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Can Diabetics Drink Tea

Can Diabetics Drink Milk Tea ?

Can Diabetics Drink Milk Tea ?

I happen to oversee a lot of discussion about Milk and milk tea for diabetics in our whatsapp group. There is always a dispute Today's topic is "Can Diabetics Drink Milk Tea? " problem is there is no straight answer to this. So I will break down the topic into few small topics. Survey results of Can Diabetics drink Milk Tea? I have conducted a survey, This question was sent to our email subscribers asking for their opinion on Milk Tea for Diabetics, They have responded as shown below. The chart below indicates that - Approximately 50% of the diabetics think it is safe to drink milk tea without sugar 13% said, yes but should not drink more than 2 cups a day First thing to understand is that the Cows which are of Indian Breed contain A2 protein. A1 Protein is more in Cows which are imported from other developed countries where There alot of studeis which are linked to consumption of milk with lactose intolerance, Digestive problems and diabetes, But on the contrary The milk form Indian desi cows is considered very easy to digest and that is why Ayurveda recommends it, So for now the safe milk is milk from Desi cows and that to getting it from a doodhwala. The Bos Indicus cow is the desi breed that produces the A2 milk with the good quality protein but it has been conveniently replaced by the high-yielding cross breed, popularly known as HF or Holstein Friesian in India which provides the A1 variety of milk. This is something you need to consider beyond the 'type' of milk.” Above is a typical variety of a Indian cow, named Red Sindhi which is mostly seen in Nothern part of India , see how to identify a Indian Cow Dr. Abdul Samad says it is safe to drink Milk from Indian cows and most of the cross breed cows, Luckily Milk Adulteration issue in India is far better in shape Continue reading >>

Ginseng Tea May Help Lower Blood Sugar

Ginseng Tea May Help Lower Blood Sugar

T he herbal extract ginseng has been popular for centuries in parts of Asia and Europe but only recently began gaining mainstream acceptance within the U.S. While many health-conscious consumers enjoy ginseng for its ability to increase energy, stimulate brain function and maintain overall wellness, some studies show that the herb can provide some diabetic-specific benefits too. According to research conducted in Finland, drinking a cup of ginseng tea daily can help type 2 diabetics experience lower overall blood sugar levels. Diabetics in the study who consumed the daily ginseng brew were found to experience lower blood sugar for up to a year after beginning their ginseng regimen. As always, consult your physician or dietitian before making changes to your dietary regimen. If you spend time on social media, why not get your diabetes tips there also? Lifescript has just launched a dedicated type 2 diabetes Facebook page that will offer diabetes tips, recipes, inspiration and more. You’ll get advice, find friends, and discover solutions to everyday living. Come join us! Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Have you ever noticed a difference in your blood sugar after drinking a big cup of coffee or tea? According to the Mayo Clinic, caffeine can indeed have an affect on your blood glucose levels causing lower or higher fluctuations, so limited consumption is recommended for better control. Another study published by the ADA (2005) suggests that people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes can reduce their risk of hypoglycemia during the night by having a small to moderate amount of caffeine before bed. Some people also claim that symptoms of hypoglycemia become more noticeable when incorporating caffeine into their diet. The effects of caffeine on each person are varied though with the added factor of tolerance to the stimulant can build up as quantity increases. While some people claim that they see a noticeable difference in their BG levels when they drink caffeine, others say that they don’t have any issues incorporating caffeine with food. Let’s explore some variables that could contribute to the shift in BG levels in relation to caffeine consumption. Side effects Certain common side effects of caffeine consumption may often explain shifts in BG levels. Lack of sleep Not enough sleep has proven to contribute to insulin resistance in the body for people with Type 1. Too much caffeine could certainly contribute to insomnia, especially since caffeine tolerance decreases as we grow older. Elevated heart rate / “the jitters” Two common effects if too much caffeine is in the system, or if the body is not accustomed to it. These are also symptoms of hypoglycemia, which might cause someone with Type 1 to check their BG levels more frequently if mistaking the symptoms for a low. Heartburn / Upset stomach / Dehydration Some people are less tolerant to coffee and other caffeinat Continue reading >>

What’s To Drink?

What’s To Drink?

Staying Hydrated in the Heat On a hot day, nothing quite hits the spot like a cold drink. But cold (and hot) beverages are not just enjoyable; they’re necessary for good health. Drinking adequate fluids in hot or cold weather keeps your body hydrated and running smoothly. When your body doesn’t have enough fluids, you can feel sluggish and irritable, get headaches, and have trouble controlling your blood glucose levels. You tend to need more fluids in hot weather because more are lost through sweat. Water is a good choice for staying hydrated because it has no calories, carbohydrate, fat, alcohol, or caffeine. Beverages that contain calories, carbohydrate, fat, or caffeine still provide needed fluids, but when drunk in large quantities, they can make weight control and blood glucose control more difficult. Alcohol has a diuretic effect, meaning it increases urine output, so beverages containing alcohol can promote dehydration. When you’re thirsty, having a drink containing alcohol is not a good choice; it’s better to drink nonalcoholic beverages first to quench your thirst before drinking any alcoholic drinks for pleasure. However, alcoholic beverages also contain calories, carbohydrate, and, less commonly, fat. While water is a good choice for health reasons, many people enjoy beverages with a little more flavor, such as fruit juices, soft drinks, tea, or coffee. There’s nothing inherently wrong with any of these beverages — and in fact, fruit juices, teas, and coffees contain beneficial antioxidants — but a high consumption of sweetened beverages has been identified as one of the reasons the United States is having an obesity epidemic. Part of the problem is that people tend to ignore the calories, carbohydrate, and fat in beverages. Studies suggest that Continue reading >>

Pu'er Tea A Wonder Cure For Diabetics

Pu'er Tea A Wonder Cure For Diabetics

A sip of Pu'er tea can be as helpful as drugs in lowering blood sugar and preventing diabetes, says a recent press briefing by the Pu'er city government. That is the finding of scientists at Jilin University and the Changchun Science and Technology University, after two years of studies organized by Pu'er city, Yunnan province. The provincial government's Science and Technology Department also organized a forum for health experts to discuss the health benefits of Pu'er. "Owing to Pu'er tea's obvious effect in restraining some enzymes related to diabetes, the experts believe drinking the right amounts of Pu'er tea can help lower blood sugar levels and prevent diabetes to some extent," says Sheng Jun, deputy mayor of Pu'er city. The first phase of the study involved 20 genetically obese lab rats with very high blood sugar levels. Researchers fed 10 of them with regular amounts of mature Pu'er tea while the other 10 rats were not given any. "Only two rats of the group not fed any tea, survived after 11 months. The others became infected and had sores before dying," says Sheng. "Meanwhile, all the 10 rats that drank Pu'er tea survived, and showed no trace of sores or infection." The research team also compared Pu'er tea with Rosiglitazone, a widely used medicine to lower blood sugar levels. After two weeks, they found that the rats that were fed Rosiglitazone had 36.5 percent less blood sugar, while the figure was 42 percent for the group that was fed Pu'er tea. Also, those on Pu'er lost weight while those on the drug showed no evidence of any weight loss. The researchers carried out a test among 120 diabetic volunteers. They were asked to drink Pu'er regularly and stop their medicines, while making no change to their dietary habits. Seventy percent reported blood sugar lev Continue reading >>

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

Coffee is one thing that we all love but can’t really decide if it’s good for us or not. Research in the past has shown that coffee and diabetes don’t go well together. However, a new research, funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), indicates that coffee is good for: Cardiovascular diseases(myocardial infarction, high cholesterol…) Cancer (prostate, breast…) Parkinsons disease According to the research conducted by Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, from NFU School of Medicine: (Of all the foods we consume) coffee has the most potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Forecast) What is more, WHO has released guidelines for dietary recommendation for Americans for 2015-2020, in which they state that 3-5 cups of coffee is associated with health benefits (including for type 2 diabetes). Seems like both the latest research and even WHO is pro-coffee. I know I’m pro-coffee myself, being an avid coffee drinker and I think it’s great I’m doing something good for myself by having a cup of coffee a day! Let alone 5 cups! You can download the WHO statement here, I’ve copied the section about coffee for you here (be aware what is says about how much sugar and milk you should add to coffee): Let me pour myself another cup of coffee right now (and according to the coffee and diabetes research, you should grab a coffee yourself) because we’re going to see: Why is coffee good for us? What does other research about coffee and diabetes suggest How much sugar and milk I personally add to my coffee? I’ll reveal my own easy recipe for diabetes-friendly coffee – I’m drinking one right now! In short, do coffee and diabetes go hand in hand together? Let’s find out: Coffee and Diabetes – An Age Old Question I don’t really know anybody that wouldn’t l Continue reading >>

Effects Of Coffee And Tea On Diabetes

Effects Of Coffee And Tea On Diabetes

A January 2004 study of coffee and diabetes shows that men who drank 6 cups of coffee a day reduced their chances of developing type-2 diabetes by half, and women who drank the same amount cut their risk by 30 percent. 126,000 people filled out questionnaires over the previous 12-18 years with information about their coffee intake and other health questions. In earlier studies, Dutch researchers discovered that there are compounds in coffee that aid the body's metabolism of sugar. Their study involved 17,000 men and women in the Netherlands. The results were published in November 2002, in the journal Lancet. According to their study, people who drank 7 cups a day (or more) were 50% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Drinking less coffee had less of an impact on diabetes onset. Researchers are still looking at the connection between coffee and diabetes, and caution people that 7 cups of coffee per day is enough to create other health problems. A number of older studies have shown that caffeine may increase your risk of developing diabetes. The theory is that the beneficial chemicals are able to offset the damage done by the caffeine. So drinking decaffeinated coffee would be the best bet if you are thinking of drinking coffee to prevent diabetes. Tea also has an effect on diabetes. Drinking tea can improve insulin activity up to 15 times, and it can be black, green or oolong. Herbal teas don't have any effect. The active compounds don't last long in the body, so you would have to drink a cup or more of tea every few hours to maintain the benefit. The catch is that you should drink it without milk (even soy milk), because milk seems to interact with the necessary chemicals and render them unavailable to your body. Continue reading >>

Coffee, Tea, Soft Drinks And Risk Of Diabetes

Coffee, Tea, Soft Drinks And Risk Of Diabetes

Diabetes is an increasing health problem worldwide. Approximately 11.3 percent of US adults have type-2 diabetes. Keeping in mind that diabetes is such a strong risk factor for cardiovascular disease, it is likely that the burden of heart disease and stroke in our community will increase in the near future. Therefore, in order to imply preventive measures, an understanding of the underlying causes of the diabetes epidemic is hugely important. Several epidemiological studies have shown that habitual caffeine consumption, in the form of tea and coffee is associated with less risk of diabetes. However, this has been confounded by some short term metabolic studies showing that caffeine may elevate blood sugar levels and decrease insulin sensitivity. Both these effects might, in theory, increase the risk of diabetes. Coffee and Type 2 Diabetes An analysis of huge epidemiological data, published in the most recent issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has highlighted the association of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea consumption on the risk of type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the researchers investigated the joint effects of caffeine and sugar-sweetened beverages and caffeine and coffee on the risk of type 2 diabetes. Bhupathiraju and colleagues at The Harvard Public School of Health used data from the Nurses Health Study (NHS) and The Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) to study the effects of caffeinated and caffeine free beverages on the risk of developing type2 diabetes among women and men. The consumption was based on repeated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Participants were asked how often on average during the previous year they had consumed caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and different types of sugar-sweetened and artificially Continue reading >>

Antihyperglycemic Effect Of Oolong Tea In Type 2 Diabetes

Antihyperglycemic Effect Of Oolong Tea In Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract OBJECTIVE—To determine the efficacy of oolong tea for lowering plasma glucose in type 2 diabetic patients in Miaoli, Taiwan. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 20 free-living subjects who had type 2 diabetes and took hyperglycemic drugs as prescribed were enrolled in the present study. Subjects consumed oolong tea (1,500 ml) or water for 30 days each in a randomized crossover design. Tea was not consumed for 14 days prior to treatments. RESULTS—Relative to initial concentrations, oolong tea markedly lowered concentrations of plasma glucose (from 229 ± 53.9 to 162.2 ± 29.7 mg/dl, P < 0.001) and fructosamine (from 409.9 ± 96.1 to 323.3 ± 56.4 μmol/l, P < 0.01), whereas the water control group had not changed (208.7 ± 61.0 vs. 232.3 ± 63.1 mg/dl for glucose and from 368.4 ± 85.0 to 340.0 ± 76.1 μmol/l for fructosamine). CONCLUSIONS—Oolong tea may be an effective adjunct to oral hypoglycemic agents in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Recently, consumption of tea has become even more popular in Taiwan, Japan, and China. Consumption of tea leaves in Taiwan increased 2.2 times during last 20 years (1). Tea consumption may have an impact on plasma glucose concentrations. The concept was supported by in vivo studies of tea fed to diabetic rodents (2–4) and by in vitro studies where tea components were incubated with brush border membrane vesicles of rabbit small intestine (5). Caffeine is one of the most important components in tea. There are some studies examining caffeine, for example, in healthy volunteers (6,7), in type 1 diabetes (8–10), and in type 2 diabetes (11). However, the efficacy of tea in lowering plasma glucose concentrations in humans was limited. There are three types of tea: green, oolong, and black. They are produced from a Continue reading >>

Green Tea And Diabetes Blood Sugar And Insulin Sensitivity

Green Tea And Diabetes Blood Sugar And Insulin Sensitivity

Five green tea and diabetes studies show how tea may regulate blood sugar levels and improve insulin action. When you have diabetes, your body is not very good at converting blood sugar into energy. This can happen in two ways: The body does not make enough insulin, a hormone that causes glucose to enter the body’s cells to be converted into energy or fat. The body cells do not respond properly to insulin i.e. low insulin sensitivity. Often, both mechanisms do not work properly. Without treatment, diabetics can build up high glucose levels in many parts of the body, causing damage to eyes, kidney, nerves and blood vessels. Increasingly, scientific studies are showing that drinking green tea or consuming tea extract can help by Blocking glucose absorption Improving insulin actions Regulating blood sugar levels Green Tea and Diabetes Benefit #1: Block Glucose Absorption A 2008 study conducted by the University of Massachusetts Amherst investigated the effects of tea and wine had on people with type 2 diabetes. The researchers discovered that these beverages inhibit an enzyme called alpha-glucosidase, which causes glucose to be absorbed more slowly from the small intestine into the body. "Levels of blood sugar, or blood glucose, rise sharply in patients with type 2 diabetes immediately following a meal," says Shetty, one of the food scientists who published the research. "Red wine and tea contain natural antioxidants that may slow the passage of glucose through the small intestine and eventually into the bloodstream and prevent this spike, which is an important step in managing this disease." Red and white wines, black, oolong, white and green teas were all tested. Red wine was found to be 5 times more effective than white wine. Black tea was the most effective, followed Continue reading >>

8 Worst Drinks For Diabetics

8 Worst Drinks For Diabetics

8 Worst Drinks for Diabetics Diabetics should be mindful before consuming these drinks Choosing diabetic-friendly drinks isn’t always easy. For many of us, a soda is the first thing we reach for to quench our thirst, but it’s certainly not the healthiest drink choice, especially for diabetics who have to think twice about what they consume. For those who have diabetes, it’s crucial that they watch what they drink in order to maintain a healthy weight and blood sugar level, because beverages high in carbohydrates, calories, and sugar can be seriously harmful. But being mindful of drinks with high levels of sugar and carbs can be tough when so many drinks out there are loaded with them. Drinks such as soda, alcohol, and energy drinks are generally known as unhealthier options. But some seemingly healthy drinks, including fruit juice, coffee, and whole milk, can also be dangerous for diabetics. Take a look at which drinks diabetics should stay away from. Fruit Juice Fruit juices are packed with sugar and carbohydrates. One 8-ounce glass of fruit juice can contain as much as 30 grams of carbohydrates, 20 grams of sugar, and 100 calories. For healthier options, choose fruit juices that are 100 percent juice with no added sugar. Flavored Coffee Coffee is a tricky one, as it has been shown to affect each person with diabetes differently. For some, it has little to no effect on blood sugar levels, but for others, even drinking coffee black can raise sugar levels. And adding cream and sugar only makes matters worse, as they not only raise blood sugar but can also cause you to gain weight. Chocolate Drinks If not consumed in moderation, chocolate drinks like packaged hot chocolate can raise blood pressure and pack on pounds, as they are loaded with sugar. Whole Milk The hig Continue reading >>

Drinks And Gestational Diabetes

Drinks And Gestational Diabetes

Staying well hydrated is very important during pregnancy and even more so if you have diabetes whilst pregnant. Drinking water doesn't directly lower blood sugar levels, but it does flush excess sugar out of your system and so staying hydrated will help control and stabilise blood sugar levels. Ideally you should be drinking around 3 litres (10 -12 glasses) at least, a day. You will need to drink even more during warmer weather or if you are exercising. We recommend drinking a glass of water with AND in between every meal and snack during the day. Tea, coffee and fizzy drinks containing caffeine should not be included as part of your recommended daily fluid intake as they are diuretics. Diuretics make you urinate more frequently, causing you to lose water. If you don’t like the taste of water then you could try carbonated water with lemon and lime added to it, or some sugar free squash. Be careful when choosing drinking squash which has ‘no added sugar’, it means exactly that, no ADDED sugar, but will still contain natural sugars. Check labels for the lowest total carbs for the best choices. Drinks suitable for a GD diet Water, carbonated or still. Beware of flavoured waters that may contain sugar. Tea & coffee, decaffeinated or remember to include within your recommended daily intake Diet/Zero/No added sugar carbonated drinks No added sugar diluting squash (watch out for high juice or squashes with natural or concentrate fruit juices added) Raspberry leaf tea As a treat - Highlights, Options or Choc Shot hot chocolate with added whipped cream! Diet, no added sugar and zero carbonated drinks There are many alternatives to well loved, original full sugar drinks such as the following: Dr Pepper > Dr Pepper Zero Coke > Diet Coke or Coke Zero (please note that Coke Li Continue reading >>

Boba Tea Can Lead To Obesity And Diabetes, Health Experts Warn

Boba Tea Can Lead To Obesity And Diabetes, Health Experts Warn

LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- A coalition of health and community organizers launched the Rethink Your Asian Drink campaign to help raise awareness about the unhealthy nutrition contents of boba tea. For the past 15 years, the Asian drink boba tea, also known as bubble tea, has been extremely popular across the U.S. "Growing up in the San Gabriel Valley, boba was very affordable. I had it every day," said Scott Chan, program manager at the Asian and Pacific Islander Obesity Prevention Alliance (APIOPA). Health experts warned that boba can be just as unhealthy as soda. A 12-ounce serving of boba can contain about 90 grams of sugar, 7 grams of fat and 490 calories. "You don't want that much sugar in your body every single day. It has a lot of different impacts on your health," Chan said. The APIOPA launched the campaign in an attempt to warn people, especially the Asian community, about the need to be conscious about what you put into your body. "1997 to 2011 here in L.A. County, there was a 68 percent increase in diabetes in our communities," Chan said. Chef Nico de Leon from Lassa Restaurant in Chinatown created an alternative boba drink to mimic the traditional components. "In my alternative drink we did a black tea, carrot juice for the color and also add some sweetness, some almond milk instead of the dairy in there so it's actually vegan, and then instead of boba we used chia seeds," de Leon said. Longtime boba lovers approved of the alternative version. "The carrot juice, it's very sweet. It's very light. It's refreshing so it's a great alternative, especially for a summer drink," boba drinker Whitney Chung said. While health experts warn about boba, they said people can still enjoy the beverage with modifications. "Ask for smaller options, less options. You know a lot of Continue reading >>

Iced Tea Suitable For Diabetics

Iced Tea Suitable For Diabetics

In a one gallon container,reconstitute lemonade mix in 2 quarts of cold water, stir well to mix and set aside. Bring to boiling point and remove from heat. Add tea to lemonade mixture. Keep refrigerated. Serve over plenty of ice. The tea will remain fresh-tasting for several days if kept in the refrigerator. If this occurs, you can"clear it up" by adding a small amount of boiling water. Continue reading >>

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