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Can Diabetic Patient Eat Citrus Fruits?

Eat Citrus To Help Get Your Diabetes Under Control

Eat Citrus To Help Get Your Diabetes Under Control

Citrus fruit may hold the answer to diabetes management What could be more commonplace than the orange? We juice it, eat it, decorate it with cloves at the holidays, and even named a color after it. These little spheres of juiciness also house a rich store of vitamins, minerals, fiber, pectin, and a category of nutrients called flavonoids. This broad class of plant chemicals includes flavanones, flavonols, and phenolic acids, which have been shown to be great anti-inflammatories and antioxidants, while also helping to prevent cancer, blood clots, and bacteria and viruses. And according to a study from Preventative Medicine, they can also help in the management of diabetes. [1] And it’s not just oranges that confer these amazing health benefits. Lemons, kumquats, and orange relatives such as clementines, tangelos and mandarins, and other citrus fruits have shown tremendous protective abilities. But what is it exactly that makes citrus so powerful? It’s All About the Peel Research has shown that the bulk of citrus’ health benefits lie in the peel.[2] In fact, an orange peel contains 136 mg of vitamin C per 100 grams. The fleshy part you eat (the pulp) has only 71 mg. It doesn’t end there. The peel also contains several times the amount of vitamins A and B, calcium, selenium, manganese and zinc than the pulp. And we are literally throwing this all away! Like your skin, the peel also has several layers. The top layer (the colored part) is called the flavedo. The white inner layer is the albedo. Like the other nutrients mentioned above, the peel also has the greatest concentration of flavonoids. The three types of flavonoids found in all citrus fruits are: Flavanones Flavones Flavones A 1998 study found that flavanones in particular are greater in the albedo (the whi Continue reading >>

Enjoy Citrus Fruits As Part Of Your Diabetes Meal Plan

Enjoy Citrus Fruits As Part Of Your Diabetes Meal Plan

See how Spartans make a difference in Michigan Enjoy citrus fruits as part of your diabetes meal plan Options for fresh fruits are limited for those who live in northern states. Luckily, citrus fruits are in season and not too high in carbohydrates. Posted on December 8, 2017 by Joan Schilling , Michigan State University Extension Fresh fruits are a delicious part of any meal and also make healthy snacks. Farmers markets in Michigan are overflowing with a bounty of fruits in the summer but as winter approaches options diminish. Luckily, citrus fruits from warmer climates come into season as snow flurries begin in northern states. Citrus fruits have a moderate amount of carbohydrate and are high in vitamin C. Medium orange = 18 grams of carbohydrates Half grapefruit = 13 grams of carbohydrates Medium tangerine = 13 grams of carbohydrates Medium clementine = 9 grams of carbohydrates Besides being tasty, citrus fruits are good for health and the American Cancer Association states that Many studies have linked intake of foods rich in vitamin C to a lower risk of cancer. They explain that while this is true for studies of whole foods, the few studies in which vitamin C has been given as a supplement have not shown a reduced risk for cancer. If you have diabetes, it is important to balance the amount of carbohydrates you eat throughout the day. Eating a whole fruit is generally better than drinking fruit juice. This is because the whole fruit contains fiber which delays digestion. This will help you feel full and will not spike blood sugar levels as quickly as drinking fruit juice can. So enjoy a citrus fruit as a snack between meals or try this recipe from The Food Advisor from the American Diabetes Association website. Try adding some grilled chicken breast to make this sa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Ex-Diabetic Sidebar: When I was diabetic, my doctors and the hospital's dietitian told me that I would have to avoid fruits. I found that kind of strange, especially, since some of my hospital meals included applesauce, tangerine slices and orange juice! Avoiding fruits was difficult for me because I had a "sweet tooth" -- a strong craving for sweets. Being diabetic, my body craved sugar and I loved sweets -- not just fruits -- I loved apple pie, brownies, chocolate chip cookies, and ice cream. During my research, I discovered how to stop the cravings (see below). I also learned that eating some whole fruit can be beneficial, despite the sugar content in most fruits. Why? Because it's better to eat an apple than some cookies or ice cream to satisfy your craving for something sweet! :-) In addition, studies have shown that the nutrients within most fruits (e.g. antioxidants, Vitamin C, fiber, water) can help prevent and reverse the damage to blood vessels and body tissues caused by Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and other similar diseases. The key is to make sure that you follow an effective reverse diabetes nutritional program such as the one defined in the "Death to Diabetes" 10-Step Reverse Diabetes Wellness Program. Most whole fruits are on the moderate to low end of the Glycemic Index (GI), making them a pretty good choice for most people with diabetes. Many fruits are also packed with vitamins A and C, as well as water,fiber and antioxidants (flavonoids) such as catechin, quercetin, and anthocyanidin. Top 10 Fruits | Reverse Diabetes The following is a list of the top 10 fruits that most diabetics can eat because, for most diabetics, these fruits don't cause large or sustained blood glucose spikes. As a result, eating these fruits can help to satisfy your sweet to Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Oranges?

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Oranges?

Oranges are a healthy citrus fruit, but if you have type 2 diabetes, you may worry about their high sugar content if your blood sugar levels are out of control. Fortunately, oranges contain components that make them a nutritious part of a diabetic diet as long as you eat them in concert with other healthy foods. Video of the Day People with type 2 diabetes cannot properly modulate blood sugar levels because they either don't produce enough insulin or their bodies can't effectively use the insulin they do produce. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, making up between 90 to 95 percent of all diabetics, according to FamilyDoctor.org. The food that a type 2 diabetic eats can significantly affect blood glucose levels, so choosing the right foods is important. Fruit in a Diabetic Diet Fruit can and should be part of a diabetic's daily diet. Diabetics who eat between 1,600 and 2,000 calories per day need to eat at least three servings of fruit per day. Those consuming 1,200 to 1,600 calories need two fruit servings daily, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. The fiber, vitamins and minerals in fruit are essential to maintaining overall health. Because fruits provide carbohydrates, you usually need to pair them with a protein or fat. Oranges provide high levels of fiber, which is important for digestive health, and vitamin C, which supports the immune system. The carbohydrate count in one orange is about 10 to 15 g. For diabetics using a carbohydrate-counting system to determine how much they can eat in a day, an orange is one serving. For diabetics using the glycemic index or glycemic load of foods to plan what they eat, oranges are also a good choice. The glycemic load of an orange is about 5, a low number that indicates the fruit causes only a s Continue reading >>

25 Best Fruits For Diabetics

25 Best Fruits For Diabetics

Are you a diabetic? Are you worried about foods with a high glycemic index? Don’t worry. We are here to give you the best fruits that you can relish without worrying about your blood sugar levels. Would you like to know more? Keep reading! Diet For Diabetics: Diabetics do not have to eliminate all sugary foods from their regular meals. Sugar or glucose is a vital requirement for the human body. It fuels us with energy so that we can stay active all day. But when you have to deal with diabetes, it is necessary to take care of your sweet cravings in an appropriate manner. Hence, portion control is essential for every diabetic. So, what would be the best practical way to ensure diabetics get their required intake of sugar? Fruits: The Ultimate Food For Diabetics: Most would prefer a healthier and natural way, and what better way is there to go with than fruits! A quick light snack, an after meal desert, or simply blended and squeezed into a refreshing drink, fruits can be consumed in many ways. Fruits also provide us with roughage, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. But how would fruits benefit a diabetic? Well, in addition to the various nutrients fruits give, the simple sugars or carbs in them are a whole lot easier for the body to process. Also, these are the healthier kind of sugars the body needs. Diabetes may cause weight loss, resulting in severe health adversities. Including fruits in their diet regimen can contribute towards reducing the excessive weight of many diabetics. One of the effects of diabetes is that it makes people hungry all the time, and the intake of certain fruits can create the feeling of fullness. Again, too much of anything can prove to be bad for you. Thus, when consuming fruits, a diabetic must be cautious and careful while picking the fru Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

11 Best Low-sugar Fruits

11 Best Low-sugar Fruits

Watching your sugar intake is a good idea, but taming your sweet tooth can be an incredibly difficult feat. Perhaps you’ve already cut out processed sugars, but didn’t realize how much sugar is contained in fruit. Or maybe you live with diabetes and want to know which fruits will have the least impact on your blood sugar. While fruit also contains lots of other healthy nutrients, some varieties are higher in sugar than others. Learn which fruits are lowest in sugar content so you can satisfy your sweet tooth without breaking the sugar bank. 1. Lemons (and limes) High in vitamin C, lemons and their lime green counterparts are fairly sour fruits. They don’t contain much sugar (only a gram or two per lemon or lime) and are the perfect addition to a glass of water to help curb your appetite. 2. Raspberries With only five grams — a bit more than a teaspoon — of sugar per cup, and lots of fiber to help fill you up, raspberries are one of several amazing berries to make the list. 3. Strawberries Strawberries are surprisingly low in sugar considering they taste so sweet and delicious. One cup of raw strawberries has about seven grams of sugar, along with over 100 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin C. 4. Blackberries Blackberries also only have seven grams of sugar per cup. You don’t have to feel guilty snacking on these dark colored berries. As a bonus, they’re also high in antioxidants as well as fiber. 5. Kiwis These odd fuzzy green-fleshed fruits are technically considered a berry too. Kiwis (or kiwifruits) are rich in vitamin C and low in sugar — with just six grams per kiwi. You can find kiwis all year-round at the grocery store. 6. Grapefruit Another citrus fruit to make the list is grapefruit. While grapefruits certainly don’t taste as s Continue reading >>

Top 20 Fruits For Diabetics

Top 20 Fruits For Diabetics

Some serious health conditions need extra precaution when it comes to our eating habits. One such disease, diabetes, restricts us from eating certain types of food. From watching our sugar intake to controlling the consumption of refined carbohydrates, precautions could help in reducing the risk factor of diabetes, which could even lead to some types of cancer. Quite many people believe that diabetics cannot eat certain fruits. According to the guidelines by nutritionists and medical institutions, it is important for everyone to have at least 4 to 5 fruits servings in a day. Considering the fact that a person who is suffering from diabetes, should have controlled sugar level, there is no need for them to avoid fruits to keep their blood sugar level controlled. They just need to be extra careful when eating certain kind of fruits such as bananas, litchis, custard apples and mud apples. Eat them but in limited quantity. Here we have listed top 20 fruits that can be eaten by diabetics... Pears Rich in vitamins and fibre, this delicious food is one of the healthier snacking options for diabetics. Papaya Another 'super-food' for diabetics is papaya. Papaya contains essentials minerals and vitamins, hence, can be eaten by people suffering from diabetes. Starfruit Somewhat similar to jamuns, starfruit is another option for diabetics. It controls your blood sugar level but in case a person has diabetes nephropathy, starfruit should be avoided. Guava Guava is good for controlling blood sugar and also prevents constipation. Loaded with vitamin A and C, they also contain high dietary fibre. Kiwi fruit You could include kiwi in your diet. Many researchers have proved that eating kiwis could actually help you in lowering your blood sugar levels. Black Jamun This fruit is one of the Continue reading >>

What Fruits Can A Diabetic Eat?

What Fruits Can A Diabetic Eat?

Diabetics often ask whether it is safe for them to eat large quantities of fruit. Many diabetic patients avoid eating fruit because they are worried that the high sugar content found in most fruits will worsen their condition. Fortunately, there are many fruits a diabetic can enjoy which do not significantly affect blood glucose levels, in fact certain fruits may actually improve glucose control and insulin sensitivity over time. Good Fruits For Diabetics Fiber rich foods are generally safe for diabetics to eat because they tend to have a lower glycemic index (GI) and therefore do not spike blood sugar levels to the same extent as high GI foods. This is because fiber delays the emptying of stomach contents into the small intestine which slows down the absorption of sugar into the blood stream. Fiber rich fruits tend to be fruits with edible skins and seeds as it is these parts of the fruit that are highest in fiber. Fruits high in fiber include (fiber content in brackets): passion fruit (10.4%), raspberries (6.5%), apples (2.5%), pears (2.1%), apricots (2.1%), blueberries (2.7%), kiwifruit (2.1%), strawberries (2.0%), pomegranates (3.4%), and avocados (6.7%). 3 Foods to Throw Out Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com The avocado is not only high in fiber, but is also a rich source of monounsaturated fat. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends a diet high in monounsaturated fat as it can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease which is more common in diabetics than the general population. There is also some evidence that a diet rich in monounsaturated fat can improve glycemic control. Fruits high in fructose, and those with high fructose to glucose ratios are also beneficial to diabetics because fructose does not requ Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Not all healthy foods are created equal. Greens may be good for you, but the nutrients in iceberg lettuce may not be as plentiful as those in kale, spinach, and Swiss chard. Besides nutrient content, the glycemic index (GI) of a food may also help you make healthy choices. The GI measures how quickly a food will raise blood sugar. Low GI foods have a score of 55 or less, while high GI foods have a score of 70 or more. In general, lower GI foods are a better choice for people with diabetes. Foods that are both nutritious and have a low GI are helpful in managing health and blood glucose levels. Here are 10 superfoods that are especially good for those with diabetes. 1. Non-Starchy Vegetables Non-starchy vegetables have fewer carbs per serving. They include everything from artichokes and asparagus to broccoli and beets. This category of veggies goes a long way in satisfying your hunger and boosting your intake of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals. These vegetables are also low in calories and carbohydrates, making them some of the few foods that people with diabetes can enjoy almost with abandon. In fact, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) identifies most non-starchy vegetables as low GI foods with a ranking of 55 or less. A small study of 11 people found that a low-calorie diet consisting of non-starchy vegetables may successfully reverse type 2 diabetes. 2. Non-Fat or Low-Fat Plain Milk and Yogurt Vitamin D is essential for good health. One of its roles is to keep bones healthy, yet many of us don’t get as much as we need. Non-fat dairy foods, including milk and yogurt, are fortified with vitamin D. These dairy products are smart choices for diabetics because they have low GI scores: Skim milk has a GI score of 32 while reduced fat yogurt has a GI sco Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

Diabetes mellitus (DM) commonly referred to as Diabetes, is a chronic disorder. It occurs when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or when the cells of the body become resistant to insulin. In either case, the blood sugar cannot get into the cells for storage, which then leads to serious complications. Diabetes, perhaps more than any other disease, is strongly associated with the western diet, as it was uncommon in cultures consuming a 'primitive diet'. However as cultures switch from their native diets, to the foods of commerce; their rate of diabetes increases eventually reaching the proportions seen in the western societies. However, what's alarming is the fact that India Is home to 62 million diabetics and the number is estimated to be 100 million by 2030. Obesity is seen as one of the major contributing factors to the development of insulin resistance in approximately 90% of the individuals with type-2 diabetes. In most cases, achieving ideal body weight is associated with the restoration of normal blood sugar levels. Hence dietary modifications and treatment are fundamental to the successful treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. There are some specific foods that have been shown to produce positive effects on blood sugar control. These foods have a low glycemic index and glycemic load and are high in fiber. When it comes to diabetics eating fruits, there is a lot of confusion and information is very misleading. Just remember that moderation is the key here. TIPS TO ENJOY FRUITS IF YOU ARE DIABETIC: - Always eat fruits that are fresh, local and in season. - Eat fruits that have a low glycemic index. - Fruits should not be eaten with your main meals, its best to have fruits in between meals and as a snack. - Fruits with high glycemic index should be Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

Eating Fruit As A Diabetic

Eating Fruit As A Diabetic

There is a common assumption among many that fruit is not an okay choice for people with diabetes. People have formed the idea that diabetics should steer clear of fruits because these foods contain high sugar levels like fructose. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases says eating fruit when you have diabetes is healthy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) reports that as long as you are not allergic to fruit, you can eat whatever fruit you want. Over 420 million people worldwide have diabetes. More than 29 million people in the US have been diagnosed with diabetes. Plus, there are new studies in China promoting the health benefits of consuming fruit, even if you are diabetic. Researchers, led by Huaidong Du of the University of Oxford in the UK, studied 500,000 people in China, patients with diabetes and without, and found that eating fruit did not negatively affect diabetics when the portions were done in moderation. The participants of the China Kadoorie BioBank study were between the ages of 30 and 79. The study lasted for seven years. Medical News Today reports, “The team found that people who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study and consumed fresh fruit in high amounts had a significantly lower risk of diabetes.” People that may have diabetes running in their family can rest assured that eating fruits every day can reduce your risk of developing diabetes by 12%. The health benefits of eating fruit daily are endless. Eating fruit every day lower relative risk of dying early, reduce heart trouble, stroke, kidney diseases, and eye diseases. The health benefits attributed to eating fruit are possible because fruit is full of fiber and antioxidants. Research from the China Kadoorie BioBank shows that people with dia Continue reading >>

Fruit And Diabetes - Can I Eat Fruit?

Fruit And Diabetes - Can I Eat Fruit?

Tweet Along with vegetables, fruit is one of the healthiest food groups and contains an important source of vitamin C which helps to keep our cells healthy. Can someone with diabetes eat fruit? People with diabetes can eat fruit. However, fruit can be quite sugary so bear this in mind to prevent blood sugar levels rising too high Daily recommendations of fruit The Department of Health advises us to consume at least 5 portions of fruit or vegetables a day. The American Diabetes Associations recommends fruit as a good option if you’re having a dessert. Effect on diabetes Fruit is naturally quite high in sugars and fruit will typically have more carbohydrate than non-starchy vegetables. Some fruits are more sugary than others. For example, banana and oranges are examples of more sugary fruits whereas berries are examples of less sugary fruits. You may find therefore that you need to choose smaller portions of certain fruits depending on your blood glucose levels. Fruit juices and smoothies typically contain a lot of fruit sugar so exercise caution with how much fruit juice you consume. Health benefits of fruit Fruit helps to supply us with fibre, minerals and vitamins, and they are particularly high in their supply of vitamin C. Vitamin C is important for preventing our cells being damaged. Fibre helps digestion and is linked with helping reduce cholesterol levels. As with vegetables, different fruit have different characteristics. For example grapefruit contains a healthy amount of vitamin A and potassium whereas berries are good sources of vitamin K and manganese. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention note that eating the recommended quantity of fruit and vegetables may reduce susceptibility to chronic disease and cancers. Which fruits are lowest in carbs? Continue reading >>

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