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Can Diabetes Cause Urinary Tract Infections?

8 Most Common Causes Of Utis

8 Most Common Causes Of Utis

If you've ever had a urinary tract infection, then you know the agony of that terrible burning feeling and relentless need to pee—and you'd probably do anything to avoid getting another. According to the National Kidney Foundation, 1 in 5 women experiences a UTI at some point in her life. And while men can get them, too (UTIs are the second most common infection), women are much more likely to contract one, says the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. That's because we have a shorter urethra, which makes it all too easy for UTI-causing bacteria to pass through it and invade the bladder. No fair. "Our urinary tract system is designed to keep out bacteria; however, these defenses can fail," says Kelly M. Kasper, MD, an ob-gyn at Indiana University Health. "When that happens, bacteria can grow and multiply and cause infections." (Reverse chronic inflammation and heal your body from the inside out with the all-natural solution in The Whole Body Cure!) Here are 8 of the most common causes of urinary tract infections—and a handful of helpful tips for prevention. We know, huge bummer. Many women get UTIs after doing the deed because the motion of sex can transfer bacteria from the bowel or vaginal cavity into the urethra. To lower your risk of getting a urinary tract infection, pee within 30 minutes of having sex, says Lisa N. Hawes, MD, a general urologist in Fulton, Maryland, and a physician spokesperson for the American Urological Association. And ignore the often-shared advice that both partners should wash their genitals immediately before and after sex. "This actually changes bacterial flora and will increase UTI risks," Hawes says. MORE: 7 Little Things You Can Do During Sex To Boost Your Bond With Your Partner You might be able to blam Continue reading >>

Complicated Urinary Tract Infections Associated With Diabetes Mellitus: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis And Management

Complicated Urinary Tract Infections Associated With Diabetes Mellitus: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis And Management

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.111637 Diabetes mellitus has a number of long-term effects on the genitourinary system. These effects predispose to bacterial urinary tract infections (UTIs) in the patient with diabetes mellitus. Complicated UTIs are also common and potentially life-threatening conditions. They include emphysematous pyelonephritis, emphysematous pyelitis/cystitis, xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, renal/perirenal abscess, and renal papillary necrosis. Improved outcomes of these entities may be achieved by early diagnosis, knowledge of common predisposing factors, appropriate clinical and radiological assessment, and prompt management. Herein we review complicated UTIs associated with diabetes mellitus in terms of pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, radiological features, and current management options. Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, emphysematous cystitis, emphysematous pyelitis, emphysematous pyelonephritis, renal abscess, renal papillary necrosis, xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis How to cite this article: Mnif MF, Kamoun M, Kacem FH, Bouaziz Z, Charfi N, Mnif F, Naceur BB, Rekik N, Abid M. Complicated urinary tract infections associated with diabetes mellitus: Pathogenesis, diagnosis and management. Indian J Endocr Metab 2013;17:442-5 Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for urinary tract infections (UTIs) and is also associated with increased risk of certain complicated UTIs such as emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN), emphysematous pyelitis (EP), emphysematous cystitis (EC), xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGP), renal/perirenal abscess, and renal papillary necrosis (RPN). Such conditions are potentially life-threatening and require prompt evaluation and management. Herein we review complicated UT Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Urinary Tract Infections: What You Need To Know About Utis?

Diabetes & Urinary Tract Infections: What You Need To Know About Utis?

Ever felt the urgent need to pee? Well everyone has one of those days. But what if the urgent need to pee is followed by a burning sensation when you finally pee? And what if the pee turns out cloudy and foul-drenching smelly? Turns out, this one isn’t just one of those days. What it might indicate is Urinary Tract Infection, something in the ilk of urinary or bladder infection. There’s quite a relation between the urinary tract infection and diabetes and we here would depict the same in today’s entry of ours. Let’s start off with the UTI then, shall we? What’s Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)? Generalized as the urinary tract infection, UTI affects kidneys, bladder, urethra and prostate as per the gender. However, most of the cases include the occurrence of UTI in the bladder region, where the urine is stored. The root cause of UTI The urinary tract system, the very system which is known to safeguard the body gets infected with the bacteria which results in the UTI. These bacteria originate mostly from bowel region. That severally affects the normal functioning of the urinary tract system. As for a little insight, here’s how Urinary Tract system functions normally. The urinary system is it ureters, carries the urine from the kidney to the bladder region. The ureters have a valve system that stops any urine from staying back in the kidney for long. The bladder then empties the content out via urination and keeps the body free of bacterial particles. The relation between Diabetes and UTI UTI is often seen as the second most common infection type in diabetes. UTI on its own is a common thing around but paired with diabetes, it has the mischievous nature to cause serious complications going forward. Women, adherent to their anatomy are more likely, in fact around Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: What You Need To Know

The urgent need to go. The burning pain when you do. The cloudy, foul-smelling urine. If you've experienced a urinary tract or bladder infection, you'd probably prefer to avoid another one. Unfortunately, if you have diabetes, you are up to twice as likely as those without the disease to develop these often painful infections. They’re especially common among women. But there’s a lot you can do to avoid them and to ease your discomfort when they do strike. Making healthy lifestyle choices is key to managing type 2 diabetes, but it can be hard to stay on track. Dr. Anthony Cardillo explains that focusing on diet, exercise and stress reduction can help you maintain control of your diabetes. 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. Why Diabetes Poses a Risk Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, occur when bacteria or other bugs invade your body’s drainage system. Normally, your immune defenses banish these bugs before they can grow and multiply. But if you have diabetes, the following factors interfere: Diabetes impairs some parts of your immune response. You have fewer white blood cells and T cells to fight off invading bacteria, viruses, and fungi. For the same reason, diabetics often develop UTIs caused by less commonly encountered germs. Routine antibiotics may be ineffective. Nerve damage can keep your bladder from emptying, either by weakening muscles or scrambling the signals between your brain and urinary system. Urine that remains in your body too long poses a greater infection risk. Sugar in your blood and urine can also contribute to a greater risk for UTI. Besides pain and Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Recurring Uti

Type 2 Diabetes And Recurring Uti

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Im a 55 year old male who was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes two years ago. Since then I have been on Metformin 500mg tablets which I take twice a day. Since the beginning of May, I have had a recurring Urinary Tract Infection (burning sensation when I urinate), a high temperature and a general feeling of being unwell. I wake up two or three times during the night, soaked with sweat. I went to see my GP and traces of blood and protein were found in my urine. The doctor prescribed a 7-day course of Amoxicillin 250mg and although these seemed to help bring my temperature down, I was still experiencing discomfort when passing water. My doctor prescribed a further 5-day course of Amoxicillin 250mg. By the end of the second course of antibiotics the burning sensation seemed to have subsided. The practice nurse tested my urine on and confirmed that my infection had gone. However I wasnt convinced that it had completely gone away because my urine still seemed to be very strong and smelly at certain times of the day. My blood pressure has also been high since the onset of these infections. My GP has put me on Ramipril 2.5mg. Another urine test two weeks later showed that my UTI had returned. This time, my GP prescribed a 7-day course of Trimethoprim 200mg. Initially these seemed to clear the infection but within three weeks of finishing the course, my UTI was back. The practice nurse suggested I ask my doctor to refer me to a Urologist. This I did but unfortunately had to wait two months for an appointment. In the meantime I was prescribed another 7-day course of Trimethoprim 200mg. When I eventually saw the Urologist, he examined my prostate, which he said s Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) in Diabetes Mellitus Author: John L Brusch, MD, FACP; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD more... Predisposition to urinary tract infections (UTIs) in diabetes mellitus results from several factors. Susceptibility increases with longer duration and greater severity of diabetes. [ 1 ] High urine glucose content and defective host immune factors predispose to infection. Hyperglycemia causes neutrophil dysfunction by increasing intracellular calcium levels and interfering with actin and, thus, diapedesis and phagocytosis. Vaginal candidiasis and vascular disease also play a role in recurrent infections. Recently, the use of SGLT2 inhibitors, such as dapagliflozin, has produced concern about an increased risk of urinary tract infections in recipients of these medications. Levels of urinary glucose increased with greater doses of the medication; however, the incidence of urinary tract infections did not. Nonetheless, such patients do appear to be at a 3- to 5-fold increased risk of genital infections. [ 2 , 3 ] Over time, patients with diabetes may develop cystopathy, nephropathy, and renal papillary necrosis, complications that predispose them to UTIs. Long-term effects of diabetic cystopathy include vesicourethral reflux and recurrent UTIs. In addition, as many as 30% of women with diabetes have some degree of cystocele, cystourethrocele, or rectocele. All of these may contribute to the frequency and severity of UTIs in female diabetics. Complicated UTIs in patients who have diabetes include renal and perirenal abscess, emphysematous pyelonephritis, emphysematous cystitis, fungal infections, xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, and papillary necrosis. The current article focuses on emphysematous UTIs, with which diabetes is closely associ Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: The Case Against A Pre-emptive Strike

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: The Case Against A Pre-emptive Strike

One of the most frustrating things about diabetes is the myriad of ways it can hurt you. Regular readers of this Viewpoint know that patients with diabetes are more prone to heart attacks, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease, as well as damage to the eyes, nerves, and kidney. As if this wasn’t enough, there is another common complication of diabetes that gets less attention, yet which affects thousands of patients every year. I’m talking about infections. Infections can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or other pathogens, and patients with diabetes are more prone to a whole slew of them. Some of these infections are rare and potentially lethal, like mucormycosis, which almost never affects people without diabetes. Others are more common, like athlete’s foot, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. While anyone can come down with these conditions, folks with diabetes are more likely than those with normal blood sugar to be affected. Furthermore, the complications of those infections can be much more severe in people with diabetes, and can be more difficult to treat. Take urinary tract infections, for example. Women with diabetes are about two to three times more likely to have bacteria in their bladders than women without diabetes (interestingly, the same does not appear to be true for men). There also seems to be an increased risk of the infection spreading upwards into the kidneys in diabetic patients, and diabetic women with urinary tract infections are also more likely to require hospitalization than non-diabetic women. Why is this the case? Well, diabetes affects many systems that protect against infection in general, and against urinary tract infections specifically. Poor circulation in diabetes reduces the ability of infection-fighting white blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

In this article we will cover everything you need to know about diabetes and your risk for Urinary Tract Infections. Do you have an increased risk of Urinary Tract Infections now that you have diabetes? We will cover what a Urinary Tract Infection is, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment guidelines, as well as why they are more common in people with diabetes. More importantly, we will discuss steps you can take to prevent them! What Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)? A urinary tract infection or UTI is an infection anywhere in your bladder, kidneys or in the urinary system. An infection of the upper urinary tract or the bladder is called a bladder infection or cystitis. An infection in the urethra is called urethritis. Women tend to be more at risk of these types of infections due to their anatomy; they have a much shorter area between the urethra and the opening to the urethra to the bladder. Urinary tract infections are rare in men under 50 due to their anatomy. A more serious infection of the lower urinary tract is an infection of the kidney and the ureters and is called pyelonephritis. This is a complication and occurs when the bladder infection progresses to the kidneys. I highly advise reading the following articles: According to the Stanford Medicine’s Michael Hsieh Lab, half of women and men will have experienced a urinary tract infection (UTI) during our lifetime at least once. They are the most common infection, and can lead to death in patients who are experiencing it severely. Antibiotics are the most effective therapy.The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases account 8.1 million visits to the clinic, hospitals for UTI purposes. For women, the risk of getting a UTI is 50 percent greater than a man. What Are The Symptoms of a UTI? L Continue reading >>

Genital And Urinary Tract Infections In Diabetes: Impact Of Pharmacologically-induced Glucosuria

Genital And Urinary Tract Infections In Diabetes: Impact Of Pharmacologically-induced Glucosuria

1. Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a debilitating disease with multiple complications resulting from hyperglycaemia, inflammation, and possibly immune dysfunction. In addition to macro- and micro-vascular damage, T2DM is also associated with increased risks of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), urinary tract infections (UTIs), and non-sexually transmitted genital infections (vulvovaginal infections and balanitis) [1,2]. ASB is defined as two consecutive voided urine specimens with isolation of the same bacterial strain in quantitative counts ≥105 colony-forming units per millilitre collected from a patient without symptoms of a UTI [3]. The presence of ASB (most commonly caused by Escherichia coli [E. coli] and Klebsiella pneumoniae [K. pneumoniae]) is a major risk factor for developing symptomatic UTI [4]. Patients with diabetes generally present with symptoms of UTIs similar to those reported in healthy controls. Complications of UTIs are also more common in patients with diabetes [5], and this population has an increased risk of acute upper UTI (pyelonephritis) requiring hospital admission [6]. Emphysematous pyelonephritis, a severe manifestation of this disease, is seen almost exclusively in patients with diabetes. This review article aims to explore the relationship between diabetes and UTIs and genital infections, particularly in the context of emerging new therapies for T2DM that pharmacologically increase urinary glucose concentrations. 2. Search strategy We conducted a search of the scientific literature to identify relevant studies in MEDLINE (1990–2012) using the search terms–type 2 diabetes, infections, urinary, vaginitis, balanitis and bacteriuria. We limited the literature searches to humans and English-language publications. The searche Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Review Of Prevalence, Diagnosis, And Management

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Review Of Prevalence, Diagnosis, And Management

Go to: Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by variable degrees of insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and increased glucose production. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of infections, with the urinary tract being the most frequent infection site.1–4 Various impairments in the immune system,5,6 in addition to poor metabolic control of diabetes,7,8 and incomplete bladder emptying due to autonomic neuropathy9,10 may all contribute in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections (UTI) in diabetic patients. Factors that were found to enhance the risk for UTI in diabetics include age, metabolic control, and long term complications, primarily diabetic nephropathy and cystopathy.11 The spectrum of UTI in these patients ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) to lower UTI (cystitis), pyelonephritis, and severe urosepsis. Serious complications of UTI, such as emphysematous cystitis and pyelonephritis, renal abscesses and renal papillary necrosis, are all encountered more frequently in type 2 diabetes than in the general population.12,13 Type 2 diabetes is not only a risk factor for community-acquired UTI but also for health care-associated UTI,14 catheter-associated UTI,15 and post-renal transplant-recurrent UTI.16 In addition, these patients are more prone to have resistant pathogens as the cause of their UTI, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive Enterobacteriaceae,17 fluoroquinolone-resistant uropathogens,18 carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae,19 and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci.20 Type 2 diabetes is also a risk factor for fungal UTI, mostly caused by Candida.21 Diabetes is also associated with worse outcomes of UTI, including longer hospitalizations and incre Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Overview Predisposition to urinary tract infections (UTIs) in diabetes mellitus results from several factors. Susceptibility increases with longer duration and greater severity of diabetes. [1] High urine glucose content and defective host immune factors predispose to infection. Hyperglycemia causes neutrophil dysfunction by increasing intracellular calcium levels and interfering with actin and, thus, diapedesis and phagocytosis. Vaginal candidiasis and vascular disease also play a role in recurrent infections. Recently, the use of SGLT2 inhibitors, such as dapagliflozin, has produced concern about an increased risk of urinary tract infections in recipients of these medications. Levels of urinary glucose increased with greater doses of the medication; however, the incidence of urinary tract infections did not. Nonetheless, such patients do appear to be at a 3- to 5-fold increased risk of genital infections. [2, 3] Over time, patients with diabetes may develop cystopathy, nephropathy, and renal papillary necrosis, complications that predispose them to UTIs. Long-term effects of diabetic cystopathy include vesicourethral reflux and recurrent UTIs. In addition, as many as 30% of women with diabetes have some degree of cystocele, cystourethrocele, or rectocele. All of these may contribute to the frequency and severity of UTIs in female diabetics. Complicated UTIs in patients who have diabetes include renal and perirenal abscess, emphysematous pyelonephritis, emphysematous cystitis, fungal infections, xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, and papillary necrosis. The current article focuses on emphysematous UTIs, with which diabetes is closely associated. Diabetes mellitus and obstruction of the urinary tract are the predominant risk factors for developing emphysematous UTIs. T Continue reading >>

Bacterial Quality Of Urinary Tract Infections In Diabetic And Non Diabetics Of The Population Of Maan Province, Jordan

Bacterial Quality Of Urinary Tract Infections In Diabetic And Non Diabetics Of The Population Of Maan Province, Jordan

Bacterial Quality of Urinary Tract Infections in Diabetic and Non Diabetics of the Population of Maan Province, Jordan Background and Objective: The patients with Diabetes Mellitus (DM) have malfunction in bladder which prompt urine accumulation in its pool which serves a decent situation to the microbes to be develop and cause Urinary Tract Infection (UTI). The UTI is the most infectious disease that affects both males and females. This study was designed to detect the bacterial species responsible for UTI in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients in Maan province, Jordan. Materials and Methods: One hundred sixteen urine samples were investigated to determine UTI-causing bacteria. These samples distributed unequally between diabetic male (12) and diabetic female (25) and also non-diabetic male (13) and non-diabetic female (66). Results: It was observed that E. coli is responsible for large proportion (44.8%) of UTI in both diabetic (15.5%) and non-diabetic (29.3%) patients. This study showed inequality in the bacterial species that were isolated from both diabetic and non-diabetic samples. However, five bacterial species including E. aerogenes, E. cloacae, C. freundii, A. baumannii and B. subtilis did not exist in all diabetic samples. Treatment of UTI in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients with chloramphenicol (30 g), ciprofloxacin (5 g) and vancomycin (30 g) resulted in more favorability than other antibiotics. At the same time cephalothin (30 g) was not recommended. Conclusion: Escherichia coli was the prevailing bacterial infections among those which were isolated from patients with UTI. Certain forms of bacterial infections inclined to be extra common in diabetic patients than others and other infections may be more severe in people with diabetics than in no Continue reading >>

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to have an erection and the inability to sustain an erection. Estimates of the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes vary widely, ranging from 20 to 75 percent. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than men who do not have diabetes. Among men with erectile dysfunction, those with diabetes may experience the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Research suggests that erectile dysfunction may be an early marker of diabetes, particularly in men ages 45 and younger. In addition to diabetes, other major causes of erectile dysfunction include high blood pressure, kidney disease, alcohol abuse, and blood vessel disease. Erectile dysfunction may also occur because of the side effects of medications, psychological factors, smoking, and hormonal deficiencies. Men who experience erectile dysfunction should consider talking with a health care provider. The health care provider may ask about the patient's medical history, the type and frequency of sexual problems, medications, smoking and drinking habits, and other health conditions. A physical exam and laboratory tests may help pinpoint causes of sexual problems. The health care provider will check blood glucose control and hormone levels and may ask the patient to do a test at home that checks for erections that occur during sleep. The health care provider may also ask whether the patient is depressed or has recently experienced upsetting changes in his life. Treatments for erectile dysfunction caused by nerve damage, Continue reading >>

Disease Burden Of Urinary Tract Infections Among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients In The U.s.

Disease Burden Of Urinary Tract Infections Among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients In The U.s.

Volume 28, Issue 5 , SeptemberOctober 2014, Pages 621-626 Disease burden of urinary tract infections among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in the U.S. Author links open overlay panel ShengshengYua Type 2 diabetes is a reported risk factor for more frequent and severe urinary tract infections (UTI). We sought to quantify the annual healthcare cost burden of UTI in type 2 diabetic patients. Adult patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were identified in MarketScan administrative claims data. UTI occurrence and costs were assessed during a 1-year period. We examined UTI-related visit and antibiotic costs among patients diagnosed with UTI, comparing those with versus without a history of UTI in the previous year (prevalent vs. incident UTI cases). We estimated the total incremental cost of UTI by comparing all-cause healthcare costs in patients with versus without UTI, using propensity score-matched samples. Within the year, 8.2% (6,014/73,151) of subjects had 1 UTI, of whom 33.8% had a history of UTI. UTI-related costs among prevalent versus incident cases were, respectively, $603 versus $447 (p=0.033) for outpatient services, $1,607 versus $1,819 (p=NS) for hospitalizations, and $61 versus $35 (p<0.0001) for antibiotics. UTI was associated with a total all-cause incremental cost of $7,045 (95% CI: 4,130, 13,051) per patient with UTI per year. UTI is common and may impose a substantial direct medical cost burden among patients with type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Utis

What You Need To Know About Utis

Burning when you urinate. A frequent urge to urinate. Pain in your back or abdomen. Do any of these symptoms sound familiar? These are all symptoms of a urinary tract infection, or UTI, for short. Studies show that people with Type 2 diabetes have a greater risk of getting a UTI than people without diabetes. Despite the fact that UTIs are all too common and downright annoying, they can also lead to more serious situations if they’re not caught and treated. What is a UTI, anyway? A UTI is an infection in your urinary tract. Your urinary tract includes your kidneys, bladder, ureters, urethra, and, in men, prostate. Most UTIs occur in your bladder, the organ that stores your urine. What causes a UTI? A UTI is caused by bacteria, usually from the bowels. Normally, the urinary tract system has safeguards to protect against infection. For example, the ureters, which are the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder, have one-way valves to prevent urine from backing up into the kidneys. The process of emptying your bladder (called urination) also helps to flush out bacteria and other microbes. And a healthy immune system helps protect against infection, as well. Why are UTIs more common in people with diabetes? UTIs are the second most common type of infection. Women are 10 times more likely to get a UTI than men because of their anatomy. In fact, more than 50% of women will have a UTI at some point in their lives. If you’re a woman with Type 2 diabetes, your risk may be even higher, according to two recent studies. In one study, 9% of the subjects with diabetes had UTIs compared with 6% of those without diabetes. And the second study showed that people with diabetes had a 60% higher risk of getting a UTI compared to those without diabetes. Why are people with Continue reading >>

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