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Can Diabetics Drink Grapefruit Juice?

Type 2 Diabetes Diet: The Best Foods To Prevent Or Manage The Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Diet: The Best Foods To Prevent Or Manage The Disease

Healthy eating is one of the best ways to manage type 2 diabetes. This type of diabetes is strongly linked to excess weight, so calorie reduction and the right kind of diabetes diet can go a long way toward an improvement in overall health. Among the most important components of good nutrition when you have type 2 diabetes are meals with the right mix of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats to keep your blood sugar as normal as possible throughout the day. With these basic building blocks in place, make sure to seek out particular foods and beverages that can give you an extra edge in managing type 2 diabetes, says Beth Reardon, RD, an integrative nutritionist in private practice in Boston and a senior nutrition adviser for Caring.com. Here are some foods to reach for to help you manage your diabetes better. Eat Brown Rice and Other Fiber-Rich Foods White rice has long been known to have a negative effect on blood sugar. Like most "white" foods, it causes blood sugar spikes. A moderate amount of healthy whole grains, such as brown rice, and other fiber-rich foods instead of processed grains may reduce the risk of complications like diabetic neuropathy, which is nerve damage resulting from high blood sugar. Brown rice is packed with fiber, an important component for diabetes management. “Because fiber is not digested by the body, it does not affect blood sugar levels,” Reardon says. “This helps keep blood sugar levels steady and may prevent glucose spikes.” Another way to add fiber to your diet is with beans and other legumes. Research published in April 2012 in Nutrition Journal showed that beans and rice eaten together do not cause as drastic a blood sugar spike as rice alone. Also, a study published in October 2016 in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agricu Continue reading >>

Grapefruit Juice And Metformin

Grapefruit Juice And Metformin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Can anyone tell me if it's OK to drink grapefruit juice shortly after taking Metformin. I have been doing this occasionally and found that my blood sugar goes up to higher than normal 2 hours later when doing glucose test. This was the only reason I could think of as to why my blood sugar was higher than normal after breakfast. I Googled this and low and behold I have just read that you should not combine the two and I have also read that it does not matter. Suffice to say, I won't be combining them any more! I would also like to take apple cider vinegar every day. Does anyone know if this affects Metformin? I don't know about the combination of metformin and grapefruit juice but have never heard it could be a problem. Carbs in general will raise your bg. There is a lot of sugar in grapefruit juice and possible in other of the food items you have for breakfast like bread or milk so a rise in BG is to be expected. I usually have eggs and such for breakfast and it doesn't move my BG at all. Pretty sure it's fine. I think you may be getting confused with grapefruit juice and statins. The leaflets that come with my metformin tablets (and I've had several different brands!) don't have any warnings about not taking them with grapefruit. As dannyw says, if you take statins then you definitely must not eat grapefruit - and the information leaflet do warn against doing so. Your pharmacist or doctor should be able to give you a definitive answer, so check with them. All fruit juice is high in sugar and will raise blood glucose. It's a big myth that fruit juice is healthy, it's worse than the actual fruit because it's more highly concentrated and doesn't have th Continue reading >>

Grapefruit As Diabetes Drug

Grapefruit As Diabetes Drug

Your mother may have known something all those years ago when she went on a grapefruit diet to lose weight. People have eaten the fruit and drunk the juice for decades in the hope of dropping weight, and claims that grapefruit contained “something” that burned fat have sold many a diet book. Now it seems there may be some basis for this enduring dietary craze. In fact, an active ingredient in grapefruit appears to lower glucose levels as effectively as a widely-prescribed diabetes drug. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley decided to test the link between grapefruit juice and weight loss using a controlled experiment. Previous studies on grapefruit juice were not rigorous, tended to be small and produced contradictory results. A natural fruit drink lowered glucose levels as effectively as a prescription drug. What they found surprised them. Mice that ate a high fat diet gained less weight when they drank grapefruit juice compared to mice that drank water. And the juice-drinking mice had better levels of glucose, insulin, and triglycerides, a type of fat, compared to those that drank water. The results were so astonishing, “We even re-checked the calibration of our glucose sensors, and got the same results over and over again,” said Andreas Stahl, one of the researchers in a statement. Different groups of mice were fed a variety of liquids. The control group was fed water with a small amount of glucose and saccharin added. The other groups drank different concentrations of slightly sweetened grapefruit juice and water. The calories were kept equal for all the mice. Along with the liquids, mice ate a diet that was either 60 percent fat or 10 percent fat for 100 days. One group of mice was also given naringin, a bioactive compound found in grapefru Continue reading >>

Grapefruit For Diabetes

Grapefruit For Diabetes

People with diabetes suffer from fluctuating blood sugar levels caused by the body’s inability to process glucose. One of the main ways a diabetic patient can control blood sugar levels is by losing weight and changing his diet and eating habits. It is important to visit a doctor or dietician to find out what foods can be eaten, what foods should be avoided, and what foods can treat the condition. A proper diabetes diet can provide relief from symptoms and prevent complications that generally result from the disease. For example, if you suffer from diabetes, you are at a higher risk of developing heart disease and blood pressure. 1 Warning: 3 Foods to Avoid These 3 Foods Should Come with a Warning Label Nucific 2 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 As a result, you will have to cut down on red meat and dairy products as these can increase cholesterol levels and cause heart problems. The American Diabetic Association recommends that people with diabetes should eat a diet high in fiber. Foods rich in fiber such as fruits and vegetables, whole grain breads and cereals help in lowering blood sugar levels and maintaining insulin levels naturally. Amongst the various fruit that are beneficial for diabetes, studies show that grapefruit for diabetic patients is highly recommended. Grapefruit contains the antioxidant – naringenin that is responsible for the bitter taste of this juicy citrus fruit. The effect of naringenin on diabetes is equivalent to two different drugs used to treat the condition. Since diabetes occurs because the body is unable to produce enough insulin to regulate blood glucose levels, naringenin increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin. It also helps maintain weight, which is Continue reading >>

What Are The Effects Of Grapefruit On Diabetes

What Are The Effects Of Grapefruit On Diabetes

Although grapefruit is a great source of vitamin C, many diabetics should avoid this fruit because of its well known interactions with many types of medications. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to see whether you can safely include grapefruit in your diet. If you are not on any medications, you can eat grapefruit without any problems. Keep in mind that, as with any fruit, too much can raise your blood sugar levels beyond your target range. The amount of carbohydrates found in a whole small or half of a large grapefruit is similar to the amount of carbohydrates found in a small apple, pear or two kiwifruits. Carbohydrates from fruits, just like the carbohydrates from sugar or flours, can raise your blood sugar levels. With about 15 grams of carbohydrates per serving, fruits such as grapefruit can usually be included in your diabetes meal plan. Monitor your blood sugar levels at regular intervals to ensure that your diet helps you keep them under control. Avoid grapefruit juice, because it doesn't contain any fiber and provides more carbohydrates per serving, with about 24 grams per cup. Glycemic Index Grapefruit has a glycemic index of 25, which makes it a safer carbohydrate option compared to high glycemic index choices like white rice, bread and potatoes. A glycemic index value below 55 is considered low and is best for diabetics. In other words, even if you eat the same amount of carbohydrates by eating either half of a large grapefruit or 1/3 cup of cooked white rice, your blood sugar levels will not increase as much with grapefruit compared to white rice because of their different glycemic index values. Medication Interactions The main problem with grapefruit for people with diabetes is its interaction with many drugs used to control blood pressure, blood chole Continue reading >>

Study Shows Grapefruits Tackle Diabetes As Well As Leading Drug

Study Shows Grapefruits Tackle Diabetes As Well As Leading Drug

The breakthrough discovery could be a simple way to get Britain's soaring diabetes and obesity crises under control. US researchers have found that the so-called "grapefruit diet" which was popular in the Seventies and Eighties as the latest "Hollywood" diet secret followed by the likes of actress Brooke Shields may in fact have some scientific basis. The team, from the University of California, Berkeley, gave one group of mice an antioxidant called naringin, a bioactive compound in grapefruit juice that has been identified as a key agent in weight loss. They gave another group metformin, the most common glucose-lowering drug prescribed for patients with Type 2 diabetes. The mice were fed a diet that was either 60 per cent fat or 10 per cent fat for 100 days, and their metabolic health was monitored throughout the study. Researcher Professor Joseph Napoli said: "The grapefruit juice lowered blood glucose to the same degree as metformin. "That means a natural fruit drink lowered glucose levels as effectively as a prescription drug." The group of high-fat-diet mice that received naringin had lower blood glucose levels than the control group, but there was no effect on weight, suggesting that some other ingredient in grapefruit juice is also beneficial. The study did not find as big an impact on mice that ate a low-fat diet. The researchers also randomly divided mice into six groups, including a control group that drank only water. Those drinking grapefruit juice got a mixture diluted with water at different concentrations, and sweetened slightly with saccharin to counteract grapefruit's bitterness. The researchers also added glucose and artificial sweeteners to the control group's water so that it would match the calorie and saccharin content of the grapefruit juice. At t Continue reading >>

Grapefruit Juice May Affect Insulin Resistance

Grapefruit Juice May Affect Insulin Resistance

Drinking grapefruit juice daily can lead to weight loss and help control blood glucose… Grapefruit juice is considered to be high in nutrients while remaining relatively low in calories when compared to other fruit juices. These diets often rely on daily low calorie commitment, which calls into question the true weight loss effect of grapefruit juice. Also, previous studies have shown mixed results. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of using grapefruit juice while maintaining a diet that was high in fat which is typical of many Americans. These results would be compared to those given a low fat diet. The study was performed on mice. The mice were randomized into groups that were given a diluted grapefruit juice or water sweetened with glucose and saccharin. Grapefruit juice use was also compared to water sweetened with glucose and saccharin that contained metformin. Weight and blood glucose samples were collected three times per week. An insulin ELISA was used to monitor insulin concentrations. Results showed that mice fed the high fat diet receiving grapefruit juice weighed 18.4% less than the controls after 100 days (31.4+0.7g vs 38.5+2.8g, P<0.05). This group also saw fasting blood glucose that was 13% lower compared to controls (P<0.05). Fasting serum insulin levels were 72% lower compared to controls (P<0.05). Finally, triglycerides in the liver were reduced by 38% in this group compared to the control group. Those mice on the low fat diet saw a decrease in fasting insulin, but none of the other effects as seen in the high fat diet group. Grapefruit juice use compared favorably to those receiving metformin. Weight loss was seen in both groups with no statistically significant difference noted. Both groups also saw lowered fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

Grapefruit And Type 2 Diabetes: Nutrition Facts And Benefits

Grapefruit And Type 2 Diabetes: Nutrition Facts And Benefits

As its appearance reflects, the grapefruit is actually thought to be a hybrid between a pomelo and a sweet orange. The beautiful pink-fleshed citrus fruit is a low calorie breakfast staple for many. But how, you may be wondering, can grapefruit fit into a healthy diet for those with diabetes? Well, grapefruit happens to be a relatively low carb fruit that fits perfectly into your menu. Most people do just fine with smaller amounts of the fruit (think half of a grapefruit), and its many nutritional benefits definitely shouldn’t go unrecognized. Read on for a thorough exploration of how this sweet-and-sour delight can help round out a healthy diabetic diet. Grapefruit Nutrition Facts Grapefruit is low in calories (30-4o per half grapefruit) and as already suggested it's relatively low in carbohydrates at 8-10 grams of carbohydrates per half grapefruit. That same half grapefruit also contains 1 to 1.5 grams of fiber. Half a grapefruit contains approximately 59% of your recommended daily amount (RDA) of vitamin C, 7% RDA copper and vitamin A, 5% RDA potassium, and 4% RDA biotin and vitamin B1. Grapefruit has a low glycemic index of just 25. When eating grapefruit, be sure to pair it with a protein or fat source such as nuts, cottage cheese, or yogurt. Eating fats and proteins with carbohydrate sources helps slow down the release of glucose into the bloodstream. Health Benefits of Grapefruit Vitamin C: This powerhouse antioxidant helps boost immunity, prevent colds, helps with tissue repair, and promotes heart health. Lycopene: Another antioxidant, found only in pink and red grapefruit (not white). It helps protect against cancer and tumor growth. Limonoids: Phytonutrients found in citrus fruits that help protect against cancer and may help lower cholesterol. Pectin: This Continue reading >>

Can Grapefruit Juice Prevent Weight Gain, Increase Insulin Sensitivity?

Can Grapefruit Juice Prevent Weight Gain, Increase Insulin Sensitivity?

Since the 1930’s, one fad diet after another has hit the scene touting grapefruit consumption as a way to shed those unwanted pounds. But according to new animal research from the University of California, Berkeley, there may be some science to back up these claims. (This is not the first time grapefruit consumption has been in the news: A 2012 study found that the fruit and its juice can dangerously interact with a wide variety of prescription drugs, including several likely to be taken by people with diabetes.) Previous studies on the weight-loss effects of grapefruit juice have been small or not well controlled, and the findings have been contradictory, according to Joseph Napoli, PhD, and Andreas Stahl, PhD, lead authors of the current research. In order to increase knowledge about the metabolic effects of grapefruit juice consumption, the scientists randomly divided mice into six groups. All of the groups were fed either a high-fat (60% fat) or a low-fat (10% fat) diet, and two were provided with no-pulp grapefruit juice diluted with water at different concentrations and sweetened slightly with saccharin to counteract the bitterness of the juice. A third group received water mixed with naringin, a compound in grapefruit juice that has been identified as a key factor in weight loss; a fourth group was provided with the diabetes medicine metformin mixed into water; and a fifth group received metformin mixed into sweetened grapefruit juice. A control group of mice was fed a high-fat diet and given water with glucose and saccharin added to match the calorie and artificial sweetener content of the grapefruit juice mixtures. For 100 days, the mice maintained the study diets and had their metabolic health measured. At the end of the study period, the researchers found t Continue reading >>

Grapefruit Juice May Be As Effective As Diabetes Drugs

Grapefruit Juice May Be As Effective As Diabetes Drugs

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. A new mice study suggests that grapefruit juice might be just as effective as the type 2 diabetes drug, metformin, at lowering blood glucose. The research, which was funded by the California Grapefruit Growers Cooperative, was published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE. Regarding the funding, study co-author Joseph Napoli, PhD, professor and chair of nutritional sciences and toxicology at the University of California, Berkeley, said this: “I understand the skepticism.” But the funders had nothing to do with the experiment, he says, besides providing some money and grapefruits. “We were very clear in telling them, you’re going to get the data we get,” Napoli says. “We can’t guarantee you’re going to like what you see. It might be nothing.” What they found was not nothing. The researchers fed different groups of mice a range of liquids: sweetened diluted grapefruit juice, sweetened water, and water that contained metformin, a diabetes drug. The mice who were fed a high-fat diet typical of the average American and drank the grapefruit juice lost 18% more weight than those drinking sweetened water, and they had a 13-17% drop in blood glucose levels and threefold decrease in insulin levels. (Mice on a low-fat diet had far less dramatic effects.) But one of the biggest findings was that mice drinking grapefruit juice had glucose-lowering effects that were just as potent as the mice who sipped on metformin. “It was very surprising,” says Napoli. You might have to drink a lot to get those prescription-level effects, however. The amount of grapefruit juice used in mice equates about four cups a day in people, the study says. But the researchers were so encouraged by the results that they plan to next look at if lowe Continue reading >>

Should Diabetics Drink Grapefruit Juice With Diabetes Drugs?

Should Diabetics Drink Grapefruit Juice With Diabetes Drugs?

People with diabetes should know that some fruits contain certain ingredients, which when eaten with specific medications can cause more harm than good. Grapefruit juice with diabetic medicine is one such combination. This has been the subject of many research studies, largely because people could not really agree on whether it is a 'safe' combination or not. 1 3 Foods to Remove from - The Fridge Forever Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com 2 Toxic Arthritis Food List Limit these foods to decrease arthritis pain and inflammation. naturalhealthreports.net Health Benefits of Grapefruit Health wise, grapefruit juice has been considered extremely useful in curing ailments like cancer and hardening of the arteries. According to scientists, there are certain chemicals in grapefruit juice that can greatly help an ailing person. Grapefruit is therefore a nutraceutical. Grapefruit juice also delivers: vitamin C - helps build different types of tissue like bone, muscle, cartilage, etc. potassium - helps regulate blood pressure lycopene - an antioxidant helps neutralize radicals in the body to fight certain cancers Known Side Effects of Grapefruit Grapefruit juice also contains certain ingredients that can be very harmful when taken with certain medications. In many cases, diabetics tend to drink their grapefruit juice with diabetes drugs, or for that matter any pill type medication during breakfast. Diabetics say it taste better that way. In cases where the fruit or the fruit juice interferes with the functioning of the medication, there could be serious side effects if both are swallowed together. Under these circumstances, it is obvious that doctors will tell their patients to either stay off the fruit or its juice, or to keep a time gap betw Continue reading >>

What Are The Effects Of Grapefruit On Diabetes?

What Are The Effects Of Grapefruit On Diabetes?

Grapefruit provides significant amounts of vitamins A and C and is relatively low in calories and low on the glycemic index, making it a nutritious fruit choice for diabetics. Eating grapefruit may also help you better control your blood sugar levels, but if you take certain medications, you may be better off choosing a different fruit because of potential medication interactions. Video of the Day Half of a large grapefruit has 53 calories and 13.4 grams of carbohydrates, including 1.8 grams of fiber. If you control your blood sugar by counting carbohydrates, this counts as one carbohydrate serving. Diabetics can typically have between 45 to 75 grams of carbohydrate per meal, or three to five carbohydrate servings. The glycemic index estimates the effect of a food that contains carbohydrates on your blood sugar levels. Foods with a low glycemic index of less than 55 aren't likely to cause large increases in blood sugar levels, while those with a high glycemic index of 76 or more may cause spikes in your blood sugar levels after you eat them. Grapefruit has a low GI of 25, so it isn't likely to have a significant effect on your blood sugar as long as you watch your portion size. Eating half a grapefruit before each meal may help you control your blood sugar levels and lose a small amount of weight, according to a study published in the "Journal of Medicinal Food" in March 2006. The fresh grapefruit helped improve insulin resistance as well as insulin levels two hours after eating. Grapefruit juice was also beneficial for weight loss, but not for improving insulin resistance. Stick with fresh grapefruit instead of grapefruit juice, which is higher in both calories and carbohydrates. Each 8-ounce glass has 94 calories and 22.1 grams of carbohydrates. Check with your doctor Continue reading >>

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

Tweet Fruit juice has, until recently, been considered a great way to get your five a day. people with diabetes need to moderate their fruit juice intake as larger glasses of juice can substantially raise blood sugar levels. The key is to In addition, more recently, regular consumption of fruit juice has been linked with an increase in type 2 diabetes risk. What's in fruit juice? Aside from vitamin C and calcium, fruit juice contains: Calories - 250ml glass of unsweetened orange juice typically contains around 100 calories, compared to the 60 calories in an actual orange Fructose (a form of sugar) - half a pint of fruit juice contains more sugar than the World Health Organisation recommends ideally having in a day (30g of sugar for men, 24g for women) A lack of fibre - juice always contains less fibre than whole fruit and highly processed juices may not contain any fibre How does this affect my diabetes? Badly, is the short answer. Sugar levels in fruit juice can cause a significant spike in blood sugar levels, increasing the risk of hyperglycemia. The glycemic index, which is used to reflect the impact on blood sugar levels of individual foods, places orange juice between 66 and 76 on a scale of 100. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice doesn't offer much fibre. (it's stripped away in the juicing process). Fibre is a kind of carbohydrate that, because the body doesn't break it down, is calorie-free, so it doesn't affect your blood sugar, making it important for people with diabetes. Soluble fibre can help lower your cholesterol levels and improve blood glucose control if eaten in large amounts. Apples, oranges, and pears all contain soluble fibre, but not when juiced. Is fruit juice all bad for people with diabetes? Fruit juice has some benefits for people wi Continue reading >>

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Many medications, such as statins and some antihistamines, have a negative interaction with grapefruit. Metformin is used in treatment of type 2 diabetes. Does having grapefruit while taking metformin lead to adverse side effects? There’s limited research, but here’s what you need to know. Metformin is a drug that’s prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can’t use insulin normally. This means they can’t control the amount of sugar in their blood. Metformin helps people with type 2 diabetes control the level of sugar in their blood in several ways, including: decreasing the amount of sugar your body absorbs from food decreasing the amount of sugar produced by your liver increasing your body’s response to the insulin that it makes naturally Metformin can rarely cause a very serious and life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. People with liver, kidney, or heart problems should avoid taking metformin. There are more than 85 drugs that are known to interact with grapefruit. Of these drugs, 43 of them can lead to serious adverse effects. All forms of grapefruit — including freshly squeezed juice, frozen concentrate, and the whole fruit — can lead to drug interaction. Some of the chemicals found in grapefruit can bind to and inactivate an enzyme in your body that’s found in your intestines and liver. This enzyme helps break down the medication you take. Normally when you take a drug orally, it’s broken down slightly by enzymes before it reaches your bloodstream. This means that you receive a little less of the drug in your bloodstream than the amount you initially consumed. But when the enzyme is inhibited — as it is when it interacts with the chemicals in grapefruit — there’s a dramatically larger amount of the dr Continue reading >>

Could Grapefruit Juice Protect Against Diabetes?

Could Grapefruit Juice Protect Against Diabetes?

"Grapefruit juice 'could be the key to weight loss','' is the misleading headline in The Daily Telegraph. It reports on a study in which mice fed a combination of a high-fat diet and grapefruit juice still put on weight – albeit at a lower rate than mice fed a sugary drink. Their blood sugar levels and insulin sensitivity were also better regulated than mice that did not drink grapefruit juice. The mice were given either a high-fat diet or a low-fat diet in a range of experiments. Mice fed a high-fat diet and grapefruit juice had an 18% reduced rate of weight gain compared with mice given sugary water with the same number of calories as the grapefruit juice. They also had 13% lower fasting blood sugar levels. There was no effect on weight gain in mice fed a low-fat diet. Drinking grapefruit juice improved insulin sensitivity in mice, regardless of their diet (in people, reduced insulin sensitivity can be a sign of impending diabetes). Grapefruit juice lowered blood sugar as effectively as metformin, a drug widely used to treat people with type 2 diabetes. However, none of the mice actually had diabetes, so this research has little immediate relevance to humans with the condition. For the time being, people with diabetes should not swap their metformin for grapefruit juice on the basis of this study. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the University of California and was funded by the California Grapefruit Growers Cooperative, although it had no role in the study design, data collection, analysis or decision to publish. The study was published in the peer-reviewed science journal PLOS ONE. This is an open-access journal, so the study is freely available to all. Both the Mail Online and The Daily Telegraph’s headlines incorrec Continue reading >>

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