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Can Diabetes Increase Cholesterol?

Cholesterol

Cholesterol

People with diabetes generally have similar total cholesterol levels and similar rates of the 'good' (HDL) cholesterol as the general population. However, people with diabetes, on average, have higher levels of 'bad' (LDL) cholesterol and higher levels of triglycerides than people without diabetes. This is because diabetes can upset the balance between 'good' (HDL) and 'bad' (LDL) cholesterol levels in a number of ways. People with diabetes tend to have 'bad' cholesterol particles that stick to arteries and damage their walls more easily. High levels of glucose in the blood can result in 'bad' cholesterol staying in the blood stream for longer People with diabetes tend to have low HDL and high triglyceride (another blood fat) levels, both of which boost the risk of heart and artery disease. This means that people with diabetes are at a higher risk of: Heart disease, including heart attack and stroke Circulation problems which can lead to damage to hands, feet and legs Improving Blood Cholesterol There is strong evidence to suggest that lifestyle changes, like eating a healthy diet and doing regular physical activity, can significantly improve the blood cholesterol levels of people with diabetes. In Australia, eating less saturated fat is one of the most practical ways to lower cholesterol. Low cholesterol or cholesterol free foods may be useful for some people, but check that they also low in saturated fat. You should focus on eating less saturated fat rather than eating less cholesterol, because saturated fats more often effect on blood cholesterol levels and many of the foods that are high in saturated fat are also high in cholesterol anyway. If a food does make a low cholesterol claim, check the amount of saturated fat in the nutrition panel. For oils, margarines and Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cholesterol

Diabetes And Cholesterol

Tweet High cholesterol levels may be a sign that you are at higher risk of heart disease and stroke. However, it is the balance of cholesterol levels that is a better indicator heart health and it is the balance of cholesterol that your doctors should take into account before advising treatment. Lifestyle modifications and statins are commonly used to reduce high cholesterol levels. Whilst cholesterol levels may rise for a number of reasons, high cholesterol levels over a period of years is often associated with a greater risk of health problems. Too low cholesterol can be more dangerous than too high cholesterol. What is cholesterol? Cholesterol is a type of blood fat (blood lipid) that forms the membrane of each cell of the body. Cholesterol is carried in the blood by proteins called lipoproteins and it is these that are measured when you have a cholesterol test. These are: High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) LDL is often referred to as ‘bad cholesterol’, because it is this form of cholesterol that can build up in blood vessels. HDL is often referred to as ‘good cholesterol’, because it helps to clear excess LDL out of the blood. Whilst LDL may be called bad cholesterol, it is needed for the body and is usually healthy as long as it is kept in balance by a sufficient level of HDL. Triglycerides are another form of blood lipid (blood fat) and are also measured when a cholesterol test is taken. Total cholesterol is the figure of all the different blood fats added together. Ratio of total cholesterol-to-HDL is taken by dividing the total cholesterol figure by the HDL figure. This provides a more reliable indicator of heart health than looking at the total cholesterol or LDL figures. Read more: Cholesterol targets for people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Cholesterol 101

Diabetes And High Cholesterol 101

Cholesterol is a type of fat found in the blood. Everyone has it, but people with diabetes are more likely to have unhealthy levels of LDL, which can cause narrowing or blocking of the blood vessels. This blockage, when severe, keeps blood from reaching some areas of the heart, increasing your risk for a heart attack or stroke. There are two types of cholesterol in the blood: HDL and LDL. LDL levels should be kept low to help protect your heart. By contrast, HDL is a healthy fat that helps clear fatty deposits from your blood vessels and protect your heart. Try thinking "L should be low, H is healthy" to help you remember the difference between the two types. Triglycerides are another type of fat in your blood that can add to your risk of a heart attack or stroke at high levels, similar to the effect of high cholesterol. Know the Numbers What are the low and high levels of cholesterol for those with diabetes? According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), most adults with diabetes should aim for an LDL level of less than 100 mg/dl. The ADA-recommended HDL levels are greater than 40 mg/dl for men with diabetes and greater than 50 mg/dl for women with diabetes. The ADA recommends that both men and women with diabetes aim for triglyceride levels less than 150 mg/dl. What's mg/dl? It stands for milligrams of cholesterol per deciliter of blood -- the standard unit of measure for cholesterol and triglycerides. Everyone, including people with diabetes, needs some cholesterol in their blood to help build healthy cells. However, there are no symptoms to alert you if your LDL is too high or your HDL is too low. A blood test at your doctor's office is the only way to know. As a result, it is especially important to have your cholesterol checked regularly (at least yearly) i Continue reading >>

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

High cholesterol has long been known to raise the risk of heart and blood vessel disease in people with diabetes and without. Unfortunately, it’s very common among Americans generally, including those with diabetes. The good news is that there’s a lot you can do to lower your cholesterol and, consequently, lower your risk of heart disease. Making the effort to lower blood cholesterol is especially important for people with diabetes — Type 1 or Type 2 — who have a higher risk of heart disease than the general public. The bad guy: LDL Your LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol is the culprit when it comes to raising the risk of heart disease. LDL stands for low-density lipoprotein, and if you have too much of it in your blood, it can build up along the insides of your artery walls, leading to the formation of fatty deposits called plaque. Plaque makes it harder for blood to flow through your arteries, which means that less blood can get to vital organs, such as your heart and brain. Sometimes this can lead to a heart attack or a stroke. Plaque can also rupture, triggering the formation of blood clots, which can also block the arteries, leading to a heart attack or stroke. So it makes sense to keep your LDL level low. The American Diabetes Association recommends that most adults with diabetes who are not taking cholesterol-lowering statins have a fasting lipid profile done at diagnosis, first medical evaluation, and thenevery five years after, while those taking statins should have the test done when they start the medication and periodically thereafter. This test measures HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol, as well as the level of triglycerides (a type of blood fat) in the blood. HDL cholesterol above 50 mg/dl, LDL cholesterol below 100 mg/dl, and triglycerides below 150 mg Continue reading >>

The Dangers Of High Cholesterol And Diabetes

The Dangers Of High Cholesterol And Diabetes

The Dangers of High Cholesterol and Diabetes The Dangers of High Cholesterol and Diabetes Scientists are finding evidence that diabetes itself wreaks havoc with cholesterol , significantly increasing the likelihood of a heart attack or stroke even higher. The close ties between these two risk factors mean that if you are diabetic, you have to be extremely vigilant about controlling your cholesterol. Researchers are still figuring out exactly how diabetes changes cholesterol levels at the microscopic cellular level. They do know that high levels of insulin in the blood tend to adversely affect the number of cholesterol particles in the blood. High insulin levels act to raise the amount of LDL-cholesterol (the "bad cholesterol") that tends to form plaques in arteries and lower the number of HDL cholesterol particles ("good cholesterol") that help to clear out dangerous plaques before they break off to cause a heart attack or stroke. Diabetes also tends to cause higher levels of triglycerides, another type of fat circulating in the blood. Similarly, high cholesterol can also be a predictor of diabetes; elevated cholesterol levels are often seen in people with insulin resistance, even before they have developed full-blown diabetes. When LDL levels start to climb, experts recommend paying close attention to blood sugar control and starting a diet and exercise regimen to help stave off diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This is especially important if you have a family history of heart disease. For people with Type 1 diabetes , controlling blood sugar can make a big difference. Good blood sugar control is related to near-normal cholesterol levels, similar to those seen in people without diabetes. But people with poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes have increased triglyceride Continue reading >>

A Guide To Living With Diabetes And High Cholesterol

A Guide To Living With Diabetes And High Cholesterol

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, you know that controlling your blood sugar levels is important. The more you can keep these levels down, the lower your risk of developing cardiovascular disease and other health problems. Having diabetes puts you at a higher risk for developing high cholesterol. As you watch your blood sugar numbers, watch your cholesterol numbers too. Here, we explain why these two conditions often show up together, and how you can manage both with practical lifestyle approaches. Diabetes and high cholesterol often occur together If you have both diabetes and high cholesterol, you’re not alone. The American Heart Association (AHA) states that diabetes often lowers HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels and raises triglycerides and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels. Both of these increase the risk for heart disease and stroke. The National Diabetes Statistics Report of 2014 shared similar findings. Between 2009 and 2012, about 65 percent of adults with diabetes had LDL cholesterol levels higher than ideal, or used cholesterol-lowering medications. As a reminder: An LDL cholesterol level under 100 milligrams/deciliter (mg/dL) is considered ideal. 100–129 mg/dL is close to ideal. 130–159 mg/dL is borderline elevated. High cholesterol levels can be dangerous. Cholesterol is a type of fat that can build up inside the arteries. Over time, it can harden to form a stiff plaque. That damages arteries, making them stiff and narrow and inhibiting blood flow. The heart has to work harder to pump blood, and risk for heart attack and stroke go up. Why diabetes increases risk of high cholesterol Scientists aren’t sure yet exactly how diabetes affects cholesterol, but they’re working on it. Some research has pointed to a connection between insulin and Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Having diabetes is now considered a risk factor for heart and circulatory disease. This is because people with diabetes are less efficient at processing blood fats like cholesterol and triglycerides. Many people with diabetes share a common pattern of raised blood fats. This includes: normal or slightly raised levels of cholesterol Small dense LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) It is this distinctive pattern of dyslipidaemia (altered blood fats) that increases the risk of heart and circulatory disease in people with diabetes. People with symptoms of pre-diabetes often have the same pattern. Recent guidelines recommend that all adults with diabetes should have their blood fats measured and cardiovascular risk assessed each year. Many people with diabetes are now routinely treated with a statin, especially if over the age of 40. Find out if you might be at risk of type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

About Type 2 Diabetes And High Cholesterol

About Type 2 Diabetes And High Cholesterol

WELCHOL is not for those with blood triglyceride levels of > 500 mg/dL Type 2 diabetes is the more common form of diabetes1 95% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes2,3 More than 90% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese3 Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, family history, and physical inactivity.3 Common symptoms of diabetes may include urinating often, feeling very thirsty, feeling very hungry (even though you are eating), extreme fatigue, blurry vision, cuts/bruises that are slow to heal, and tingling, pain, or numbness in the hands and/or feet (type 2). However, some people with type 2 diabetes may not experience any symptoms.4 Type 2 diabetes in adults is a chronic condition that should be taken seriously Type 2 diabetes can be associated with many serious health complications including5: Neuropathy (tingling, pain, numbness, or weakness in the feet and/or hands) Kidney disease Eye complications Skin complications High blood pressure Stroke Welchol has not been shown to prevent heart disease, heart attacks, stroke, or any of the above risks. Please see "What is Welchol® (colesevelam HCl)" and "Important Safety Information about Welchol" below. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) explains that type 2 diabetes is a problem with the body that causes blood sugar levels to be high, either because the body doesn't make enough of the insulin hormone, or the body does not use insulin properly. When your body does not use insulin properly, this is called insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time your pancreas isn’t able to keep up and can’t make enough insulin to keep your blood sugar levels normal. Type 2 diabetes is treated with lifestyle changes (healthy eating and exerc Continue reading >>

How To Eat If You Have High Cholesterol And Diabetes

How To Eat If You Have High Cholesterol And Diabetes

If you have been diagnosed with both high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes , you may be feeling overwhelmed at the prospect of changing your diet. You should know that there is considerable overlap for how to eat with the two conditionsand that it is not as difficult as you may think. Here are three first steps for managing high cholesterol and diabetes through your diet. Start by eating more vegetables. There's a reason the diabetic plate method recommends filling half of your plate with non-starchy vegetablesthey're loaded with fiber. They're also high in good-for-you phytonutrients, but fiber is the biggest benefit for both cholesterol and diabetes. Fiber is the indigestible part of plants. You eat it, it fills you up, but it doesn't add any calories. That's helpful for diabetessince many people with type 2 diabetes are also watching their weight. Soluble fiber (the kind found in beans, apples, oatmeal) aids in lowering "bad" LDL cholesterol and also helps to keep blood glucose levels steady. Fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are the best sources of fiber. Aim to increase the amount of fiber you eat every day gradually, to at least 25 grams per day if you're a woman; 38 grams per day if you're a man. Another healthy change for both diabetes and high cholesterol is to swap the fats and oils you use. As a general rule, you want to eat more monounsaturated fats (found in foods such as walnuts, avocado, and olive oil) and decrease saturated fats (found in marbled meats and full-fatdairy products) and trans fats (found in fried foods and baked goods). This one might be harder, but getting to a healthy weight can improve both your diabetes and your high cholesterol. Losing weight can help you lower your average blood glucose levels, as well as lower your total cho Continue reading >>

Hdl Cholesterol And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Mendelian Randomization Study

Hdl Cholesterol And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Mendelian Randomization Study

Observationally, low levels of HDL cholesterol are consistently associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, plasma HDL cholesterol increasing has been suggested as a novel therapeutic option to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Whether levels of HDL cholesterol are causally associated with type 2 diabetes is unknown. In a prospective study of the general population (n = 47,627), we tested whether HDL cholesterol–related genetic variants were associated with low HDL cholesterol levels and, in turn, with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. HDL cholesterol–decreasing gene scores and allele numbers associated with up to −13 and −20% reductions in HDL cholesterol levels. The corresponding theoretically predicted hazard ratios for type 2 diabetes were 1.44 (95% CI 1.38–1.52) and 1.77 (1.61–1.95), whereas the genetic estimates were nonsignificant. Genetic risk ratios for type 2 diabetes for a 0.2 mmol/L reduction in HDL cholesterol were 0.91 (0.75–1.09) and 0.93 (0.78–1.11) for HDL cholesterol–decreasing gene scores and allele numbers, respectively, compared with the corresponding observational hazard ratio of 1.37 (1.32–1.42). In conclusion, genetically reduced HDL cholesterol does not associate with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, suggesting that the corresponding observational association is due to confounding and/or reverse causation. Low levels of HDL cholesterol are consistently associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes in epidemiological studies (1,2). Therefore plasma HDL cholesterol increasing has been suggested as a novel therapeutic option to reduce risk of type 2 diabetes (3–5). Low levels of HDL cholesterol and high levels of triglycerides are part of the diabetic dyslipidemia (6–8), and high levels of trigl Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cholesterol: What Is The Relationship?

Diabetes And Cholesterol: What Is The Relationship?

What is the relationship between cholesterol and diabetes? How does cholesterol affect my diabetes, and how do I manage it? Judy contacted TheDiabetesCouncil When Judy contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she had questions about her cholesterol. Though her overall number was at 180 mg/dl, and in a normal range, her LDL-C was higher than normal, although mildly elevated, and her HDL-C was low. Her doctor had explained very little about this to Judy, and she was confused. How can her overall cholesterol number be acceptable, but her other cholesterol numbers were out of range. What did this mean for Judy’s health? Was she more prone to heart disease and stroke due to these cholesterol numbers? Her triglycerides were a little elevated, too. We decided to give Judy a guide that would help her to fully understand her cholesterol numbers, and how they affect her cardiovascular health. We also wanted to make sure that Judy and others like her understand how their cholesterol numbers relate to their diabetes. So let’s get started… What is cholesterol Cholesterol is mainly comprised of fat and lipoproteins. A lipoprotein is comprised of cholesterol, protein, and fat (triglycerides). Cholesterol comes from two sources. Our body manufactures some cholesterol on its own. In addition, cholesterol comes from animal products, such as milk, eggs, cheese, and meats. Cholesterol has the consistency similar to gum or wax. Small amounts of cholesterol are important for a healthy cell membrane (good cholesterol), and some cholesterol has been deemed, “the bad cholesterol,” due to these cholesterol particles tends to cause atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. Some cholesterol is “good,” cholesterol, that tends to carry the bad cholesterol away and out the body. That is why y Continue reading >>

Diseases Linked To High Cholesterol

Diseases Linked To High Cholesterol

High cholesterol is associated with an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. That can include coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease. High cholesterol has also been linked to diabetes and high blood pressure. To prevent or manage these conditions, work with your doctor to see what steps you need to take to lower your cholesterol. The main risk from high cholesterol is coronary heart disease. If the cholesterol level is too high, cholesterol can build up in the walls of your arteries. Over time, this build-up -- called plaque -- causes hardening of the arteries or atherosclerosis. This causes arteries to become narrowed, which slows the blood flow to the heart muscle. Reduced blood flow can result in angina (chest pain) or in a heart attack if a blood vessel gets blocked completely. Atherosclerosis causes arteries that lead to the brain to become narrowed and even blocked. If a vessel carrying blood to the brain is blocked completely, you could have a stroke High cholesterol also has been linked to peripheral vascular disease. This refers to diseases of blood vessels outside the heart and brain. In this condition, fatty deposits build up along artery walls and affect blood circulation. This occurs mainly in arteries that lead to the legs and feet. Diabetes can upset the balance between HDL and LDL cholesterol levels. People with diabetes tend to have LDL particles that stick to arteries and damage blood vessel walls more easily. Glucose (a type of sugar) attaches to lipoproteins (a cholesterol-protein package that enables cholesterol to travel through blood). Sugarcoated LDL remains in the bloodstream longer and may lead to the formation of plaque. People with diabetes tend to have low HDL and high triglyceride (another kind of blood fat) leve Continue reading >>

Triglycerides And Hdl Cholesterol

Triglycerides And Hdl Cholesterol

Stars or second leads in diabetes? Diabetes carries a high risk of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease, especially coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, is by far the leading cause of death among patients with type 2 diabetes. Although statins reduce the risk of major vascular events by about one-fifth per millimole per liter reduction in LDL cholesterol, with similar proportional reductions in major coronary events, stroke, and the need for coronary revascularization, the residual risk remains high. In the Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4S) (1), although the relative risk reduction in diabetic patients was larger than in nondiabetic patients, simvastatin-treated diabetic patients were still at higher risk of death than the placebo-treated nondiabetic patients. Multifactorial intervention reduces the risk even further, but significant danger remains. Current guidelines call for an aggressive treatment strategy to reduce LDL cholesterol, blood pressure, and glucose levels in diabetic patients, but data concerning the management of high triglyceride (TG) levels and low HDL cholesterol levels remains inconclusive. This article reviews the data concerning diabetic dyslipidemia and its management. DIABETIC DYSLIPIDEMIA The cluster of lipid abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes is defined by a high concentration of TG and small dense LDL and a low concentration of HDL cholesterol. Plasma LDL cholesterol levels are generally normal. Insulin resistance is believed to contribute to this atherogenic dyslipidemia by increasing the hepatic secretion of VLDL and other apolipoprotein (apo)B-containing lipoprotein particles, as a result of increased free fatty acid flux to the liver (2,3). This may also be the result of a diminished suppressive effect of i Continue reading >>

Cholesterol Abnormalities & Diabetes

Cholesterol Abnormalities & Diabetes

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that is made by the body and found in some animal-based foods. Blood cholesterol levels describe a group of fats also known as lipoproteins which includes HDL-C, or "good" cholesterol and LDL-C or "bad" cholesterol. Cholesterol is important to overall health, but when levels are too high, cholesterol can be harmful by contributing to narrowed or blocked arteries. Unfortunately, people with diabetes are more prone to having unhealthy high cholesterol levels, which contributes to cardiovascular disease (CVD). By taking steps to manage cholesterol, individuals can reduce their chance of cardiovascular disease and premature death. Using a blood sample taken after a brief period of fasting by the patient, a lipoprotein profile reveals the following lipid measures: Low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol = "bad" cholesterol A high LDL-C level is associated with a higher risk for CVD. However, your LDL number should no longer be the main factor in guiding treatment to prevent heart attack and stroke, according to the latest guidelines from the American Heart Association. For patients taking statins, it’s important to work with your doctor to manage your LDL appropriately. A diet high in saturated and trans fats can raise your LDL cholesterol. High-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol = "good" cholesterol With HDL-C, higher levels are associated with a lower risk for CVD. Low HDL cholesterol puts you at higher risk for heart disease. People with high blood triglycerides usually also have lower HDL cholesterol. Genetic factors, type 2 diabetes, and certain drugs, such as beta-blockers and anabolic steroids, also lower HDL cholesterol levels. Smoking, being overweight and being sedentary can all contribute to lower HDL cholesterol. Triglycerid Continue reading >>

Cholesterol & Diabetes

Cholesterol & Diabetes

Most adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at high risk for cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke. People with diabetes have an increased risk of these diseases even if their low-density lipoprotein, or LDL ("bad") cholesterol, is “normal.” They have an even higher risk if their LDL-cholesterol is elevated. Definitions Cardiovascular disease: Damage to the heart and blood vessels. One cause is narrowing of the blood vessels due to fat deposits on the vessel walls, which limits blood flow. Cholesterol: A fat substance that is naturally present in your blood and cells. There are two main types of cholesterol: LDL and HDL. LDL (low-density lipoprotein): Often called “bad” cholesterol because higher levels of LDL can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. HDL (high-density lipoprotein): Often called “good” cholesterol because higher levels of HDL can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Triglyceride: A form of fat that the body makes from sugar, alcohol or other food sources. Have you had your cholesterol tested lately? Adults with diabetes should have their cholesterol tested yearly or as indicated by your health-care provider. More frequent testing may be necessary for people taking cholesterol medications. Always discuss your cholesterol results with your doctor and other members of your health-care team. Have you been told that you have high cholesterol? High cholesterol usually refers to high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. The main goal is to lower LDL-cholesterol. Check with your health-care provider to find out if you should be on medication to accomplish this. Weight management, healthy eating and regular physical activity will also help you reach this goal. Diabetes management requires good blood glucose (sugar), blood pr Continue reading >>

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