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Can Diabetes Go Undetected In Blood Tests

Millions Of Americans Are At Risk For Diabetes. Here’s How To Get Screened

Millions Of Americans Are At Risk For Diabetes. Here’s How To Get Screened

November is National Diabetes Month. In the U.S., approximately 29.1 million people are living with diabetes (either type 1 or type 2). Medical expenditures for those people are as much as 2.3 times higher than for a person living without diabetes. Diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational Type 1 diabetes, previously known as juvenile diabetes, is most often diagnosed in children, teens and young adults. Type 2 diabetes is more common. It makes up about 90-95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, yet it’s estimated that in 2015, as many as 7.2 million adults were undiagnosed. That same year, 84.1 million Americans aged 18 and older had prediabetes, which is a precursor to type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy but often goes away soon after delivery. However, if you’ve ever been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, you and your baby are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Fortunately, there are simple and fairly inexpensive (and sometimes even free!) tests that can let you know if you have diabetes or if you’re at risk of developing it later in life. Who Should Get Screened for Diabetes The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that adults aged 40 to 70 be screened for abnormal blood glucose and diabetes. However, if you or a family member are experiencing what may be symptoms of type 2 diabetes, you should talk to a medical professional about your concerns, regardless of age. (Type 1 diabetes is unlike type 2 in that type 1 is too often diagnosed only when it reaches a critical point, meaning most symptoms may go undetected until a physical crisis occurs. Still, there are symptoms to watch for that may be indicative of type 1 diabetes.) You should consider being screened for type 2 diabetes if you: Are ove Continue reading >>

Undetectable Symptoms Of Prediabetes

Undetectable Symptoms Of Prediabetes

Have you heard of prediabetes ? What are the symptoms of prediabetes ? These are some of the questions you might have wondered over the years especially if you are at the age above 45 years old. Prediabetes is a condition where your body’s blood levels are higher than normal and even though it’s not categorized as being diabetic yet; your body would not be able to manage the blood sugar levels any more. This has become an increasing issue from time to time throughout the years. Most of the time prediabetes shown no symptoms of some sort, which makes some people doesn’t care at all about their health because they think that they are healthy. If you think about it, just like cancer or any other diseases that are around; it is definitely better to detect it at early stage, than knowing at the end that you are in fact diabetic. Most importantly is so you could still treat your body in how to manage your blood sugar levels to become normal again. You might also wonder if you have any other symptoms of prediabetes inside your body, which is why doing a routine general check-up is highly advisable. There are a few signs and symptoms of prediabetes that you might want to know so you could treat it early. If you are at the group age of 45 years old and above or have any other family members with the line of being diabetic, there is nothing wrong with getting yourself checked up especially get tested for your sugar blood level to find out for sure. Some people might also be overweight or obese, and then they might be in high risk of being diabetic also. Being overweight usually have a lot of disadvantages, other than physically you would be lazier to do anything; internally you could get diseases easier because your body would metabolize slower than a healthy body. Symptoms Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Cats

Diabetes In Cats

This article is about diabetes mellitus in cats. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease in cats, whereby either insufficient insulin response or insulin resistance lead to persistently high blood glucose concentrations. Diabetes could affect up to 1 in 230 cats,[1] and may be becoming increasingly common. Diabetes mellitus is less common in cats than in dogs. 80-95% of diabetic cats experience something similar to type-2 diabetes, but are generally severely insulin-dependent by the time symptoms are diagnosed. The condition is treatable, and treated properly, the cat can experience a normal life expectancy. In type-2 cats, prompt effective treatment may lead to diabetic remission, in which the cat no longer needs injected insulin. Untreated, the condition leads to increasingly weak legs in cats, and eventually malnutrition, ketoacidosis and/or dehydration, and death. Symptoms[edit] Cats will generally show a gradual onset of the disease over a few weeks or months, and it may escape notice for even longer.[citation needed] The first outward symptoms are a sudden weight loss (or occasionally gain), accompanied by excessive drinking and urination; for example, cats can appear to develop an obsession with water and lurk around faucets or water bowls. Appetite is suddenly either ravenous (up to three-times normal) or absent. These symptoms arise from the body being unable to use glucose as an energy source. A fasting glucose blood test will normally be suggestive of diabetes at this point. The same home blood test monitors used in humans are used on cats, usually by obtaining blood from the ear edges or paw pads. As the disease progresses, ketone bodies will be present in the urine, which can be detected with the same urine stri Continue reading >>

Diabetes Overview

Diabetes Overview

Diabetes is a long-term condition in which the blood sugar level in the body is higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. It is usually (although not exclusively) seen in young people. Type 2 diabetes or non insulin-dependent diabetes. It tends to affect adults over 40 and overweight people, although it is now becoming commoner amongst younger people. Type 2 diabetes occurs more frequently in people of South Asian and African-Caribbean descent. There are also other types of diabetes. Women can develop diabetes during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes, as it is sometimes referred to, usually disappears after the birth of the baby. However, having gestational diabetes increases the risk of type 2 diabetes later in life. Existing type 1 diabetes may be exacerbated during pregnancy. This is when diabetes is caused as the result of another condition, eg inflammation of the pancreas, or by the use of certain medication such as diuretics or steroids (the most common cause). How common is diabetes? Currently over 3 million people in the UK have with diabetes, the majority of which is type 2. It is estimated that more than half a million people more in the UK have type 2 diabetes, but are unaware of it. The last 30 years has seen a threefold increase in the number of cases of childhood diabetes. This is especially worrying in respect of the rising numbers of children and teenagers with Type 2 diabetes, which was once only seen in older people. This trend is likely to reflect the rising obesity levels in young people over the same time period. There has also been an increase in the number of children with Type 1 diabetes, the cause of which is unclear. What causes diabetes? Glucose is sugar. Blood sugar level is the sam Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Could You Have It And Not Even Know?

Type 2 Diabetes: Could You Have It And Not Even Know?

Do any of these sound like you? You feel sluggish or have a little less “get up and go” than previously, but you attribute it to high stress levels or increased age. You’ve had gradual weight gain and chalk it up to age. You have an increased desire for carbohydrates and never really feel full after eating. People close to you wonder how you can always eat at the drop of a hat. If so, you could you be one of the 7 million people in the U.S. with undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 or adult-onset diabetes does not normally come on like a lightning bolt or an earthquake, but silently develops over years. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, type two diabetes affects more than 25.8 million people or 8.3 percent of the U.S population. Experts predict a whopping 10 percent increase in adult diabetes in the next decade. Anne Peters, M.D., a leading diabetologist and researcher at University of Southern California (USC), believes that the average person diagnosed with type two diabetes actually had it for seven years prior to diagnosis! How can this happen? Or better yet, how can you monitor whether you are a type two diabetic or at risk for diabetes? 1. Get a physical every year and monitor your fasting glucose (blood sugar) levels. The ideal number is less than 95. If your numbers are consistently above 100 or are in the 100-115 range, you could be pre-diabetic or diabetic. 2. Ask your physician yearly to monitor a blood test called glycosylated hemoglobin A1C. This simple test measures what your blood sugar has been averaging over the previous three months. The number (depending on the laboratory) should be between 4-6. If it is over six, you could be diabetic. If you have a parent or sibling with type two or adult onset diabetes, this test is Continue reading >>

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

According to the latest American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, about 8 million people 18 years and older in the United States have type 2 diabetes and do not know it. Often type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed until symptoms become severe and hospitalization is required. Left untreated, diabetes can cause a number of health complications. That's why it's so important to both know what warning signs to look for and to see a health care provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Symptoms In incidences of prediabetes, there are no symptoms. People may not be aware that they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes because they have no symptoms or because the symptoms are so mild that they go unnoticed for quite some time. However, some individuals do experience warning signs, so it's important to be familiar with them. Prediabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes No symptoms Increased or extreme thirst Increased thirst Increased appetite Increased appetite Increased fatigue Fatigue Increased or frequent urination Increased urination, especially at night Unusual weight loss Weight loss Blurred vision Blurred vision Fruity odor or breath Sores that do not heal In some cases, no symptoms In some cases, no symptoms If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: If your blood glucose levels are in normal range, testing should be done about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes There are three ty Continue reading >>

Test One Drop To Stop ​diabetic Ketoacidosis

Test One Drop To Stop ​diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening condition which often develops quickly when the signs and symptoms of Type 1 diabetes have been overlooked or mistaken for other illnesses. A simple glucose test can detect early onset Type 1 diabetes and stop diabetic ketoacidosis before it kills! Progressing symptoms of undiagnosed Type 1 diabetes often imitate flu, strep, stomach virus, urinary tract infections, growth spurts and other common illnesses. When left untreated, Type 1 diabetes can develop into a life-threatening complication called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). If you or a loved one have a combination of the following symptoms, immediately request medical personnel Test One Drop of blood or urine for glucose (sugar) levels. A simple, inexpensive glucose test–performed in seconds–can save lives. These symptoms can be an indication of Type 1 diabetes. They are listed in possible order of progression, but your experience may vary. excessive thirst frequent urination bedwetting​ increased appetite abdominal pain irritability or mood changes headaches vision changes/blurriness itchy skin or genitals vaginal yeast infection thrush ​slow healing wounds ​recurrent infections sudden weight loss flushed, hot, dry skin muscle or leg cramps fruity/acetone scented breath nausea and vomiting* weakness or fatigue* shortness of breath* labored breathing* drowsiness or lethargy* confusion* stupor* unconsciousness* Anyone of any age, race, family medical history, socio-economic level, body type, general health condition, life-style, etc. can be diagnosed with an autoimmune disease called Type 1 diabetes. Despite the fact that it is also known as "juvenile diabetes", Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed in people of all ages, both children and adults. In fact, according to the U Continue reading >>

Is Your Thyroid Killing You? Diabetes

Is Your Thyroid Killing You? Diabetes

Dana, your blood sugar and cholesterol are very high. Do you have a family history of diabetes and heart disease? Several months later… Dana, your blood sugar and cholesterol are high again. You should start a cholesterol-lowering statin drug and diabetes medication. Let’s wait until your next lab test to decide. 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. The World Health Organization warns that its escalating rates around the world will result in the doubling of diabetes deaths between 2005 and 2030.[1. World Health Organization. World Diabetes Day 2012] Thyroid Disease and Diabetes The frequency of thyroid dysfunction in diabetic patients is higher than that of the general population. The Journal of Thyroid Research published an article in 2011 reviewing the scientific research worldwide on thyroid disorders and diabetes mellitus.[2. Hage, M., Zantout, M.S., Azar, S.T. Review Article: Thyroid Disorders and Diabetes Mellitus. Journal of Thyroid Research Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 439463, 7 pages] Perros et al. demonstrated an overall prevalence of 13.4% of thyroid diseases in diabetics with the highest prevalence in type 1 female diabetics (31.4%). A prevalence of 12.3% was reported among Greek diabetic patients and 16% of Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes were found to have thyroid dysfunction. In Jordan, a study reported that thyroid dysfunction was present in 12.5% of type 2 diabetic patients. Thyroid disorders remain the most frequent autoimmune disorders associated with type 1 diabetes. Positive TPO antibodies have been reported in as high as 38% of diabetic individuals. Ghawil et al. documented that 23.4% of type 1 diabetic Libyan subjects had positive TPO antibodies and 7% had positive TG antibodies. According to the World Health Organization, 50% of Continue reading >>

What You Can Do To Lower Risk Of Diabetes

What You Can Do To Lower Risk Of Diabetes

Question: What can I do to prevent becoming diabetic? Answer: More than one in three Americans has prediabetes, and 90 percent of them don’t know it. With prediabetes, your blood sugar levels are impaired but aren’t high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Because most people don’t have symptoms, it can go undetected without screening. Unfortunately, many with this condition will develop diabetes within a short time if the condition isn’t addressed. If you have prediabetes, you’re at increased risk for heart disease and stroke. If diabetes develops, add blindness, kidney failure and loss of limb from amputation to the risk list. The good news is that you often can prevent diabetes with healthy lifestyle modifications, education, and sometimes, medication. Identifying the early stages of glucose impairment before diabetes develops is an important way to reverse and prevent chronic disease. If you have one or more of the following risk factors, talk to your doctor about screening for prediabetes with a blood test: • Age greater than 45. • Overweight or obese. • A history of gestational diabetes. • Limited exercise. • Elevated blood pressure. • A family history of diabetes. If you have prediabetes or are at risk for developing diabetes, several lifestyle changes can greatly decrease your risk. Although making lifestyle changes can be challenging, even small adjustments can have lasting results: Losing 5-7 percent of your body weight can prevent or delay the progression to diabetes. Replacing processed and packaged food with vegetables, fruits and lean protein such as chicken, fish, and turkey improves nutrition and decreases calories. Avoiding white flour in pasta, pastries and bagels and instead choosing whole-grain options for carbohydrates can impr Continue reading >>

What It’s Like To Have Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

What It’s Like To Have Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

One of the greatest dangers of type 2 diabetes is that it can be slow and silent. Many people with the condition don’t experience any symptoms at all, even though their unbalanced blood sugar is already affecting their cells and tissue. You might be one of those people. How can you tell if you're at risk for developing type 2 diabetes? You may be more likely to develop the condition if you: Are overweight, with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or higher Are inactive Are age 45 or older Have a family history of type 2 diabetes Are African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, Asian-American, or a Pacific Islander Have low levels of HDL, or the “good” cholesterol Have high levels of triglycerides (a type of fat) in your blood Although the telltale signs of type 2 diabetes may develop slowly over many years, the condition will cause symptoms for many people. Do any of these sound familiar? Increased thirst Frequent urination Increased hunger Unexplained weight loss Extreme fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Sores that are slow to heal Skin, bladder, or gum infections Whether you're experiencing any of these symptoms or not, uncontrolled levels of high blood sugar over time can lead to tissue damage throughout your body, from your eyes to your toes. Uncontrolled Diabetes Is Scary — and Even Deadly Type 2 diabetes damages essential systems in your body: your blood vessels, nerves, or both. The consequences of uncontrolled diabetes can be very serious, and some can eventually be fatal. They include: Infections Amputations due to infections in the feet These complications sound scary — and they are. Fortunately, controlling your blood-glucose levels can help prevent many of these secondary problems, or at least manage them if they have already developed. Take Action Tod Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 20 million Americans suffer from diabetes, and nearly one-third of them do not know that they have the disease. Diabetes does not only affect older people; in 2005, 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in patients 20 years old and up. Diabetes is a major risk factor for heart disease. As many as two-thirds of patients with diabetes die from some form of heart or blood vessel disease. What is Diabetes? Diabetes mellitus is a serious condition in which the body cannot make or properly respond to insulin. Insulin, a hormone that is secreted from the pancreas, changes sugar and starch from food into energy. People with diabetes cannot properly use the energy from the food they eat. When this energy transfer fails, cells are damaged. Because this disease prohibits cells from using it, the amount of glucose in the blood increases to dangerously high levels. Too much glucose in the blood is called “high blood sugar” or diabetes. The major forms of diabetes are: Type 1 or Juvenile Diabetes. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5% to 10% of all cases of diabetes. Although it may occur at any age, it usually begins early in life—during childhood or the teenage years. There is no way to prevent type 1 diabetes. It is an autoimmune disease in which the cells in the pancreas that make insulin are damaged. People with type 1 diabetes produce very little or no insulin. These patients must take insulin to control their blood sugar levels to stay alive. Type 2 Diabetes. This metabolic disorder is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90% to 95% of all cases of diabetes. It is usually diagnosed in people older than 30, but it can also occur in children and young adults. People with type 2 diabetes can produce Continue reading >>

Dipping Blood Sugars Cause Surprisingly Irregular Heart Rhythms In Diabetics

Dipping Blood Sugars Cause Surprisingly Irregular Heart Rhythms In Diabetics

• Research unveils clues to ‘Dead in Bed’ cases where young people without any history of long-term complications die suddenly from diabetes. • Low blood sugar levels lead to heart rhythm disturbances and even life-threatening heart attacks. Dangerous overnight blood sugar levels often go undetected and cause prolonged periods of heart rhythm disturbances in older patients with Type 2 diabetes and associated heart problems, new research reveals. The findings from the research – led by Professor Simon Heller of the University of Sheffield’s Department of Human Metabolism and Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust - could offer vital clues to the mechanism by which low blood sugar levels could contribute to life-threatening changes in heart rhythm, a major risk for patients with diabetes. They also shed important new light on the ‘Dead in Bed’ syndrome – where young people without any history of long-term complications die suddenly from the disease. Previous studies have apparently ruled out a direct effect of hypoglycaemia (very low levels of sugar in the blood) as a cause of death in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Few of the patients taking part in the present study reported symptoms of low blood sugar levels or irregular heartbeats – and they were only detected through continuous glucose monitoring and electrocardiograms used by Sheffield researchers which tracked blood glucose levels and heart rates over a week in a group of older patients with Type 2 diabetes and a history of cardiovascular disease. The breakthrough research was conducted by Elaine Chow, a specialist registrar at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals and the University of Sheffield under a £190K Biomedical Research Fellowship awarded by the National Institute for Health Researc Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Unknown: How Many Diabetes Cases Go Undetected?

Diagnosis Unknown: How Many Diabetes Cases Go Undetected?

Diagnosis unknown: how many diabetes cases go undetected? Diagnosis unknown: how many diabetes cases go undetected? 3.3m people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK in 2013/14, whilst an additional 590,000 are undiagnosed. GP practice registers support the 3.3m figure, but the methodology and reliability of the undiagnosed figure is more uncertain. "Diabetes UK says the number of people with the illness in the UK has reached an all-time high of 3.9 million, and estimates there are another 590,000 people with undiagnosed type-2 diabetes." Diabetes UK's claim that3.3 million people arediagnosed with diabetes (of either type) in the UK refers to2013/14, and accurately quotesthe sum ofdata from GP surgeries inEngland, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The figure for undiagnosed cases is more uncertain, so the 3.9 million total figure is difficult to verify. Sky News hasmistakenly double-counted the estimated undiagnosed cases, consigning an extra 590,000 people to the condition. We've asked them to correct their online article. As defined by the NHS , diabetes is "a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high" caused by an inability of the body to break down glucose into energy using insulin. There are two main types of the condition: people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes don't have any insulin at all to carry out this process, whilst those diagnosed with (the more common) type 2 don't have enough insulin or it doesn't work effectively at breaking down the glucose. Symptoms can only become apparent very gradually, such that diabetes can go undiagnosed for a long period of time leaving the sufferer unknowing of the cause. We checked Diabetes UK's claim of 3.3 million people being diagnosed with diabetes (of either type) in the UK in 2013/ Continue reading >>

A Destructive Disease That Often Goes Undetected

A Destructive Disease That Often Goes Undetected

Diabetes: The American Diabetes Association estimates there are 17 million Americans with diabetes—nearly 6 percent of the U.S. population. More troubling is the fact that half of them don’t know they have it. Diabetes is a terribly destructive disease. It silently destroys circulation to the heart, brain, kidneys, legs, eyes and skin. It increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, and kidney failure. More than 60 percent of non-traumatic amputations are due to diabetes and it is the leading cause of blindness in the adults 20 to 74. Yet, about 90-95% of those with diabetes have Type 2, which typically takes decades to cause symptoms. Many people have heard the “classic” symptoms of diabetes: increased thirst, increased urination, hunger and weakness, but these are symptoms of Type 1 diabetes which is most commonly seen in children and which is a very different disease from Type 2. Because most diabetics have no symptoms, it is important to understand what to look for. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called insulin dependent or juvenile diabetes, typically starts in childhood. Research has shown that Type 1 diabetes results from the immune system attacking and destroying the pancreas cells that produce insulin. Our bodies use insulin to control blood sugar levels. Although Type 1 diabetes is genetically based, it is not inherited from parents as other traits would be. Symptoms of Type 1 diabetes are increased thirst, fatigue, weight loss, increased urination, hunger, and blurred vision. Left untreated, Type 1 diabetes causes the blood sugar to rise and produce acids which can cause nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, loss of consciousness and even death. Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin injections as it does not respond to pills. Type 1 diabetics must be rigor Continue reading >>

8 Signs Your Child May Have Type 1 Diabetes

8 Signs Your Child May Have Type 1 Diabetes

Source: Web exclusive, August 2010 Over 300,000 Canadians have type 1 diabetes, yet when your own child is diagnosed with this disease, it can come as a shock. ‘Most kids who get diabetes do not have another family member with it,’ points out diabetes specialist Dr. Maureen Clement in Vernon, B.C. ‘Often, it’s just a bolt of lightning.’ Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed during childhood, often between the ages of 10 to 13. There’s nothing parents can do to prevent this type of diabetes. However, if you notice signs your child might have the disease, you can take action to prevent a serious complication called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), in which the body runs out of insulin to process sugar and begins to break down fat instead. If your child shows indications of type 1 diabetes, says Clement, then don’t delay in visiting your pediatrician. ‘Don’t say, ‘let’s wait a week or two.’ Get your kid tested that day to make sure they don’t have diabetes.’ And if it does turn out that your child is diabetic, remember that as long as the disease is well managed, she can still enjoy good health her whole life. Here’s what to watch out for. Sign 1: Unquenchable thirst Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may be constantly thirsty. That’s because as their blood-glucose level rises, fluid is pulled from their body tissues. These kids may especially crave sweet, cold drinks. Sign 2: Frequent urination What goes in must come out, so it stands to reason that a child who is drinking more will also visit the washroom more. If your kid is taking an unusual number of bathroom breaks, there may be an underlying and serious reason behind it. A younger child who was previously toilet trained at night may start to wet the bed again. Sign 3: Weight loss A Continue reading >>

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