is a compound known for it’s ability to lower blood glucose levels. Another reason why Bilberry tea is such a good herbal tea for those with type 2 diabetes is because Bilberry is often used to treat eye issues such as diabetic neuropathy. Sage Tea – There are many medicinal uses for Sage tea and one of them happens to be it’s positive effect on how your body uses insulin. Studies have shown that Sage has the ability to boost insulin activity in diabetics. Those with type 2 diabetes found Sage to be the most effective. Along with being an effective aid in Diabetes control, Sage tea is also known for it’s positive effect on liver function. A liver that is not functioning at it’s best can lead to headaches, fatigue, and reduced immunity. So Sage’s positive effect on the liver is one of it’s greatest medicin Continue reading >>

6 Benefits Of Drinking Tea For People With Diabetes

6 Benefits Of Drinking Tea For People With Diabetes

We’ve known for years that tea is good for you. In fact, it’s often known as a “superdrink”. But did you know that tea offers specific benefits for people with diabetes (diabeteas)? Unfortunately for those of us who like a milky brew, the health benefits only come from black or green tea. No sugar, no milk, no herbal tea. We’ve looked at six benefits of drinking tea for people with diabetes. 1. Tea improves insulin sensitivity… Type 2 diabetes is caused by insulin resistance, which occurs when we stop being sensitive to insulin. Not being sensitive to insulin means the pancreas has to produce more and more, which can destroy insulin-producing cells over time. Several studies have indicated that tea improves insulin sensitivity (sensitivitea?) – as long as you don’t add milk. 2. …Lowers blood pressure… High blood pressure affects eight out of 10 people with type 2 diabetes, and three out of 10 people with type 1 diabetes. Black or green tea helps you to keep healthy blood pressure levels. 3. …Reduces the risk of heart disease… Heart disease is one of the most common diabetic complications. It is the cause of death for 80 per cent of people with diabetes. Tea has a number of heart health benefits. 4. …Lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes… For those of us at risk of type 2 diabetes, three to five cups of black tea per day helps stop type 2 diabetes from developing. 5. …Lowers the risk of cancer… Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of certain kinds of cancer. These include pancreatic cancer, liver cancer and endometrial cancer. Research suggests that tea could reduce these risks. 6. …And lowers stress levels. Tea contains theanine, an amino acid that controls blood pressure levels and lowers stress. Stress hormones like cortisol cause blood g Continue reading >>

Why Drinking Tea May Help Prevent And Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Why Drinking Tea May Help Prevent And Manage Type 2 Diabetes

The fountain of youth still remains elusive, but there's something that seems close: green tea. People have been drinking tea for centuries, and today it's the second most popular drink in the world (after water). Some of that popularity may stem from the many widely recognized benefits of tea, including its reported power to prevent cancer and to sharpen mental health. But tea may offer health benefits related to diabetes, too. “We know people with diabetes have problems metabolizing sugar,” says Suzanne Steinbaum, DO, a cardiologist, director of women’s heart health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “Insulin comes along to decrease sugar, but with type 2 diabetes, the body isn’t so sensitive to insulin, so blood sugar levels go up. Through a complex biochemical reaction, tea — especially green tea — helps sensitize cells so they are better able to metabolize sugar. Green tea is good for people with diabetes because it helps the metabolic system function better.” A 2013 research review published in the Diabetes and Metabolism Journal outlined the potential benefits of tea when it comes to diabetes as well as obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes. It highlighted a Japanese study that found that people who drank 6 or more cups of green tea a day were 33 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than were people who drank less than a cup of green tea a week. It also reported on Taiwanese research that found that people who drank green tea regularly for more than a decade had smaller waists and a lower body fat composition than those who weren't regular consumers of green tea. Drinking tea for diabetes is such a good idea because tea contains substances called polyphenols, which are antioxidants found in every plant. “Polyphenols help r Continue reading >>

6 Reasons Why Green Tea Is Best For Diabetes Patients

6 Reasons Why Green Tea Is Best For Diabetes Patients

Green tea, which is the products made from Camellia sinensis leaves, is one of the varieties of tea, alongside with black tea and oolong tea. While it is originates from China, but right in the moment you can find it all around the world. Green tea, which is commonly served as a beverage, also has a very good reputation to cure and protect you from various kinds of disease. Sponsors Link One of the most common questions among the societies is whether green tea would be beneficial for diabetic people or not. The answer to that question is yes, definitely that green tea would be very useful to protect you from diabetes. Before we tell you about why green tea is so beneficial for diabetic people, firstly, we need to know what is diabetes and what are the types of diabetes. Definition of Diabetes and Its Types Diabetes is a disease that can occur because of the high levels of blood sugar (glucose) in your body. The blood sugars in your body are commonly regulated by the insulin hormone, which is produced by the pancreas. In a diabetic person, pancreas couldn’t produce the insulin hormone in a proper amount or there is a problem with how the body cells’ respond to it. There are two types of diabetes, which are diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2. Diabetes type 1. This type of diabetes could occur when the pancreas stops producing insulin hormone, and this type of diabetes is unpreventable. The only way to treat this type of diabetes is by daily injection of insulin. Diabetes type 2. This type of diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes could occur because of your unhealthy lifestyle such as insufficient physical activity, poor diet, and obesity. Long term effects of type 2 diabetes is very dangerous for your health, even very deadly. Reasons on Continue reading >>

Black Tea Improves Glucose Levels, May Help Prevent Diabetes

Black Tea Improves Glucose Levels, May Help Prevent Diabetes

Although green tea has been getting most of the attention lately for its myriad health benefits, accumulating research shows that black tea offers advantages, too. The latest revelation: black tea’s ability to blunt increases in blood sugar. 1 A new study has found that black tea significantly reduces rises in blood glucose levels among both healthy and pre-diabetic adults, in this case after consuming a sugary drink. 1 “We demonstrated that black tea reduced incremental blood glucose after sucrose consumption at 60, 90 and 120 minutes compared with placebo,” wrote the authors of the study, which appears in the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1 “The data confirm that polyphenols lower glycemic response and may be responsible for the lower rates of diabetes observed with tea and coffee consumption,” said Peter Clifton, M.D., PhD., professor of nutrition at the University of South Australia in Adelaide, who recently conducted a review of the role of dietary polyphenols (in tea, cinnamon, coffee, chocolate, pomegranate, red wine and olive oil, among others) in regulating glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity, published in Nutrients. 2, 3 The Polyphenol Power of Tea Indeed, the major bioactive compounds in black tea are polyphenols—naturally occurring antioxidants abundant in plant foods (and drinks) that are said to promote health and protect against a range of diseases. 4 Black, green and oolong teas are all made from the plant Camellia Sinensis. Green tea, which is minimally oxidized, contains simple flavonoids called catechins. During the process of making black tea, which is more fully oxidized, the catechins convert to complex flavonoids known as theaflavins and thearubigens, and research has shown that theaflavins and thearubigens mainta Continue reading >>

Can Tea Help With Diabetes? Is It Beneficial?

Can Tea Help With Diabetes? Is It Beneficial?

When living with diabetes, every food and drink choice becomes a conversation. Deciding what you put in your body can be a daunting task when the consequences of choosing poorly are more extreme than what a person living without diabetes might face. It’s also true that food and drink choices can be some of the simplest, and most empowering, ways for people living with diabetes to manage their condition and its symptoms. There has been some evidence in recent years that drinking certain teas, in certain quantities, can have a beneficial effect on your health whether you have diabetes or not. For those living with diabetes, tea actually has the potential to do a lot of good. Depending on what type you drink, tea can chemically assist your body with processing and managing sugar and insulin levels, and can also help people manage some of the symptoms of diabetes, including circulation problems, energy levels, blood pressure and more. A Little Background on Tea Tea is a hot or cold beverage consumed by billions of people across the globe daily, with 3 billion tons of tea produced every year for human consumption. There are many varieties of tea; green, white, black, oolong, rooibos, herbal… the list can be long and a bit intimidating, especially when you take into account that many “teas” don’t actually contain the leaves of the tea plant, or camellia sinensis, which is an evergreen shrub native to Asia. Rooibos is made from a bush native to Southern Africa. Herbal teas can contain flowers, leaves, or other parts of a number of different plant varieties, and all of these plants can and do have a different effect on your body. Given that so many people drink tea of one sort or another on such a regular basis, science has been studying the effect that tea and it’s Continue reading >>

Does Unsweetened Tea Elevate Blood Sugar?

Does Unsweetened Tea Elevate Blood Sugar?

If you have diabetes or are prediabetic, your doctor has probably advised you to watch your sugar and simple carbohydrate intake. Eliminating soft drinks and juice is a simple way to reduce both of these from your diet. Unsweetened tea can be a satisfying option because it doesn't contain any sugar or carbohydrates. Unfortunately, unsweetened tea does contain caffeine. A 2011 issue of the "Journal of Caffeine Research" notes that caffeine can raise blood sugar levels in Type 2 diabetics. If you suffer from Type 2 diabetes, you may want to try decaffeinated tea or herbal teas that are naturally caffeine-free. Video of the Day Ideally, your normal fasting blood sugar level should be less than 100 mg/dL, according to ClevelandClinic.com. If your level falls between 100 and 125 mg/dL, you’re considered prediabetic, and anything over that typically indicates diabetes. Prediabetics are encouraged to adopt lifestyle changes such as a healthy diet and regular exercise to avoid becoming diabetic. Having an elevated blood sugar level causes numerous complications in diabetics, including the potentially fatal diabetic coma. Artificial Sweeteners If you’re used to consuming soda or other sugary beverages, unsweetened ice tea might not seem all that appealing at first. If you don’t like it plain or with a lemon, consider adding an artificial sweetener. Most artificial sweeteners will not elevate your blood sugar levels. Saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame potassium and sucralose are all safe for diabetics or anyone watching her blood sugar level. On the other hand, sugar alcohols such as xylitol, mannitol and sorbitol will elevate blood sugar slightly. Unsweetened ice tea contains caffeine. The exact amount varies based on the brand and how long you brew it for, but it is general Continue reading >>

Milk In Your Tea? Not A Good Idea

Milk In Your Tea? Not A Good Idea

If you like tea, you probably drink it for pleasure, not for its health benefits. More than two billion people in the world drink tea. Many acquired a habit to add a bit of milk to their regular cup of tea. It is a matter of taste, but scientists now say that that drop of milk can completely negate all the benefits tea can have on our health. How is that possible? What is in tea? While many people drink tea because it is pleasant, soothing drink, tea has many health benefits, which were known to ancient cultures like Chinese and Indians. Tea has many active ingredients that affect our health. It is particularly rich in antioxidants and vitamins. It is found to improve our immune system, to control blood sugar levels, reduce damage to cells and prevent cardiovascular diseases. But, if you add milk to your tea, its beneficial effects on your vascular system go away. How milk affects tea? In a small study conducted on 16 healthy women, scientists compared the effects of tea on their vascular system, with tea, water and tea with milk. They found that tea relaxes blood vessels (improves flow-mediated dilation), but tea with milk does not. Researchers believe that the most likely explanation is that the caseins, proteins found in milk, form complexes with catechins in tea, its most important flavonoids. Interestingly, they found that proteins in soy milk have the same effect. Continue reading >>

Ginseng Tea May Help Lower Blood Sugar

Ginseng Tea May Help Lower Blood Sugar

T he herbal extract ginseng has been popular for centuries in parts of Asia and Europe but only recently began gaining mainstream acceptance within the U.S. While many health-conscious consumers enjoy ginseng for its ability to increase energy, stimulate brain function and maintain overall wellness, some studies show that the herb can provide some diabetic-specific benefits too. According to research conducted in Finland, drinking a cup of ginseng tea daily can help type 2 diabetics experience lower overall blood sugar levels. Diabetics in the study who consumed the daily ginseng brew were found to experience lower blood sugar for up to a year after beginning their ginseng regimen. As always, consult your physician or dietitian before making changes to your dietary regimen. If you spend time on social media, why not get your diabetes tips there also? Lifescript has just launched a dedicated type 2 diabetes Facebook page that will offer diabetes tips, recipes, inspiration and more. You’ll get advice, find friends, and discover solutions to everyday living. Come join us! Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done Continue reading >>

Green Tea For Type 2 Diabetes

Green Tea For Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a degenerative disease in which the body becomes less efficient at absorbing and utilizing glucose. It is different than Type 1 diabetes because it is acquired as the body’s cells become less and less receptive to insulin—the shuttle that delivers glucose to be burned and stored in cells—whereas type 1 is present at birth. Elevated production of insulin is a sign of diabetes in its gestation period. Insulin is the aging hormone, like oxygen its presence is needed in the body for metabolism, but resistance linked over production results in what appears to be rapid aging. It only seems natural that as Western medicine confronts this epidemic it would turn to one of nature’s most renowned anti-aging botanicals, green tea. Diabetes is a highly complex disorder that, while it can be partially attributed to genetic proclivities, depends primarily on lifestyle choices. An unbalanced diet high in sugar and nutritionally inferior processed foods (which are full of sugar) and a sedentary life are two of the most common contributing factors leading to the development of diabetes. In response to the metabolizing of sugar, the pancreas secretes the enzyme insulin along with other pancreatic digestive juices to transport glucose into individual cells throughout the body to be burned (body heat). Insulin is needed because with the exception of the brain and liver most organs and tissue cannot absorb glucose on their own. In the process water and carbon dioxide are created, but the cell is also capable of trapping energy through a chemical process. This energy is a reserve. When blood sugar volumes spike, as they do after eating, say, a candy bar, the pancreas must secrete an ample amount of insulin to “shuttle” the glucose into cells—glucose is a stick Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lesson: Sweet Tea And Steve

Diabetes Lesson: Sweet Tea And Steve

One and half years of ‘rocking’ this disease, I am still learning a diabetes lesson. We live, we err and hopefully we learn. I see so many who do not learn. You will make mistakes, learn from them Learn to test foods and check labels I was born and raised in the Southern US and if there is ONE DRINK that I could not live without before my diabetes diagnosis … it was Sweet Tea. I would often drank it morning, noon and night. I LOVED MY SWEET TEA! Of course we all know the deal, I was really loving the sugar. Diabetes Lesson: Diagnosis I knew I had to give sweet tea up … and I did. In fact I cut out all sugar added foods immediately. It was not as tough as I thought it would be. It’s amazing how a trip to the hospital via an ambulance and a three night stay in Intensive Care Unit can change your perspective. It’s easy it is to avoid certain foods or drinks when you have a life threatening illness staring you in the face, or it should be easy. I know, even then it’s tough for some… but they just need to get their “mind right”. Since my diabetes diagnosis in February 2009, I had had only a couple of swallows of ‘sweet tea’ and even those swallows were accidental. In both cases a server had brought me sweet tea instead of my un-sweetened tea. In both cases it was immediately obvious to me… the tea seemed thick and extremely high in sugar… to the point of being sickening. And that is one of the great benefits of ‘low carb paleo’, a benefit that I don’t talk enough about… your entire body adjusts to the reduced sugar/carbohydrates including your taste buds. Foods that once seemed bland are ‘sweeter’ now…this includes broccoli, cauliflower and other vegetables. It’s a good thing! :) Another Diabetes Lesson Learned I recently attended Continue reading >>

Green Tea For Diabetes

Green Tea For Diabetes

Did you know that green tea can actually benefit people with both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, as well as assist people who are actively working to prevent the onset of Type 2 Diabetes? This is due to the unique antioxidants contained in the green tea leaves, and the effect that these antioxidants have on our bodies. WHAT IS DIABETES? Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too high. Blood glucose levels are normally regulated by the hormone insulin, which is made by the pancreas. In people with diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or there is a problem with how the body’s cells respond to it. (*) THERE ARE TWO MAIN TYPES OF DIABETES: TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 Type 1 Diabetes is where the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach, stops making insulin, and this type of diabetes is not preventable. (Diabetes Australia) Unless treated with daily injections of insulin, people with type 1 diabetes accumulate dangerous chemical substances in their blood from the burning of fat. This can cause a condition known as ketoacidosis. This condition is potentially life threatening if not treated. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 85-90% of all people with diabetes. Type 2 diabetes results from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Although there is a strong genetic predisposition, the risk is greatly increased when associated with lifestyle factors such as high blood pressure, overweight or obesity, insufficient physical activity, poor diet and the classic ‘apple shape’ body where extra weight is carried around the waist. (Diabetes Australia) HOW COMMON IS DIABETES IN AUSTRALIA? Diabetes is an epidemic affecting over 1 million Australians. Every day, 280 people are being diagn Continue reading >>

What To Drink When You Have Diabetes

What To Drink When You Have Diabetes

Your body is made up of nearly two-thirds water, so it makes sense to drink enough every day to stay hydrated and healthy. Water, tea, coffee, milk, fruit juices and smoothies all count. We also get fluid from the food we eat, especially from fruit and veg. Does it matter what we drink? Yes, particularly when it comes to fruit juices and sugary drinks – you can be having more calories and sugar than you mean to because you’re drinking them and not noticing. Five ways to stay hydrated… Water is the best all-round drink. If your family likes flavoured waters, make your own by adding a squeeze of lemon or lime, or strawberries. Children often need reminding to drink, so give them a colourful water bottle with a funky straw. Tea, coffee, chai and hot chocolate – cut back on sugar and use semi-skimmed or skimmed milk. Herbal teas can make a refreshing change and most are caffeine-free. Fruit juices (100 per cent juice) contain vitamins and minerals and 150ml provides one portion of our five a day – but remember, fruit juices only count as one portion, however much you drink. They can harm teeth, so for children, dilute with water and drink at meal times. Milk is one of the best drinks to have after sport. It’s hydrating and a good source of calcium, protein and carbohydrate. Choose skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. …and two drinks that are great for hypos Fizzy sugary drinks provide little else apart from a lot of sugar, so only use these to treat hypos. Otherwise, choose sugar-free alternatives Energy drinks – the only time when these drinks can be helpful in diabetes is when you need to get your blood glucose up quickly after a hypo. Energy drinks are high in sugar and calories. Quick quenchers Add slices of cucumber, lemon, or mint leaves to a glass of iced wa Continue reading >>

Warning To Diabetics Who Drink Tea And Coffee

Warning To Diabetics Who Drink Tea And Coffee

Diabetics who drink tea and coffee every day are increasing their blood sugar levels and undermining efforts to bring their condition under control, scientists have discovered. Researchers in America say that although there are no guidelines warning patients with diabetes against consuming caffeine, that may have to change. Hidden salt in food 'puts children's health at risk' The study, conducted by Dr James Lane from Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, is the first to track the impact of caffeine consumption as patients go about their normal lives. Researchers monitored 10 regular coffee drinkers with established type 2 diabetes who were managing their disease through diet and exercise but with no extra insulin. The patients were fitted with a tiny monitor which continuously tracked their glucose levels over a 72-hour period. Each took capsules containing caffeine equal to four cups of coffee on one day, and identical capsules containing a placebo on another. Related Articles Hidden salt in food a health risk to children 28 Jan 2008 All were free to eat whatever they liked. Researchers found that when the participants consumed caffeine, their average daily sugar levels went up eight per cent. Caffeine also exaggerated the rise in glucose after meals, increasing by nine per cent after breakfast, 15 per cent after lunch and 26 per cent after dinner. The findings, which appear in the February issue of Diabetes Care, add more weight to a growing body of research which suggests eliminating caffeine from the diet might be a good way to manage blood sugar levels. Dr Lane said: "Coffee is such a common drink in our society that we forget that it contains a very powerful drug - caffeine. "Our study suggests that one way to lower blood sugar is to simply qu Continue reading >>

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