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Can Diabetes Cause Weight Loss

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Millions of people suffering from Type 2 diabetes could be cured of the disease if they just lost weight, a new study suggests. Scientists at Newcastle University have shown the disease is caused by fat accumulating in the pancreas and losing less than one gram from the organ can reverse the life-limiting illness and restore insulin production. Type 2 diabetes affects 3.3 million people in England and Wales and, until now, was thought to be chronic. It can lead to blindness, stroke, kidney failure and limb amputation. “For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal” Professor Roy Taylor, Newcastle University But now researchers at Newcastle have shown that the disease can be reversed, even in obese people who have had the condition for a long time. 18 obese people with Type 2 diabetes who were given gastric band surgery and put on a restricted diet for eight weeks were cured of their condition. During the trial the patients, aged between 25 and 65, lost an average of 2.2 stone, which was around 13 per cent of their body weight. Crucially they also lost 0.6 grams of fat from their pancreas, allowing the organ to secrete normal levels of insulin. The team is now planning a larger two year study involving 200 people with Glasgow University to check that the findings can be replicated and weight loss can be sustained for two years. “For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal,” said Professor Roy Taylor, of Newcastle University who also works within the Newcastle Hospitals. “So if you ask how much weight you need to lose to make your diabetes go away, the answer is one gram. But t Continue reading >>

7 Scary Reasons You’re Losing Weight Without Trying

7 Scary Reasons You’re Losing Weight Without Trying

It's natural for your weight to fluctuate during the year. A swing of a few pounds up or down is normal—and nothing to worry about. But if you drop 5% of your body weight in less than six months—and you can't pinpoint a good explanation for that weight loss—it's time to let your doctor know what's up, says Anne Cappola, MD, an endocrinologist and professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. "It's not common to lose a significant amount of weight without an obvious reason," she says. "If you're losing weight and nothing's changed with your diet or activity, you need to worry about that a little bit." Other experts agree. While small or temporary weight fluctuations are normal—gaining a few pounds during the holidays, maybe, or losing a few after a stomach bug—more significant weight shifts that don't have an obvious trigger could be an early sign of a serious health condition, says Kerry Hildreth, MD, an assistant professor of geriatric medicine at the University of Colorado. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get healthy living tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!) Here are 7 health issues that could underlie your unexplained weight loss. Weight loss is a common symptom of hyperthyroidism—or an over-active thyroid, Cappola says. "If I suspected a thyroid issue, I'd probably look for increased hunger or heart palpitations," she explains. Sleeping problems or feeling hot all the time are two more symptoms of an over-active thyroid, she says. Prevention Premium: If You Think Lowering Your Cholesterol Is The Best Way To Prevent Heart Disease, You Need To Read This Celiac disease—an autoimmune disorder tied to gluten—can cause a drop in weight, and tends to be accompanied by other GI symptoms like diarrhea, says Jamile W Continue reading >>

Why Am I Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes?

Why Am I Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes?

Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. If you have type 2 diabetes, weight loss can be a good thing. This is assuming the weight loss is part of a balanced approach to your diabetes management, involving sound nutrition and physical activity. Why weight loss is (usually) a good thing Decreased weight is a goal usually associated with type 2 diabetes for many reasons: it helps in lowering blood sugars, decreases your risk of heart disease, and contributes to overall health, to name a few. In fact, a decrease in body weight by as little as five to 10 percent can result in tremendous benefits when talking about blood glucose and health in general. But if you have type 2 diabetes and you’ve had unintentional weight loss, take it as a warning sign, and consult your physician. More on diabetes and weight loss: How Does Losing Weight Help With Type 2 Diabetes? Weight Loss and Diabetes: A Balancing Act There are three worrisome causes of unintentional weight loss for those with type 2 diabetes: 1. Continual high blood sugar With type 2 diabetes, the body is not able to effectively get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells for use in all bodily functions. And if your type 2 diabetes is not managed or controlled, blood sugar gets high very quickly and stays high until something is done about it. If nothing is done to resolve high blood sugar, the glucose that is causing the high blood sugar can’t get into the body’s cells for energy and is excreted in the urine. In other words, if you eat carbohydrates to fuel your body, those carbohydrates that are broken down into glucose aren’t used as fuel, Continue reading >>

Your Weight And Diabetes

Your Weight And Diabetes

Diabetes is a group of disorders characterized by chronic high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to the body's failure to produce any or enough insulin to regulate high glucose levels. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, which often occurs in children or adolescents, is caused by the body's inability to make insulin or type 2 diabetes, which occurs as a result of the body's inability to react properly to insulin (insulin resistance). Type 2 diabetes is more prevalent than type 1 diabetes and is therefore seen in roughly 90% of all diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes is predominantly diagnosed after the age of forty, however, it is now being found in all age ranges, including children and adolescents. The impact of diabetes goes beyond chronic hyperglycemia. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness (diabetic retinopathy), end stage kidney diseases (diabetic nephropathy) and non-traumatic lower extremity amputations (diabetic neuropathy) in working-age adults. People with diabetes are also two to four times more likely to experience cardiovascular complications and strokes. Diabetes and its related complications result in an estimated 200,000+ deaths each year, making diabetes one of the major causes of mortality in the U.S. In 2012, the NIH reported an estimated 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) living with diabetes. Of these, an estimated 8.1 million persons were unaware that they had the disease. How does my weight relate to type 2 diabetes? There are many risk factors for type 2 diabetes such as age, race, pregnancy, stress, certain medications, genetics or family history, high cholesterol and obesity. However, the single best predictor of type 2 diabetes is overweight or obesity. Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes a Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss

Unexplained Weight Loss

Tweet Unexplained weight loss is the term used to describe a decrease in body weight that occurs unintentionally and can be a warning sign of diabetes. The amount you weigh is determined by a number of factors including age, your calorie intake and overall health. Once you reach middle adulthood, your weight should remain relatively stable from year to year. Losing or gaining a few pounds here and there is normal, but unexplained weight loss that is significant (10 lbs/4.5kg or more or over 5% of your body weight) or persistent may signal an underlying medical condition. Unexplained weight loss means weight loss that occurs without trying through dieting or exercising. What are the possible causes of unexplained weight loss? Unintentional or unexplained weight loss can be caused by a number of things, including depression, certain medication and diabetes. Potential causes of unexplained weight loss include: Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need lon Continue reading >>

Is Weight Loss Caused By Diabetes Dangerous?

Is Weight Loss Caused By Diabetes Dangerous?

Ask the experts I have a friend that is 35 and has diabetes. For the past eight years, his weight has always been in check and if anything he may have been a little overweight. Just recently, he has lost a lot of weight and he told me that he weighs less than he did in high school. I think he looks too thin and I am concerned about his health with him being a diabetic. Should there be a concern and what kind of advice can you give me to pass on to him. Doctor's response We often assume weight loss is good and healthy. A slow steady intentional weight loss using nutritional change and exercise is associated with beneficial effects on the heart, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. In addition, weight loss can reduce "insulin resistance" and make muscles and fat tissues more sensitive to circulating insulin levels in the blood. What type of diabetes causes weight loss? A reduction in insulin resistance is problematic because insulin is needed to help glucose enter these tissues to be metabolized. If these tissues are resistant to insulin, higher than normal levels are needed for this process to occur. This is often the case in Type 2 diabetes. As a result, a vicious cycle occurs, the higher the insulin levels are, the harder it is to lose weight (insulin is anabolic, and is a hormone that likes to store fat). On the other hand, the heavier a person is, the more likely they are to have higher insulin levels. As you can see, the cycle is often hard to break. What causes unintentional weight loss in diabetes? While intentional weight loss in people with diabetes is usually a good thing, unintentional weight loss is not. If blood sugars are very high, patients with diabetes tend to urinate a lot, and this results in dehydration as a possible cause of weight loss. Also, mus Continue reading >>

10 Reasons Unexpected Weight Loss Could Be A Serious Problem

10 Reasons Unexpected Weight Loss Could Be A Serious Problem

iStock/silviajansen When most people hear the word "malnutrition," they tend to think of starving children in developing countries. However, malnutrition, or the lack of getting proper nutrients in the right amounts, exists in every part of the world and can affect people of all ages. In fact, a whopping 50 percent of patients in hospitals worldwide aren't adequately nourished or are at risk of malnutrition. "Hospitalization can lead to malnutrition because, while in hospital care, patients may not get the right nutrients to live a healthful life," says Abby Sauer, a registered dietitian specializing in adult nutrition for Abbott. If malnutrition happens long enough, it can have a significant impact on a person's health—including unexplained weight loss. While older adults are at risk because of medications or natural appetite loss, a nutritionally imbalanced diet can contribute to malnutrition in younger, presumably healthy people. (Here are signs you could have a nutrient deficiency.) The best way to treat malnutrition is to prevent it before it becomes serious. "Make sure you're eating balanced meals that include the right mix of protein, fat, and carbohydrates," says Sauer. If you become hospitalized, keep nutrition top of mind and talk with hospital professionals to ensure you're well nourished during and after your stay. (Don't miss these 50 secrets hospitals won't tell you.) Muscle loss (sarcopenia) iStock/tetmc Research shows that ignoring muscle health is one reason why about 45 percent of older U.S. adults experience muscle loss as they age. "The technical term for this muscle atrophy is sarcopenia, which can begin as early as your 40s and cause unexplained weight loss and reduced strength, energy, and mobility," Sauer says. While hormonal changes can contri Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Weight Loss – Blood Sugar And Weight Loss

Diabetes And Weight Loss – Blood Sugar And Weight Loss

Diabetes is frequently associated with rapid fluctuations in weight gain or weight loss. Many diabetics, both Type 1 and Type 2, will want to lose weight in order to manage their conditions and optimize health. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes and wish to lose weight or body fat, read on for details on how to manage your condition and lose excess weight in an effective, safe way. When you are diagnosed with diabetes, you may find yourself amidst a significant amount of confusing medical information, yet one thing becomes crystal clear reasonably quickly: you need to lose weight, preferably in a healthy and easily manageable way. Those few -or more- extra pounds you’ve been carrying around no longer mean merely aesthetic concerns; you need to redesign your entire life and diet to ensure maintaining optimal health despite having diabetes. On the other hand, you may have been living with diabetes, battling its effects on your well-being since early childhood. Your weight could be ideal now, but it’s a perpetual battle to keep it that way regardless of medications and meal plans designed with your physical condition in mind. “What i have come to see is that what we eat truly is a matter of life and death. I have seen the people from my TV show on diabetes make amazing changes by changing the food they consume, i have seen people in my film do the same. We know what the foods and sugary drinks can do to us, we know this all to well. At the end of the day we are in the drivers seat with our health with certain conditions, even if we need meds to help us, we can put our bodies in a situation where the foods we eat are not the contribution factor to our overall health” states Charles Mattocks, Celebrity Chef and Diabetes Advocate. Perhaps you’ve experienced th Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss With Diabetes

Unexplained Weight Loss With Diabetes

You might be aware that as a metabolic disorder, some forms of diabetes come with excessive weight. But diabetes might also cause a sudden drop in weight too. In fact, many patients who are ultimately diagnosed with diabetes first go to their doctor with concerns about unexplained weight loss. Several mechanisms are behind this symptom. Weight loss can occur as a consequence of high blood sugar, dehydration, muscle breakdown and problems with your thyroid. Video of the Day Although both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can involve fairly dramatic weight loss over several days at the onset of the disease, it tends to be more common among people with type 1. In both cases, the cause is that your body fails to adequately deal with insulin. The job of insulin is to transport glucose from the foods you eat into your cells to provide energy for all the work that’s required to keep you alive. However, most type 1 diabetics don’t produce insulin. Type 2 diabetics either don’t produce enough insulin or their bodies don’t respond to it properly. Consequently, even if you eat normally, that blood sugar simply builds up and gets excreted in your urine. This causes weight loss, but it could also damage your organs if you don't receive treatment. If you experience an unexplained weight loss, surpassing 5 percent of your body weight within days, see your health care provider as soon as possible. Another symptom of diabetes associated with weight loss is frequent urination. When you urinate more frequently and don’t drink enough to replace the lost fluid, you become dehydrated. Urination increases in diabetes, because your kidneys have to work harder to filter the excess glucose building up in your system. The increased glucose in the urine draws fluid from your tissues. When you l Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Diabetes

Losing Weight With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, know that you are not alone. According to recent statistics, the occurrence of diabetes in the United States has reached 9.4% of children and adults - or about 30.3 million Americans. Before we go into the tips for weight loss and diabetes, it's important to understand the different types and what causes diabetes. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where the body has too much glucose, or blood sugar, in the bloodstream. Usually, the body produces insulin in response to glucose. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose from the bloodstream into the cells, but with type 1 diabetes, the body no longer produces insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body either may or may not be making enough insulin, however, the cells don't use the insulin properly. In either situation and without proper management, glucose can build up in the bloodstream. This excess buildup of glucose flows through the blood vessels throughout your body and then eventually can cause damage to your heart, eyes, kidneys and feet. Although both types have to do with high blood sugar, type 1 and type 2 diabetes differ in a number of ways. Type 1 diabetes, is most often diagnosed in childhood, while type 2 diabetes is more frequently diagnosed in adulthood. However, increasingly, type 2 is being seen earlier on, even being diagnosed in young children. Type 1 diabetes, unlike type 2, is an autoimmune disease where the body's immune system mistakenly attacks cells in the pancreas responsible for producing insulin. The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown, but genetics do play a role, along with environmental factors such as viruses. There is no cure for type 1 diabetes, but a person can manage their condition by taking insulin injections daily. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Our society is obsessed with weight, if you haven’t noticed. More than two thirds of US adults are overweight or obese, there are more diet books published than we can count, and, of course, we have the privilege of watching shows like The Biggest Loser to help keep us in line. And according to government statistics, more than 85% of people with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. So it stands to reason that much of the focus of managing Type 2 diabetes is based on reaching and staying at a healthy weight. It’s important to note that thin people can get diabetes too, and not just Type 1 diabetes. In a 2008 study published in the journal Diabetes Care, adults age 60 to 79 years old with a body-mass index (BMI) of less than 18.5 (which is considered to be underweight) were 30% more likely to get Type 2 diabetes than adults with a “normal” BMI of 18.5 to 24.9. In a society where being thin equates with beauty, youth, intelligence, and success, there is often little sympathy or patience for people who are too thin and who desperately want to gain weight. If you’ve struggled with losing weight and keeping it off, you know all too well how challenging that can be. People who want to gain weight often face the same kind of battle. And to have diabetes on top of that can make it doubly difficult. First things first: identify the cause If you have diabetes, are underweight, and would like to gain weight, it’s helpful to first have a talk with your doctor. Make sure there are no health or medical reasons for you being underweight (especially if you’ve recently lost weight without trying) such as having an overactive thyroid, a digestive disorder (such as Crohn disease), or cancer, for example. A physical exam, blood work, and other tests may be needed to rule out certai Continue reading >>

Will Weight Loss Help Your Diabetes?

Will Weight Loss Help Your Diabetes?

There's no question about it. If you're overweight and have type 2 diabetes, you will lower your blood sugar, improve your health, and feel better if you lose some of your extra pounds. You'll want to work closely with your doctor or diabetes educator, because your blood sugar, insulin, and medications will need special attention while you're losing weight. If you drop even 10 or 15 pounds, that has health perks, such as: Lower blood sugar Lower blood pressure Better cholesterol levels Less stress on your hips, knees, ankles, and feet More energy Brighter mood The Right Balance for Diabetes and Weight Loss Keep tight control over your blood sugar levels while you lose weight. You don't want to get high or low levels while you change your eating habits. It’s generally safe for someone with diabetes to cut 500 calories a day. Trim from protein, carbohydrates, and fat. The USDA says that calories for adults should come from: 45% to 55% carbs 25% to 35% fat 10% to 35% protein Carbs have the biggest effect on blood sugar. Those that have fiber (whole-grain bread and vegetables, for example) are much better than eating sugary or starchy carbs, because they’re less likely to spike your blood sugar and quickly make it crash. How Exercise Helps One of the many benefits of working out is that it helps keep your blood sugar in balance. You're also more likely to keep the pounds off if you're active. If you're not active now, check in with your doctor first. She can let you know if there are any limits on what you can do. Aim to get at least 2.5 hours a week of moderate aerobic exercise, like brisk walking, to improve your health. You can split up the time any way you choose. To help yourself lose weight you’ll need to do more physical activity. You should also do strength tr Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Weight Loss In Some People And Weight Gain In Some Others?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Weight Loss In Some People And Weight Gain In Some Others?

To understand dynamics of body weight first we have to understand Energy balance equation which states Calorie intake - calorie lost = Weight So if, Calorie intake > calorie lost = Weight Gain Calorie intake < calorie lost = Weight Loss Calorie intake = calorie lost = Weight is maintained Let's try to understand it in patients with diabetes Scenarios causing weight gain in Diabetes 1. In patients with type 2 Diabetes some may have predominantly insulin resistance ( cells are not as much sensitive to action of insulin as they should be ) This makes their pancreas to secrete excess insulin in an attempt to overcome this resistance . Excessive insulin coupled with high calorie intake causes weight gain 2. A patient of Type 1 Diabetes or type 2 Diabetes who has good control of glucose but consumes excess calories than he needs is bound to gain weight . A good number of patients resort to defensive eating for the fear of hypoglycemia and this also causes weight gain Scenarios causing weight loss in Diabetes 1. Any patient with uncontrolled diabetes will usually have weight loss . This is due to the fact that cells of our body are deprived of glucose as a source of energy and therefore body resorts to using fat and protein as alternative sources causing weight loss 2. A patient of Type 1 Diabetes or type 2 Diabetes who has good control of glucose but consumes less calories than he needs loses weight . In addition associated thyroid disorders may also have some influence on weight . Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss? Why You Need To See A Doctor

Unexplained Weight Loss? Why You Need To See A Doctor

All of us can gain or lose a pound or two; we indulge a little too much, and then we put in a few extra workouts. But if you haven’t tightened the belt on your diet or ramped up your exercise routine and your weight is still dropping, talk to your doctor. While weight loss of just a pound or two isn’t a reason for concern, unexplained weight loss of 10 pounds or more may mean something is wrong. It could be an early sign of diabetes. This weight loss can occur relatively quickly — over a few weeks to a couple of months. Why can diabetes cause weight loss? Insulin is a hormone that allows your body to use glucose (sugar) for energy. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin effectively, and can’t transport the glucose to the cells. Instead, it builds up in the blood. When the glucose doesn’t arrive in your cells, your body thinks it’s starving and finds a way to compensate. It creates energy by burning fat and muscle at a rapid pace. This causes unexplained weight loss. Your kidneys also begin working overtime to eliminate the excess sugars in the blood. This uses additional energy and can cause damage to the kidneys. Type 1 diabetes has a similar pattern, but instead of being unable to use insulin, your body stops producing it altogether. Unexplained weight loss can occur in people who have type 2 diabetes, but it’s more commonly found in people with type 1. Parents are often the first to notice the unusual weight loss in a child with type 1 diabetes. What other symptoms should you watch for? Weight loss from diabetes is not usually a standalone symptom. It is typically accompanied by other signs and symptoms including: Excessive thirst or hunger Itchy skin Dark skin around the neck and armpits Slow healing of cuts and bruises Yeast infe Continue reading >>

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