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Can Diabetics Drink Flavored Sparkling Water

Beverage Dos And Don'ts For Diabetes

Beverage Dos And Don'ts For Diabetes

To successfully manage type 2 diabetes, plan your beverages as carefully as you plan your food choices. That typically means taking sugary drinks — such as soda, sweet tea, and even juice — off the table. You might be surprised at how much a single drink can affect you when you have type 2 diabetes. Drinking just one soda a day is associated with developing type 2 diabetes, according to 2013 research in the journal PLoS One. When you are faced with so many new constraints on sugar and other carbs after a diabetes diagnosis, you may be left asking, “What can I still drink?” Fortunately, there’s a variety of refreshing, flavorful beverages you can enjoy, says Katherine Basbaum, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. Before you take your next sip, here are the top drinking dos and don’ts for those with diabetes. Do Drink: Water Water is one of the few beverages you can drink without worry throughout the day and a great way to stay hydrated. If you often forget to drink as much water as you should, Basbaum has a suggestion for increasing your intake: Drink one 8-ounce glass of water for every other beverage you drink that contains sugar substitutes or caffeine. Shake things up with sparkling water or by squeezing lemon or lime juice into your glass. Do Drink: Skim Milk “Skim or low-fat milk is also a good beverage option, but it must be counted toward your carb total for a particular meal or snack,” Basbaum says. Cow’s milk also provides protein and calcium. Be aware that non-dairy options, such as almond milk, may have added sweeteners and flavorings. Don’t Drink: Sugar-Sweetened Soda or Tea “Sugar-sweetened drinks are absorbed into your bloodstr Continue reading >>

Of Healthy Waters And Hydrators

Of Healthy Waters And Hydrators

The hottest months of the year are here, and finding some thirst-quenching drink options can be tough for those of us who need to count carbs and respect the blood sugar effect of anything we swallow. Seriously, I just went through this in Indy when dealing with a string of days above 90 degrees and needing to make sure I had enough hydration options while doing some work outdoors. One gets tired of plain water, and diet soda is not so thirst-quenching in extreme heat. So we're always on the lookout for true "D-friendly" drinks, that won't impact our blood sugars but also aren't filled loads of artificial chemicals and sweeteners that are suspected of negative effects. So what's refreshing and good for us at the same time, we ask? Fortunately, we have some new options in the Diabetes Community! Amy swears by the new Sparkling ICE drink, appearing in supermarkets around the country. It's carbonated flavored water with zero carbohydrates and zero calories -- and comes in intense but very pleasant fruit flavors. We plan a review of that one soon. Meanwhile, a new sports drink that's captured my attention recently is called Nutri-Twist Wow Water. Created by Michigan startup Twisted Concepts about two years ago, it was the original brainchild of the Andoni family in the suburbs of Detroit, dealing with a type 1 diagnosis in their young son. They were frustrated with the diabetes drink options, so they invented their own, establishing a Michigan-based business that's expanding throughout the Midwest. We think their story fits right in to our Small But Mighty series! Wow Water first caught my eye in Spring 2012, while visiting a JDRF conference in the Metro Detroit area when I met the man behind the drink, Peter Andoni. He's actually known to most folks locally as the man behi Continue reading >>

Flavoured Water | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Flavoured Water | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have a fasting blood test in the morning, prior to my 6 monthly review next week. I can not stand drinking plain water, is it ok to drink flavoured water? In this heat, I can't not drink anything, as I keep feeling woozy if I get dehydrated. A whole 500ml bottle, contains 6 calories, although I know I won't drink the whole bottle before morning. Will that affect the results or am I better to go without? Most flavoured waters have sugar in too so it'll affect the test. Best to avoid. Why can't you drink plain tap water? I drink it all the time, litre upon litre in this heat. And the occasional glass of sea salt and water of course. If a 500 ml bottle contains 6 carbs and you need something like four to six bottles, that is two or three litres when it's very hot, possibly much more, that adds up to something like 24 to 36 grams of carbs just from drinking expensive water when there is perfectly fine, carb free water on tap. I rarely go above 30 grams of carbs in a day so if you need to control BG it seems a bit wasteful to have so many carbs in your drink, doesn't leave much space for nice foods. I find cold tea can be very nice on a hot day. Not the sweet iced tea variety but plain tea, maybe made rather weak or diluted. Or put a few slices of cucumber in a glass of water or a slice of lemon if you don't like the taste of tap water. Or whatever you fancy. Plain water, either from a bottle or a tap, makes me retch. I used to always drink squash, but have now got onto the flavoured water which is much better. The one I'm drinking say cals: 10 (I thought it was 6...my mistake), Sugars: Nil, Fat: Nil, Saturates: Nil, Salt: Trace. If it's got no sugars, f Continue reading >>

Carbonated Water: Is It A Good Drink For Diabetes?

Carbonated Water: Is It A Good Drink For Diabetes?

Carbonated water—also called sparkling or effervescent water, club soda, seltzer water, tonic water, fizzy water—is water that contains carbon dioxide gas dissolved under pressure—the bubbles are the carbon dioxide (CO2) escaping the liquid once the pressure has been released by opening the bottle or container. There are some differences between these types of carbonated water—club soda, for example, tends to contain added minerals while tonic water contains quinine and a small amount of sugar, usually high fructose corn syrup. Flavors can be added to any of these forms of carbonated water.[1] There are many different makers of carbonated water, but read the labels, especially if you are on a sodium-restricted diet, to see how much if any sodium may be in the carbonated water. You also want to be certain that the water is pure without any additional sugars, flavorings or color agents. I recommend reading the following articles too: Is Carbonated Water Healthy? Maybe the question should be—if you want a “YES!” answer—is carbonated water healthier than other beverages? In this case, the answer is definitely yes! Carbonated water is healthier than diet or regular soda, healthier than alcoholic drinks, healthier in general than coffee, healthier in some ways than juices and possibly healthier than some teas, particularly in some circumstances. Carbonated water is healthier than diet or regular soda because it contains nothing but CO2 and water—carbonated mineral water will have extra minerals in it as well, but diet and regular soda contains sugars, sugar substitutes, concentrated sugars like High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS), phosphates and phosphoric acid, caffeine, added colors and preservatives, artificial and natural flavors, and other substances. On to Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Drinking Water Instead Of Fizzy Drinks Significantly Reduces Risk Of Diabetes

Drinking Water Instead Of Fizzy Drinks Significantly Reduces Risk Of Diabetes

10 per cent of NHS budget spent on diabetes and complications, claims charity Diabetes can increase risk of heart disease five-fold Drinking water instead of fizzy drinks could dramatically reduce your chances of developing Type 2 diabetes, scientists say. Researchers from Harvard University are presenting new evidence which shows replacing sugar-sweetened drinks with water can lead to weight loss and help reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes by seven per cent. Professor Frank Hu, from the Harvard School of Public Health, said: 'There is convincing evidence that regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with increased risk of obesity and diabetes, and emerging evidence that these beverages increase the risk for heart disease. 'To reduce risk of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases, it is important to reduce consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and replace them with healthier choices such as water and unsweetened tea or coffee.' More than 2.8 million people in the UK have the chronic condition of diabetes, while another one million have it without realising, according to NHS figures. People who develop the Type 2 condition lose the ability to break down glucose into energy, which causes blood-sugar levels to rise. The immediate symptoms of hyperglycaemia include feeling thirsty and drowsy. It can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, which can eventually cause unconsciousness and even death. Diabetes raises the risk of heart disease by up to five times. Over time it can cause sight problems and nerve damage leading to foot ulcers. Patients are encouraged to exercise more and eat a healthier diet to help control the condition. Diabetes UK says 10 per cent of total NHS spending goes towards treating the condition and its complications. The International Cha Continue reading >>

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn't have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it's as close as a tap. If you're after something tastier, though, you've got options. Some tempting or seemingly healthy drinks aren't great for you, but you can make swaps or easy homemade versions of many of them. These tasty treats can fit into your diabetes diet and still satisfy your cravings. 1. Chocolate Milk This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk. 2. Sweet Tea A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill, and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment. 6. Hot Chocolate It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs. It seems like a he Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Soda?

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Soda?

When you have diabetes, it's easy to feel limited by what you can eat and drink. Although you might occasionally be tempted to stray from your healthy meal plan, you're best to avoid dietary temptations and consume only what your doctor deems appropriate. If you've been previously accustomed to drinking soda, diet alternatives should be safe for you. Video of the Day The American Diabetes Association lists diet soda among the beverages that are safe for diabetics to consume. Diet soda is typically sweetened with one of five artificial sweeteners, including aspartame. These sweeteners do not contain calories, and the ADA reports that they will not cause a blood glucose reaction. Many common flavors of soda are available in diet versions, including cola, root beer, lemon-lime and orange. Risks of Diet Soda The safety of artificial sweeteners is highly contested, although the National Cancer Institute reports that no proof exists linking the Food and Drug Administration's approved artificial sweeteners to cancer. A greater risk in frequently consuming artificially sweetened soda is consuming unhealthy foods because you aren't drinking a high-calorie beverage. A study published in 2010 in the "Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine" that found those who drink heavy amounts of diet soda are more likely to be obese than those who don't drink diet soda, and obesity is a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes. Even if drinking diet soda is safe for diabetics, you shouldn't make a habit of consuming this type of beverage. Diet soda has little nutritional value, and consuming a caffeinated flavor can harm your ability to sleep soundly. Excessive caffeine consumption can also lead to side effects, including anxiety and restlessness. Ceasing to consume caffeine can lead to symptoms su Continue reading >>

Beat Sugar By Drinking Bubbly Lacroix Sparkling Water

Beat Sugar By Drinking Bubbly Lacroix Sparkling Water

Beat Sugar By Drinking Bubbly LaCroix Sparkling Water LaCroix Sparkling Water is a Healthy Beverage Choice Nearly 1/2 of Americans consume sugary or artificially sweetened beverages, like soda on a daily basis. The average soda drinker is consuming more than 2 glasses per day, which is the equivalent of more than 10 grams of sugar each day! One can of soda per day adds up to more than 31 pounds of sugar consumed per year! (Source: Center for Science in the Public Interest) According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, drinking sugary and sweetened beverages is linked to: According to data published by the Nutrition Source at Harvard School of Public Health : People who consume sugar drinks regularly 1 to 2 cans per day or more have a 26% greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than people who rarely drink sodas. A large research study showed that soda drinkers had a 20% higher risk of having a heart attack as compared to others who rarely drank sugary drinks. Water is essential for life and comprises more than 50% of our body weight. Every cell in your body requires fluid to transport nutrients and keep us alive. In addition, fluid intake and maintaining a healthy hydration status helps to regulate our body temperature. Think about it, nearly every organ in your body requires water for proper functioning: Continue reading >>

What Drinks Are Good And Bad For People With Diabetes?

What Drinks Are Good And Bad For People With Diabetes?

When a person has diabetes, insulin, a hormone that helps cells absorb glucose, is either nonexistent or in short supply. A person with diabetes is unable to use insulin properly, which causes sugars to build up in the blood. Diabetes can be dangerous if it is not properly managed. Different drinks can affect blood sugar levels in a number of ways. Contents of this article: The best drinks for people with diabetes The following drinks are good choices for people with diabetes. Things to look out for when choosing a drink Many drinks contain lots of sugars and carbohydrates. Paying attention to food labels and nutritional facts can provide important information. Labels should state the serving size and carbohydrate content of any drink. People with diabetes have different bodily needs, so there are no exact dietary rules. However, some tips can help. To make it easier to control blood sugar, it is important to: eat a balanced diet and manage the amount of carbohydrate consumed keep carbohydrate levels consistent from day to day consume managed amounts of carbohydrate, because the brain and body need some carbohydrate to function. Paying attention to food labels and nutritional facts can provide important information. Labels should state the serving size and carbohydrate content of any drink. The worst drinks for people with diabetes The following drinks are bad choices for people with diabetes. Soda and energy drinks Sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. For people who already have diabetes, this type of drink provides large amounts of sugar and requires little digestion. Drinking sodas without healthy food can lead to large spikes in blood sugar levels. As it is important to spread carbohydrate intake out evenly, it would be Continue reading >>

Carbonated Water Do You Drink It | Diabetic Connect

Carbonated Water Do You Drink It | Diabetic Connect

By MAYS Latest Reply2011-02-04 14:19:21 -0600 Does anyone here drink carbonated (soda) water? Soda Water is a excellent, refreshing drink for diabetics, because it is totally free of carbohydrates and sugars. Soda water, also referred to as sparkling water, and is plain water with carbon dioxide gas added. It is the most dominant ingredient of most soft drinks.. Carbonation produces carbonic acid, which produces soda pop. Many people enjoy a simple home chemistry: using a seltzer bottle filled with water and then charged with carbon dioxide to produce soda water, also known as club soda. Club soda is often the same as plain carbonated water; sometimes, however, there may possibly be a small amount of table salts and/or sodium trace minerals. Such additives could possibly make the taste of home made soda water a bit salty. In some areas the process occurs very naturally and issues in carbonated mineral water. Its possible that, in some cases, a little dental decay might be related to sparkling mineral water. Potential dental problems with sparkling water are greater than normal water, but only slightly so. Sparkling water does not cause nearly as much tooth decay as regular soft drinks. The rate is so low it suggests that carbonation of drinks may not be a factor in causing dental decay. Artesian wells can be the source for waters that filter among layers of minerals in the ground; the layers contain forms of carbonates, and the waters absorb the carbon dioxide gases released by those carbonates. This kind of water is known as natural sparkling water. Sparkling mineral water results in cases where the filtered water picks up enough different minerals to add a flavor. Basically, water + carbon dioxide = soda water. Sparkling mineral water is one of the naturally-occuring Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Drinks For Type 2 Diabetes

Best And Worst Drinks For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 Best and Worst Drinks for Type 2 Diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, you know it's important to watch what you eat — and the types of drinks you consume. Drinks that are high in carbohydrates and calories can affect both your weight and your blood sugar. "Generally speaking, you want your calories and carbs to come from whole foods, not from drinks," says Nessie Ferguson, RD, CDE, a nutritionist at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The best drinks have either zero or very few calories, and deciding on a beverage isn't really difficult. "When it comes right down to it, good beverage choices for type 2 diabetes are good choices for everyone," she says. Some good drinks for type 2 diabetes include: Water Fat-free or low-fat milk Black coffee Unsweetened tea (hot or iced) Flavored water (zero calories) or seltzer But sugary soda is one of the worst types of drinks for type 2 diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. The problems with soda include: Empty calories. Soft drinks are very high in sugar, have zero nutritional value, and are often used in place of healthy drinks such as milk. Cavities. The high sugar combined with the acid in soda dissolves tooth enamel, which increases the risk of cavities. Weight gain. Sugary sodas have about 10 teaspoons of sugar per 12-ounce can. Boosts risk of diabetes and risk of complications for those who have diabetes. Some people with type 2 diabetes continue to drink alcohol, but you should be aware that any alcohol consumption may result in dangerously low blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours. That’s why it’s important to check your blood sugar often and get your doctor's okay before you drink alcohol. People with diabetes should only consume alcohol if their diabetes is well controlled and should always wear a medical Continue reading >>

Sparkling Ice Flavored Water

Sparkling Ice Flavored Water

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Has anyone tried the Sparkling Ice flavored water? My sister was telling me about this and says it has no carbs? Any info is appreciated before I spend any money on this product. Hi Catherine, you can find the ingredients and the nutrition facts on their website. I am pretty sure they use splenda to sweeten their products. haven't tried them yet but looks promising. they have had them at our costco...they are very good...so is cascade ice at the grocery store. LocationSomewhare in the South Pacific??? Water is just that, Water!!! Only it's carbonated. No more or less. That's the reason I asked the question....I don't like just plain water. I've tried adding things but it still to me just yucky. Need something to get myself off the diet coke. Sams club here sells it and I have found it at alot of different stores in all kinds of flavors. I think it tastes good but I'm trying to get off the sweetener habit and plain water is no Diet Coke(they must still put that special ingredient in it LocationSomewhare in the South Pacific??? That's the reason I asked the question....I don't like just plain water. I've tried adding things but it still to me just yucky. Need something to get myself off the diet coke. OK I see, Well I would get the carbonated water and keep it in the fridge replacing the Diet Coke! I am a DC freak too and hooked on it. Perhaps put a little fruit juice in it, Just a little to make it palatable. Continue reading >>

Carbonated Water: Yes Or No?

Carbonated Water: Yes Or No?

Ive become a fan of flavored seltzer water. With flavors like lime, pomegranate, green apple, and, yes, even eggnog (at holiday time), one can never get bored. Also, thanks to seltzer, Ive been able to wean myself off Diet Coke to some degree. But is carbonated water really all that good? And whats the difference, anyway, between club soda, seltzer, and tonic water? Drink more water. Drink water instead of soda or juice. You hear these phrases a lot, especially if you have diabetes. Regular soda and other soft drinks, along with fruit juice, contain a lot of carbohydrate and calories, which equals higher blood glucose levels and can add pounds to the scale. But sometimes, plain old water is well, a little too plain. Fizzy waters like seltzer and club soda at least provide a bit more interest. Whats the difference, though? Seltzer water. Seltzer water is regular water to which carbon dioxide gas has been added. It usually does not contain any minerals. Seltzer water comes plain as well as flavored, usually with natural extracts that dont add any carbs or calories. Seltzer water is sometimes called sparkling water, too. Club soda. Often used interchangeably with seltzer, club soda is also water to which carbon dioxide gas is added. However, club soda usually contains added minerals, such as potassium bicarbonate or potassium sulfate, which add a subtle flavor, as well as some sodium. Mineral water. If your tastes run to Perrier or San Pellegrino, youre drinking water that contains naturally-dissolved minerals and that comes from a natural underground source. Mineral waters cost more than seltzer or club soda. Tonic water. Tonic water is carbonated water that contains quinine, and, often, a little bit of sugar (or, more likely, high fructose corn syrup), along with citric Continue reading >>

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

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