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Can Diabetic Patient Eat Orange

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Many people think that diabetics have to avoid many foods, including different fruits. However, there are super healthy fruits for diabetics because they provide important minerals, vitamins, phytochemicals and fiber. Some low-carb fruits are also good for diabetics. People who have this disease should care about the ratings of the glycemic index to measure the carbohydrates which are converted to the blood Gl. Scientifically, the suitable glycemic index for diabetics is below 50. The following are the top 19 good fruits for diabetics and high blood pressure. Let’s check out these fruits to control your blood sugar and cure diabetes naturally. 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure Revealed! 1. Apples (Gl: 38, Gl/a fresh apple: 150g:7) Apples are very high in vitamin C, antioxidants and fiber. Apple pulp and peel contain pectin which helps to detoxify your body and remove harmful waste from the body. Pectin also is high in galacturonic acid that can help diabetics lower their insulin requirements up to 30%. You can eat a fresh apple or toss some slices of apples into a cup of tea and enjoy your breakfast. A medium apple contains about 12 g of carbohydrates and 54 calories. You can eat fresh apples without peeling them because apple peel includes a good source of anti-oxidants that good for digestion. Furthermore, apples are available throughout any seasons of the year. For containing a large amount of the soluble fiber, apples are fruit good for diabetics. Apples help diabetes patients reduce cholesterol, normalize their blood sugar level and improve their bowel function. Apple is also good at eliminating inflammation in the body and help diabetics beat infections effectively. Besides, apple is rich in anti-oxidants that help boost immunity. Apple also h Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Oranges?

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Oranges?

Oranges are a healthy citrus fruit, but if you have type 2 diabetes, you may worry about their high sugar content if your blood sugar levels are out of control. Fortunately, oranges contain components that make them a nutritious part of a diabetic diet as long as you eat them in concert with other healthy foods. Video of the Day People with type 2 diabetes cannot properly modulate blood sugar levels because they either don't produce enough insulin or their bodies can't effectively use the insulin they do produce. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, making up between 90 to 95 percent of all diabetics, according to FamilyDoctor.org. The food that a type 2 diabetic eats can significantly affect blood glucose levels, so choosing the right foods is important. Fruit in a Diabetic Diet Fruit can and should be part of a diabetic's daily diet. Diabetics who eat between 1,600 and 2,000 calories per day need to eat at least three servings of fruit per day. Those consuming 1,200 to 1,600 calories need two fruit servings daily, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. The fiber, vitamins and minerals in fruit are essential to maintaining overall health. Because fruits provide carbohydrates, you usually need to pair them with a protein or fat. Oranges provide high levels of fiber, which is important for digestive health, and vitamin C, which supports the immune system. The carbohydrate count in one orange is about 10 to 15 g. For diabetics using a carbohydrate-counting system to determine how much they can eat in a day, an orange is one serving. For diabetics using the glycemic index or glycemic load of foods to plan what they eat, oranges are also a good choice. The glycemic load of an orange is about 5, a low number that indicates the fruit causes only a s Continue reading >>

Oranges And 30 Other Things About Type 1 Diabetes

Oranges And 30 Other Things About Type 1 Diabetes

What do oranges have to do with Type 1 diabetes, you ask? The juice proves helpful when treating a low, but bear with me—oranges play another role in this story of my mine. Let me tell you about them and 30 other things. First, an explanation. I’ve have had Type 1 diabetes for 31 years. It seems fitting to memorialize the occasion with 31 anecdotes and facts related to the condition. The diagnosis. I was two years old when the doctor told my parents I had Type 1 diabetes. The oranges. When I was first diagnosed, the diabetes educator trained my mom using an orange. It apparently claims a texture similar to a toddler’s skin. (I remain unconvinced. My skin is not and never was the consistency of an orange.) In any case, pumping an orange full of insulin helped my mom transition to pumping me full of insulin. Runs in the family. I don’t know that Type 1 is considered a hereditary disease anymore, but it was the dominant thought when I was little. It runs in my family. My grandpa had it and experienced all the complications that come with not managing it well. My brothers also were tested for the disease when they were young; they don’t have it, fortunately. Examples to follow, examples not to. If I manage my diabetes well, it may have something to do with my grandpa. I witnessed the price exacted by choosing to eat whatever one wanted: he went blind and lost circulation in some of his limbs. I refuse to let that be my story. Faith. I think becoming diabetic at such a young age made me more open to Jesus and believing in him. These days, I think God uses the disease to keep me from pride and to allow me to enter into other people’s suffering. Diabetes is all about control, which becomes a scary, scary thing as a person who battles perfectionism. It also runs cou Continue reading >>

Apples Could Reduce Risk Of Diabetes: Eating Fruit Twice A Week Could Cut Chance Of Developing Type 2 By 23%

Apples Could Reduce Risk Of Diabetes: Eating Fruit Twice A Week Could Cut Chance Of Developing Type 2 By 23%

Drinking more fruit juice was linked to an increased risk of developing the condition Study is the first to look at the effects of different types of fruit on diabetes risk Previous studies have linked anthocyanins found in berries and grapes to lowered heart attack risk An apple a day could keep diabetes away, according to a new report. Research showed that eating whole fruits - particularly blueberries, grapes and apples - was ‘significantly associated’ with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. However, drinking more fruit juice was linked to an increased risk of developing the condition, reports the British Medical Journal. The study is the first to look at the effects of different types of fruit on diabetes risk. Professor Qi Sun, of Brigham Women’s Hospital in the United States, said: “While fruits are recommended as a measure for diabetes prevention, previous studies have found mixed results for total fruit consumption. “Our findings provide novel evidence suggesting that certain fruits may be especially beneficial for lowering diabetes risk.” Researchers looked at data from more than 187,000 people, gathered between 1984 and 2008. More than 12,000 of these developed diabetes during the study period. The researchers looked at overall fruit consumption, as well as consumption of individual fruits. These were grapes or raisins, peaches, plums, apricots, prunes, bananas, cantaloupe melon, apples or pears, oranges, grapefruit, strawberries and blueberries. They also looked at consumption of apple, orange, grapefruit, and “other” fruit juices. People who ate at least two servings each week of certain whole fruits - particularly blueberries, grapes, and apples - reduced their risk for type 2 diabetes by as much as 23% in comparison to those who ate less than Continue reading >>

Orange Peels

Orange Peels

When you think of oranges, a host of beneficial properties come to mind. However, the peel is an often-overlooked aspect of this nutritious fruit. Historically, orange peels were highly valued and used for their essential oils in a variety of medicines and remedies. They are still in regular consumption (mainly as a zest) as part of the Mediterranean diet. Considering this diet is credited with numerous healthy benefits, they may be onto something when it comes to eating orange peels. In fact, the peel can contain as much as four times the fiber of the actual fruit as well as more flavonoids. TWEET #didyouknow Orange peels can have as much as 4x the fiber of the actual fruit as well as more flavonoids. @BaselineHealth Orange Peel Detoxing Benefits The limonene and flavonoids found in orange peel seem to have anti-carcinogenic properties by acting as a blocking agent. Studies have shown that limonin and limonene, both found in high concentrations in the peel, can induce the enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase, which is an important detoxifying enzyme. Also, limonene is also one of nature’s great solvents helping to carry waste out of cells as well as nutrients into them--which is one of the reason that Jon Barron uses it in most of his liquid formulas. Orange Peels May Decrease Risk of Cancer The citric acid found in orange peels also helps starve cancer cells by cutting off their energy supply. A number of studies have shown decreased risk of several cancers, most notably skin, breast and colon cancer, linked with the increased consumption of orange peels. Orange Peels as Natural Weight Loss Aid In addition, orange peels and orange peel extract can provide an extra benefit to diabetics and those looking to reduce overeating. This is due to the fact that orang Continue reading >>

What Fruits Can A Diabetic Eat?

What Fruits Can A Diabetic Eat?

Diabetics often ask whether it is safe for them to eat large quantities of fruit. Many diabetic patients avoid eating fruit because they are worried that the high sugar content found in most fruits will worsen their condition. Fortunately, there are many fruits a diabetic can enjoy which do not significantly affect blood glucose levels, in fact certain fruits may actually improve glucose control and insulin sensitivity over time. Good Fruits For Diabetics Fiber rich foods are generally safe for diabetics to eat because they tend to have a lower glycemic index (GI) and therefore do not spike blood sugar levels to the same extent as high GI foods. This is because fiber delays the emptying of stomach contents into the small intestine which slows down the absorption of sugar into the blood stream. Fiber rich fruits tend to be fruits with edible skins and seeds as it is these parts of the fruit that are highest in fiber. Fruits high in fiber include (fiber content in brackets): passion fruit (10.4%), raspberries (6.5%), apples (2.5%), pears (2.1%), apricots (2.1%), blueberries (2.7%), kiwifruit (2.1%), strawberries (2.0%), pomegranates (3.4%), and avocados (6.7%). 3 Foods to Throw Out Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com The avocado is not only high in fiber, but is also a rich source of monounsaturated fat. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends a diet high in monounsaturated fat as it can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease which is more common in diabetics than the general population. There is also some evidence that a diet rich in monounsaturated fat can improve glycemic control. Fruits high in fructose, and those with high fructose to glucose ratios are also beneficial to diabetics because fructose does not requ Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

There’s compelling evidence supporting the notion that high-fructose diets are responsible for most chronic disease; insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and obesity in particular Many fruits are very high in fructose, up to 50X the sugar that most of the fruits our ancestors were exposed to due to consistent hybridization over the past century for sweetness Therefore most fruits are best limited or avoided if you have insulin/leptin resistance as determined by struggling with your weight, or, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease or cancer According to a new study, certain kinds of whole fruits—particularly blueberries, grapes, prunes and apples—may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes Consumption of fruit juices, on the other hand, was found to have greater risk. Those who drank one or more servings of fruit juice each day had a 21 percent higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to the others I believe most will benefit from restricting their fructose to 25 grams a day; and as little as 15 grams a day if you’re diabetic or have chronic health issues. This includes fructose from whole fruits By Dr. Mercola You're probably well-familiarized with my controversial stance on fructose. Compelling evidence shows that fructose is, by far, more harmful to your health than other sugars—especially when it's removed from whole fruits and highly processed and genetically modified, such as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in most processed foods. I've also, as a general rule, warned you of eating too much fruit, as many fruits can be quite high in fructose. This has caused some confusion and consternation among many readers, as fruit has long been promoted as an important part of a healthy diet. That said, there are considerations to take into account when it comes to Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Orange Juice?

Can Diabetics Drink Orange Juice?

If you’re living with diabetes, caution around what you eat and drink is natural. Certain foods like sugary sodas are clearly off the cards. But when fresh produce and fiber are recommended, or your sugar levels are dipping, is it okay to reach for a glass of orange juice? What’s In Your Orange Juice? A fresh squeezed glass of orange juice contains 112 kcal, 20.83 gm of sugars, and 25.79 gm of carbohydrates. This 248 gm serving also delivers lots of calcium and vitamin C, as well as nutrients like potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin A and folate. These minerals and vitamins are important for a range of normal body functions and also have antioxidant properties that make them good for health.1 Yet, there is concern around whether or not diabetics should even be considering having the juice due to the sugar and carb content in a glass of OJ(orange juice). Should Diabetics Be Worried? The American Diabetes Association recommends drinking low calorie(or even zero calorie drinks) like plain water or unsweetened tea and coffee. When you need a cool drink, they suggest water with a squeeze of lime. Flavored water with orange slices could work just as well. But what about orange juice?2 The Association advises against consuming sugary drinks of any kind, and that could well mean your favorite packaged orange juice doesn’t pass muster. In fact, some fruit juices can be as high in natural sugars as sodas, even if they don’t have any added sugar in them.3 If you’re watching your diet and taking care not to have high glycemic index(GI) foods which increase blood glucose levels quickly (causing a potentially dangerous spike in sugar levels), then aim for foods with a glycemic load of 10 and under. These are low GI foods. Once the GI goes over 20, they’re considered Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Top 20 Fruits For Diabetics

Top 20 Fruits For Diabetics

Some serious health conditions need extra precaution when it comes to our eating habits. One such disease, diabetes, restricts us from eating certain types of food. From watching our sugar intake to controlling the consumption of refined carbohydrates, precautions could help in reducing the risk factor of diabetes, which could even lead to some types of cancer. Quite many people believe that diabetics cannot eat certain fruits. According to the guidelines by nutritionists and medical institutions, it is important for everyone to have at least 4 to 5 fruits servings in a day. Considering the fact that a person who is suffering from diabetes, should have controlled sugar level, there is no need for them to avoid fruits to keep their blood sugar level controlled. They just need to be extra careful when eating certain kind of fruits such as bananas, litchis, custard apples and mud apples. Eat them but in limited quantity. Here we have listed top 20 fruits that can be eaten by diabetics... Pears Rich in vitamins and fibre, this delicious food is one of the healthier snacking options for diabetics. Papaya Another 'super-food' for diabetics is papaya. Papaya contains essentials minerals and vitamins, hence, can be eaten by people suffering from diabetes. Starfruit Somewhat similar to jamuns, starfruit is another option for diabetics. It controls your blood sugar level but in case a person has diabetes nephropathy, starfruit should be avoided. Guava Guava is good for controlling blood sugar and also prevents constipation. Loaded with vitamin A and C, they also contain high dietary fibre. Kiwi fruit You could include kiwi in your diet. Many researchers have proved that eating kiwis could actually help you in lowering your blood sugar levels. Black Jamun This fruit is one of the Continue reading >>

5 Fruits To Avoid During Pregnancy Diabetes

5 Fruits To Avoid During Pregnancy Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is thought to affect 18 out of every 100 women and can cause serious problems in a pregnancy week by week, along with complications during delivery. Pregnancy diabetes can develop when the sugar levels in your blood begin to rise, and your cells become more resistant to absorbing insulin. While the extra sugar is necessary to produce enough nutrients for your baby’s healthy development, when it cannot be absorbed into your cells, it can cause your glucose levels to rise dangerously. If you are pregnant and worried about developing gestational diabetes, there are some healthy ways you can lower your risk. Pregnant women are often told to eat plenty of fresh fruits, and in most cases this is an excellent way to ensure you and your baby are getting the nutrients you need to stay healthy. When gestational diabetes occurs, it is important to limit your sugar intake, and this includes cutting back on how much fruit you eat during the day. Most fruits are high in natural sugar, which is generally easier for your cells to absorb, but when you are suffering from gestational diabetes, the glucose simply builds up in your blood stream, which can result in serious health complications for you and your baby. While health care professional still recommend eating three servings of fresh fruit during the day, there are some you may want to avoid. Oranges Oranges and its deliciously refreshing juice are both high in natural sugar that can be a problem if you have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes. The added glucose in your body can cause your sugar levels to climb to dangerous levels that can put you and your baby at risk. If you simply cannot give up oranges for 9 months, then you want to limit how much you eat. Sticking with only a section of the fresh fr Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

Should I Drink Fruit Juice?

Should I Drink Fruit Juice?

If my blood glucose goes low, drinking orange juice can help raise it. But how about drinking orange juice when my blood sugar level is normal? I’m concerned that it will raise my sugar too much. So I’ve been staying away from fruit juices and just eat the fruit itself. Continue reading >>

Best 15 Fruits For Diabetics

Best 15 Fruits For Diabetics

Which are the best fruits for diabetics? This is the common question which arises in the minds of the diabetics as many of them believe that they can”t eat fruits as all fruits contain high sugar content. But there are lots of healthy fruits for diabetics which do not increase the blood glucose level and these fruits for diabetics could be said to be best fruits for diabetics. Fruits having these two characteristics are particularly beneficial fruits for diabetic patients: Low Glycemic Index -Fruits with low Glycemic Index(GI) are good for people with diabetes. Glycemic Index describes the effect of carbohydrates present in food materials on our blood glucose levels. Fruits with low GI will produce small change in our blood glucose and levels of insulin. Low GI fruits release the glucose slowly into the blood which avoids the sudden rise in blood glucose levels. This is an important factor in diabetes management. High Fiber content -Fruits especially rich in fiber are good fruits for diabetics as they have a low glycemic index. Fibers present in these fruits slow down the absorption rate of sugar in the bloodstream. Hence these are good fruits for diabetes. List of Best Fruits for Diabetics The healthy fruits for diabetics are listed below: -Called as a “diabetes superfood” by American Diabetes Association blueberries help the body to efficiently process blood glucose for energy. Blueberries have low calorie content which also helps in weight loss and losing belly fat. Fruits for diabetes increase the sensitivity towards insulin and help in managing blood glucose levels. -Grapefruits help in weight loss and this in turn helps to reduce insulin resistance. A study has found that consuming grapefruit could help in diabetes treatment. Scientists have found that an an Continue reading >>

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