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Can Diabetic Patients Eat Dal?

Eating Well With Diabetes: South Indian And Sri Lankan Diets

Eating Well With Diabetes: South Indian And Sri Lankan Diets

Many staple foods in the South Indian diet are good for your health. From fresh guava to lentils to vegetarian cuisine, there are lots of nutrient-rich choices. However, deep fried items, high-fat foods and refined flour are also common and should be limited. If you have diabetes, you can work with your healthcare team to develop a plan that is right for you. It will likely include exercise, a meal plan, blood sugar monitoring and perhaps medication. This article will focus on the dietary changes that you can make. Diabetes information in other languages! Call EatRight Ontario at 1-877-510-510-2 to get practical tips and information on managing diabetes in: Gujrati, Pakistani, Punjabi and Urdu. This information will tell you which of your favourite traditional foods fit into a healthy diet and which should be limited to help you manage diabetes. What is type 2 diabetes? Diabetes is a disease where the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. When the body is working well, insulin helps carry sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells where it is used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body's cells do not receive enough glucose, so it stays in your blood. High blood glucose (or high blood sugar) can lead to heart, kidney, vision and blood vessel problems. Who has a higher risk of diabetes? Some ethnic groups in Canada have a higher risk of getting diabetes, including people of South Asian descent. There are certain genes that affect insulin function. Having these genes increases your risk of diabetes. These genes are commonly found in high risk populations such as people with South Asian heritage. What to eat…and when If you have diabetes, it is important to eat every 4 to 6 hours Continue reading >>

What Are The Health Benefits Of Toor Dal?

What Are The Health Benefits Of Toor Dal?

Toor dal is also sometimes referred to as lentils or split pigeon peas. This traditional Indian dish is often served with rich spices over rice, and is a staple in many Indian restaurants and households. Toor dal is a member of the legume family, and this meal is not only delicious, it also has a number of health benefits. Video of the Day Toor dal contains folic acid, an important vitamin for all women, especially those planning to become pregnant. Folic acid is essential for fetal development and can help to prevent neural tube birth defects such as spina bifida. Getting adequate amounts of folic acid in your diet can help to reduce specific brain and spinal cord birth defects by more than 70 percent, according to the New York State Department of Health. Protein and Vegetables The United States Department of Agriculture notes that beans and peas such as toor dal can be counted in both the protein and vegetable subgroups of the government's healthy eating plan. This is because legumes such as toor dal are an excellent source of nutrients and plant protein, and they also contain dietary fiber. In essence, legumes are nutritionally similar to poultry, meat and fish, though they represent a low-fat and low-cholesterol alternative. Legumes such as toor dal provide essential nutrients, fiber and protein for vegetarians as well as those who wish to merely limit their meat consumption. Toor dal is also an excellent source of carbohydrates, which your body needs for energy. When you eat food containing carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into glucose, or blood sugar. Blood sugar is then used to provide energy to your brain, body and nervous system. Unlike simple carbohydrates, which contain processed and refined sugars with little nutrition, legumes such as toor dal cont Continue reading >>

Are Lentils Good For Blood Sugar?

Are Lentils Good For Blood Sugar?

Lentils provide essential nutrients including protein, fiber, B vitamins, iron, potassium, zinc, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, copper and zinc. Like other pulses, which are a type of legume, they are rich in phytochemicals, so they may help lower your risk for cancer. They are also low on the glycemic index, so they may help you control your blood sugar. A carbohydrate serving for a diabetic is 15 grams, with many diabetic meal plans allowing for three carbohydrate servings per meal. A 1-cup serving of cooked lentils provides 39.9 grams of carbohydrates. However, 15.6 grams comes from fiber, and diabetics can subtract half of the fiber grams from the carbohydrate count if a food contains more than 5 grams of carbohydrates, resulting in 32.1 grams of carbohydrates. This is about two carbohydrate servings. Glycemic Index The glycemic index measures how much carbohydrate-containing foods raise your blood sugar after you eat them. Foods low on the glycemic index, which are those foods with a GI value of 55 or less, have only minimal effects on blood sugar levels. Lentils have a GI value ranging from 18 to 52 depending on the type of lentil and the preparation. Boiled red lentils tend to have a lower GI, while canned green lentils tend to have a higher GI. Research Results A study published in "ARYA Atherosclerosis" in 2008 found that when people replaced 30 grams of bread and 20 grams of cheese in their diet each day with 50 grams of lentils and 6 grams of canola oil, they were able to decrease their fasting blood sugar and cholesterol levels. This suggests that low-GI foods can be helpful for lowering blood sugar levels if you use them as a replacement for foods higher on the glycemic index, like bread or other refined grains. Adding Lentils to Your Diet Lentils are am Continue reading >>

Dal, Masoor

Dal, Masoor

PULSES AND DALS Each serving in this Group contains 12 gms. of carbohydrates, 6 gms. of proteins and 1 gram of fat and gives approximately 80 calories. Each serving in the Group is about 25 gms by weight if uncooked and about 1 cup cooked ( thin, watery) or ½ cup cooked ( thick) One serving can be from the following foods: Dal, Masoor Dal, Arhar Dal, Urad Dal, Chana (bengal gram) Dal, Moong ( greengram) Dal, Tur (red gram) Dal, Mooth (mothbeans) Val (field beans) Vatana (peas dry) Cow Pea ( Lobiya) Muth (mothbeans) Moong (greengram) Rajmah Chana ( Bengal Gram) Baked beans Beans Blacked beans Black eyed peas Kidney beans Lentils Lima beans Pinto beans Red beans Refried beans For more food items in this list click here Continue reading >>

10 Indian Foods For Type 2 Diabetes Prevention And Control

10 Indian Foods For Type 2 Diabetes Prevention And Control

Type 2 Diabetes or Diabetes mellitus is one such lifestyle condition which can be easily managed with a good diabetic diet and weight loss. In this blog, we present to you the top 10 best foods for diabetics that one must include in the diet. Now avail a Diabetes Weight Management Consultation with Superfoods from an expert Truweight Nutritionist, for FREE! Click and get started. A Diabetes Diet plays a crucial role in dealing with the disease. Hence it is very important to know which foods can help. A typical diet plan for type 2 diabetes should contain healthy fruits and veggies. However, there are certain superfoods like Quinoa, Oats, Bitter Gourd, legumes which are not that popular but can greatly help managing diabetes. 10 Superfoods for Type 2 Diabetes patients Fenugreek Seeds Psyllium Seeds Millets Bitter gourd Oats Seeds Brown rice Quinoa Cinnamon Legumes We have compiled the list of 10 superfoods for Type 2 Diabetes management in the video below. 1. Fenugreek Seeds Fenugreek seeds or methi seeds are one of the top superfoods for diabetes mellitus prevention and control. Studies have found that fenugreek helps lower the blood sugar by affecting the rate of digestion of starch and other carbs. In addition, several clinical trials seem to have shown methi seeds to reduce the metabolic conditions seen commonly in diabetes mellitus. A study even found that 100 grams of fenugreek seeds seemed to lower the fasting blood sugar levels. 2. Psyllium Seeds Psyllium husk is one the major foods for diabetes that you can incorporate in the diet. In the digestive system, viscous fibres present in psyllium husk absorb water and swells to form a thick, jelly-like mass. According to a study conducted by Cleveland Clinic, the resulting viscous substance slows down the rate at whic Continue reading >>

Chana Dal In Diabetes

Chana Dal In Diabetes

Are you confused about which Dal to be consumed if you have diabetes? Don�t worry we got the best option for Diabetic Patients. Consumption of chana dal in diabetes prior to a meal could lower the risk of an increase in diabetes. This is recently stated as per a new study conducted�at�Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad. The Study A team of scientists from IICT�has compared different legumes (dals). The comparison is�was done on the effectiveness of three commonly consumed legumes. There are mainly three legumes – Bengal gram, green gram and an another variant of chickpea. The new study found that Bengal gram showed consistent results in terms of reducing sugar spikes after a starchy meal. If a diabetic eats 50 grams of sprouted raw Bengal gram or chana dal before a meal it will observe rise in blood glucose levels. This increase is due to the rapid absorption of carbohydrates after a meal. But as soon as we eat our food it balances. Hence, this study is proving the act of chana dal being a natural insulin. The study was aimed at finding the varieties of sprouts which are most beneficial for improving the health of diabetics said Scientist Tiwari. �We all know the benefits of sprouts. But his study specifically shows how diabetics can prevent sugar spikes to delay the onset or in some cases, even prevent the disease. Tiwari highlighted the importance of the high amount of protein and presence of digestion-resistant carbohydrate in Bengal gram (Chana Dal). Chana Dal in Diabetes and Nutrition A protein-rich diet takes longer to be absorbed by our system. A presence of digestion-resistant carbohydrates further reduces the rate of absorption of carbohydrates into our bloodstream. Bengal Gram (chana dal) should ideally be consumed raw afte Continue reading >>

Dal Fry

Dal Fry

Diet types: Recipe created by the mother of DaVita dialysis patient Aditya from California and submitted by DaVita dietitian Shawna from California. Ingredients 2 teaspoons vegetable oil 1 teaspoon black mustard seeds 1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds 1/2 cup onion 1 green chili pepper 1 teaspoon ginger 1 cup green lentils, cooked soft 1-1/2 cups water 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon mustard powder 1/2 teaspoon red chili powder 2 teaspoons lemon juice 1 tablepoon cilantro 4 cups white rice, cooked Preparation Chop onion an chili pepper. Grate ginger. In a saucepan, heat vegetable oil. Add mustard seeds and cumin. When they splutter, add chopped onion, green chilies and ginger. Fry till the onion gets a light brown color. Add cooked lentils; add 3/4 cup water, salt and mustard powder. Cook for 10 minutes till the lentil cooks to desired consistency. Add lemon juice and sprinkle with finely chopped cilantro. Serve hot with rotis/rice. Calories 231 Protein 9 g Carbohydrates 42 g Fat 3 g Cholesterol 0 mg Sodium 144 mg Potassium 327 mg Phosphorus 166 mg Fiber 5.3 g Renal and renal diabetic food choices 2-1/2 starch 1 vegetable, medium potassium Roti is a flat Indian bread, also known as chapati. Wet grinders are very popular tools in the South Indian kitchen and are used to make paste out of soaked grains and lentils. Idli is a round, fluffy bread roughly eight centimetres in diameter. Idli is made from ground rice or rice flour mixed with ground urad dal, salt, methi (fenugreek seeds) and water. The mixture is allowed to ferment prior to being steamed in an idli steamer. They are traditional to Southern India and are most often eaten with sambar. Most often eaten at breakfast or as a snack, idli are usually served in pairs with chutney, sambar, or other accompaniments. Continue reading >>

Best Diet For Diabetes: Vegetarian And Non Vegetarian

Best Diet For Diabetes: Vegetarian And Non Vegetarian

Don’t you denounce sugar and rice as soon as your sugar levels shoot up? However, diet for diabetes is much more than restricting sugar and rice. You may still crave for ice creams, chocolates, pizza or burger, but diabetes must be making you think that all this food items are completely taken away from your list for life long, am I right? However, if you are following a proper well balanced diet for 6 days a week, you can easily treat yourself for 1 day. Yes, you heard it right; you can eat one meal of your choice. The same follows even for the non-vegetarians In this article, I’ll be sharing 2 sample menus with you, one for vegetarians and the other for non-vegetarians. These are the generalized balanced diet for diabetes, sugar peasant, which will help you maintain the diabetes normal range without fearing of any side effects. We will help to prepare a diet chart for sugar control. Best Diet for Diabetes – Vegetarian Menu(Non-veg for diabetes) Consuming non veg for diabetes is considered harmful, but minimal amounts can be eaten as shown in the following diabetic diet chart. 1. Early Morning 1 tsp. of methi seeds (soaked overnight, gulp the seeds with water) (You can take one fenugreek capsule per day as an alternative) 2. Breakfast 1 glass buttermilk + 1 bowl Oats/Broken wheat (daliya) 3. Mid-morning 1 fruit (As per the list given below). Make sure you are eating fruits properly. 4. Lunch 1 whole cucumber + 1 onion + 1 Chapatti (No ghee) + 1 cup vegetables (As per the list given) + 1 cup dal (less oil) + ½ cup brown rice 5.Afternoon (2 hours post lunch) 1 cup green tea + 1 tsp. flaxseeds roasted and grinded (Omega 3, 6, 9 veg capsules can be used as an alternative) 6. Evening snack 4 almonds + 2 walnuts + 1 bowl of boiled sprouts 7.Dinner (Before 8pm) 1 cup b Continue reading >>

Skimmed Milk / Coffee / 1 Cup (200ml) Tea (weak)

Skimmed Milk / Coffee / 1 Cup (200ml) Tea (weak)

FOOD GROUP FOODS TO BE INCLUDED FOODS TO BE AVOIDED ADVICED DISH CEREALS Rice, Rice flakes, Puffed Rice, Wheat, Semolina, Vermicelli, Bread Ragi, Bajra and other Millets, Bran, Brown Bread. Idli, Dosa (without oil), Idiappam, Conjee, Pongal / Kitchedi (No seasoning), Phulkas, Sand wich, Double cooked rice PULSES All Dhals example Green gram dhal, Red gram dhal and Bengal gram dhal All grams - Green gram, Whole black gram, Channa, Cowpea (Karamani), Peas(dry), Rajmah Thin dhal, Bland sambar / Rasam (no seasoning) * ROOT VEGETABLES Potato, Carrot, Beetroot, Sweet Potato. Yam, Radish, Colacasia, Tapioca. Boiled and Mashed Soup GREEN LEAFY VEGETABLE All Leaves Stalk of the green leafy vegetables, cabbage Puree, Soup OTHER VEGETABLES All Cauliflower, Capsicum Boiled, Soup MILK & MILK PRODUCTS Skimmed milk, Skimmed Buttermilk and Curd Whole milk and its products, Butter, Khoa, Cheese, Condensed milk Custards Porridge FRUITS All (Without skin and seed) Whole Fruit or Juice NON - VEGETARIAN ITEMS Egg white, Fish, Chicken Egg yolk, Organ meat, Beef, Pork, Prawn, Mutton Boiled or steamed FATS & OILS ALL NUTS & OIL SEEDS Tender coconut water All Ground Nuts, Cashew Nuts, Coconut * SUGAR & JAGGERY Glucose, Honey, etc., SPICES & CONDIMENTS Turmeric Powder Mustard seeds, Chilies, Jeera, Ginger, Pepper, Coriander seeds COMMERCIAL FOODS Marie Biscuits, Health Drinks Garam masala, Pappad, Pickle, Chips, Chutney SALT NORMAL / RESTRICTED FLUID NORMAL / RESTRICTED * TO BE AVOIDED IF DIABETIC EARLY MORNING Skimmed milk / Coffee / 1 cup (200ml) Tea (Weak) BREAKFAST Idli / Dosa / Idiappam / Bread / Porridge / Kitchadi with Thin Dhal / Sambar / Sugar / Jam MID MORNING Tender coconut water, Soup, Buttermilk, Fruit Juice LUNCH Rice / Phulkas, Bland Sambar, Rasam, Boiled Vegetable, Egg White, But Continue reading >>

Indian Diet Chart For Diabetics To Reverse Diabetes

Indian Diet Chart For Diabetics To Reverse Diabetes

Diet chart for Diabetic patients is not much different from healthy eating style, we have forget the basics our grandmothers told us, Indian cooking is based on Ayurveda which is a 5,000 year-plus-old Indian health science. I can say if you can go back and think what were you eating 30 / 40 years ago and follow the same you will no more need diabetic diet chart to control or reverse your diabetes. reverse your diabetes Ayuvveda is an ancient science which actually discovered how cooking and the time taken to cook can change the composition of a particular food and its effect on the body. few examples are lycopene in tomatoes, which enhances while cooking can be used by the body more effectively. Tempering onion with hing balances the diuretic properties in onion that makes it good for cough and cold and helps in digestion deep frying onions till they turn brown will only make them loose all their nutrients and even cause acidity. That’s why our grand mothers used to recommend frying onions till they turn translucent. Most of our food practices have been passed down from one generation to the next through the oral tradition. This includes what to eat, how to eat, how much to eat and when to stop eating. Now we are asking some one else who really don't know about all these except our Grandmother, Did you ever wonder why food cooked by Grandmother tastes so well and we feel so good after we eat ? this is because Grandmother knows it all. ​My diet chart contains all Indian recipes because I believe in Indian Food wisdom ​No of varieties Cooking sequence Right ingredients Every recipe have more than 10 ingredients, more ingredients - more nutrition - no to garam masala please. Just rewind back to 1970's or 80's and study what were you eating and include them in your fo Continue reading >>

Chana Dal

Chana Dal

Like most people with diabetes I seem to be on an endless quest for good-tasting food that won't play havoc with my blood sugar levels. What I keep looking for is food low in saturated fat, without any transfats, and packed with nutritious carbohydrates. The problem is that many foods high in carbohydrates send our blood sugar levels skyrocketing. But when I found the food of my dreams a couple of years ago, I ignored it because I had no idea what it was. This food—chana dal—is practically unknown in the West, but is becoming available here too. Chana dal is a bean that comes from India, where they appreciate it very much. My interest in chana dal began when I started gathering information for my Web page about the glycemic index, which ranks foods on how they effect our blood sugar levels. This index measures how much your blood sugar increases in the two or three hours after eating. The glycemic index is about foods high in carbohydrates. Foods high in fat or protein don't cause your blood sugar level to rise much. But the problem, many experts believe, is that people with diabetes should limit how much fat and protein they eat. A lot of people still think that it is plain table sugar that people with diabetes need to avoid. The experts used to say that, but the glycemic index shows that even complex carbohydrates, like baked potatoes, can be even worse. Gathering studies for my glycemic index page, a couple of years ago I stumbled on references in the professional literature to something called "Bengal gram dal." I included it, although I didn't know what it was. Then, someone sent me e-mail asking about it. My initial reaction was to take Bengal gram dal out of the glycemic index, because the number was almost unbelievably low. It has almost no effect on your bl Continue reading >>

The Hidden Danger Of Diabetes

The Hidden Danger Of Diabetes

by JANE CLARKE, You magazine, Mail on Sunday Over the past few weeks, my clinics have been inundated with people who want to shift some unwanted pounds, no doubt spurred on by the new-year, new-you momentum. I welcome this trend, not least because it decreases a little-known risk of being overweight, that of developing diabetes mellitus, an increasingly common disease. In 1950, approximately 300,000 people in the United Kingdom suffered from diabetes, but by 2010, according to recently reported research in the British Medical Journal, it is estimated that it will affect some 3 million people, or 6 per cent of the population. Because diabetes is a major cause of coronary heart disease, blindness, kidney failure and arterial damage, the outlook seems grim, particularly for our children, yet diabetes is largely preventable if you're aware of the risk factors, of which being overweight is the most common on account of the strain that it puts on the pancreas, the organ that produces insulin, a hormone that regulates the body's blood-sugar levels. Eating sugar-containing foods (and these not only include sweets and chocolates, but also pasta, bread and potatoes, among others) causes the blood-sugar level to rise, whereupon a normally functioning pancreas releases sufficient insulin to enable the body's cells to absorb the sugar for use as fuel, after which the blood-sugar level should return to normal. If you're diabetic, however, your pancreas can't produce enough insulin to complete the sugar's absorption, which means that it stays in the blood, causing mayhem. The symptoms of uncontrolled diabetes include tiredness, weight loss and an unquenchable thirst combined with the need to urinate frequently (your body compels you to drink huge amounts of water because the most effe Continue reading >>

Using Lentils To Help Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Using Lentils To Help Manage Type 2 Diabetes

November is Diabetes Month in Canada, and November 14 is World Diabetes Day. That means it’s a great time to talk about how a diet rich in legumes – including lentils – can help regulate blood sugar and improve glycemic control, both important factors in managing type 2 diabetes. It’s been known for some time that both high-fibre foods and legumes are important components of a diabetes diet because of their low glycemic index (GI) – a measurement of a food’s impact on blood sugar. Most diabetics have probably already been told to eat more whole grains and legumes. But until recently, there was little hard evidence of the actual impact of these dietary changes on the long-term management of diabetes. University of Toronto researchers decided to find out exactly how much high-fibre and high-legume diets could benefit those with type 2 diabetes. They divided a group of 121 type 2 diabetes patients and had half of them add a cup of legumes to their diet each day, while the other half consumed whole-wheat foods. Researchers measured the impact on blood sugar and blood pressure. Their results, published online in October by the scientific journal Archives of Internal Medicine, showed that HbA1c (hemoglobin A1c), a measure of blood sugar, was reduced for both groups, with the high-legume group seeing a larger drop. The high-legume group also saw a much larger drop in blood pressure than the high-fibre group, indicating that a high-legume diet may also help type 2 diabetes patients ward off heart disease. The great news here is that it’s incredibly easy to incorporate more legumes into your diet. Lentils are much easier to prepare than beans because they require no pre-soaking, and they work well in many different kinds of dishes. 7 Easy Ways to Add Lentils to You Continue reading >>

15 Low Glycemic Index Foods Indian Diabetics Can Eat

15 Low Glycemic Index Foods Indian Diabetics Can Eat

The number of diabetics is continuously on the rise. More and more members of the younger generations are getting affected. It is important to know that though Diabetes does not have a cure it can be well managed. One major change diabetics got to make in their diet is to consume more of low index glycemic foods in their daily diet. What is Glycemic Index? Glycemic Index (GI) refers to a scale of 1-100 that measures how fast and how much a food item raises blood glucose levels. Carbohydrate-containing foods are compared with glucose or white bread as a reference food, which is given a GI score of 100. As these foods control your blood sugar levels, they regulate your hunger pangs and eating habits. The GI rating of various carbohydrates include: low GI (less than 55) – foods that induce a relatively gradual rise in blood sugar medium GI (55 to 70) – the foods that lead to an average rise in blood sugar high GI (greater than 70) – foods that cause a rapid rise in blood sugar levels As we all know, artificial sweeteners have alarming long-term side effects, you can opt for a Low-Glycemic Sugar which has no bitter aftertaste. Buy the DiaBliss Low-GI Sugar which has a GI of 44, compared to normal sugar which has a GI of 65. This Low-GI Sugar can be used in making desserts and Mithais (Sweets) at home. Low GI foods, because of their slow digestion and absorption properties, cause only a gradual rise in blood sugar and insulin levels. Chickpeas – help prevent elevated blood sugar levels, making it a good choice for diabetics. You can toss them in your green salads, make a tasty curry for chapati or prepare hummus to eat along with pita bread. Beans (kidney beans, black beans, white beans) – if you are looking for a food item that has high-quality carbohydrates, lean Continue reading >>

Diabetics: Heed These Diet Tips!

Diabetics: Heed These Diet Tips!

Home > Get Ahead > Living > Health ou are young. Just when you think you are hale and hearty, you are diagnosed as being diabetic. What you need is a good diabetic meal plan and exercise to control your blood-glucose levels and general well-being. In a two-part series, diabetitians Priya Khanna and Seema Tarneja offer some solutions to make your life better! Here are some health and exercise tips: ~ Healthy tips for diabetics 1. Eat food at fixed hours. 2. Do not eat immediately after a workout. 3. Do not overeat. 4. If you are on insulin, make sure you have three proper meals with light snacks in between. 5. Do not eat fast; masticate and munch your food well before you swallow. 6. Drink a lot of water that will help flush the toxins off your system. 7. Make sure the gaps between your meals are short. 8. Avoid fried foods and sweetmeats. 9. Include fresh vegetable salad in every meal. 10. Have at least 20 to 25 grams of raw onion daily. 11. Add wheat bran to your wheatflour (50% wheatflour + 50% wheat bran). This helps increase fibre in your diet. You can also make diabetic flour by mixing wholegrain cereal, soyabean, blackgram (urad dal), jowar, bajra, Bengal gram (kala chana), wheat bran and barley. You can also add flaxseed and methi seeds into the wheatflour. 12. Include sprouts in the diet. Sprouts are a fountain of nutrients. ~ Now for that X-rated word: Exercise! Exercise is a good way to increase calorie deficit. But it is very important to take certain precautions before you exercise, especially if you lead a sedentary lifestyle. It is very important that you check with your doctor first before starting on an exercise regime. Start an exercise routine that you will enjoy and stick to. Walking is the simplest aerobic activity. Cycling is a good form of exercise Continue reading >>

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