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Can Diabetes Insipidus Cause Weight Gain

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes insipidus is a condition in which your ability to control the balance of water within your body is not working properly. Your kidneys are not able to retain water and this causes you to pass large amounts of urine. Because of this, you become more thirsty and want to drink more. There are two different types of diabetes insipidus: cranial and nephrogenic. Cranial diabetes insipidus may only be a short-term problem in some cases. Treatment includes drinking plenty of fluids so that you do not become lacking in fluid in the body (dehydrated). Treatment with medicines may also be needed for both types of diabetes insipidus. A note about thirst and water balance in your body Getting the balance right between how much water your body takes in and how much water your body passes out is very important. This is because a large proportion (about 70%) of your body is actually water. Also, water levels in your body help to control the levels of some important salts, particularly sodium and potassium. Your body normally controls (regulates) water balance in two main ways: By making you feel thirsty and so encouraging you to drink and take more water in. Through the action of a chemical (hormone) called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) which controls the amount of water passed out in your urine. ADH is also known as vasopressin. It is made in a part of your brain called the hypothalamus. It is then transported to another part of your brain, the pituitary gland, from where it is released into your bloodstream. After its release, ADH has an effect on your kidneys. It causes your kidneys to pass out less water in your urine (your urine becomes more concentrated). So, if your body is lacking in fluid (dehydrated), your thirst sensation will be triggered, encouraging you to drink. As Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

On this page: What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder that occurs when a person's kidneys pass an abnormally large volume of urine that is insipid—dilute and odorless. In most people, the kidneys pass about 1 to 2 quarts of urine a day. In people with diabetes insipidus, the kidneys can pass 3 to 20 quarts of urine a day. As a result, a person with diabetes insipidus may feel the need to drink large amounts of liquids. Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus—which includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes—are unrelated, although both conditions cause frequent urination and constant thirst. Diabetes mellitus causes high blood glucose, or blood sugar, resulting from the body's inability to use blood glucose for energy. People with diabetes insipidus have normal blood glucose levels; however, their kidneys cannot balance fluid in the body. What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist. They are located just below the rib cage, one on each side of the spine. Every day, the kidneys normally filter about 120 to 150 quarts of blood to produce about 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra fluid. The urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder through tubes called ureters. The bladder stores urine. When the bladder empties, urine flows out of the body through a tube called the urethra, located at the bottom of the bladder. How is fluid regulated in the body? A person's body regulates fluid by balancing liquid intake and removing extra fluid. Thirst usually controls a person’s rate of liquid intake, while urination removes most fluid, although people also lose fluid through sweating, breathing, or diarrhea. The hormone vasopressin, also called antidiuretic hormone, con Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Introduction Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder where the system used by the body to regulate its water levels becomes disrupted. This disruption leads to the main symptoms of diabetes insipidus: excessive and prolonged thirst needing to urinate frequently passing large amounts of urine – in the most severe cases a person can pass up to 20 litres a day Read more about the symptoms of diabetes insipidus. What causes diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is caused by problems with a hormone called antidiuretic hormone (ADH), also known as vasopressin. ADH plays a key role in regulating the amount of liquid in the body. ADH is made by a part of the brain called the hypothalamus and is stored just below the brain, in the pituitary gland, until needed. When the amount of water in the body becomes too low, ADH is released from the pituitary gland. This helps to retain water in the body by stopping the kidneys producing urine. In cases of diabetes insipidus, ADH does not stop the kidneys from producing urine and allows too much water to be passed from the body. Read more about the causes of diabetes insipidus. Types of diabetes insipidus There are two main types of diabetes insipidus: Cranial diabetes insipidus Cranial diabetes insipidus occurs when there is not enough ADH in the body to regulate the production of urine. This is the most common type of diabetes insipidus and can be caused by damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary gland, for example after an infection, operation, brain tumour or head injury. However, in around one in three cases of cranial diabetes insipidus there is no obvious reason why the hypothalamus stops making enough ADH. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus occurs when there is enough ADH in the body, but the kidneys fai Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Symptoms The most common symptoms associated with diabetes insipidus (DI) are extreme thirst and excessive urination. Some patients may drink as much as a full glass of fluids every 10 to 20 minutes. As DI may start in the toddler age group, the excessive thirst and asking for fluids may be misinterpreted as “bad behavior” or habit and parents may be mistakenly told to withhold fluids to break the habit. It is important that these children are allowed open access to fluids until treatment is started. If unable to find fluids easily, some children have been known to drink directly from faucets, baths, pet dishes, swimming pools, and other unusual sources around the home. The extreme urination may continue throughout the day and the night, sometimes as often as every 15-20 minutes, and often includes bed-wetting. The urine is usually pale, without color. Symptoms of diabetes insipidus are very similar to those of diabetes mellitus, except that the urine does not contain high sugar levels. Diabetes insipidus can interfere with appetite and eating. In children, it can interfere with growth and weight gain. Signs of dehydration often appear, since the body is unable to keep enough of the water it takes in. Symptoms of dehydration include: Dry skin Dry mucous membranes (sticky mouth) /reduced tears Sunken appearance to eyes Sunken fontanelles (soft spot in the skull) in infants Fatigue/sleepiness Weight loss Headache Irritability Low body temperature Muscle pains Rapid heart rate Low blood pressure/shock Adults with untreated DI may be able to drink enough water to make up for the extreme loss of urine. However, there is a serious risk of dehydration and imbalances in the blood, such as salt and potassium. Most patients with diabetes insipidus have an abnormal appearance Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus As A Predictor Of Weight Gain In Craniopharyngeoma Patients

Diabetes Insipidus As A Predictor Of Weight Gain In Craniopharyngeoma Patients

Endocrine Abstracts (2016) 41 EP931 | DOI: 10.1530/endoabs.41.EP931 Diabetes insipidus as a predictor of weight gain in craniopharyngeoma patients Tanja Skoric Polovina, Ivana Kraljevic, Mirsala Solak, Tina Dusek & Darko Kastelan Author affiliations View ePoster Download ePoster Department of Endocrinology, University Hospital Center, Zagreb, Croatia. Craniopharyngeoma patients have reduced quality of life and increased cardiovascular mortality because of severe obesity present in about 50% of patients. In the present study we analysed postoperative body mass index (BMI) in craniopharyngeoma patients depending on the presence of the diabetes insipidus (DI). We retrospectively analyzed 19 craniopharyngeoma patients (male:female=12:7, age 31.2 years, range 967) treated at our Department since 2001. The majority of patients underwent transcranial surgery (18/19), 10/19 underwent complete debulking and 9/19 underwent incomplete resection followed by radiotherapy of residual tumor. BMI was measured before and after the treatment. All patients were evaluated for the presence of DI. Median BMI before the treatment was 26.4 kg/m2 (17.740.8) and it increased significantly after the surgery (30.6 kg/m2 (23.246), P<0.0001). Before the treatment only one patient had DI whereas postoperatively 13/19 patients developed DI. Postoperative BMI of the patients with DI was significantly higher compared to those without DI (31.5 kg/m2 (27.146) vs. 27.45 kg/m2 (23.231.6), P=0.012). Craniopharyngeoma patients that developed postoperative DI had significantly higher BMI suggesting a predictive role of postoperative DI in the development of hypothalamic obesity. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition characterized by large amounts of dilute urine and increased thirst.[1] The amount of urine produced can be nearly 20 liters per day.[1] Reduction of fluid has little effect on the concentration of the urine.[1] Complications may include dehydration or seizures.[1] There are four types of DI, each with a different set of causes.[1] Central DI (CDI) is due to a lack of the hormone vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone).[1] This can be due to damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary gland or genetics.[1] Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) occurs when the kidneys do not respond properly to vasopressin.[1] Dipsogenic DI is due to abnormal thirst mechanisms in the hypothalamus while gestational DI occurs only during pregnancy.[1] Diagnosis is often based on urine tests, blood tests, and the fluid deprivation test.[1] Diabetes mellitus is a separate condition with an unrelated mechanism, though both can result in the production of large amounts of urine.[1] Treatment involves drinking sufficient fluids to prevent dehydration.[1] Other treatments depend on the type.[1] In central and gestational disease treated is with desmopressin.[1] Nephrogenic disease may be treated by addressing the underlying cause or the use of a thiazide, aspirin, or ibuprofen.[1] The number of new cases of diabetes insipidus each year is 3 in 100,000.[4] Central DI usually starts between the ages of 10 and 20 and occurs in males and females equally.[2] Nephrogenic DI can begin at any age.[3] The term "diabetes" is derived from the Greek word meaning siphon.[5] Signs and symptoms[edit] Excessive urination and extreme thirst and increased fluid intake (especially for cold water and sometimes ice or ice water) are typical for DI.[6] The symptoms of excessive urination Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes Insipidus: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes insipidus is a condition where the body loses too much fluid through urination, causing a significant risk of dangerous dehydration as well as a range of illnesses and conditions. There are two forms of the disease: nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and central diabetes insipidus (also known as neurogenic diabetes insipidus). A number of factors have been linked to the development of diabetes insipidus, which may also occur in pregnancy or with the use of certain medications. Establishing the cause of the problem can help determine the most appropriate treatment to support the regulation of water balance in the body. Diabetes insipidus is a condition that can be managed successfully. Contents of this article: What is diabetes insipidus? An uncommon condition, diabetes insipidus is a disorder affecting the regulation of body fluid levels. Two key symptoms resemble those of the more common forms of diabetes that affect blood sugar levels (diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2).1-5 People with diabetes insipidus produce excessive amounts of urine (polyuria), resulting in frequent urination and, in turn, thirst (polydipsia). However, the underlying cause of these two symptoms is quite different from the causes in types 1 and 2 diabetes. In diabetes mellitus, elevated blood sugar prompts the production of large volumes of urine to help remove the excess sugar from the body. In diabetes insipidus, it is the body's water balance system itself that is not working properly. Here are some key points about diabetes insipidus. More detail and supporting information is in the body of this article. Diabetes insipidus is a condition where the body fails to properly control water balance, resulting in excessive urination. Diabetes insipidus can be caused by low or absent secretion of t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus|the Pituitary Foundation

Diabetes Insipidus|the Pituitary Foundation

Q: If I just drink less, will I pee out less? A: No, without your desmopressin, you would continue to pass urine and restricting your fluid could be dangerous (unless medically supervised for a water deprivation test, for example). Q: What happens if my desmopressin has been kept out of the fridge? A: Although intra-nasal desmopressin can be kept at room temperature for a limited period, long term exposure to temperatures above 8 C may reduce the effectiveness. Please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice if you are concerned that your medication has been left out of the fridge, or if the fridge is broken. Both the tablet form of DDAVP and Desmospray are stable at room temperatures; there is no need to store these in a fridge. Q: What should I do if the spray is blocked or the tube is missing or damaged? A: You should take the whole product to the chemist who will replace it free of charge. Q: Can I still use desmopressin if I have a cold or hay fever that gives rise to a blocked nose? A:Only one nostril is blocked, then using the clear nostril should give the right result. If both nostrils are blocked, your doctor may recommend temporary use of the tablets. Q: I have been having more headaches than normal recently and seem to be putting on weight. Could this be caused by desmopressin? A: If you drink large volumes of fluids and take too much desmopressin, your body may become overloaded with fluid, which could result in headaches, dizziness and abnormal weight gain. In turn, this could result in a low sodium level in the blood, which is called hyponatraemia. It is important that you contact your doctor if you experience these symptoms as you may be taking more desmopressin than you need. Your doctor will help you to find the right dose of desmopressin and will Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Insipidus Cause Weight Gain?

Can Diabetes Insipidus Cause Weight Gain?

Can diabetes insipidus cause weight gain? Can diabetes insipidus cause weight gain? I was diagnosed with Central DI 30 years ago, but it likely onset as a result of a childhood head injury 50 years ago. I've struggled with weight all my life. My pituitary problem also extends to the other hemisphere and I have reduced production of both vasopressin and testosterone. Even with exercise, I struggle to build muscle tone and weight gain and it seems to be escalating. Is anyone aware of a connection? With central DI at age 6. Im now 72. Its cause was also thought to be traumatic but I have my doubts because it was so minor. Another child jumped on my neck in a playground setting. I had a stiff neck for a week or so. Enough to see a doctor though. I think it might be genetic although no one in my family has ever had it. Personally have never had weight issues. Just fortunate. Was always thin and probably underweight as a kid. Still thin as an older adult so far. Never have had any issues with testosterone levels or muscle tone either. But thats just me. Dont really know anyone else with this condition. Various nasal sprays. Eventually was put on Diabinese(Chlorpropamide) around age 30. Been on it ever since with excellent control. Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes Insipidus?

What Is Diabetes Insipidus?

Most people have heard of the two main types of diabetes. But did you know the name has nothing to do with high blood sugar? It's a general term for any condition that causes your body to make a lot of urine. And that’s just what, diabetes insipidus does. This condition makes you extra thirsty. As a result, you pee -- a lot. Your body makes a substance called antidiuretic hormone (ADH). It’s produced in a part of your brain called the hypothalamus and stored in your pituitary gland. It tells your kidneys to hold onto water, which makes your urine more concentrated. When you’re thirsty or slightly dehydrated, ADH levels rise. Your kidneys reabsorb more water and put out concentrated urine. If you’ve had plenty to drink, ADH levels fall and what comes out is clear and dilute. When your body doesn’t make enough ADH, the condition is called central diabetes insipidus. If you make enough but your kidneys can't respond to it, you have nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In either form, the result is the same. Your kidneys can't retain water, so even if you’re dehydrated, they'll put out a lot of pale, or diluted urine. When your kidneys can’t conserve water, you’ll: Get really thirsty Pee a lot -- this is known as polyuria Some people get dehydrated. If you lose too much water, you could have: Lethargy Muscle pains Irritability If you have this condition, you’ll probably wind up at the doctor for help with your thirst and constant need for a bathroom. To diagnose you, the doctor will do a series of blood and urine tests that may take several hours. You’ll go without water the whole time, so you’ll get thirstier. Your doctor will measure the sodium in your blood and pee. He may give you an ADH substitute to see if your kidneys respond by concentrating your ur Continue reading >>

Central Diabetes Insipidus Symptoms

Central Diabetes Insipidus Symptoms

Central diabetes insipidus may be caused by an injury, a surgical intervention near the pituitary gland or hypothalamus, or even be caused by genetics. By being able to recognize the key signs and symptoms of this condition, early interventions can take place so that the symptoms can be appropriately managed and the interference with an individuals lifestyle can be minimized. The symptoms of central diabetes insipidus may appear at any age. They may appear gradually or acutely. This is the most common symptom of central diabetes insipidus. It is because the kidneys are waiting for the presence of an anti-diuretic hormone called vasopressin to tell them to concentrate urine levels. That hormone never arrives, so the kidneys keep converting new fluids into urine and then pass it along to the bladder so it can be expelled. With up to 20 liters of urine being created during the day, dehydration can begin very quickly. This common symptom is one of the most frequently cited bothersome issues that central diabetes insipidus creates. The kidneys will keep pulling fluids out of the bloodstream and refuse to concentrate urine because there isnt enough of a hormone to tell them to do so. The excessive urination can change in levels from day to day depending on the production of vasopressin in the hypothalamus, so it is possible for some days to seem normal even when this condition is present. This is typically caused by an overall lack of fluids within the body. This symptom is a signal that someone needs to consume more fluids. Headaches can also appear when fluids that contain stimulants, such as coffee with caffeine, are consumed when central diabetes insipidus is present. The dehydration headache often feels like a throbbing or pounding of the head that is accompanied by a d Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

What are the types of diabetes insipidus? Central Diabetes Insipidus The most common form of serious diabetes insipidus, central diabetes insipidus, results from damage to the pituitary gland, which disrupts the normal storage and release of ADH. Damage to the pituitary gland can be caused by different diseases as well as by head injuries, neurosurgery, or genetic disorders. To treat the ADH deficiency that results from any kind of damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary, a synthetic hormone called desmopressin can be taken by an injection, a nasal spray, or a pill. While taking desmopressin, a person should drink fluids only when thirsty and not at other times. The drug prevents water excretion, and water can build up now that the kidneys are making less urine and are less responsive to changes in body fluids. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus results when the kidneys are unable to respond to ADH. The kidneys' ability to respond to ADH can be impaired by drugs-like lithium, for example-and by chronic disorders including polycystic kidney disease, sickle cell disease, kidney failure, partial blockage of the ureters, and inherited genetic disorders. Sometimes the cause of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is never discovered. Desmopressin will not work for this form of diabetes insipidus. Instead, a person with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus may be given hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) or indomethacin. HCTZ is sometimes combined with another drug called amiloride. The combination of HCTZ and amiloride is sold under the brand name Moduretic. Again, with this combination of drugs, one should drink fluids only when thirsty and not at other times. Dipsogenic Diabetes insipidus Dipsogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by a defect in or damage to the thirst Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Print Overview Diabetes insipidus (die-uh-BEE-teze in-SIP-uh-dus) is an uncommon disorder that causes an imbalance of water in the body. This imbalance leads to intense thirst even after drinking fluids (polydipsia), and excretion of large amounts of urine (polyuria). While the names diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus sound similar, they're not related. Diabetes mellitus — which can occur as type 1 or type 2 — is the more common form of diabetes. There's no cure for diabetes insipidus, but treatments are available to relieve your thirst and normalize your urine output. Symptoms The most common signs and symptoms of diabetes insipidus are: Extreme thirst Excretion of an excessive amount of diluted urine Depending on the severity of the condition, urine output can be as much as 16 quarts (about 15 liters) a day if you're drinking a lot of fluids. Normally, a healthy adult will urinate an average of less than 3 quarts (about 3 liters) a day. Other signs may include needing to get up at night to urinate (nocturia) and bed-wetting. Infants and young children who have diabetes insipidus may have the following signs and symptoms: Unexplained fussiness or inconsolable crying Trouble sleeping Fever Vomiting Diarrhea Delayed growth Weight loss When to see a doctor See your doctor immediately if you notice the two most common signs of diabetes insipidus: excessive urination and extreme thirst. Causes Diabetes insipidus occurs when your body can't regulate how it handles fluids. Normally, your kidneys remove excess body fluids from your bloodstream. This fluid waste is temporarily stored in your bladder as urine, before you urinate. When your fluid regulation system is working properly, your kidneys conserve fluid and make less urine when your body water is decreased, suc Continue reading >>

6 Things You Need To Know About Diabetes Insipidus

6 Things You Need To Know About Diabetes Insipidus

Tatiana Ayazo /RD.com What is diabetes insipidus? You’re no doubt aware of diabetes mellitus, which has type 1 and type 2 variations. However, there’s another form out there known as diabetes insipidus (DI). It’s a disorder of water balance and control in the body, explains Christopher Calapai, DO, an osteopathic physician board-certified in family medicine, anti-aging medicine, and chelation therapy. People with the condition are typically always thirsty, even after drinking fluids, and they also produce large amounts of urine—over three liters per day in adults, or two liters per day in children. What is its link to type 1 or type 2 diabetes? The name is misleading because DI has nothing to do with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Patients with DI have normal blood sugars, says Mark Terris, MD, an otolaryngology-head and neck surgeon and author of Bullets to Bandages. However, if you or someone you know is battling type 2 diabetes, check out this step-by-step plan for reversing diabetes. What are the symptoms I need to watch for? The main symptom is producing very large amounts of urine, so other symptoms are related to dehydration: a dry mouth, excessive thirst, dry eyes, fatigue, and lightheadedness, says Dr. Terris. Other possible symptoms are weight loss and issues with memory focus and concentration. It can also lead to low blood pressure, headaches, rapid heart rate, and dry mouth, and can cause muscle cramps and confusion, says Dr. Calapai. Here are 10 more silent signs of diabetes you might ignore. The brain secretes a hormone—ADH—that helps maintain water balance in the body; when the brain fails to make enough ADH, diabetes insipidus results, explains Dr. Terris. In most cases, no one’s sure what triggers the disorder. “It may be related to an auto Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus | Upmc Health Plan

Diabetes Insipidus | Upmc Health Plan

When most people think of diabetes, they think of blood sugar, insulin, and obesity. This form of diabetes is known as Diabetes Mellitus, which occurs in two types: Type I or Juvenile Diabetes and Type II or Adult-onset Diabetes. Both types of Diabetes Mellitus involve the pancreas, the gland which produces insulin to help our bodies use blood sugar for energy. The malfunction of this gland can be the result of genetics, as with Type I, or a lifestyle of inactivity and excess weight gain leading to obesity, which puts us at higher risk of developing Type II. However, many people may not be as familiar with Diabetes Insipidus. DI and DM are wholly unrelated but can share many of the same symptoms . Our bodies use a complex hormone system to regulate hydration and thirst.Antidiuretic hormone (ADH), also known as vasopressin, is produced in the hypothalamus in the brain and stored in the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland then releases ADH to the kidneys to prevent them from filtering too much water out of the blood. Typically, most water is reabsorbed into the body and only some is concentrated into urine. Most healthy adults produce between 1.52.5 liters of urine per day. However, someone with Diabetes Insipidus may produce anywhere from 220 liters of urine per day, depending on severity, and the frequency of needing to go can potentially disrupt sleep or even lead to bedwetting. As a result, the most common symptoms of DI are persistent thirst, excessive production of diluted urine, and frequent urination, or polyuria. With such fluid loss, it can be easy for someone with DI to become dehydrated if they cannot drink enough fluid to make up for what is lost. If dehydrated, one may feel symptoms of lethargy, unexplained weakness, or muscle pain. Diabetes Insipidus is a Continue reading >>

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