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Can Diabetes Develop In 6 Months

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

After announcing the expansion of Diabetes Stops Here and asking you which topics you’d like covered, we received a specific request for more information about prediabetes. A staggering 79 million Americans deal with this condition, and while it can lead to crippling health consequences, it can be avoided. Here are five things you should know about prediabetes: 1. What is prediabetes? Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have prediabetes, a health condition where your blood glucose is higher than normal but not as high as if you had diabetes. 2. How can I find out if I have it? Your doctor can give you a blood test to tell if you have prediabetes (the same test that’s used to test for diabetes). At your next doctor visit, ask if you should be tested for prediabetes. 3. What can I do if I have prediabetes? If you have prediabetes, there are important steps you can, and should, take. Early intervention can turn back the clock and return elevated blood glucose levels to the normal range. Losing weight is an important step for most people with prediabetes, and the amount doesn’t have to be huge to make a difference. A weight loss of just 10 to 15 pounds can really stack the odds in your favor. Coupled with 30 minutes of exercise each day and healthy food choices, you’ll be on your way. Talk with your doctor and visit our website to learn more about other ways you can prevent or reverse the condition. 4. Does this mean I’m going to develop type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes can lead to type 2 diabetes…but it doesn’t have to. Scientific studies show taking the above steps can often halt or at least slow down the progression of prediabetes so it doesn’t take a turn for the worse. 5. Where can I find help? You are not alone. It’s never too late Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Develop Complications?

How Long Does It Take To Develop Complications?

If you've been diagnosed with diabetes you may well be terrified that you will develop the horrible diabetic complications you have seen ruin the lives of relatives who also had diabetes. You've seen your loved ones' feet literally rot off, their kidneys fail, their eyes grow dim. Now, you fear, it will be your turn. But it doesn't have to be! To understand why the horrors of complications devastate people with diabetes and why they don't have to ruin your life you have to understand something about the natural history of these complications: how long they take to develop and what research has found about what can slow them down or stop them. You won't develop any diabetic complication immediately after the onset of diabetes--though because so many people with Type 2 diabetes have had undiagnosed diabetes for 5 years or more, many people with Type 2 diabetes do already have complications on the day of their diagnosis. The most common diabetic complication found in these "newly diagnosed" Type 2s is neuropathy--pain or numbness in the nerves, usually of the feet, followed by protein in the urine--a sign that the kidney filtration units are getting clogged, and early retinal changes. But if you get an early diagnosis, it is almost certain you will have none of these complications at diagnosis, because studies of people with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes suggest that it takes about 5 years of exposure to high blood sugars for any of these complications to develop. For example, one study of Type 2s who had no retinopathy at diagnosis found that at 6 years after diagnosis 22% (1 in 5) had developed some retinopathy. The study states, "Development of retinopathy (incidence) was strongly associated with baseline glycaemia [high blood sugar], glycaemic exposure over 6 years, Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes an unhealthy amount of a simple sugar (glucose) to build up in a person's blood. Someone with type 1 diabetes can't produce enough insulin, a hormone that moves glucose from the bloodstream into cells throughout the body, where it supplies energy and fuels growth. Normally, a child's immune system protects her body from diseases by destroying unhealthy cells and germs. But when a child has type 1 diabetes, her body also mistakenly attacks the healthy insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). Without these cells, her pancreas produces very little or no insulin, which leads to an abnormally high amount of sugar in her blood. Without proper care, type 1 diabetes can cause serious, wide-ranging health problems that can damage organs throughout the body over the long-term. If your child has been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, it's understandable that you might worry. But diabetes can be kept under control by carefully monitoring your child's blood sugar and following her treatment plan. A team of doctors, nurses, and nutritionists can help your child be as healthy as possible and teach her to manage the condition so she stays that way. What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children? Symptoms of type 1 diabetes include: Extreme thirst Peeing more than usual (You might notice more wet diapers if your child is very young, or "accidents" if your child is potty trained.) Extreme hunger Weight loss Unusual tiredness Crankiness Yeast infection or diaper rash If your child has one or more of these symptoms, call his doctor right away. Type 1 diabetes symptoms can start quickly and become very serious without treatment. Get medical care immediately if your child has any of Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

With more than a third of diabetes cases in the United States occurring in people over the age of 65, diabetes is often referred to as an age-related condition. But around 208,000 children and adolescents are estimated to have diabetes, and this number is increasing. Type 1 diabetes is the most common form of the condition among children and adolescents. A 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that type 1 diabetes prevalence stands at 1.93 in every 1,000 children and adolescents, while type 2 diabetes affects 0.24 in every 1,000. In 2014, Medical News Today reported that, based on a study published in JAMA, rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have increased significantly among American children and teenagers. The study found that incidence of type 1 diabetes in children aged up to 9 years increased by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009, while incidence of type 2 diabetes among youths aged 10-19 years rose by 30.5 percent. The researchers note: "The increases in prevalence reported herein are important because such youth with diabetes will enter adulthood with several years of disease duration, difficulty in treatment, an increased risk of early complications and increased frequency of diabetes during reproductive years, which may further increase diabetes in the next generation." Contents of this article: Here are some key points about diabetes in children. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Type 1 and 2 diabetes are both increasing in the youth of America Often, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children develop over just a few weeks If type 1 diabetes is not spotted, the child can develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) What is diabetes in children? Type 1 diabetes in children, previously called juve Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Diabetes can affect individuals of any age, including infants and children. Knowing that your baby has diabetes can be really frightening. But by learning how to perform glucose testing and give insulin, you can help your child to grow up healthy. The first thing you need to do, though, is to keep your own stress level down. Your baby can sense if you feel anxious, so it is up to you to be as brave as your little one. Types Medical experts say that Type 1 diabetes is the form of the disease most often diagnosed in infants. More commonly known as juvenile onset diabetes, this autoimmune disorder prevents the body from producing enough insulin, a hormone needed so that cells can break down glucose for energy. Type 2, or non-insulin dependent diabetes, can also affect infants. Insulin resistance is the primary cause of Type 2 diabetes. As a result, both insulin and blood sugar levels in the body continue to rise. Certain medical conditions or genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, can cause this type of diabetes as well. Symptoms The American Academy of Pediatrics tells parents to contact their child’s pediatrician immediately if she shows any of the following symptoms. Crankiness, sweating, trembling, paleness and bluish tinge to the lips or fingers are symptoms that an infant might be hypoglycemic. A glucose test should be performed, as treatment may be needed if the infant’s blood sugar is too low. A baby’s brain development requires a continuous supply of glucose. Therefore, parents must carefully manage their child’s diabetes. Likewise, when an infant’s glucose levels climb too high, hyperglycemia means that your infant may not be getting enough insulin in combination with how much you are feeding her. While infants often display no sy Continue reading >>

'our Baby Has Diabetes'

'our Baby Has Diabetes'

(Parenting.com) -- Last winter our 11-month-old son Jake had the flu, we thought. My husband, Matt, and I had just gotten over it, and Jake was vomiting and acting lethargic. When he began to grunt with each breath, we took him to the emergency room -- expecting to hear that we were anxious parents. Instead, the nurse took his vitals and rushed to get the doctors. Doctors thought it was asthma, but asthma medicine didn't help. Jake was dehydrated and had gone into shock, so an IV was put into his leg and he was hooked up to a breathing machine. Everything was happening so fast. Minutes earlier, Jake was confused because I was crying; now he was fighting for his life. A terrible wait About an hour later, the doctors told us Jake had type I diabetes. We were stunned. I didn't know any adults with this disease, let alone a baby. Terrified, all I could think to ask was, "Will he be OK?" When they replied that they were doing everything they could, we realized how serious the situation was. He was moved to the intensive care unit -- strapped down, unconscious, connected to tubes. Over the next few days, there were more X-rays and blood tests, and Jake even stopped breathing once. But gradually the doctors regulated his sugar and blood acid levels with an insulin drip. I was worried that Jake wouldn't be the same little boy anymore; he cried when a doctor or nurse looked at him, and was uncharacteristically clingy. But he bounced back, and within a week, he was smiling and walking again. Intensive education Meanwhile, Matt and I got a crash course from the hospital's diabetes instructors in how to care for our son. It was overwhelming, but when Jake left after eight days we were prepared. Not that it's easy. We test his blood with a finger prick at least nine times a day, and Continue reading >>

Symptoms & Causes Of Diabetes

Symptoms & Causes Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Symptoms of diabetes include increased thirst and urination increased hunger fatigue blurred vision numbness or tingling in the feet or hands sores that do not heal unexplained weight loss Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can start quickly, in a matter of weeks. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly—over the course of several years—and can be so mild that you might not even notice them. Many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms. Some people do not find out they have the disease until they have diabetes-related health problems, such as blurred vision or heart trouble. What causes type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes occurs when your immune system, the body’s system for fighting infection, attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Scientists think type 1 diabetes is caused by genes and environmental factors, such as viruses, that might trigger the disease. Studies such as TrialNet are working to pinpoint causes of type 1 diabetes and possible ways to prevent or slow the disease. What causes type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of diabetes—is caused by several factors, including lifestyle factors and genes. Overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are not physically active and are overweight or obese. Extra weight sometimes causes insulin resistance and is common in people with type 2 diabetes. The location of body fat also makes a difference. Extra belly fat is linked to insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and heart and blood vessel disease. To see if your weight puts you at risk for type 2 diabetes, check out these Body Mass Index (BMI) charts. Insulin resistance Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resista Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes

Signs Of Diabetes

Thats what reportedly happened to Rob Kardashian, the 28-year-old reality TV personality, this week. According to TMZ, he was rushed to an L.A. hospital and diagnosed with the condition. Rob had put on weight recently, but he no idea he had diabetes. And hes not alone: 25 percent of people with diabetes dont know theyre afflicted, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Paying attention to prediabetes warning signs could save you from an ER visit like Kardashiansand prevent you from ever developing full-blown diabetes. Here are the top silent alarms. (If these sound familiar, exercising and losing weight can reduce your risk. Try TheGet Back in Shape Workout: A 28-Day Program That Will Transform Your Body! ) 1. You know what the bathroom looks like at night. Because you visit often. As blood sugar levels go up, diabetes symptoms like frequent urination worsen. If 4 months ago you were getting up once in the middle of the night to pee and now youre getting up three times, thats a clue you need to get checked out, says Andrew Bremer, M.D., Ph.D., program director at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. This may also be a symptom of prostate issues (such as an enlarged prostate). Either way, its best to bring the issue up with your doctor so he can rule out potential causes. You notice dark patches of skin on the back of your neck, but no matter how hard you rub, they wont come off. How come? Insulin resistance can cause a condition called acanthosis nigricans, which may appear during pre-diabetes. The dark, velvety patches can ring your neck and also appear on your elbows and knees. Once you get your glucose under control, the patches will likely fade away. Having high blood sugar levels in the long term damages the t Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding For Six Months Slashes Type 2 Diabetes Risk By 47 Per Cent, Study Shows

Breastfeeding For Six Months Slashes Type 2 Diabetes Risk By 47 Per Cent, Study Shows

Breastfeeding for six months slashes type 2 diabetes risk by 47 per cent, study shows Women who breastfed for six months are more protect themselves against diabetesCredit:Alamy Breastfeeding for six months or longer cuts the risk of developing type 2 diabetes nearly in half for women during their childbearing years, the longest ever study has shown. Researchers in the US analysed data from women who enrolled in a heart health study more than 30 years ago, and whose lifestyles and health were monitored throughout that time. They found that those who had breastfed their children for at least six months were 47 per cent less likely to have developed type 2 diabetes during the three decades compared to mothers who did not breastfeed. Women who breastfed for fewer than six months also lowered their risk by 25 per cent. Scientists believe that there are good biological reasons why breastfeeding may protect against diabetes. For example, it is known to boost hormones which control blood insulin levels and lower blood sugar. It can also help new mothers lose pregnancy weight. We found a very strong association between breastfeeding duration and lower risk of developing diabetes, even after accounting for all possible confounding risk factors, said lead author Dr Erica Gunderson, senior research scientist with the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in California. "The incidence of diabetes decreased in a graded manner as breastfeeding duration increased, regardless of race, gestational diabetes, lifestyle behaviors, body size, and other metabolic risk factors measured before pregnancy, implying the possibility that the underlying mechanism may be biological. Research has found that breastfed babies have fewer health problems, such as chest infections, and are less likely t Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Overview Type 1 diabetes in children is a condition in which your child's body no longer produces an important hormone (insulin). Your child needs insulin to survive, so you'll have to replace the missing insulin. Type 1 diabetes in children used to be known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children can be overwhelming at first. Suddenly you and your child — depending on his or her age — must learn how to give injections, count carbohydrates and monitor blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes in children requires consistent care. But advances in blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery have improved the daily management of the condition. Symptoms The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. These signs and symptoms include: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your child's bloodstream pulls fluid from tissues. As a result your child might be thirsty — and drink and urinate more than usual. A young, toilet-trained child might suddenly experience bed-wetting. Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs lack energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign of type 1 diabetes to be noticed in children. Fatigue. Lack of sugar in your child's cells might make him or her tired and lethargic. Irritability or behavior changes. In addition to mood problems, your child might suddenly have a decline in performance at school. Fruity-smelling breath. Bu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

6 Signs Your Pet May Have Diabetes

6 Signs Your Pet May Have Diabetes

Diabetes is a glucose control problem that can affect both dogs and cats. A growing epidemic, raising awareness about diabetes is vital to identifying and treating the disorder early. Does My Pet Have Diabetes? Diabetes is a complex disease caused by either a lack of the hormone insulin or an inadequate response to insulin. Diabetes can develop gradually, over time, and the signs may not be apparent at first. There are a few signs to look for especially in older pets. 1. Extreme Thirst and Increased Urination The foremost clinical sign of diabetes is increased water consumption (“polydipsia”) and consequently increased urination (“polyuria”). Thirst is sometimes difficult to quantify. Is my dog drinking excessive amounts of water or just temporarily thirsty or hot? This must be evaluated over time and sometimes is vague in small dogs and cats. It’s easier to spot in large dogs, because their water bowl will empty quickly. The resulting urine will be diluted or clear, almost like water. 2. Increased Appetite and Weight Loss Dogs with diabetes will lose weight although may be still eating normally, or even appear hungrier than usual. That’s because the body can’t convert the food into energy – due to either a lack of insulin or insulin resistance. Since they are not getting energy from food, their body starts burning fat and muscle for energy, causing a reduction in overall body weight. 3. Chronic or Sudden Bouts of Fatigue Feeling fatigued or lethargic is also a sign of diabetes, and can be caused by blood sugar swings on both sides of the spectrum. When their blood sugar is high, it stops their body from getting the energy they need from food, so they are tired all the time. Blood sugar dips can cause sudden bouts of fatigue. 4. Depression and Vomiting A Continue reading >>

Can You Develop Type 2 Diabetes Within 6 Months?

Can You Develop Type 2 Diabetes Within 6 Months?

Can you develop type 2 diabetes within 6 months? Lately, I have been having tingling hands and feet and I notice that this usually happens after I eat. The thing is it happens randomly. Sometimes I can eat candy and sweets like crazy and I'll feel no tingling, but other days I'll eat even a little bit and feel tingling. I also notice that they sometimes... show more Lately, I have been having tingling hands and feet and I notice that this usually happens after I eat. The thing is it happens randomly. Sometimes I can eat candy and sweets like crazy and I'll feel no tingling, but other days I'll eat even a little bit and feel tingling. I also notice that they sometimes tingle when I'm sitting down. Also another thing is that my hands and feet tingle, but its for the most part just my left hand and feet that will tingle and not my right. I also have headaches, which again are mostly on the left side of my head. I was wondering if this is warning signs of diabetes? The other symptoms such as increased thirst and frequent urination I dont have. Its mostly just tingling, headaches, and also itchy skin. Any idea what it could be? I had my A1C on August, and doctor said everything came back fine, I got a 5.3. Thats why I was wondering if it could be diabetes, seeing as how I was just tested around 7 months ago. Update: Im 19 years old, 160lbs (so not overweight) Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: The association that diabetes has with sensations in hands and feet is due to diabetic neuropathy where the nerves are damaged by the high glucose levels. But this occurs after years, perhaps decades of untreated diabetes, it would hardly be the first indications of diabetes. Go see your Doctor but it would be very unlikely for the tingling to be diabetes relate Continue reading >>

Scale Based On 6-month Glucose Change Predicts The Development Of Type 1 Diabetes In People At High Risk

Scale Based On 6-month Glucose Change Predicts The Development Of Type 1 Diabetes In People At High Risk

Scale Based on 6-Month Glucose Change Predicts the Development of Type 1 Diabetes in People at High Risk The development and utility of a novel scale that quantifies the glycemic progression toward type 1 diabetes over 6 months, by Sosenko and colleagues. Diabetes Care 2015;38:940942 What is the problem and what is known about it so far? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, which means that it develops when the body's immune system destroys the insulin-making cells of the pancreas. Exactly what causes the immune system to malfunction in this way is not known. Although type 1 diabetes runs in families, genes alone do not explain which people get it and which do not. A person might inherit a higher risk for diabetes, but may not get the disease unless he or she is exposed to certain triggers in the environment. Researchers have found dozens of genes that are linked to diabetes and many possible triggers. But for now, the story of how type 1 diabetes develops remains a mystery. Researchers do know that relatives of people with type 1 diabetes are more likely to get the disease, and those who test positive for pancreatic autoantibodies (proteins that attack pancreas cells) have an even higher risk. For this reason, prevention studies are conducted with these high-risk individuals. The Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) tried (unsuccessfully) to prevent type 1 diabetes by giving insulin to people at high risk. Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet is a research network that grew out of the DPT-1. Clinics participating in TrialNet register relatives of people with type 1 diabetes and screen them for autoantibodies. These individuals then may be able to participate in TrialNet studies aimed at learning more about how the disease develops and how it might be delayed or prevented Continue reading >>

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