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Can Diabetes Go Undiagnosed?

Type 2 Diabetes: Could You Have It And Not Even Know?

Type 2 Diabetes: Could You Have It And Not Even Know?

Do any of these sound like you? You feel sluggish or have a little less “get up and go” than previously, but you attribute it to high stress levels or increased age. You’ve had gradual weight gain and chalk it up to age. You have an increased desire for carbohydrates and never really feel full after eating. People close to you wonder how you can always eat at the drop of a hat. If so, you could you be one of the 7 million people in the U.S. with undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 or adult-onset diabetes does not normally come on like a lightning bolt or an earthquake, but silently develops over years. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, type two diabetes affects more than 25.8 million people or 8.3 percent of the U.S population. Experts predict a whopping 10 percent increase in adult diabetes in the next decade. Anne Peters, M.D., a leading diabetologist and researcher at University of Southern California (USC), believes that the average person diagnosed with type two diabetes actually had it for seven years prior to diagnosis! How can this happen? Or better yet, how can you monitor whether you are a type two diabetic or at risk for diabetes? 1. Get a physical every year and monitor your fasting glucose (blood sugar) levels. The ideal number is less than 95. If your numbers are consistently above 100 or are in the 100-115 range, you could be pre-diabetic or diabetic. 2. Ask your physician yearly to monitor a blood test called glycosylated hemoglobin A1C. This simple test measures what your blood sugar has been averaging over the previous three months. The number (depending on the laboratory) should be between 4-6. If it is over six, you could be diabetic. If you have a parent or sibling with type two or adult onset diabetes, this test is Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 1 diabetes. Other types of diabetes are covered separately (read about type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes, which affects some women during pregnancy). Symptoms of diabetes Typical symptoms of type 1 diabetes are: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk The symptoms of type 1 diabetes usually develop very quickly in young people (over a few days or weeks). In adults, the symptoms often take longer to develop (a few months). Read more about the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. These symptoms occur because the lack of insulin means that glucose stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible, because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Find your local GP service Read about how type 1 diabetes is diagnosed. Causes of type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which means your immune system attacks healthy body tissue by mistake. In this case, it attacks the cells in your pancreas. Your damaged pancreas is then unable to produce insulin. So, glucose cannot be moved out of your bloodstream and into your cells. Type 1 diabetes is o Continue reading >>

What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes?

What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes?

Diabetes often goes undiagnosed because the signs can be confusing. Here’s what you need to know Australian diabetes rates have more than doubled since 1990. There are now 1.2 million Australians diagnosed with the condition – and because it often goes undiagnosed, health experts say the actual number of cases may be much higher. The increase in diabetes levels is largely due to rising obesity rates. Two thirds of Australians are now classified as overweight or obese, which is a key risk factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes in children is also increasing, which is also thought to be due to childhood obesity levels, with one in four children now classified as obese. What is diabetes? First, it’s important to understand what diabetes is, what causes it and how it affects the body. Diabetes is a health condition where the levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too high. Blood glucose levels are normally regulated by a hormone called insulin, which is made by the pancreas. Diabetes occurs when there is a problem with this hormone and how it works in the body. There are a number of different forms of diabetes. Two of the most common are: Type 1 diabetes One in 10 cases of diabetes in Australia are type 1 diabetes. This condition can occur at any age, but is more common in people under 30. It occurs when the body destroys insulin-making cells in the pancreas, which means insulin is no longer made. The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is not yet known, but it has no link to lifestyle. It is hereditary and cannot be prevented. There is currently no cure, but it can be successfully managed with insulin injections, nutrition and exercise. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and makes up 85 to 90 per cent of all diabetes ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

With more than a third of diabetes cases in the United States occurring in people over the age of 65, diabetes is often referred to as an age-related condition. But around 208,000 children and adolescents are estimated to have diabetes, and this number is increasing. Type 1 diabetes is the most common form of the condition among children and adolescents. A 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that type 1 diabetes prevalence stands at 1.93 in every 1,000 children and adolescents, while type 2 diabetes affects 0.24 in every 1,000. In 2014, Medical News Today reported that, based on a study published in JAMA, rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have increased significantly among American children and teenagers. The study found that incidence of type 1 diabetes in children aged up to 9 years increased by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009, while incidence of type 2 diabetes among youths aged 10-19 years rose by 30.5 percent. The researchers note: "The increases in prevalence reported herein are important because such youth with diabetes will enter adulthood with several years of disease duration, difficulty in treatment, an increased risk of early complications and increased frequency of diabetes during reproductive years, which may further increase diabetes in the next generation." Contents of this article: Here are some key points about diabetes in children. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Type 1 and 2 diabetes are both increasing in the youth of America Often, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children develop over just a few weeks If type 1 diabetes is not spotted, the child can develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) What is diabetes in children? Type 1 diabetes in children, previously called juve Continue reading >>

A Deadly Form Of Diabetes That Doctors Sometimes Miss

A Deadly Form Of Diabetes That Doctors Sometimes Miss

Common signs of type 1 diabetes often resemble symptoms of other illnesses Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Addie Parker was a happy 4-year-old who appeared to have the flu. But within hours she was in a coma. Tragically, her parents weren't familiar with the signs of type 1 diabetes -- extreme fatigue, thirst and sweet-smelling breath, among others -- in time to save their little girl. Soon after she was diagnosed, Addie's brain hemorrhaged. She died six days later, about a month shy of her fifth birthday. Experts say a lack of awareness of the signs of type 1 diabetes is all too common. Just this month, a Wisconsin toddler died apparently because of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. "Addie had flu symptoms," recalled her mother, Micki Parker, who works in the operating room at a nearby hospital but was unfamiliar with type 1 diabetes. "By the next morning, she was throwing up every hour," Parker said. Addie didn't have a fever, but later that day, she couldn't get up from the bathroom floor because she was so dizzy. Eventually, the Parkers learned that Addie's blood sugar level was 543 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) -- more than four times higher than normal, according to the American Diabetes Association. Most people have heard of type 2 diabetes, but type 1 diabetes is far less common. It can strike at any age -- even though it used to be known as juvenile diabetes -- and it always requires treatment with injected insulin or insulin Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for: If you’re experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst. Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin. If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isn’t able to get adequate energy from the food you eat. High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes. Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose. Other signs of diabetes Pay attention if you find yourself feeling drowsy or lethargic; pain or numbness in your extremities; vision changes; fruity or sweet-smelling breath which is one of the symptoms of high ketones; and experiencing nausea or vomiting—as these are additional signs that something is not right. If there’s any question, see your doctor immediately to ensure that your blood sugar levels are safe and rule out diabetes. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than Continue reading >>

People Dying Of Diabetes Who Never Knew They Had It, Study Finds

People Dying Of Diabetes Who Never Knew They Had It, Study Finds

People who don't know they have Type 1 diabetes may account for a surprising number of deaths from one complication of the condition, a new study says. Nearly a third of people in Maryland who died over a six-year period from diabetic ketoacidosis, a condition of severe insulin deficiency, had no known history of diabetes, the study of autopsy results found. While the researchers weren't able to definitively tell whether those who died had Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, their high blood sugar levels suggest they probably had Type 1, said study researcher Dr. Zabiullah Ali, the assistant medical examiner for the Office of Chief Medical Examiner in Maryland. The finding highlights the need for regular physicals that include checking blood sugar levels, especially if warning signs of diabetes are present, the researchers said. The study was published in the September issue of the American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology. What happens when the body runs out of sugar Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complication of diabetes that occurs when body cells don't have enough glucose (sugar) to use for energy, so they switch to burning fat instead. (Body cells need insulin in order to take up sugar from the bloodstream; in people with Type 1 diabetes, little or no insulin is produced.) Breaking down fat for energy produces molecules called ketones, which are acids and can build up in the blood. If ketone levels climb too high, they can poison the body, causing chemical imbalances that can lead to coma, or death. In the study, Ali and colleagues looked at 20,406 autopsies and found 107 people who had died from diabetic ketoacidosis, although only 92 had data available for further review. Out of the 92 cases, they found that 60 people were previously diagnosed with diabetes, while 3 Continue reading >>

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

According to the latest American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, about 8 million people 18 years and older in the United States have type 2 diabetes and do not know it. Often type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed until symptoms become severe and hospitalization is required. Left untreated, diabetes can cause a number of health complications. That's why it's so important to both know what warning signs to look for and to see a health care provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Symptoms In incidences of prediabetes, there are no symptoms. People may not be aware that they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes because they have no symptoms or because the symptoms are so mild that they go unnoticed for quite some time. However, some individuals do experience warning signs, so it's important to be familiar with them. Prediabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes No symptoms Increased or extreme thirst Increased thirst Increased appetite Increased appetite Increased fatigue Fatigue Increased or frequent urination Increased urination, especially at night Unusual weight loss Weight loss Blurred vision Blurred vision Fruity odor or breath Sores that do not heal In some cases, no symptoms In some cases, no symptoms If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: If your blood glucose levels are in normal range, testing should be done about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes There are three ty Continue reading >>

Undiagnosed Diabetes And Pre-diabetes

Undiagnosed Diabetes And Pre-diabetes

More than 25 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, indicates the American Diabetes Association, and of those, only 18.8 million have been formally diagnosed with the disease…. In fact, some 7 million people live with undiagnosed diabetes, and as many as 79 million people in the United States live with prediabetes – elevated blood glucose levels, which are almost always a precursor to type 2 diabetes. Lawrence Barker, PhD Associate Director for Science in CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation, stated that, “In 2010, 35 percent or 79 million Americans aged 20 years or older had prediabetes (50 percent of those aged 65 years or older). Similarly, 36 percent of Mexican American adults were estimated to have prediabetes in 2010,” “Prediabetes has few obvious physical signs. Rather than look for physical signs, one should consider one’s risk factors (such as obesity, sedentary lifestyle, family history of diabetes, and age) and then have one’s prediabetes status assessed by a health care provider.” Because there are not many symptoms associated with prediabetes, when it blossoms into type 2 diabetes, many individuals are unaware they have a very serious disease. Prevention is key. Barker explains individuals with type 2 diabetes can go years without exhibiting outward symptoms, and because of that, just as with prediabetes, it is important for a person to know the risk factors for developing the disease. “Rather than focusing on symptoms, people who are at high risk of type 2 diabetes are better off seeking assessment by their health care provider. “Obesity puts one at greater risk of developing prediabetes and, if one has prediabetes, at greater risk for developing type 2 diabetes,” said Barker. “Many factors influence one’s risk of developin Continue reading >>

Report: Thousands In Valley With Diabetes Go Undiagnosed

Report: Thousands In Valley With Diabetes Go Undiagnosed

About 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, according to new information from the World Health Organization.Video provided by Newsy Newslook One in ten adults in the Coachella Valley has been diagnosed with diabetes and many more are going undiagnosed or are at risk of developing the disease, according to a new report. The latest HARC survey report found that 10.3 percent of valley adults — more than 36,000 people — have been diagnosed with diabetes, a condition where the body does not properly process blood sugar. The figures, based on a 2013 survey, show a rise in the local prevalence of diabetes since 2010, when a survey found 9.1 percent of valley adults had been diagnosed. The latest report also found that more than 6,800 local people have been told they have pre-diabetes. HARC estimated that 13,000 more people have diabetes but have not been diagnosed. The local prevalence of diabetes is slightly higher than the national rate and that for California as a whole, but nearly twice the overall rate for Riverside County, according to HARC, or Health Assessment and Research for Communities, a Palm Desert nonprofit that specializes in health-related surveying and data. The HARC survey found that Coachella Valley adults with diabetes are more likely to be men and over the age of 55. Most valley adults with diabetes are retired and almost a quarter are military veterans. The report recommends that more be done to reach people who have not had their diabetes diagnosed and that more opportunities need to be created for disease management education for those already in treatment. "The problem with diabetes is you can feel pretty good and have it for a time," said Yuri Krochmaluk, a registered nurse and diabetes educator at the Eisenhower Medical Center Dia Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Q. What is gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. It is different from having known diabetes before pregnancy and then getting pregnant. Gestational diabetes is generally diagnosed in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, and usually goes away after the baby is born. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for the mother and baby, but treatment and regular check-ups mean most women have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. Q. Am I at risk of gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes affects between 10 and 15 per cent of pregnancies in Australia. Women of certain ethnic backgrounds — Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, Indian, Asian, Middle Eastern, African, Maori and Pacific Islander — are more at risk of developing gestational diabetes than women of Anglo-Celtic backgrounds. Other factors can also increase your risk, including: being overweight; having a family history of diabetes; having had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy; being 40 years or older; having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); taking medicines that can affect blood sugar levels (such as corticosteroids and antipsychotic medicines); and previously having a very large baby (more than 4.5 kg). Q. How would I know if I had gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes does not usually give rise to symptoms. For this reason it is important to be tested during pregnancy, usually between 24 and 28 weeks. Women with risk factors for diabetes may be offered testing earlier than this – sometimes at the first antenatal visit, which is often at around 10 weeks. Women who do develop symptoms may experience: extreme tiredness; being thirsty all the time; symptoms of recurrent infections (such as thrush); and needi Continue reading >>

One Third Of Diabetes In The U.s. Is Undiagnosed

One Third Of Diabetes In The U.s. Is Undiagnosed

(Reuters Health) - Diabetes affects up to 14% of the U.S. population - an increase from nearly 10% in the early 1990s - yet over a third of cases still go undiagnosed, according to a new analysis. Screening seems to be catching more cases, accounting for the general rise over two decades, the study authors say, but mainly whites have benefited; for Hispanic and Asian people in particular, more than half of cases go undetected. "We need to better educate people on the risk factors for diabetes - including older age, family history and obesity - and improve screening for those at high risk," lead study author Andy Menke, an epidemiologist at Social and Scientific Systems in Silver Spring, Maryland, said by email. Globally, about one in nine adults has diagnosed diabetes, and the disease will be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030, according to the World Health Organization. Most of these people have type 2 diabetes. Menke and colleagues estimated the prevalence of diabetes (hemoglobin A1c 6.5% or higher) and pre-diabetes (hemoglobin A1c between 5.7% and 6.4%) using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) collected on 2,781 adults in 2011 to 2012 and an additional 23,634 adults from 1988 to 2010. While the prevalence of diabetes increased over time in the overall population, gains were more pronounced among racial and ethnic minorities, the study found. About 11% of white people have diabetes, the researchers calculated, compared with 22% of non-Hispanic black participants, 21% of Asians and 23% of Hispanics. Among Asians, 51% of those with diabetes were unaware of it, and the same was true for 49% of Hispanic people with the condition. An additional 38% of adults fell into the pre-diabetes category. Added to the prevalence of diabete Continue reading >>

Signs, Symptoms And Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Signs, Symptoms And Diagnosis Of Diabetes

The signs and symptoms of Type 1 diabetes usually develop quickly, especially in children, over a period of weeks. In babies and young children, the first indication of Type 1 diabetes may be a yeast infection that causes a severe diaper rash that's far worse than the common red, puffy and tender skin rash. In young children and infants, lethargy, dehydration and abdominal pain also may indicate Type 1 diabetes. Once the symptoms appear, a blood test generally will reveal very high blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes can be detected easily during a routine screening exam and blood test. However, it frequently can go undiagnosed for years unless a physician draws a blood sample to check the blood glucose. In the early stages of Type 2 diabetes, you experience few to no noticeable signs of the disease. As time goes by and the untreated blood glucose continues to rise, symptoms begin. If you're over 40 or have parents or siblings with diabetes, be sure to have your blood glucose checked routinely. The most common symptoms of undiagnosed Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are: Extreme thirst and a greater need to urinate: As excess glucose (sugar) builds up in the bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. The loss of fluid makes you thirsty. As a result, you may drink and urinate more than usual. Frequent hunger: Without enough insulin to move sugar into the cells (Type 1) or insulin resistance prohibiting insulin from entering the cells (Type 2), the muscles and organs are low on energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss: Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, rapid weight loss sometimes occurs. Without the energy that glucose supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often one of the first symptoms to be noticed. Blurred Continue reading >>

If Your Child Is Diabetic... Will You Know?

If Your Child Is Diabetic... Will You Know?

vgajic via Getty Images As a parent, I sometimes nag — and I’ll bet that you do, too. For instance, how often do you say things like this? “I don’t want to hear your excuses. You’re not too tired — go take out the trash.” “You just went to the bathroom. You can hold it until the end of the movie.” “You don’t need a snack or another drink of water. Go back to bed.” “Don’t talk to me in that tone of voice. Go to your room.” I know I’ve said all these things at one time or another. But here’s the thing: If you’re saying them all the time, there’s a chance that your child isn’t simply being demanding, irritable, or lazy. Instead, your child may be displaying symptoms of diabetes. These days, we’re all aware that there’s an epidemic of diabetes in adults. But diabetes rates aren’t just soaring in grownups; they’re rising in kids, too. A recent study found that the incidence of Type 1 diabetes in kids up to 9 years of age jumped by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009. During the same time, the incidence of Type 2 diabetes among children between 10 and 19 rose by 30.5 percent. Currently, more than 200,000 American kids have diabetes — and if the trends continue, that number will keep rising. So if you’re a parent, diabetes definitely needs to be on your radar. Here’s a look at what this disease is and how to spot it. Understanding Diabetes There are two types of diabetes that kids or adults can develop. Here’s a quick look at each one. Type 1 diabetes — what we used to call “juvenile” diabetes — typically strikes kids, teens, and young adults. It causes insulin-producing cells in the pancreas to die, preventing the body from getting blood sugar into cells. Genes play a big role in Type 1diabetes, but rising rates als Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

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