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Can Diabetics Drink Cokes?

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From The Netherlands: My boyfriend's son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about three months ago. I always do my best to give him healthy food and try to avoid sugary drinks as much as possible. My boyfriend, however, thinks a little differently about it and says that, for example, Coca Cola doesn't harm his son's health that much. He believes that because Coca Cola makes your blood sugar rise quickly, it also disappears quickly from your body. I don't agree with that statement. I've been trying to find the explanation of what really happens with the blood sugar after drinking a regular Coca Cola and what the consequences are of drinking it, but I can't find anything that goes deeper than it makes your blood sugar rise fast and that's bad for you weight. Does is make a difference if you mix a sugar soft drink with a healthy food? Can you explain it in details and be specific as much as possible? Answer: It is important for everyone to eat healthy foods and to enjoy their food. For a person with type 1 diabetes, balancing nutritious foods and glucose control is an art and a science. Take time to learn about how different foods affect glucose and make an informed decision. For example, carbohydrates have the biggest effect on glucose levels for people with type 1 diabetes. Tools such as blood glucose monitoring and continuous glucose monitoring will help you understand the affect of the foods eaten on glucose levels. (Know that in the first months of diabetes, he may still be making some insulin, which would affect the impact of foods on glucose). In my experience, most people with type 1 diabetes typically decide to limit their regular soda to periods of hypoglycemia or to prevent hypoglycemia related to exercise, as regular soda may cause a significant rise Continue reading >>

What A Can Of Coke Does To Your Body | Diabetic Connect

What A Can Of Coke Does To Your Body | Diabetic Connect

Open happiness is the slogan of the worlds beloved Coca-Cola drink, but perhaps what it really should say is Open diabetes/obesity/heart disease. The CEO of fitness company CrossFit came under fire from some in the diabetes community for his tweet saying just that: open diabetes. But while his message may have been tactless, there is, in fact ,some truth to this statement. A 2010 study published in Diabetes Care found that people who drank one to two cans of sugary beverages a day were 26 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who drank them on occasion. Drinking Coke may also lead to heart disease: a 2012 study published in the journal Circulation observed 40,000 men for two decades and found that those who had one can of a sugary drink (like Coke) per day were 20 percent more likely to experience or die from a heart attack compared to those who didnt. Another study found similar results in women. Its worth noting, however, that these studies were designed to reveal links between health hazards and sweetened drinks, but they do not prove cause and effect. Coke and other sugary soda drinks may also be major factors that lead to obesity. A campaign to highlight the effects of soda beverages like Coca-Colacalled The Real Bears , as a slam against the Coke polar bear adsclaimed that sugary drinks are the biggest source of calories in the American diet. Dr. Frank Hu, professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, argues that theres sufficient scientific evidence to prove that decreasing sugary drink consumption will reduce obesity and obesity-related diseases in the U.S. population. Sugary drinks are also believed to increase our risk for gout, which is a particularly painful form of arthritis. All in all, there is ample evid Continue reading >>

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Managing blood sugar levels is an everyday goal for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While eating sugar doesn’t cause either type of diabetes, keeping tabs on carbohydrate and sugar intake is an important part of managing both types of diabetes. Eating healthfully can also reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. In fact, obesity is one of the leading causes of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of American adults are considered obese. Obesity puts you at risk for diabetes, as well as other troublesome conditions. Eating processed foods that are high in sugar, unhealthy fats, and empty calories increases your risk of gaining too much weight. Drinking sugary drinks is also a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. If you are working to keep your blood sugar in check or manage your weight, you might choose diet soda. Low in calories and sugar, diet sodas appear to be a good alternative to sugary drinks. Diet coke and A&W’s diet root beer, for example, claim to be entirely sugar-free. Unfortunately, even though they contain no actual sugar, they are loaded with artificial sweeteners and other unhealthy additives. At one time, there was much debate over the safety of artificial sweeteners. Many feared that these sweeteners caused certain types of cancer. Studies performed in the 1970s suggested that the artificial sweetener saccharin was linked to bladder cancer. Since that time, however, saccharin has been deemed safe. Both the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) consider the sweetener nontoxic. Aspartame, another common yet controversial sweetener, has also gained clearance fo Continue reading >>

How Does Diet Soda Affect Diabetes?

How Does Diet Soda Affect Diabetes?

Many of us who enjoy fizzy drinks select diet soda as a healthier option than the normal soda. Even if we have with diabetes, we feel that diet soda has less sugar and is therefore not harmful to us. Sadly, that’s not entirely true. Let’s find out how does diet soda affect diabetics. Pros of Drinking Diet Soda with Diabetes: Diet soda contains artificial sweeteners, which are also referred to as non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) or non-caloric sweeteners. They have a higher intensity of sweetness per gram than caloric sweeteners like sucrose. Popular artificial sweeteners like aspartame, acesulfame-K, neotame, saccharin, and sucralose are regulated as food additives by the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). Aspartame and saccharin, commonly found in diet sodas, are both FDA reviewed and approved. Besides FDA, most sweeteners used in diet sodas are approved by World Health Organization (WHO) and/ or Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI). The American Diabetes Association (ADA) lists diet soda as safe for diabetics to consume. Diet soda is typically sweetened with one of five artificial sweeteners. These sweeteners do not contain calories (or have less than 20 calories), and the ADA reports that they do not cause a blood glucose reaction. Furthermore, carbohydrate content in diet soda is less (less than 5 gm) when compared to that of regular soda. Also, the calorie content in diet soda is less than that of regular soda. Risks Of Diet Soda For Diabetics According to Mayo Clinic, a nonprofit medical practice and medical research group based in Rochester, Minnesota, while the artificial sweeteners may not raise blood sugar, the caffeine in it might. A 2004 study at Duke University showed that caffeine consumption can increase blood sugar levels by up to Continue reading >>

I'm A Type 1 Diabetic, And I Drink Regular Coke

I'm A Type 1 Diabetic, And I Drink Regular Coke

I'm a Type 1 Diabetic, and I Drink Regular Coke Got into an interesting conversation (more like an argument) about fake sugar and real sugar. I'll get to that in a moment. My wife found the notes she took when we met a dietitian after I first got diagnosed as a diabetic. My first look was to minimum daily carb intake. I'm 6'5, around 200 pounds, and she wanted me to at least eat 300 carbs a day. I saw a thread in the forum about how much diabetics typically hate dietitians, add me to the group. Anyway since I have been on the pump, I've actually be watching what I eat more because I know how easily I can gain weight. As a result, I've actually dropped about 10 pounds from the pump. My normal carb intake per day ranges from 125 to 175g a day. On average I am using between 45 to 55 units of Humalog a day. So back to the argument. A person says "wait you are a diabetic and you are drinking regular soda". I've actually taught a lot of other people that fake sugar tends to make you close friends with the toilet. As for me, I've always found I need just one can of Coke a day to stave off a headache, or worse a migraine. After that, I typically just keep it too water. As far as the person who thought they were an expert at diabetes I said, "that cupcake you're eating has diabetes, so watch it"..... :) I get nasty headaches/migraines as well. I stopped drinking carbonated soda drinks all together a year ago. Diet or regular, they are both hard on you. I would agree with you that manufactured sugar substitutes aren't as good for you as the real thing, but when you think about it, I wouldn't consider coke to be the real thing either. Have you thought about a low dose caffeine supplement to combat the headaches? I used to do the same thing as you but I found a healthier alternati Continue reading >>

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

I’m confused by news that drinks containing artificial sweeteners can lead to diabetes. I know you advise against the use of artificial sweeteners, but does this study mean that we should drink “regular” instead of diet sodas? You will be much better off not drinking any sodas at all. The results of the study connecting artificial sweeteners with metabolic syndrome, a collection of conditions that together dramatically increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes, by no means vindicate sugar. Instead, they suggest that artificial sweeteners are as bad for health as too much sugar. The study, from Israel, showed that artificial sweeteners altered the collection of bacteria (known as the microbiome) in the digestive tract in a way that caused blood glucose levels to rise higher than expected and to fall more slowly than they otherwise would. This finding may solve the longstanding mystery of why drinking artificially sweetened diet sodas doesn’t lead to weight loss. It also strongly suggests that the use of artificial sweeteners has been contributing to the worldwide obesity epidemic and rising rates of type 2 diabetes. To arrive at their conclusions, the Israeli researchers gave 10-week old mice water sweetened with saccharin, sucralose or aspartame, plain water, or sugar-sweetened water. After one week, the mice that received the artificially sweetened water had developed glucose intolerance, the first step on the path to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. With glucose intolerance, the body cannot easily handle large amounts of sugar. The researchers next gave the mice antibiotics, which killed the bacteria in the animals’ digestive systems. The glucose intolerance disappeared, supporting the hypothesis that this condition is caused by a change Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease marked by higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. It is caused by the body’s inability to produce or use insulin, a hormone that acts to move glucose out of the blood and into cells to be used as energy. There are two types of diabetes: • Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes, is an autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce the hormone insulin. There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes, which represents 5% of diabetes cases. • Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, representing about 95% of all diabetes cases. It usually begins with insulin resistance, where the body does not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But over time, the pancreas loses its ability to produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar at normal levels. Type 2 diabetes is preventable. Prediabetes, also referred to as impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose, is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. People with prediabetes have a much higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, as well as an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Without intervention efforts, up to 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years5, and up to 70 percent will develop diabetes within their lifetime6. A 2016 study by UCLA found 13 million adults (46 percent of all adults in California) to have prediabetes or undiagnosed diabetes. An additional 2.5 million adults have diagnosed diabetes. Altogether, 15.5 million adults (55 percent of all California adults) have prediabetes or diabetes.7 Liquid sugar is a unique driver of today’s skyrocketing type 2 diabetes and obes Continue reading >>

For Someone Who Is Type-2 Diabetic And Can't Refrain From Consuming Soda Drinks (coke, Pepsi, Sprite, Etc.), What Is More Unhealthy, Overall, Those With Sugar Or The Artificially Sweetened

For Someone Who Is Type-2 Diabetic And Can't Refrain From Consuming Soda Drinks (coke, Pepsi, Sprite, Etc.), What Is More Unhealthy, Overall, Those With Sugar Or The Artificially Sweetened "diet" Variants?

I LOVE sweets. I spent my whole life eating tons of sweets and drinking sweetened drinks. My suggestion is to stop drinking all of that crap. It just is not necessary. You can learn to live without it, and you will live a lot longer. I could never have imagined giving up sweets. I gave up all sweet drinks after I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. No sodas, no diet sodas, no fruit juices. Nothing. Only water. I no longer have diabetes but I have no desire any longer for sweet drinks. It just does not even occur to me to drink one. The transition to a low sugar, low carb diet can be difficult physically and psychologically. I did mindfulness exercises that got me through those difficult times. I used The Dieting Mindfulness Meditations. I am not sure I could have gotten through that period without them. Diet drinks are harmful to your health even if they do not raise blood sugar levels. You can make this change in your life. You will be very thankful that you have. I reversed the diabetes because I was willing to change my lifestyle. Maybe you would be willing to do the same? Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Soda?

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Soda?

When you have diabetes, it's easy to feel limited by what you can eat and drink. Although you might occasionally be tempted to stray from your healthy meal plan, you're best to avoid dietary temptations and consume only what your doctor deems appropriate. If you've been previously accustomed to drinking soda, diet alternatives should be safe for you. Video of the Day The American Diabetes Association lists diet soda among the beverages that are safe for diabetics to consume. Diet soda is typically sweetened with one of five artificial sweeteners, including aspartame. These sweeteners do not contain calories, and the ADA reports that they will not cause a blood glucose reaction. Many common flavors of soda are available in diet versions, including cola, root beer, lemon-lime and orange. Risks of Diet Soda The safety of artificial sweeteners is highly contested, although the National Cancer Institute reports that no proof exists linking the Food and Drug Administration's approved artificial sweeteners to cancer. A greater risk in frequently consuming artificially sweetened soda is consuming unhealthy foods because you aren't drinking a high-calorie beverage. A study published in 2010 in the "Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine" that found those who drink heavy amounts of diet soda are more likely to be obese than those who don't drink diet soda, and obesity is a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes. Even if drinking diet soda is safe for diabetics, you shouldn't make a habit of consuming this type of beverage. Diet soda has little nutritional value, and consuming a caffeinated flavor can harm your ability to sleep soundly. Excessive caffeine consumption can also lead to side effects, including anxiety and restlessness. Ceasing to consume caffeine can lead to symptoms su Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Coke Or Diet Pepsi?

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Coke Or Diet Pepsi?

I’m disappointed in the quality of the other answers thus far, so I’m going to give you some useful advice here. Yes, in general, diabetics can consume diet soft drinks without a risk to raising their blood sugar. There are a few caveats to this, however, and you should keep this in mind: In some countries, “diet soda” is actually low-sugar soda. That is, it’s made with less sugar, not zero sugar. This kind of diet soda will definitely raise your blood sugar, so be careful. Know what you’re putting into your body. Many diet sodas contain caffeine, and caffeine has been found to elevate blood sugar levels in a certain percentage of the population. I’m one of the lucky ones, so I can drink all the caffeine I want to. But you might be one of the unlucky ones. The best thing to do is test before and after drinking a diet soda and determine for yourself what happens to your body. If you drink “fountain drinks” in restaurants, be aware of the fact that sometimes the employees attach the fountain spigot to the wrong bottle of syrup. You’ll think you’re getting diet soda, but you might get the genuine article. With practice, you’ll be able to taste the difference, but sometimes you won’t know for sure. In that case, you can usually tell by dipping your finger in the soda. Real soda will become sticky on your finger when it dries. Diet soda will not. Artificial sweeteners are still sugars! They are sugars that are a couple of orders of magnitude sweeter than table sugar, so a lower quantity of sweeteners results in an equivalent level of “sweetness.” What this means is that if you consume a large amount of diet soda all at once (like a liter or more), your blood sugar will still probably rise because there are carbs in artificial sweeteners. If you Continue reading >>

What Everyone Must Know About Coke Zero And Diabetes

What Everyone Must Know About Coke Zero And Diabetes

If you have diabetes you may be thinking quitting your regular Coke and opting for Coke Zero is going to do you a big favor. After all, it's sugar free and therefore healthier, right? Wrong! Once you read this, you'll understand that the scientific research shows quite the opposite. What is Coke Zero? Coke Zero was launched in 2005 as a sugar free, low calorie alternative to regular coke. One thing that's quite funny is that while Diet Coke has been around since the 1980’s, many men thought the title “diet” sounded a little too feminine and they weren’t interested in buying it. So as a result, Coke Zero was born. It was marketed mostly towards men who wanted to enjoy the taste of a classic Coke with zero guilt. Coke Zero comes in several different flavors, including classic, vanilla, and cherry. You might be thinking that a sugar free soda sounds too good to be true. And you would be right! Unfortunately, Coke Zero and other sugar free sodas are not a soda lover’s dream come true. And you'll soon see why… Nutrition Facts You probably already know that regular soda has a ton of sugar in it, which means you should steer clear of it at all costs – diabetic or not. For example, a 12 ounce can of regular Coke contains 39 grams of sugar, all derived from high fructose corn syrup, which makes that a double no, no. That can of soda also packs 140 empty calories – meaning, you don’t get any nutrients from it. It’s easy to see why so many people were thrilled when diet sodas hit the market. After all, the promise of cutting down on sugar to lose weight, and reduce your risk of obesity and diabetes – that sounds like a good deal, right? Well, unfortunately those promises aren't all they're cracked up to be. The sweetener in Diet Coke is called ‘aspartame,' Continue reading >>

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn't have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it's as close as a tap. If you're after something tastier, though, you've got options. Some tempting or seemingly healthy drinks aren't great for you, but you can make swaps or easy homemade versions of many of them. These tasty treats can fit into your diabetes diet and still satisfy your cravings. 1. Chocolate Milk This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk. 2. Sweet Tea A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill, and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment. 6. Hot Chocolate It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs. It seems like a he Continue reading >>

Can I Still Drink Soda If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Still Drink Soda If I Have Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

One Can Of Soda A Day Raises Diabetes Risk, Study Suggests

One Can Of Soda A Day Raises Diabetes Risk, Study Suggests

Shutterstock By: Rachael Rettner, MyHealthNewsDaily Senior Writer Published: 04/24/2013 06:05 PM EDT on MyHealthNewsDaily Drinking just one 12-ounce soda a day may increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes, a new study from Europe suggests. In the study, people who drank a 12-ounce sugar-sweetened soda daily were 18 percent more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes over a 16-year period compared with those who did not consume soda. And people who drank two sodas daily were 18 percent more likely to have a stroke than those who drank one; those who drank three sodas daily saw the same risk increase compared with those who drank two, and so on. The results held even after the researchers took into account risk factors for Type 2 diabetes such as age and physical activity levels, body mass index (BMI) and the total daily calorie intake. The findings agree with earlier studies in the United States, which found daily soda consumption increased the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 25 percent. However, the study found only an association, and cannot prove soda consumption causes Type 2 diabetes. It’s possible other factors not accounted for by the study influenced the disease risk. In addition, participants answered questions about their diet just once at the study’s start, and it’s possible they changed their diets over time, the researchers said. The researchers analyzed information from about 12,000 people who developed Type 2 diabetes between 1991 and 2007, and a randomly selected group of about 15,000 people, most of whom did not develop diabetes. All participants were taking part in a larger study looking into the interaction between diet, environmental factors and the risk of cancer and chronic diseases conducted in eight European countries. People who drank one or more glasses Continue reading >>

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