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Can Diabetes Make Your Breath Smell Of Alcohol?

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Dispatch calls your EMS unit to the side of a roadway, where police officers have detained a driver on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol intoxication. You find the female driver handcuffed in the back seat of a police cruiser. She is screaming profanities and hitting her head against the side window. An officer tells you that she was weaving in and out of traffic at highway speed, and it took several minutes to pull her over. She was noncooperative and it took several officers to subdue her. She sustained a laceration to her head, which the officers want you to evaluate. The woman continues to swear at you as you open the car door. You note that she is diaphoretic and breathing heavily. You can smell what appears to be the sour, boozy smell of alcohol, even though you are not close to her. You can see that the small laceration near the hairline on her right forehead has already stopped bleeding. Her speech is slurred and she appears to be in no mood to be evaluated. The police officers are ready to take her down to the station to be processed for driving under the influence. Sound familiar? It should — this is a scene that is played out often in EMS systems. While it may seem initially that these incidents are not medical in nature, they really deserve close attention by the EMS personnel. In this article we will focus on the challenges of evaluating a patient who is intoxicated versus a patient who is experiencing an acute diabetic emergency. There have been numerous instances where EMS providers have exposed themselves to serious liability secondary to medical negligence. Let's take a closer look. Diabetes Diabetes is a serious disease that affects nearly 29 million people in the United States [1]. Advances in diabetic care have resulted in an impr Continue reading >>

Bad Breath? Chances Are That You Could Be Diabetic

Bad Breath? Chances Are That You Could Be Diabetic

Bad Breath? Chances are that you could be Diabetic. Breath odour is the scent of the air you breathe out of your mouth. Unpleasant breath odour is commonly called bad breath orhalitosis; this is something you should not ignore. Those close to you would certainly agree. Bad breath can originate from the most common causes like, poor dental or oral hygiene, the cook's heavy hand with garlic or an underlying serious health problem? Regardless, you can take steps to prevent bad breath at home and treat halitosis with the help of your dentist. Your breath has an interesting ability to provide clues to your overall health. ·Bad breath related to poor oral hygiene is most common and caused by release of sulphur compounds by bacteria in the mouth ·Fruity odour in the breath is a sign ofketoacidosis, which may occur in diabetes. It is a potentially life-threatening condition ·Breath that smells like feces can occur with prolongedvomiting,especially when there is abowel obstruction ·Bad breath having an ammonia-like odor (also described as urine-like or"fishy") occurs in people withchronic kidneydisease ·Similarly, a very foul fruit odor may be a sign of anorexia nervosa ·Other diseases, such as asthma, lung and liver disease also can cause distinct odors on the breath. Bad breath, also called halitosis, can be so intense that doctors may even be able to use it to identify diabetes. Recently, researchers have found that infrared breath analyzers can be effective in identifying if you have pre-diabetes or early-stage diabetes. And researchers are testing a breath analyzer that even measures blood glucose levels. What Causes Diabetes Breath? Diabetes induced halitosis has two main causes: Gum disease High levels of ketones in the blood. Gum Diseases (Periodontitis) Gum diseas Continue reading >>

Drinking, Drugs And Diabetes* Do You Know?

Drinking, Drugs And Diabetes* Do You Know?

Page 1 While we don’t recommend that you drink, smoke, or take drugs, we know that adoles- cence is a period where people often try new things, even risky ones. If you choose to experiment, we want you to know how to be safer as these substances relate to your health as a person with diabetes. ALCOHOL AND DIABETES As a person with T1D, your body handles alcohol differently than someone else’s, which can be dangerous if you are not prepared, paying attention, and know what to look out for. What happens in your body when you drink alcohol? - Your body considers it a toxin and wants to get rid of it, so your liver starts working to break down the alcohol. - Your liver stores sugar. So if you drink a moderate amount, your blood glucose can rise. But if you drink a lot, you have a much higher risk of having a severe low blood sugar because your liver is too busy breaking down the alcohol and can’t raise your blood sugar for you. - This risk of low blood sugars can continue for 24 hours after drinking—until your liver clears all the alcohol out of your body. What’s your risk? You are at risk of severe lows if you are taking insulin or certain diabetes pills. If you make the decision to drink alcohol, here are some tips to keep you safe: • Wear your medical ID. • Use the buddy system – you don’t have to tell everyone at the party you have diabetes, but make sure you drink with a friend who can look out for you, keep you safe, and knows what to do if you get low. • NEVER drink on an empty stomach. Eating a meal first will take the pressure off your liver. • Check your blood sugar frequently, including before your first drink. • Drink slowly (sips, not gulps!) and in moderation. • Keep track of Continue reading >>

Banishing Bad Breath

Banishing Bad Breath

Stinky breath. Halitosis. Fetor oris. Whatever the name, it’s something that no one wants. Bad breath can be mildly annoying (as well as socially upsetting), and while it may be traced back to the 13-garlic-clove chicken dinner you ate last night, it can also indicate something more serious, especially if you have diabetes. Read on to learn more about halitosis, its causes, and what you can do to combat it. What is bad breath? If your breath smells bad to you or to others, you have bad breath, otherwise known as halitosis. We’ve probably all had it at some time or another, perhaps related to a food or beverage that we’ve consumed, or possibly we’ve woken up in the morning with what I call “dragon breath.” At its best, bad breath is unpleasant (to you and to others) and can certainly be embarrassing (who wants bad breath when you’re on a job interview or a first date?). Our society deems bad breath as something to be banished, too: just walk down the aisle of the pharmacy and witness the mouthwashes, toothpastes, and other potions to rid yourself of this condition. Unfortunately, most of these products work temporarily and, in some cases, can actually worsen the condition. How do you know if you have bad breath? Surprising as it may seem, you may not know if you have halitosis. The best way to check your breath is to ask a spouse, family member, or close friend to check out your mouth odor and let you know. If no one is around to help you out, lick your wrist, let it dry, and then smell it. If your wrist smells bad, you have bad breath. What causes bad breath? There are many potential causes of bad breath, ranging from food to oral hygiene to health conditions. Here’s a run-down of the main culprits: Food: Food particles that get stuck in your mouth and t Continue reading >>

The Link Between Diabetes & Bad Breath

The Link Between Diabetes & Bad Breath

People with bad breath are essentially ashamed of their condition. They avoid talking to others for fear that they may be ridiculed or laughed at. This can cause some serious self esteem issues to these people in the long run. In most cases, bad breath is caused by environmental and lifestyle factors. The way they accomplish their oral hygiene regimens, the food that they eat and the beverages that they drink often times can be the root causes of their foul smelling breath. There are a few cases, however, that the persistence of the halitosis condition of a person is due to a more serious underlying medical condition. In some cases diabetes = bad breath. Diabetes is considered to be one of the many medical conditions that could have bad breath as one of its symptoms. The Correlation of Diabetes & Bad Breath Diabetes is a medical condition that causes the body to have high blood sugar caused by the body’s inability to either produce ample amount of insulin or inability to respond to the produced insulin by the body. This uncontrollable and fluctuating blood sugar levels makes a person with this condition more prone to gum diseases that causes bad breath. Thus diabetes and bad breath usually go hand in hand. A person with diabetes has the inability to use sugar as a fuel source and instead, fat is utilized by the body instead. Due to this, the breakdown of fats causes the occurrence of ketones. These ketones are acidic and removed by the body through its waste and through the breath. When this happens,diabetes-bad breath occurs. Steps To Avoid Bad Breath In Diabetes There are several steps in eliminating diabetes bad breath. The most important step is to try to control blood sugar levels. In addition to this, oral hygiene regimens have to be strictly followed. Brush the Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes + Bad Breath - Possible Causes

Signs Of Diabetes + Bad Breath - Possible Causes

People with type 2 diabetes are more prone to dental problems due to higher levels of blood sugar. Dental disease, in turn, can cause halitosis or bad breath. Many people are 'undiagnosed diabetics', so if you have signs of diabetes + bad breath, a blood glucose test may be in order. Problems like tooth abscesses and gum infections can cause a noticeable odor. Pain is not always a good indicator that there is a dental problem, as some people do not experience pain with these conditions. If you notice a bad odor, or someone else indicates that there is one, take it seriously. Get it checked out as soon as you can. In some cases there is a simple cure for the problem; other times the cure may be more involved. Regular dental checkups and cleanings are important for good diabetes dental care. These issues may not initially seem all that pressing, but dental issues can lead to other problems as well. It can lead to severe pain, problems chewing or swallowing, loss of teeth, even heart disease and other serious health conditions. Another reason for bad breath is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. One of the symptoms of hypoglycemia is a chemical-like smell to the breath that some people describe as smelling like acetone or alcohol. Hypoglycemia should be treated immediately by administering glucose gel or another fast-acting carbohydrate. Do not ignore hypoglycemia; doing so can lead to fainting or diabetic shock, which can in turn lead to coma or death. Excess bacteria in the mouth can also cause bad breath. We all have bacteria in our mouths that digest food particles. High blood glucose, however, can cause bacteria to increase excessively, which can in turn cause bad breath. Diabetics should aim to hit their target blood glucose levels (as determined by their doctor) and c Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

Your breath has an interesting ability to provide clues to your overall health. A sweet, fruity odor can be a sign of ketoacidosis, an acute complication of diabetes. An odor of ammonia is associated with kidney disease. Similarly, a very foul, fruity odor may be a sign of anorexia nervosa. Other diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and liver disease, also can cause distinct odors on the breath. Bad breath, also called halitosis, can be so telling that doctors may even be able to use it to identify diabetes. Recently, researchers have found that infrared breath analyzers can be effective in identifying prediabetes or early-stage diabetes. Diabetes-related halitosis has two main causes: periodontal disease and high levels of ketones in the blood. Periodontal diseases Periodontal diseases, also called gum diseases, include gingivitis, mild periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis. In these inflammatory diseases, bacteria attack the tissues and bone that support your teeth. Inflammation can affect metabolism and increase your blood sugar, which worsens diabetes. While diabetes can lead to periodontal diseases, these diseases can also create further problems for people with diabetes. According to a report in IOSR Journal of Dental and Medical Sciences, an estimated one in three people with diabetes will also experience periodontal diseases. Heart disease and stroke, which can be complications of diabetes, are also linked to periodontal disease. Diabetes can damage blood vessels, which can reduce blood flow throughout your body, including your gums. If your gums and teeth aren’t receiving a proper supply of blood, they may become weak and more prone to infection. Diabetes may also raise glucose levels in your mouth, promoting bacteria growth, infection, Continue reading >>

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

Some doctors and clinics are using new infrared devices to find people with pre- or early stage diabetes simply by mechanically “smelling” their breath “Halitosis” the medical name for bad breath is an old but accurate way of diagnosing several different potentially harmful diseases. A sweet smell, like fruit is a sign of ketosis (see below). An ammonia smell can indicate kidney problems. Anorexia nervosa gives off a foul fruity odor. Other odors can be associated with liver problems, lung cancer, asthma, or cystic fibrosis. Using familiar technology like alcohol breath analyzers, some doctors and clinics are using new infrared devices to find people with pre- or early stage diabetes simply by mechanically “smelling” their breath. 90 percent of bad breath odors are composed of gas from Sulphur compounds (H2S, CH3SH, CH3SCH3), produced by oral bacteria. These devices contain a semi-conductor gas sensor sensitive enough to equal gas chromatography units which are both incredibly expensive and only used in large science labs. Periodontitis, gingivitis, and other periodontal diseases are inflammatory diseases of the mouth and can be the result of diabetes or bacterial infections and can give off their own distinct odors. They can also affect one’s metabolism, increasing blood sugar and making diabetes even worse. One can actually make the other worse. Diabetes and periodontal disease can also affect or worsen cardio vascular disease and stroke. Diabetics heal slower that non-diabetics and therefore the mouth infections and periodontitis may persist for years. Signs of oral infection include: red, bleeding, tender, or sensitive teeth and/or gums. Bad breath can be reduced with the following steps: No smoking Drink lots of water Visit dentist or physician for me Continue reading >>

Can Ketones Fool A Dui Breath Test Even If I Don't Have Diabetes?

Can Ketones Fool A Dui Breath Test Even If I Don't Have Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, you may find yourself unfairly charged with California DUI as a result of either hypoglycemia or ketosis--or both. Diabetics often experience hypoglycemia--the condition in which one's blood sugar is too low.1 The symptoms of hypoglycemia can look a lot like those of intoxication--and can lead an officer to suspect you of VC 23152(a) driving under the influence. People with diabetes are also prone to "ketosis," which involves the production of ketones. Ketones are waste substances produced by the liver when the body burns fat stores for energy.2 Some of these ketones are excreted in the breath and can "fool" a DUI breath test. This in turn can lead to charges of VC 23152(b) driving with a BAC of 0.08 or above. So diabetes can be a defense to California DUI charges. Below, our California DUI defense attorneys answer the following frequently asked questions about diabetes and California DUI: Can diabetic hypoglycemia lead to unfair DUI charges? Unfortunately, diabetes and DUI charges are closely connected. One basis for this connection is the phenomenon of "hypoglycemia." People with diabetes--either Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes--experience hypoglycemia when their blood sugar gets too low. This can happen if you: What does hypoglycemia/diabetes have to do with DUI? The answer lies in the list of common symptoms of hypoglycemia, which include: Shakiness; Sweating; Anxiety or nervousness; Clumsiness or jerky movements; Slurred speech; Drowsiness; and You may notice that these symptoms of diabetic hypoglycemia are a lot like the symptoms of having had too much to drink or taken drugs. Thus, it is not uncommon for people with diabetes suffering from hypoglycemia to get pulled over while driving--and for officers to then suspect them of DUI or DUI o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Bad Breath – The Truth Behind The Myth

Diabetes And Bad Breath – The Truth Behind The Myth

Diabetes and bad breath are often related to each other and it is no longer a myth. Medical researches show that these two conditions have relation to each other. Uncontrolled blood sugar increases the risk of unpleasant breath since high blood sugar levels make any gum diseases worse, the usual cause of stinky breath. How these two conditions relate to each other Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a definitely a life-threatening and is a very serious disease. Ketoacidosis is generally seen in persons suffering from type 1 diabetes. This complication occurs when the body is unable to use sugar (glucose) as a fuel source because the patients do not produce enough insulin, and because of that the fat is used instead. Ketones build up in the body and this is the byproducts of fat breakdown. Type 1 diabetes is the one that occurs usually at childhood. These acidic ketones make the blood acidic in nature. Our body has natural way of getting rid of these ketones through urine or through breath and it causes bad breath. This is the truth how diabetes and bad breath are related to each other. There are lots of ways to get rid of bad breath caused by diabetes but proper oral hygiene is the most effective. How to Avoid Halitosis Caused by Diabetes: * You can get rid of halitosis by controlling your blood glucose levels. * Brush your teeth at least twice a day. Cleaning the tongue is effective too for removing the biofilm coating your tongue where bacteria reside. Use germ-fighting toothpaste and flossing is recommended to remove food particles lodged between teeth. If you are a denture wearer you should remove dentures nightly and clean them before placing in the mouth. * Drink plenty of water is another key to halitosis treatment. Balance water intake creates a moist environment and Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Symptoms

Diabetic Coma Symptoms

A diabetic coma is one of the most life-threatening complications of diabetes. The main symptom is unconsciousness. A diabetic coma can be the result of having a blood glucose level that is too high (hyperglycemia) or a blood glucose level that is too low (hypoglycemia). The diabetic in a diabetic coma is unconscious and can die if the condition is not treated. Symptoms of Diabetic Coma Before you lapse into a diabetic coma, there are usually warning signs of blood sugar levels that are too low or blood sugar levels that are too high. For example, if the blood sugar is too high, the you may experience tiredness, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, increased urination, increased thirst, a rapid heart rate, a dry mouth, and a fruity smell to your breath. If the blood sugar is too low, you may experience signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia, including weakness, tiredness, anxiety, tremulousness, nervousness, nausea, confusion, problems communicating, light-headedness, hunger, or dizziness. If you have had diabetes for many years, you may not have many symptoms of low blood sugar and won’t know you have the condition prior to falling into a coma. If you suspect that you have either high blood sugar or low blood sugar, you need to check your blood glucose levels and do what your doctor has recommended for you to treat the disease. If you don’t feel better after trying home remedies, you need to call 911 and get some kind of emergency care. Causes of Diabetic Coma The main cause of a diabetic coma is an extremely high blood sugar or an extremely low blood sugar. The following medical conditions can cause a diabetic coma: Diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome. This is a condition in which the blood sugar is as high as 600 mg/d: or 33.3 mmol per liter. There are no ketones in the u Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and β-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal.[1] Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover.[2] Ketosis may also give off an odor, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Cause[edit] Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively.[3] In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accomp Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

The symptoms of type 1 diabetes can develop very quickly (over a few days or weeks), particularly in children. In older adults, the symptoms can often take longer to develop (a few months). However, they should disappear when you start taking insulin and the condition is under control. The main symptoms of diabetes are: feeling very thirsty urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk itchiness around the genital area, or regular bouts of thrush (a yeast infection) blurred vision caused by the lens of your eye changing shape slow healing of cuts and grazes Vomiting or heavy, deep breathing can also occur at a later stage. This is a dangerous sign and requires immediate admission to hospital for treatment. See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. When to seek urgent medical attention You should seek urgent medical attention if you have diabetes and develop: a loss of appetite nausea or vomiting a high temperature stomach pain fruity smelling breath – which may smell like pear drops or nail varnish (others will usually be able to smell it, but you won't) Hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) If you have diabetes, your blood glucose levels can become very low. This is known as hypoglycaemia (or a "hypo"), and it's triggered when injected insulin in your body moves too much glucose out of your bloodstream. In most cases, hypoglycaemia occurs as a result of taking too much insulin, although it can also develop if you skip a meal, exercise very vigorously or drink alcohol on an empty stomach. Symptoms of a "hypo" include: feeling shaky and irritable sweating tingling lips feeling weak feeling confused hunger nausea (feeling sick) A hypo can be brought under control simply by eating or drinking somethin Continue reading >>

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person's breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person's breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person's breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. Contents of this article: How diabetes can affect breath Diabetes can affect the way a person's breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person's breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person's breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person's breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body does not make enough insulin to break down glucose in the blood. This means that the body's cells do not receive enough glucose to use as energy. When the body cannot get its energy from sugar, it switches to burning fat for fuel instead. The process of breaking down fat to use as energy releases by-products called ketones. Ketone bodies include acetone. Acetone is the same substance that is used in nail varnish remover and is distinguished by its fruity smell. When a pe Continue reading >>

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