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Can Diabetics Chew Gum

Xylitol For Diabetics | Come Back To Nature | Sweetlife

Xylitol For Diabetics | Come Back To Nature | Sweetlife

Wondering how xylitol can be used for diabetics? Read on Xylitol is a fantastic sugar alternative for people with Type 2 Diabetes, where the body doesnt produce enough insulin or the insulin it does produce, doesnt work as well as it should. SweetLifes xylitol products can help manage diabetics blood sugar levels, as it is a natural sweetener absorbed much more slowly than sugar. It also doesnt contribute to high blood sugar levels. Theres no insulin spike because the blood sugar levels are stabilised. This is good news because raised sugar levels put a strain on the bodys systems and lead to countless health problems. As a 100% natural sweetener, xylitol is perfect for diabetics. It metabolizes without insulin and as such, only has a glycemic index of 7. Now compare that to sugar, which has a glycemic index of 65. Type 2 Diabetes is on the rise globally because of our diet and lifestyle choices and because of cravings for refined carbs and sugar, prevention or keeping the disease at bay has meant that many people have turned to various artificial sweeteners to get their sweet fix. However, apart from the bitter after taste these artificial sweeteners have, there are very serious concerns about the long-term health consequences of these lab made sugar alternatives. Such are the health benefits of xylitol, that for decades it has been the sweetener of choice in numerous countries including Switzerland, Russia and Japan. By using SweetLifes 100% natural xylitol products, people with Type 2 Diabetes and other diseases affiliated with excess sugar intakes, can finally eat the sweet things they crave with little effect on their insulin levels. Our products are a delicious and safe alternative. We are proud to be Australias original #1 xylitol company where we are making a b Continue reading >>

Chewing Gum Can Help Tackle Diabetes

Chewing Gum Can Help Tackle Diabetes

Chewing gums can prove very helpful in delivering insulin in the blood stream of the diabetics, say researchers. Chewing gum can help tackle diabetes (Getty images) Chewing gums can prove very helpful in delivering insulin in the blood stream of the diabetics, say researchers. Robert Doyle, a chemist at Syracuse University in New York State, is sure that an insulin chewing gum can offer a significant solution to the breaking down of orally-taken insulin by the digestive system. Past studies have shown that the digestive system breaks down an insulin pill taken orally, and that any surviving enzyme is not easily absorbed into the bloodstream from the gut. Doyle points out that the body has specific mechanisms for protecting and absorbing valuable molecules that would usually be damaged by conditions in the gut. Giving an example of vitamin B12, he says that it is protected by a salivary protein called haptocorrin that binds to it in the mouth and protects it in the stomach. The researcher says that once haptocorrin reaches the intestines, another chemical pathway takes over to help vitamin B12 pass into the bloodstream. His idea is to bind insulin molecules to vitamin B12 so that it can hitch a ride on this protected supply chain. Doyle believes that the insulin can ride all the way into the bloodstream, where it is released to do its work. He claims that tests on rats conducted by his team have shown some promising results, reports New Scientist magazine. Although the animal study involved a treatment in liquid form, Doyle and his colleagues are of the opinion that chewing gum would be a better delivery method in humans. The researchers say that chewing would ensure a plentiful supply of saliva, providing the protein needed for the insulin to make its way into the bloo Continue reading >>

How To Choose The Right Chewing Gum

How To Choose The Right Chewing Gum

Edit Article Buying gum may seem simple, but there are many health issues to consider. Read on. 1 2 Think about your reaction to sugar. Even if you're not diabetic, sugar can still be harmful to your health. Does diabetes run in your family? Does sugar make you hyper? If so, you should avoid sugar as much as possible. 3 4 Analyze your allergies. Have you had allergic reactions to artificial sweeteners? If so, and you also want to avoid sugar, so you must decide: How bad is your reaction to artificial sweeteners, compared to wanting to avoid cavities, etc. You may decide to avoid gum altogether. 5 Assess whether you're trying to quit a smoking addiction. If you have a history of smoking, and want to stop, you might want to try a type of nicotine gum. This can help you in quitting smoking. 6 Accommodate dental work. If you wear dentures or braces, and regular gum sticks to them, consider trying gum specially made for them, as they are less sticky. 7 Think about your kidney health Do you have kidney issues? Sugarless gum isn't for you then, instead go for gum with sugar, but limit your chewing and brush after chewing. You're helping people by reading wikiHow wikiHow's mission is to help people learn, and we really hope this article helped you. Now you are helping others, just by visiting wikiHow. Direct Relief is a humanitarian nonprofit with a mission to improve the health and lives of people affected by poverty and emergencies. Recognized by Charity Navigator and Forbes for its efficiency, Direct Relief equips health professionals in the U.S. and throughout the world with essential medical resources to effectively treat and care for patients – without regard to politics, religion, or ability to pay. Click below to let us know you read this article, and wikiHow will don Continue reading >>

Keeping Your Mouth Squeaky Clean

Keeping Your Mouth Squeaky Clean

New Products That Can Help Periodontal (gum) disease has been called the sixth complication of diabetes (in addition to eye, kidney, nerve, foot, and cardiovascular complications) because so many people with diabetes have it. Having high blood glucose raises the risk of developing periodontal disease, and periodontal disease tends to raise blood glucose levels. So clearly, making an effort to brush, floss, and have regular dental checkups is important when you have diabetes. However, sometimes these efforts just don’t seem to be enough, and a little more help is needed. This is particularly true when a person has dry mouth, or a lower-than-normal amount of saliva. Normally, saliva protects the teeth and gums by diluting the acids that are excreted by bacteria in the mouth and that are also present in foods and beverages. Saliva additionally contains minerals such as calcium, phosphate, and fluoride that are necessary for rebuilding the teeth and keeping the enamel strong. It also helps you chew and swallow food. When there is not enough saliva to perform these functions, a person’s risk of tooth decay, gum disease, and other mouth infections rises. There are many causes of dry mouth — some avoidable, and some not. Dry mouth is a common side effect of many prescription and nonprescription drugs. It is a symptom or side effect of numerous medical conditions, including diabetes. It can be a side effect of some medical treatments, such as radiation for cancer treatment. It can also be caused by dehydration, smoking or chewing tobacco, or prolonged breathing through your mouth. While many people are well aware that they have dry mouth, not everyone who has it notices it. However, if you cannot eat a cracker without drinking water, or if your dentist or dental hygienist Continue reading >>

Xylitol: Everything You Need To Know (literally)

Xylitol: Everything You Need To Know (literally)

Added sugar may be the single most unhealthy aspect of the modern diet. For this reason, people have looked towards natural alternatives like Xylitol. Xylitol looks and tastes like sugar, but has fewer calories and doesn't raise blood sugar levels. Several studies suggest that it can improve dental health and have various other important benefits. This article takes a detailed look at Xylitol and how it can affect your health. Xylitol is a substance that is categorized as a sugar alcohol (or polyalcohol). Sugar alcohols are like hybrids of a sugar molecule and alcohol molecule. Their structure gives them the ability to stimulate the sweet taste receptors on the tongue. Xylitol is found in small amounts in many fruits and vegetables and is therefore considered natural. Humans even produce small amounts of it via normal metabolism. It is a common ingredient in sugar free chewing gums, candies, mints, diabetes friendly foods and oral care products. Xylitol has a similar sweetness as regular sugar, but contains 40% fewer calories: Table sugar: 4 calories per gram. Xylitol: 2.4 calories per gram. Xylitol is basically just a white, crystalline powder. Obviously, xylitol is a refined sweetener, so it doesn't contain any vitamins, minerals or protein. In that sense, it is "empty" calories. Xylitol can be processed from trees like birch, but it can also be made with an industrial process that transforms a plant fiber called xylan into xylitol. Even though sugar alcohols are technically carbohydrates, most of them do not raise blood sugar levels and therefore don't count as "net" carbs, making them popular sweeteners in low-carb products. Btw... don't be intimidated by the sugar alcohol part... this really has nothing to do with the alcohol people get drunk from. Sugar alcohols a Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Sugar Alcohol?

Can Diabetics Eat Sugar Alcohol?

Cutting back on sugar doesn't have to mean going without sweets. A new brand of naturally-sourced sweeteners is popping up in foods that can soothe your sweet tooth without causing surges to your blood sugar. These misleadingly named "sugar alcohols" are relatively safe for everyone, including diabetics; however, they are not risk-free. If you have diabetes, you need to monitor your sugar alcohol intake, and consume them in moderation. Video of the Day Despite their name, sugar alcohols contain neither sucrose nor ethanol, which are commonly referred to as sugar and alcohol. Sugar alcohols occur naturally in foods such as fruits and berries, and are often added to processed foods as sugar substitutes. Sugar alcohols add sweetness, bulk and texture to foods. They also help food stay moist and add a cooling sensation. They're found in a wide variety of products, from chewing gum to candy, baked desserts, energy bars and chocolate. Sugar Alcohols Vs. Artificial Sweeteners Artificial sweeteners such as saccharin, or Sweet N Low, and aspartame, or NutraSweet, which are often used as tabletop sugar substitutes, have zero calories and no carbohydrates. Sugar alcohols, on the other hand, contain about 2.6 calories per gram and a small amount of carbs. Both are considered generally safe for use by diabetics, but the American Diabetes Association says sugar alcohols should not be eaten in excess. Even for people without diabetes, sugar alcohols can cause bloating, gas and a laxative effect that might cause loose stools and diarrhea. The FDA regulates both artificial sweeteners and sugar alcohols, and has approved several as safe for consumption. If you are watching your carb intake as part of your diabetes management regimen, it's important to understand sugar alcohols' effects o Continue reading >>

Why Some Sugar-free Products Raise Blood Sugar

Why Some Sugar-free Products Raise Blood Sugar

In the latest “Really?” column, Anahad O’Connor explores why some foods labeled “sugar free” may still raise blood sugar. The culprits are sugar alcohols that are sometimes paired with artificial sweeteners. He writes: Sugar alcohols get their name from their structure, which looks like a cross between a molecule of alcohol and sugar but is technically neither. Companies have added them to more and more “sugar free” products, like cookies, chewing gum, hard candy and chocolate. For people trying to manage their blood sugar, this can make interpreting nutritional labels a little tricky. While sugar alcohols provide fewer calories than regular sugar — in general about 1.5 to 3 calories per gram, compared with 4 calories per gram of sugar — they can still slightly raise your blood sugar. To learn more, read the full column, “The Claim: Artificial Sweeteners Can Raise Blood Sugar,” then please join the discussion below. Continue reading >>

Metformin Chewing Gum For Type-2 Diabetes And Obesity

Metformin Chewing Gum For Type-2 Diabetes And Obesity

It seems that chewing gum is a good method of drug delivery. Generex Biotechnology collaborates with medicinal chewing gum developer Fertin Pharma A/S to develop a chewing gum containing metformin, a generic drug used for the treatment of Type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Metformin Chewing Gum for Type-2 Diabetes and Obesity It seems that chewing gum is a good method of drug delivery. Generex Biotechnology collaborates with medicinal chewing gum developer Fertin Pharma A/S to develop a chewing gum containing metformin, a generic drug used for the treatment of Type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. The collaboration will seek to combine Generex’s proprietary buccal drug delivery platform technologies with Fertin’s know-how related to gum base formulations, and taste masking/modification to create a metformin medicinal chewing gum that will deliver metformin into the body via the buccal mucosa. (the inner lining of the mouth) rather than in its current tablet form. The developers hope that this method of delivery will circumvent adverse side effects associated with taking metformin in tablet form such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, abdominal bloating, and increased gas production. Continue reading >>

Xylitol: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions And Warnings - Webmd

Xylitol: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions And Warnings - Webmd

Crapo PA. Use of alternative sweeteners in diabetic diet. Diabetes Care 1988;11:174-82. View abstract. Everything added to food in the US. US Food and Drug Administration, November 2011. Available at: Gales MA, Nguyen TM. Sorbitol compared with xylitol in prevention of dental caries. Ann Pharmacother 2000;34:98-100. View abstract. Gales MA, Nguyen TM. Sorbitol compared with xylitol in prevention of dental caries. Ann Pharmacother 2000;34:98-100. View abstract. Lee B, Sue D. Xylitol for prevention of dental caries. DICP 1989;23:691-2. Makinen KK. Can the pentitol-hexitol theory explain the clinical observations made with xylitol? Med Hypotheses 2000;54:603-13. View abstract. Makinen KK. The rocky road of xylitol to its clinical application. J Dent Res 2000;79:1352-5. Merck Index, 12th ed. Whitehouse Station: Merck Research Laboratories, 1996. Soderling E, Isokangas P, Pienihakkinen K, Tenovuo J. Influence of maternal xylitol consumption on acquisition of mutans streptococci by infants. J Dent Res 2000;79:882-7. View abstract. Tapiainen T, Luotonen L, Kontiokari T, et al. Xylitol administered only during respiratory infections failed to prevent acute otitis media. Pediatrics 2002;109:E19. View abstract. Uhari M, Kontiokari T, Koskela M, Niemela M. Xylitol chewing gum in prevention of acute otitis media: double-blind, randomized trial. BMJ 1996;313:1180-4. View abstract. Uhari M, Kontiokari T, Niemela M. A novel use of xylitol sugar in preventing acute otitis media. Pediatrics 1998;102:879-84. View abstract. Learn about User Reviews and read IMPORTANT information about user generated content Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible Continue reading >>

Chew On This: Gum And Diabetes

Chew On This: Gum And Diabetes

Jewels Doskicz is a registered nurse, freelance writer, patient advocate, health coach, and long-distance cyclist. Jewels is the moderator of Diabetic Connect’s weekly #DCDE Twitter chat, and she and her daughter both live healthfully with type 1 diabetes. Diet purists may shudder at the thought of artificial sweeteners in just about anything, while people living with diabetes are realists, looking for culinary enjoyments while minimizing blood sugar swings. It’s true that gum isn’t a “food”—but can it impact our eating habits and dental health? There may be an uptick in gum chewers with dentists recommending the practice as a preventive aid against dental decay and gum disease, but it comes with a catch—there’s more to selecting a pack of chewing gum than choosing the most appealing flavor. Let’s break it down into some basic questions you may have. Does chewing gum affect my blood sugars? The short answer—it depends on your choice. Most sugared chewing gums fall into the category of six grams of carbohydrates per piece; when choosing these types of gums, the dental benefits are nearly absent and the likely outcome is increasing blood sugar values. Take a look at what you’re chewing on. An ingredient list and nutritional labeling can be found on every pack of gum, much like this one from Wrigley's Hubba Bubba Bubble Gum. Are there detriments to chewing gum? Dental health isn’t overrated; regular visits to a dentist for check-ups, cleanings, and regular maintenance are vital parts of your wellness routine. Dental decay and oral infections can sound an alarm with diabetes, often resulting in chronic high blood sugars. A healthy smile is a quick snapshot of overall well-being. Some people avoid gum chewing like the plague, and I’m actually not a Continue reading >>

8 Best Chewing Gums (not Packed With Chemicals)

8 Best Chewing Gums (not Packed With Chemicals)

You try to eat healthy, buy only organic apples, and don't drink Diet Coke. But you know that pack of Orbit you chew every day? Let's just say it's not exactly innocent minty refreshment. Almost all big brands of sugar-free gum contain artificial sweeteners, namely aspartame and acesulfame potassium (both are "generally regarded as safe" by the FDA, but we would like to emphasize the word "generally," as studies have linked the fake sugars to heart disease, diabetes, and obesity). Even sketchier, though, is that most gums are also made out of plastic. Gum base formulas vary by brand, but they can contain synthetic rubbers, emulsifiers, the controversial preservative BHT and a plastic called polyvinyl acetate. (Snack AND lose weight with this box of Eatclean-approved treats from Bestowed.) Enter the concept of clean chewing gum—and the preponderance of new brands claiming to have a leg up on your average pack of Trident. Most are made from natural sugar alcohols like xylitol instead of artificial sweeteners, and some brands go the extra mile by swapping out the gum base for chicle, a natural latex made from the bark of the sapodilla tree. It's what gum used to be made out of in the 1950s before scientists figured out how to replicate the stuff in a lab and poison our bubble-snapping idyll. One caveat: A stick of naturally flavored chicle isn't as enjoyable as that strawberry-shortcake flavored Extra you can't stop buying. Flavors fade more quickly, and the texture is not as bouncy as what you're used to. But if you're concerned about chomping on aspartame and plastic, here are seven gums that offer some improvement over the Wrigleys of the world: Cleanest: Train Gum Contains just four ingredients: chicle, natural oils, simple syrup, and rice flour as a coating. Flavors Continue reading >>

Why A Stick Of Chewing Gum Is More Harmful To Your Health Than Anything You Eat

Why A Stick Of Chewing Gum Is More Harmful To Your Health Than Anything You Eat

People do not typically ingest gum, so they pay very little attention to its ingredients. The assumption is that if the gum is not swallowed, then the ingredients should not be a concern. However, the ingredients in gum travel into the bloodstream faster and in higher concentrations than food ingredients, because they absorb directly through the walls of the mouth, and these ingredients do not undergo the normal filtration process of digestion. Gum is typically the most toxic product in supermarkets that is intended for internal use, and it is likely to kill any pet that eats it. Commercial gum products contain roughly the same list of toxic ingredients, with differing labeling, which is virtually always designed to mislead. Common Ingredients of Gum After looking at several different brands of chewing gum, we found that these were the most common ingredients: Titanium dioxide is so cancerous that external skin contact is enough to cause cancer. Be reminded that all of these ingredients absorb directly into the bloodstream through the walls of the mouth. Some of these ingredients are explained in-depth, because it is prudent to correct the myth that chewing gum is harmless and even good for you (e.g. "it strengthens the teeth"). The "Sugar-Free" Sugar Alcohols Sorbitol, maltitol, and mannitol are sugar alcohols. These are usually made from sugar, and they frequently increase the blood sugar just as much as eating sugar. However, manufacturers make deceptive "sugar-free" claims about sugar alcohols, since these ingredients are not pure sugar anymore. While such sugar derivatives are technically "sugar free" when the manipulative word games are employed, they nonetheless remain dangerous for diabetics, who are the very audience that these gums are marketed to. Let us not Continue reading >>

How Does Chewing Gum Affect Your Blood Sugar?

How Does Chewing Gum Affect Your Blood Sugar?

Chewing a gum has been shown to benefit those with diabetes. This is because it helps to keep our mouth busy and thus, satiates hunger. According to the journal Appetite, a study conducted in 2011 found that participants who chewed gum in between meals for 45 minutes and above were less hungry and showed less cravings for snacks as compared to participants who did not chew gum. Psychologically, chewing a gum causes one to crave less food therefore it is beneficial for people with diabetes who are trying to lose weight. However, before you get into the habit of chewing gums, there are several important things that you need to know. Does Chewing A Gum Affect Your Blood Sugar Level? So does chewing a gum regularly affects your level of blood sugar? The answer will mainly depend on the type of gum you chew. Most chewing gums are loaded with sugars and may have lots of carbohydrates in them. When you chew on these types of gums, the possible outcome will be an increase in your blood sugar. Therefore, make sure that you go for sugar-free gums. Keep in mind to do it in moderation since it may contain lots of unhealthy artificial sweeteners. This could wreak havoc to your digestive system, and eventually to your overall health. Chewing Gum Burns You Calories Yes, surprisingly, chewing gum can actually burn you calories! According to a study held by Mayo Clinic, you can burn 11 calories for every hour of chewing gum. The study suggest that chewing non-caloric gum in the day through the time that you are awake could help you shed up to 11 pounds a year. However, such results are only possible with non-caloric gum. Standard gum sweetened with added sugar contains 11 calories per piece and even low-calorie sugar-free gums has around 5 calories per piece. What Are The Other Benefits Continue reading >>

Type-1 Diabetic Battles Gum Chewing Addiction

Type-1 Diabetic Battles Gum Chewing Addiction

I feel at times I am addicted to chewing gum. Now, you may laugh at this. Yet what is addiction but something you constantly reach for to help you get through the day (or, in my case, a day at dialysis). This is the definition of addiction from Wikipedia: Classic hallmarks of addiction include impaired control over substances or behavior, preoccupation with substance or behavior, continued use despite consequences, and denial.Habits and patterns associated with addiction are typically characterized by immediate gratification (short-term reward), coupled with delayed deleterious effects (long-term costs). Gum helped me quit smoking many years ago (another habit which brings me shame). Today, chewing gum helps me stay away from sugar, nuts and chocolate (all of which make tight blood sugar control near impossible for a type-1 diabetic). As I said it sounds laughable but it ain’t. If I don’t have gum I start to panic and get grumpy. Yet isn’t it a harmless addiction? The Good Side of Chewing Gum for Type-1 Diabetics Chewing gum one hour after meals has been shown to help with gastroparesis (see chapter 22 of Diabetes Solution). That’s been my #1 excuse to keep on chewing. Chewing signals the stomach to dump it’s contents, so I don’t end up hypoglycemic after a meal. And, of course, gum stops me from over eating or snacking on other foods that would really shoot my blood sugar up. But gum has so many problems… The Dark Side of Gum Chewing for a Type-1 Diabetic First, how to find a gum that is even healthy for you? Supermarkets offer nothing but gum containing artificial sweeteners like aspartame. The rest are all laden with high-fructose corn syrup made from genetically modified crops. Health food store gums often contain alocohol sugars like mannitol or xylit Continue reading >>

Chewing Gum Infused With Type 2 Medicine?

Chewing Gum Infused With Type 2 Medicine?

Chewing Gum Infused with Type 2 Medicine? Glucose-controlling metformin, the generic drug that is the first medication for many newly diagnosed type 2s, could soon be available in a chewing gum. Thats the hope held by Massachusetts-based Generex Biotechnology Corporation, which has announced that it is ready to test its proprietary metformin chewing gum product, MetControl, on 36 volunteer patients. In the study, Generex will compare the speed and efficacy of MetControl to that of immediate-release metformin tablets. Metformin is the most prescribed drug for type 2 patients. Nevertheless, many people with diabetes avoid using it because of its gastrointestinal side effects, large pill size and bitter taste. These factors are especially off-putting to the increasing number of children being diagnosed with type 2. Generex believes that the delivery of metformin in a good-tasting chewing gum will make the drug more acceptable to these patients and thereby increase adherence with diabetes therapy. Because metformin is safe, well known and well established, the company does not anticipate taking as long to come to market with MetControl as it would with a product containing a new active compound. Such products typically must undergo stringent testing that can last years. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily Continue reading >>

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