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Can Diabetes Cause Your Hands To Go Numb?

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

Left Hand Gone Numb | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Left Hand Gone Numb | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Firstly I apologise if this is a regular topic or obvious question, but it's got me a little concerned. I woke this morning to find my left hand and in particular three of my fingers feeling numb, as though I had slept on my hand. I've been up for a few hours now and the feeling hasn't returned or improved at all which is a bit worrying as in the past this sort of thing would have passed after a few minutes. Just wandering if anyone else has experienced similar and whether the feeling will return. I'm only recently diagnosed so surely it's too soon for nerve damage, unless it's damage from pre diagnosis? My BG levels have been steadily improving, my 30 day average is 6.7mmol/L and my 14 day average is 5.4mmol/L so not excessively high (I don't think). I'd be interested to hear whether this is a common complaint or cause for concern. Thanks, Jon Something similar? Yes I suppose so even though I am type 2. I have some numbness in my little fingers and sometimes I have doubtful feeling in the one next to it. Recently I have had some burning sensations in my forearm. The arm is normal for the most part unless stressed into some attitudes or if it touches something (like banisters) in a certain way then it might feel as though I have been stung. These things have been with me a while and, no, they are not going away. To describe the degree of it. I was walking down the garden one day and my cockerel was beside me. I looked at my hand and there was blood on it. Turned out the nice cockerel had taken a lump out of the little finger and I never felt it. Oddly, the next time I saw the pharmacist she asked if I had experienced any numbness in fingers or toes. L Continue reading >>

10 Reasons Your Hands Are Going Numb

10 Reasons Your Hands Are Going Numb

Your hands contain some of the most sensitive touch receptors in your entire body. And all those touch receptors are connected to your brain by a network of nerves. If even one of those nerves—or one section of those nerves—is pinched or somehow damaged, your brain may not receive all the sensory info your hands are sending its way. The result could be numbness, says Dr. Rob Danoff, DO, director of family medicine at Philadelphia's Aria Health System. Danoff says one of the most common causes of hand numbness is carpal tunnel syndrome—a condition in which the median nerve, which runs down your forearm and into your hand, becomes pinched at your wrist. (These 5 stretches can ease your carpal tunnel pain.) "It's fairly common for people who spend a lot of time working on a computer," Danoff says. Especially if your desk setup requires you to lay your wrist against an edge or hard surface while you're typing or mouse-ing, you're at risk. Along with numbness, symptoms of carpal tunnel include a sensation that one or more of your fingers—especially your thumb, index, and middle finger—are swollen or tingling, according to the NIH. (Here are 7 other reasons your hands and feet are tingling.) If these symptoms describe what you're feeling, let your doctor know ASAP, Danoff says. If left untreated too long, you may need surgery to relieve your pinched nerve. What else could be causing your hands to go numb? Plenty. Keep reading. If you're a tennis player of golfer—or partake in any activity that requires repetitive twisting of the hand, wrist, or elbow—you're at risk for epicondylitis, or "tennis elbow," Danoff says. This condition stems from the wearing down or weakening of tendons that wrap across your elbow, according to the American Society for Surgery of the Continue reading >>

Are The Tingling And Numbness In My Hands Caused By My Diabetes?

Are The Tingling And Numbness In My Hands Caused By My Diabetes?

If you have tingling in your hands but not your feet, diabetes may be a contributor, but it is more likely that you have another problem, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. Tingling and numbness, as well as a lack of feeling and sometimes ongoing pain, are symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, meaning damage to nerves other than those of the brain and spinal cord. High blood sugar from diabetes is a common cause of peripheral neuropathy. Nerve injury occurs throughout the body, but the longest nerves-those with nerve fibers that start near the spine and end in the feet-are the most sensitive. For this reason, symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy almost always start in the feet, though it can eventually progress to the hands. But other conditions can lead to neuropathy as well. Carpal tunnel syndrome, as I mentioned above, is one of them. In this condition, the median nerve, one of the main nerves to the hands, is compressed as it crosses the wrist. Pressure on the nerve causes symptoms that are very similar to those of peripheral neuropathy, but only in the hand. Unfortunately, nerve injury from the two problems may be additive. If you have diabetes, high blood sugars may have damaged the nerves in your body enough to make you more sensitive to the effects of carpal tunnel syndrome. For this reason, people with diabetes may have symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome earlier than people who don’t have diabetes. In your case, both problems could be contributing. In some instances, specialized tests, such as electromyography (EMG) or nerve conduction studies (NCS) may be helpful in determining the cause of these symptoms. Continue Learning about Diabetic Neuropathy (Nerve Damage) Videos Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations Continue reading >>

Tingling In Hands And Feet

Tingling In Hands And Feet

Tingling hands, feet, or both is an extremely common and bothersome symptom. Such tingling can sometimes be benign and temporary. For example, it could result from pressure on nerves when your arm is crooked under your head as you fall asleep. Or it could be from pressure on nerves when you cross your legs too long. In either case, the "pins and needles" effect -- which is usually painless -- is soon relieved by removing the pressure that caused it. In many cases, however, tingling in the hands, feet, or both can be severe, episodic, or chronic. It also can accompany other symptoms. such as pain, itching, numbness, and muscle wasting. In such cases, tingling may be a sign of nerve damage, which can result from causes as varied as traumatic injuries or repetitive stress injuries, bacterial or viral infections, toxic exposures, and systemic diseases such as diabetes. Such nerve damage is known as peripheral neuropathy because it affects nerves distant from the brain and spinal cord, often in the hands and feet. There are more than 100 different types of peripheral neuropathy. Over time, peripheral neuropathy can worsen, resulting in decreased mobility and even disability. More than 20 million Americans, most of them older adults, are estimated to have peripheral neuropathy. It's important to seek prompt medical evaluation for any persistent tingling in your hands, feet, or both. The earlier the underlying cause of your tingling is identified and brought under control, the less likely you are to suffer potentially lifelong consequences. Causes of Tingling in the Hands and Feet Diabetes is one of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy, accounting for about 30% of cases. In diabetic neuropathy, tingling and other symptoms often first develop in both feet and go up t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness—loss of feeling—in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. What causes diabetic neuropathies? The causes are probably different for different types of diabetic neuropathy. Researchers are studying how prolonged exposure to high blood glucose causes nerve damage. Nerve damage is likely due to a combination of factors: metabolic factors, such as high blood glucose, long duration of diabetes, abnormal blood fat levels, and possibly low levels of insulin neurovascular factors, leading to damage to the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to nerves autoimmune factors that cause inflammation in nerves mechanical injury to nerves, such as carpal tunnel syndrome inherited traits that increase susceptibility to nerve disease lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use What are the symptoms of diabetic neuropathies? Symptoms depend on the type of neuropathy and which Continue reading >>

Does Pins And Needles Sensation Means You Have Diabetes?

Does Pins And Needles Sensation Means You Have Diabetes?

The sensation of “pins and needles” is technically known as a form of paresthesia. Paresthesias are abnormal sensations and include sensations of burning, tingling, prickling, skin crawling or itching, often in the hands and/or feet. All the forms of paresthesia are due to nerve damage, either because of some disease affecting the nerves (eg. Multiple sclerosis or diabetes), by traumatic injury or entrapment (eg. Carpel tunnel syndrome), by strokes or by tumors pressing on the nerves.[1] Paresthesias can also be caused by Vitamin B12 deficiency, heavy metal poisoning, alcohol abuse and by a low-functioning thyroid (hypothyroidism).[2] Paresthesias can also be caused by various medications such as antihistamines, blood pressure medication, antibiotics and other medications can cause paresthesias such as that sensation of pins and needles. Just about everyone has experienced temporary paresthesias—these are those times when your leg “fell asleep” as you sat cross-legged or your hands were tingling or vibrating for some time after weed whacking or using some power tool. Paresthesias are usually not painful unless they are cause by spinal or traumatic injury, but they can become chronic (long-term) and can affect your overall quality of life. For example, if the “pins and needles” sensation doesn’t let you sleep, that can affect your quality of life. If that “pins and needles” sensation make it difficult for you to type, hold a pen, use a tool, sew, garden or perform another activity that you enjoy—or that you have to do—THAT can affect your quality of life. In diabetes, paresthesias often precede and are part of a complication of diabetes, peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is believed to result from chronically high levels of blood sugar. Continue reading >>

Numbness Tingling In Hands And Fingers – Symptoms Of Diabetes

Numbness Tingling In Hands And Fingers – Symptoms Of Diabetes

Numbness and tingling in the hands, fingers and extremities is a symptom of diabetes caused by nerve damage known as diabetic neuropathies. This nerve damage is in turn caused by heightened levels of glucose in the blood which is the main symptom of both types of diabetes. The exact mechanism through which prolonged exposure to glucose causes nerve damage is unknown but currently being researched. It may be a result of the direct effect that glucose has on the nerves, or it may be that the result of other effects such as poor circulation. It is likely that it is a combination of factors that varies from case to case. The sensation of this numbness and tingling has been likened to that of sleeping on your hands after waking up. This causes a similar loss of sensation that makes your hands or feet feel ‘bloated’ and ‘dead’. At the same time you might experience coldness in the area and possibly a rash. If the numbness and tingling occurs every time you sit down, is worse in the morning and at night, occurs alongside pain in the forearms and fingers and/or is also joined by a rash or dizziness; all these things point to a high likelihood of the tingling being related to diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy is one of the later symptoms of diabetes and is a cause for concern as in some extreme cases it can lead to the loss of those extremities. At the same time it is associated with difficulties with eyesight which is also one of the more serious symptoms of diabetes. As such it is better to identify the existence of diabetes before you notice numbness or tingling. However once you do notice those things it is important to get to a doctor as soon as possible. Other symptoms to look out for then in conjunction with/before the onset of the numbness include continuous urinatio Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Flashback From The First Ever Diabetes Blogger: It All Started With Tingling Fingers

Diabetes Health Flashback From The First Ever Diabetes Blogger: It All Started With Tingling Fingers

About a month ago I was driving to Santa Cruz and noticed a tingling in my fingers. It got worse when I put my hands up on the steering wheel and better when I rested them on the bottom. During this two-hour drive, it was a struggle to keep my fingers from falling asleep. Soon after, I began to wake up often during the night, having to reposition my hands so they would stop tingling. My first fear was of neuropathy. I asked myself, “Is this how it starts?” Before I confronted that possibility, I wanted to rule out other things. I went to my chiropractor who thought one of my cervical neck vertebra was out of alignment. He adjusted my back and neck, but it provided no relief. Diagnosis From a Friend I finally told a friend about how, when I push down on my wrist, sparkles and fireworks seem to run up to my fingers. He said, “That sounds just like carpal tunnel syndrome.” His words hit me hard. “Don’t I have enough to deal with with diabetes?” I thought. “This can’t be happening to me.” He told me what carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) means. CTS occurs when the median nerve is compressed where it passes through a narrow tunnel of bone and ligament in the wrist. The tendons in the carpal tunnel may swell, pinching this nerve. It can be caused by a number of things, like performing repetitive motions such as typing. People with diabetes are 15 times more prone to CTS than the general population. (Journal of Hand Surgery, January 1995). CTS is most common in insulin-dependent patients and is not associated with neuropathy. I called my doctor and got an appointment for the very next morning. He strongly suspected CTS, but referred me to a neurologist for the actual diagnosis. He suggested wrist splints and vitamin B6 at 100 mg/day. Bracing Myself His nurse was Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fingers And Numbness: Diabetes Can Cause You To Lose The Fingers

Diabetes Fingers And Numbness: Diabetes Can Cause You To Lose The Fingers

Diabetes Fingers and numbness: Diabetes can cause you to lose the fingers Published 3:54am, Sunday, February 27, 2011 Diabetes fingers tingling and going numb is a sign of nerve damage. The official word is called Diabetic neuropathy. What this means is that the tiny nerve ending in the fingers are being affected. The consequences of this is that you may have to have your finger removed. Many with Diabetes fingers have had the finger removed due to the damage to the nerves. Diabetic nerve damage is serious business that can ruin your body. It is important to recognize any pain in the fingers or tingling at the tips as a serious warning sign. Last week we spoke about diabetes feet pain and how many have had the foot removed. This is the same condition with the hands. The nerves are small in the hands and very sensitive, this is where we get our sense of touch from. Diabetes fingers are a sign of serious nerve damage. Those with tingling in the hands are experiencing the first sign that they can lose the finger if the condition is not reversed. What exactly is happening in the body and causing the tingling? The high blood sugar is a damaging force that ruins the cells and nerves of the body. You must think of blood sugar that is high as a poison in the body. It is so strong that it ruins the kidneys and heart. It is absolutely critical to remove this fast. The little tingling in the fingers is a warning sign that the nerves are losing the fight. Diabetes fingers is actually a sign the nerves are dying. The body part is killed off by the blood sugar the circulation dies. The dead fingers have to be removed. Here is our very important article on Diabetes feet that was published last week. It is important that you read both article to fully understand what diabetes does to Continue reading >>

“pins And Needles” And Diabetes

“pins And Needles” And Diabetes

Paresthesia. This is the medical term for the annoying and sometimes painful tingling, numbness, and “pins and needles” sensations that can sometimes come from diabetes. A good example of a temporary paresthesia is a foot “falling asleep” from sitting on it or the dead feeling in a hand after you slept with it tucked under your head. Compression of a nerve in your wrist can lead to carpal tunnel syndrome, making your hands ache and fingertips numb. Sometimes disc problems in the spine lead to numbness and pain. Those are also instances of parasthesia, but they are not caused by diabetes. The cause of our tingling and numbness from diabetes is usually peripheral neuropathy, or nerve damage in the arms, legs, hands, and feet. This complication results from high blood glucose levels damaging nerves and blood vessels. Since the damage hits our smallest blood vessels first, the nerves these vessels feed may develop paresthesia quickly. So tingling and numbness in our toes and fingers are often some of the earliest complications of Type 2 diabetes. But there are many other possible causes of paresthesia. A few of them are hypothyroidism (low thyroid), vitamin B12 deficiency, arthritis, poisoning, stroke, cancer, and conditions such as Lyme disease and HIV. People with diabetes often have problems with hypothyroidism and B12 deficiency. If you are plagued by paresthesia, it is a good idea to get blood tests for these conditions. “If I woke up without pain, I’d think I was dead” This phrase made me laugh, but only because it is so true. Pain is frequently part of life as we age. But I have found that paresthesia caused by diabetes can improve. Getting your blood sugar to the target recommended by your health-care provider will help over time. But in the meantime, Continue reading >>

Numbness In Hands Causes - Mayo Clinic

Numbness In Hands Causes - Mayo Clinic

Ferri FF. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. Accessed Feb. 2, 2016. Stroke: Hope through research. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Accessed Feb. 2, 2016. Rosenfeld J, et al. Numbness: A practical guide for family physicians. American Academy of Neurology. Accessed Feb. 2, 2016. De Keyser F. Ganglion cysts of the wrist and hand. Accessed Feb. 2, 2016. Raynaud's disease. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Accessed Feb. 2, 2016. Numbness. National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Accessed Feb. 2, 2016. Neuropathy (nerve damage). American Diabetes Association. Accessed Feb. 3, 2016. Stabler SP. Vitamin B12 deficiency. New England Journal of Medicine. 2013;368:149. Cervical spondylosis (arthritis of the neck). American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Accessed Feb. 3, 2016. Ganglion (cyst) of the wrist. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Accessed Feb. 4, 2016. Syrinx. Merck Manual Professional Version. Accessed Feb. 4, 2016. NINDS Brachial Plexus Injuries Information Page. Accessed Feb. 10, 2016. Katirji B. Disorders of peripheral nerves. In: Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Accessed Jan. 19, 2016. Briemberg HR, et al. Approach to the patient with sensory loss. Accessed Jan. 25, 2016. Levin K. Cervical spondylitic myelopathy. Accessed Feb. 10, 2016. Vriesendorp FJ. Clinical features and diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Accessed Feb. 15, 2016. Clinical manifestations of Sjogren's syndrome: Extraglandular disease. Accessed Jan. 29, 2016. Bowden JL, et al. The prevalence and magnitude of impaired cutaneous sensation across the hand in the chronic period post-stroke. PLoS ONE. 2014;9: e104153. Continue reading >>

Numbness In Hands

Numbness In Hands

I keep having numbness in my hands at night, I wake up and the right side of my right hand is numb, (little finger and one next to it.) it does go away after getting up and moving around.. I'm wondering if it is due to my diabetes or if it's carpel tunnel syndrome or something else? I have heard the CTS effects the other side of your hand,(thumb and finger next to it)- which I have had it there too. worried. please let me know if anyone else has this? D.D. Family type 2 on metformin since May 2009 Molly, I've had numbness in my hands as well, even before I was diagnosed with type 2. I had it checked and was told it was carpel tunnel. The doctor suggested trying to sleep while holding a rolled up wash cloth in my hand. He said that would keep me from pinching the nerve and would help with the numbness. Sometimes it worked, sometimes not. Hope you get some relief. It sounds more like CTS rather than diabetes. It could also be that while sleeping you may be pinvhing nerves. Talk to your doctor about it. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control D.D. Family T1 since 1966, pumper since '03, transplant '08 Molly, I have a very shallow ulnar nerve (in the elbow down to the hand) and I've had issues with it. I also have the outside part of my hand go numb when I sleep and sometimes when I drive. I had my acupuncturist treat it with needles and massage and it's gotten much better. T1 since 1966, dialy Continue reading >>

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Cause Your Feet To Go Numb?

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Cause Your Feet To Go Numb?

Numbness in the feet is a symptom of neuropathy or nerve damage, one of the most common long-term complications of type 2 diabetes. Neuropathy is caused by poor blood sugar control that persists over a long period of time. “The higher the blood sugars and the longer they stay high, the greater the chance of the person developing neuropathy,” says Joel Zonszein, MD, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at the University Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. “The nerves that get affected by high sugars tend to be the longest nerves in the body,” explains Dr. Zonszein. These nerves go from the spine to the toes, which is why the feet get affected before the arms or hands. Diabetic neuropathy also tends to be bilateral. “Both feet will be affected equally,” he says. If blood sugar remains poorly controlled, it can lead to serious complications. In the feet, diabetic neuropathy can not only cause numbness but pain and injuries. It can change the shape of your feet, deforming them so they no longer fit into regular shoes. It can also dry out and damage your skin, cause calluses and ulcers on your feet, and interfere with circulation. The numbness also makes it hard to tell if there is a cut or injury which can increase your risk of infections and amputation. People with diabetes are also at an increased risk for amputation. In 2010, approximately 73,000 non-traumatic lower-limb amputations were performed on adults (20 years or older) diagnosed with diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. The good news is that most amputations are preventable when you manage your diabetes well, take good care of your feet, and wear proper footwear. If you have circulatory problems or you’ve alre Continue reading >>

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