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Can Diabetics Drink Cola?

Can Diabetics Drink Coca Cola Light/ Zero?

Can Diabetics Drink Coca Cola Light/ Zero?

Company (NYSE: KO) is the worlds largest beverage company, offering over 500 brands to people in more than 200 countries. Of our 21 billion-dollar brands, 19 are available in lower- or no-sugar options to help people moderate their consumption of added sugar. In addition to our namesake drinks, some of our leading brands around the world include: AdeS soy-based beverages, Ayataka green tea, Dasani waters, Del Valle juices and nectars, Fanta, Georgia coffee, Gold Peak teas and coffees, Honest Tea, Minute Maid juices, Powerade sports drinks, Simply juices, smartwater, Sprite, vitaminwater, and Zico coconut water. At , were serious about making positive contributions to the world. That starts with reducing sugar in our drinks and continuing to introduce new ones with added benefits. It also means continuously working to reduce our environmental impact, creating rewarding careers for our associates and bringing economic opportunity wherever we operate. Together with our bottling partners, we employ more than 700,000 people around the world. Continue reading >>

What Everyone Must Know About Coke Zero And Diabetes

What Everyone Must Know About Coke Zero And Diabetes

If you have diabetes you may be thinking quitting your regular Coke and opting for Coke Zero is going to do you a big favor. After all, it's sugar free and therefore healthier, right? Wrong! Once you read this, you'll understand that the scientific research shows quite the opposite. What is Coke Zero? Coke Zero was launched in 2005 as a sugar free, low calorie alternative to regular coke. One thing that's quite funny is that while Diet Coke has been around since the 1980’s, many men thought the title “diet” sounded a little too feminine and they weren’t interested in buying it. So as a result, Coke Zero was born. It was marketed mostly towards men who wanted to enjoy the taste of a classic Coke with zero guilt. Coke Zero comes in several different flavors, including classic, vanilla, and cherry. You might be thinking that a sugar free soda sounds too good to be true. And you would be right! Unfortunately, Coke Zero and other sugar free sodas are not a soda lover’s dream come true. And you'll soon see why… Nutrition Facts You probably already know that regular soda has a ton of sugar in it, which means you should steer clear of it at all costs – diabetic or not. For example, a 12 ounce can of regular Coke contains 39 grams of sugar, all derived from high fructose corn syrup, which makes that a double no, no. That can of soda also packs 140 empty calories – meaning, you don’t get any nutrients from it. It’s easy to see why so many people were thrilled when diet sodas hit the market. After all, the promise of cutting down on sugar to lose weight, and reduce your risk of obesity and diabetes – that sounds like a good deal, right? Well, unfortunately those promises aren't all they're cracked up to be. The sweetener in Diet Coke is called ‘aspartame,' Continue reading >>

What A Can Of Coke Does To Your Body | Diabetic Connect

What A Can Of Coke Does To Your Body | Diabetic Connect

Open happiness is the slogan of the worlds beloved Coca-Cola drink, but perhaps what it really should say is Open diabetes/obesity/heart disease. The CEO of fitness company CrossFit came under fire from some in the diabetes community for his tweet saying just that: open diabetes. But while his message may have been tactless, there is, in fact ,some truth to this statement. A 2010 study published in Diabetes Care found that people who drank one to two cans of sugary beverages a day were 26 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who drank them on occasion. Drinking Coke may also lead to heart disease: a 2012 study published in the journal Circulation observed 40,000 men for two decades and found that those who had one can of a sugary drink (like Coke) per day were 20 percent more likely to experience or die from a heart attack compared to those who didnt. Another study found similar results in women. Its worth noting, however, that these studies were designed to reveal links between health hazards and sweetened drinks, but they do not prove cause and effect. Coke and other sugary soda drinks may also be major factors that lead to obesity. A campaign to highlight the effects of soda beverages like Coca-Colacalled The Real Bears , as a slam against the Coke polar bear adsclaimed that sugary drinks are the biggest source of calories in the American diet. Dr. Frank Hu, professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, argues that theres sufficient scientific evidence to prove that decreasing sugary drink consumption will reduce obesity and obesity-related diseases in the U.S. population. Sugary drinks are also believed to increase our risk for gout, which is a particularly painful form of arthritis. All in all, there is ample evid Continue reading >>

How Does Diet Soda Affect Diabetes?

How Does Diet Soda Affect Diabetes?

Many of us who enjoy fizzy drinks select diet soda as a healthier option than the normal soda. Even if we have with diabetes, we feel that diet soda has less sugar and is therefore not harmful to us. Sadly, that’s not entirely true. Let’s find out how does diet soda affect diabetics. Pros of Drinking Diet Soda with Diabetes: Diet soda contains artificial sweeteners, which are also referred to as non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) or non-caloric sweeteners. They have a higher intensity of sweetness per gram than caloric sweeteners like sucrose. Popular artificial sweeteners like aspartame, acesulfame-K, neotame, saccharin, and sucralose are regulated as food additives by the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). Aspartame and saccharin, commonly found in diet sodas, are both FDA reviewed and approved. Besides FDA, most sweeteners used in diet sodas are approved by World Health Organization (WHO) and/ or Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI). The American Diabetes Association (ADA) lists diet soda as safe for diabetics to consume. Diet soda is typically sweetened with one of five artificial sweeteners. These sweeteners do not contain calories (or have less than 20 calories), and the ADA reports that they do not cause a blood glucose reaction. Furthermore, carbohydrate content in diet soda is less (less than 5 gm) when compared to that of regular soda. Also, the calorie content in diet soda is less than that of regular soda. Risks Of Diet Soda For Diabetics According to Mayo Clinic, a nonprofit medical practice and medical research group based in Rochester, Minnesota, while the artificial sweeteners may not raise blood sugar, the caffeine in it might. A 2004 study at Duke University showed that caffeine consumption can increase blood sugar levels by up to Continue reading >>

Should You Ditch Diet Sodas?

Should You Ditch Diet Sodas?

The debate about which foods belong in a “healthy diet” (and which don’t) is ongoing – especially when it comes to diabetes. Are carbs the enemy? Should you cut out gluten? Should you sign up for that 21-day detox? And, one of the most controversial questions: Should you drink diet soda? While many organizations, such as the ADA and AND take a fairly neutral stance on artificial sweeteners found in diet sodas, stating that there is room for nutritive sweeteners (non-caloric, alternative sweeteners) in an otherwise healthy diet, I personally take a more conservative approach with my clients. Nutritional science is still a relatively new scientific field, relative to other bodies of scientific research, leaving a lot to still be discovered about long-term effects of many processed foods that have not even been around for a century. In general, I am an advocate for whole foods—foods that are as minimally processed as possible and provide an abundance of nutritive value to those that consume them. Within this logic, since diet sodas fall short of providing any nutritional value, they should be treated more as a novelty than a dietary staple. If you are still on the fence about consuming diet sodas regularly, here are some things to consider before picking up that sugar-free cola: Even “natural” sugar alternatives are processed Some sodas get their sweetness from more natural sources than others – but this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s good for you. Stevia, for instance, is a sugar substitute derived from the stevia plant, which has been used for over a thousand years by native tribes in South America to sweeten foods and teas. Unfortunately, the stevia that is found in your local grocery store is a cousin far removed from the traditional stevia leaf vers Continue reading >>

Is Diet Soda Ok For People With Diabetes?

Is Diet Soda Ok For People With Diabetes?

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. “I’ll have a burger and a diet cola, please!” No matter where we eat out these days, from fast food to fine dining, you hear this order a lot. I know I sometimes feel like I can consume more calories at a meal because I chose the diet beverage, but how accurate is that way of thinking? Should we be drinking as much diet soda as we do? First, to be clear, there is no absolute right or wrong about food or beverage consumption. I provide information I hope is useful to your own lifestyle. I always say that education is the best prescription. The power of soda Just to give you some idea of the popularity of soft drinks, our country produces 10.4 billion gallons of soft drinks yearly. Diet soda is often paired with unhealthy food choices, such as burgers and pizza. My husband is a pizza lover who cannot eat pizza without diet soda. He says the pizza tastes better with soda, and after all, it’s “diet” soda. But if the food actually tastes better to him, will he eat more pizza than he normally would with say, water as a beverage? This is a question that has actually been posed in studies. Do diet beverages allow and/or cause us to eat more calories? Data presented recently at the American Diabetes Association’s scientific sessions suggest that diet soft drinks may actually contribute to weight gain. One theory as to why this may happen is that your brain tastes something sweet, which triggers a release of insulin and elicit Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From The Netherlands: My boyfriend's son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about three months ago. I always do my best to give him healthy food and try to avoid sugary drinks as much as possible. My boyfriend, however, thinks a little differently about it and says that, for example, Coca Cola doesn't harm his son's health that much. He believes that because Coca Cola makes your blood sugar rise quickly, it also disappears quickly from your body. I don't agree with that statement. I've been trying to find the explanation of what really happens with the blood sugar after drinking a regular Coca Cola and what the consequences are of drinking it, but I can't find anything that goes deeper than it makes your blood sugar rise fast and that's bad for you weight. Does is make a difference if you mix a sugar soft drink with a healthy food? Can you explain it in details and be specific as much as possible? Answer: It is important for everyone to eat healthy foods and to enjoy their food. For a person with type 1 diabetes, balancing nutritious foods and glucose control is an art and a science. Take time to learn about how different foods affect glucose and make an informed decision. For example, carbohydrates have the biggest effect on glucose levels for people with type 1 diabetes. Tools such as blood glucose monitoring and continuous glucose monitoring will help you understand the affect of the foods eaten on glucose levels. (Know that in the first months of diabetes, he may still be making some insulin, which would affect the impact of foods on glucose). In my experience, most people with type 1 diabetes typically decide to limit their regular soda to periods of hypoglycemia or to prevent hypoglycemia related to exercise, as regular soda may cause a significant rise Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Coca‑cola If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Drink Coca‑cola If I Have Diabetes?

We recommend that anyone with diabetes who has questions about their diet contact their doctor. For people who want to reduce their sugar and calorie intake, including those with diabetes, we offer a variety of great-tasting drinks with reduced, low or no sugar and calories, like Diet Coke, Coca-Cola Zero Sugar, Fanta Zero and Sprite Zero. It’s also why we offer many of our drinks in small pack sizes. We provide information on how much sugar and how many calories are in our drinks, so people can choose what makes sense for them and their families For more information visit Diabetes UK. Continue reading >>

Two Diet Drinks A Day Could Double The Risk Of Diabetes, Study Finds

Two Diet Drinks A Day Could Double The Risk Of Diabetes, Study Finds

Two diet drinks a day could double the risk of diabetes, study finds Diet drinks were linked with a raised risk of diabetesCredit:John Taylor Two fizzy drinks a day could double the risk of diabetes - even if they are diet versions -a Swedish study has found. Research by the Karolinska Institute on 2,800 adults found that those who consumed at least two 200ml servings of soft drinks daily were 2.4 times as likely to suffer from a form of type 2 diabetes. Many fizzy drinks are sold in 330ml cans, meaning that one and a half cans would be enough to double the risk. Those who drank a litre of such drinks saw a 10-fold rise in their chance of suffering from the condition. The increased risks were the same regardless of whether the drinks were sugary or artificially sweetened, the research published in the European Journal of Endocrinology found. Researchers said the sugary drinks may have induced insulin resistance, triggering the cases of diabetes. The new research examined links between soft drink consumption and diabetesCredit:Frank Augstein/AP The artificial sweeteners in the diet drinks may stimulate and distort appetite, they said, increasing food intake, and encouraging a sweet tooth. Such sweeteners might also affect microbes in the gut leading to glucose intolerance. The research was a retrospective study, which relied on participants to recall their diet habits. Josefin Edwall Lfvenborg, lead author, said soft drinks might influence glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, leading to the increased risk of latent auto-immune diabetes, a form of type 2 diabetes. In this study we were surprised by the increased risk in developing autoimmune diabetes by drinking soft drinks, he said. We next plan on investigating what could counter this risk. More research was nee Continue reading >>

Diet Soda And Diabetes

Diet Soda And Diabetes

In reply to my recent blog entry “Stopping Diabetes Medicines,” Patsy wrote: “I have stop[ped] drinking Diet Cokes, or anything with artificial sweeteners. I can’t tell you what a difference that has made! … I am overweight and have lost 14 pounds. My blood sugar has gone down, too.” How could this be? How could diet sodas, which have essentially no carbohydrates and no calories, raise blood glucose and weight? Or is the whole thing an illusion? Four studies in the last decade have raised concerns about diet soda. In 2005, University of Texas researchers reported that people who drank diet soda were more likely to gain weight than those drank regular soda. Fewer calories = more weight! Strange… In 2006, Dartmouth scientists found that people with diabetes who drank one or more cans of diet soda a day raised their A1C levels by an average of 0.7%, compared to those who didn’t. In 2007, the American Heart Association found that those who drank either regular or diet soda had a higher risk of “metabolic syndrome,” which includes diabetes, high blood pressure, high levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and obesity, compared to nondrinkers. This is just a correlation; it doesn’t show cause, but it’s still interesting. In the January 16, 2009 issue of Diabetes Care, a group of analysts reviewing the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis found that “Daily consumption of diet soda was associated with… a 67% greater relative risk of… Type 2 diabetes compared to non-consumption.” They said the increased diabetes was not due to increased weight, although that happened too. “Associations between diet soda consumption and Type 2 diabetes were independent of baseline measures of adiposity or changes in these measures,” they wrote. The data was adj Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Coke Or Diet Pepsi?

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Coke Or Diet Pepsi?

I’m disappointed in the quality of the other answers thus far, so I’m going to give you some useful advice here. Yes, in general, diabetics can consume diet soft drinks without a risk to raising their blood sugar. There are a few caveats to this, however, and you should keep this in mind: In some countries, “diet soda” is actually low-sugar soda. That is, it’s made with less sugar, not zero sugar. This kind of diet soda will definitely raise your blood sugar, so be careful. Know what you’re putting into your body. Many diet sodas contain caffeine, and caffeine has been found to elevate blood sugar levels in a certain percentage of the population. I’m one of the lucky ones, so I can drink all the caffeine I want to. But you might be one of the unlucky ones. The best thing to do is test before and after drinking a diet soda and determine for yourself what happens to your body. If you drink “fountain drinks” in restaurants, be aware of the fact that sometimes the employees attach the fountain spigot to the wrong bottle of syrup. You’ll think you’re getting diet soda, but you might get the genuine article. With practice, you’ll be able to taste the difference, but sometimes you won’t know for sure. In that case, you can usually tell by dipping your finger in the soda. Real soda will become sticky on your finger when it dries. Diet soda will not. Artificial sweeteners are still sugars! They are sugars that are a couple of orders of magnitude sweeter than table sugar, so a lower quantity of sweeteners results in an equivalent level of “sweetness.” What this means is that if you consume a large amount of diet soda all at once (like a liter or more), your blood sugar will still probably rise because there are carbs in artificial sweeteners. If you Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Soda?

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Soda?

When you have diabetes, it's easy to feel limited by what you can eat and drink. Although you might occasionally be tempted to stray from your healthy meal plan, you're best to avoid dietary temptations and consume only what your doctor deems appropriate. If you've been previously accustomed to drinking soda, diet alternatives should be safe for you. Video of the Day The American Diabetes Association lists diet soda among the beverages that are safe for diabetics to consume. Diet soda is typically sweetened with one of five artificial sweeteners, including aspartame. These sweeteners do not contain calories, and the ADA reports that they will not cause a blood glucose reaction. Many common flavors of soda are available in diet versions, including cola, root beer, lemon-lime and orange. Risks of Diet Soda The safety of artificial sweeteners is highly contested, although the National Cancer Institute reports that no proof exists linking the Food and Drug Administration's approved artificial sweeteners to cancer. A greater risk in frequently consuming artificially sweetened soda is consuming unhealthy foods because you aren't drinking a high-calorie beverage. A study published in 2010 in the "Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine" that found those who drink heavy amounts of diet soda are more likely to be obese than those who don't drink diet soda, and obesity is a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes. Even if drinking diet soda is safe for diabetics, you shouldn't make a habit of consuming this type of beverage. Diet soda has little nutritional value, and consuming a caffeinated flavor can harm your ability to sleep soundly. Excessive caffeine consumption can also lead to side effects, including anxiety and restlessness. Ceasing to consume caffeine can lead to symptoms su Continue reading >>

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Managing blood sugar levels is an everyday goal for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While eating sugar doesn’t cause either type of diabetes, keeping tabs on carbohydrate and sugar intake is an important part of managing both types of diabetes. Eating healthfully can also reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. In fact, obesity is one of the leading causes of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of American adults are considered obese. Obesity puts you at risk for diabetes, as well as other troublesome conditions. Eating processed foods that are high in sugar, unhealthy fats, and empty calories increases your risk of gaining too much weight. Drinking sugary drinks is also a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. If you are working to keep your blood sugar in check or manage your weight, you might choose diet soda. Low in calories and sugar, diet sodas appear to be a good alternative to sugary drinks. Diet coke and A&W’s diet root beer, for example, claim to be entirely sugar-free. Unfortunately, even though they contain no actual sugar, they are loaded with artificial sweeteners and other unhealthy additives. At one time, there was much debate over the safety of artificial sweeteners. Many feared that these sweeteners caused certain types of cancer. Studies performed in the 1970s suggested that the artificial sweetener saccharin was linked to bladder cancer. Since that time, however, saccharin has been deemed safe. Both the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) consider the sweetener nontoxic. Aspartame, another common yet controversial sweetener, has also gained clearance fo Continue reading >>

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

I’m confused by news that drinks containing artificial sweeteners can lead to diabetes. I know you advise against the use of artificial sweeteners, but does this study mean that we should drink “regular” instead of diet sodas? You will be much better off not drinking any sodas at all. The results of the study connecting artificial sweeteners with metabolic syndrome, a collection of conditions that together dramatically increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes, by no means vindicate sugar. Instead, they suggest that artificial sweeteners are as bad for health as too much sugar. The study, from Israel, showed that artificial sweeteners altered the collection of bacteria (known as the microbiome) in the digestive tract in a way that caused blood glucose levels to rise higher than expected and to fall more slowly than they otherwise would. This finding may solve the longstanding mystery of why drinking artificially sweetened diet sodas doesn’t lead to weight loss. It also strongly suggests that the use of artificial sweeteners has been contributing to the worldwide obesity epidemic and rising rates of type 2 diabetes. To arrive at their conclusions, the Israeli researchers gave 10-week old mice water sweetened with saccharin, sucralose or aspartame, plain water, or sugar-sweetened water. After one week, the mice that received the artificially sweetened water had developed glucose intolerance, the first step on the path to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. With glucose intolerance, the body cannot easily handle large amounts of sugar. The researchers next gave the mice antibiotics, which killed the bacteria in the animals’ digestive systems. The glucose intolerance disappeared, supporting the hypothesis that this condition is caused by a change Continue reading >>

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