diabetestalk.net

Can Diabetes Cause Urinary Infection?

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Diabetes

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Diabetes

Abstract Results of various epidemiologic studies suggest that bacteriuria and urinary tract infection (UTI) occur more commonly in women with diabetes than in women without this disease. Similar findings have been demonstrated for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), with ASB being a risk factor for pyelonephritis and subsequent decline in renal function. Although ASB is not associated with serious health outcomes in healthy patients, further research needs to be undertaken regarding the impact of ASB in patients with diabetes. Patients with diabetes often have increased complications of UTI, including such rare complications as emphysematous cystitis and pyelonephritis, fungal infections (particularly Candida species), and increased severity and unusual manifestations (e.g., gram-negative pathogens other than Escherichia coli). Anatomic and functional abnormalities of the urinary tract are also associated with diabetes. Such abnormalities result in greater instrumentation of the urinary tract, thereby increasing the risk of secondary UTI. In addition, these abnormalities complicate UTI and require specialized treatment strategies. There is a greater likelihood of UTI affected by antimicrobial resistance or atypical uropathogens, and the risk of upper tract involvement is increased. Pre- and posttherapy urine cultures are therefore indicated. The initial choice of empiric antimicrobial therapy should be based on Gram stain and urine culture. Choice of antibiotic therapy should integrate local sensitivity patterns of the infecting organism. Fluoroquinolones are a reasonable empiric choice for many patients with diabetes. For seriously ill patients, including patients infected with Pseudomonas spp., such agents as imipenem, ticarcillin-clavulanate, and piperacillin-tazobactam Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Risk Of Acute Urinary Tract Infection Among Postmenopausal Women

Diabetes And The Risk Of Acute Urinary Tract Infection Among Postmenopausal Women

OBJECTIVE—To examine whether the presence of diabetes alters the risk of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in postmenopausal women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A case-control study of the Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound (GHC), a staff-model nonprofit health maintenance organization in Washington State, was conducted. Subjects were women aged 55–75 years who had been members of GHC for at least 1 year and who had had an acute symptomatic UTI within the preceding month. Laboratory files were used to identify women with a urine culture that grew ≥105 colonies of a urinary pathogen. Medical records were reviewed to confirm the presence of acute, clinically symptomatic UTI. Control subjects were randomly selected from the GHC enrollment file, screened to remove women with recent UTI, and frequency matched to cases by age within 2 years. An interviewer ascertained self-reported clinician-diagnosed diabetes. Diagnosis of diabetes was confirmed by the GHC diabetes registry. A subsample of women underwent measurement of postvoid residual bladder volume (n = 748) and culture of vaginal flora (n = 454). RESULTS—Of the 901 case and 913 control subjects, diabetes was reported in 13.1 and 6.8%, respectively. The health plan diabetes registry confirmed the diagnosis in 92% of women who self-reported the condition. The age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for UTI in relation to self-reported clinician-diagnosed diabetes was 2.2 (95% CI 1.6–3.0). Adjustment for frequency of sexual intercourse and history of UTI had little effect on this estimate. Compared with nondiabetic women, higher UTI odds were seen in subjects who used oral hypoglycemic agents (OR 2.9 [95% CI 1.7–5.1]) and insulin (2.6 [1.5–4.6]) but not in subjects with untreated diabetes or diabetes treated by Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: What You Need To Know

The urgent need to go. The burning pain when you do. The cloudy, foul-smelling urine. If you've experienced a urinary tract or bladder infection, you'd probably prefer to avoid another one. Unfortunately, if you have diabetes, you are up to twice as likely as those without the disease to develop these often painful infections. They’re especially common among women. But there’s a lot you can do to avoid them and to ease your discomfort when they do strike. Making healthy lifestyle choices is key to managing type 2 diabetes, but it can be hard to stay on track. Dr. Anthony Cardillo explains that focusing on diet, exercise and stress reduction can help you maintain control of your diabetes. 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. Why Diabetes Poses a Risk Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, occur when bacteria or other bugs invade your body’s drainage system. Normally, your immune defenses banish these bugs before they can grow and multiply. But if you have diabetes, the following factors interfere: Diabetes impairs some parts of your immune response. You have fewer white blood cells and T cells to fight off invading bacteria, viruses, and fungi. For the same reason, diabetics often develop UTIs caused by less commonly encountered germs. Routine antibiotics may be ineffective. Nerve damage can keep your bladder from emptying, either by weakening muscles or scrambling the signals between your brain and urinary system. Urine that remains in your body too long poses a greater infection risk. Sugar in your blood and urine can also contribute to a greater risk for UTI. Besides pain and Continue reading >>

11 Sneaky Causes Of Urinary Tract Infections

11 Sneaky Causes Of Urinary Tract Infections

Let’s be honest: Getting a urinary tract infection is the worst. With symptoms that include a burning sensation when you go to the bathroom, not being able to pee a lot (even though you feel like you do), and foul-smelling or dark urine—to name just a few—UTIs can feel like straight-up torture. And considering the fact that one out of five women will get a UTI at some point in their lives, it’s safe to say that it’s the type of misery that loves company—mostly female company, that is. Though dudes aren’t totally off the hook, it’s significantly harder for them to get UTIs. It all boils down to anatomy, explains Mary Jane Minkin, MD, a clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the Yale School of Medicine. Bacteria that cause UTIs have to make their way from the back door to the front and then up the urethra in order to wreak havoc on the urinary system. Because guys are (hashtag) blessed with a longer urethra than women, the bacteria have a further way to travel, making it more difficult for them to cause a UTI in the male body. One thing that is true for both men and women? Once you’ve had one UTI, you’re more likely to have another. While this all may sound pretty doom-and-gloom, that whole knowledge-is-power thing might help you figure out why your body seems like it’s out to get you. Here, the sneaky stuff that ups your risk for getting a dreaded UTI. 11 Sneaky Causes of UTIs Binging on cookies doesn’t only affect your waistline—it can actually lead to a UTI. “If you eat tons of added sugars and get a real surge in your blood sugar, you may end up with some of that sugar in your urine,” Minkin explains. And the bacteria that cause UTIs love feeding on sugar, so you run the risk of essentially providing a feast for them whenever Continue reading >>

Can This Be Diabetes?

Can This Be Diabetes?

So since September I had off days where I would pee a lot. When I say a lot, I mean a lot like I had the urge to go every one hour and it was clear. The amount I urinated did not match with how much I drank. By late November and December it started to become a daily thing. The amount I urinated was not on par with how much I urinated in earlier months but I ended up having the urge every 2 hours and could only hold my pee up to 4 hours. I ended up going to my doctors because of this last week. Before I touch upon that date, I would like to also say that I have been experiencing excessive hunger (or what I think is excessive - I get hungery right after I eat meals - which may be normal really since I tend to not eat until the afternoon or even as late as evenings) and also an increase of pins and needles feeling in my legs and arms. Anyways, back to the doctor visit. During that visit I told them about what I have been experiencing and they ended up making me do a urine sample. My doctor said he couldn't find any traces of sugar (but will send it to the lab to make sure - I didn't get a call back so I assume it was negative) but they did find a trace of a uti. They prescribed me the medication that starts with a N (made me pee more than what was normal- I even had to wake up in the middle of the night which never happened). Now though I still experience hunger, and pins and needles (I cannot really say about my urination problems because I am still taking the medication). So I was wondering if I should go find another doctor and force them to do more tests on me? or is this all in my head? Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections

People whose diabetes is not properly controlled have twice the risk of developing infections. In addition to diabetes, you could be more susceptible to urinary tract infections if: Your blood glucose (sugar) levels are not properly controlled. Sugar in the urine promotes bacterial growth. Your nervous system is already affected by diabetes (neuropathy). You could have a “lazy bladder” that does not empty completely. You are a woman. Certain anatomical traits, such as having a shorter urethra, increase the risk of bacterial contamination. You already have diabetes complications in your kidneys or blood vessels. This could be a sign that your diabetes is not properly controlled. You have had a urinary tract infection within the last year. People who have had infections within the last year are more at risk of a recurrence. When to consult? To avoid urinary tract infections, consult your doctor if one or more of these symptoms occur: Fever More frequent urination Burning sensation when urinating Urine has an unpleasant odour False urge to urinate Blood in the urine Abdominal pain when urinating Prevention As is the case for all types of infections if you have diabetes, it is crucial that you maintain your blood glucose (sugar) levels within the target range. Wash your hands often. Do not ignore the urge to urinate. Be sure to stay well hydrated. Quit smoking if you are a smoker. What about cranberry juice? Although studies on cranberry juice seem promising, none has clearly shown that cranberry juice can be used to treat or prevent urinary tract infections. If you nevertheless decide to drink cranberry juice, be aware of the amount of sugar in the juice or cocktail, especially if you are diabetic. Research and text: Diabetes Québec Team of Health Care Professionals S Continue reading >>

Can Uti Cause An Increase In Blood Sugar Levels In A Non-diabetic Person?

Can Uti Cause An Increase In Blood Sugar Levels In A Non-diabetic Person?

No, he is a diabetic, which very often goes undetected for many years, until because of having another medical condition blood tests are done and diabetes is detected. It is rather odd that a male would have recurrent UTIs. Has anatomic abnormalities e.g. an obstructive prostate, kidney/bladder stones, anatomical variants been ruled out by imagining studies? Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

In this article we will cover everything you need to know about diabetes and your risk for Urinary Tract Infections. Do you have an increased risk of Urinary Tract Infections now that you have diabetes? We will cover what a Urinary Tract Infection is, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment guidelines, as well as why they are more common in people with diabetes. More importantly, we will discuss steps you can take to prevent them! What Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)? A urinary tract infection or UTI is an infection anywhere in your bladder, kidneys or in the urinary system. An infection of the upper urinary tract or the bladder is called a bladder infection or cystitis. An infection in the urethra is called urethritis. Women tend to be more at risk of these types of infections due to their anatomy; they have a much shorter area between the urethra and the opening to the urethra to the bladder. Urinary tract infections are rare in men under 50 due to their anatomy. A more serious infection of the lower urinary tract is an infection of the kidney and the ureters and is called pyelonephritis. This is a complication and occurs when the bladder infection progresses to the kidneys. I highly advise reading the following articles: According to the Stanford Medicine’s Michael Hsieh Lab, half of women and men will have experienced a urinary tract infection (UTI) during our lifetime at least once. They are the most common infection, and can lead to death in patients who are experiencing it severely. Antibiotics are the most effective therapy.The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases account 8.1 million visits to the clinic, hospitals for UTI purposes. For women, the risk of getting a UTI is 50 percent greater than a man. What Are The Symptoms of a UTI? L Continue reading >>

8 Most Common Causes Of Utis

8 Most Common Causes Of Utis

If you've ever had a urinary tract infection, then you know the agony of that terrible burning feeling and relentless need to pee—and you'd probably do anything to avoid getting another. According to the National Kidney Foundation, 1 in 5 women experiences a UTI at some point in her life. And while men can get them, too (UTIs are the second most common infection), women are much more likely to contract one, says the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. That's because we have a shorter urethra, which makes it all too easy for UTI-causing bacteria to pass through it and invade the bladder. No fair. "Our urinary tract system is designed to keep out bacteria; however, these defenses can fail," says Kelly M. Kasper, MD, an ob-gyn at Indiana University Health. "When that happens, bacteria can grow and multiply and cause infections." (Reverse chronic inflammation and heal your body from the inside out with the all-natural solution in The Whole Body Cure!) Here are 8 of the most common causes of urinary tract infections—and a handful of helpful tips for prevention. We know, huge bummer. Many women get UTIs after doing the deed because the motion of sex can transfer bacteria from the bowel or vaginal cavity into the urethra. To lower your risk of getting a urinary tract infection, pee within 30 minutes of having sex, says Lisa N. Hawes, MD, a general urologist in Fulton, Maryland, and a physician spokesperson for the American Urological Association. And ignore the often-shared advice that both partners should wash their genitals immediately before and after sex. "This actually changes bacterial flora and will increase UTI risks," Hawes says. MORE: 7 Little Things You Can Do During Sex To Boost Your Bond With Your Partner You might be able to blam Continue reading >>

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to have an erection and the inability to sustain an erection. Estimates of the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes vary widely, ranging from 20 to 75 percent. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than men who do not have diabetes. Among men with erectile dysfunction, those with diabetes may experience the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Research suggests that erectile dysfunction may be an early marker of diabetes, particularly in men ages 45 and younger. In addition to diabetes, other major causes of erectile dysfunction include high blood pressure, kidney disease, alcohol abuse, and blood vessel disease. Erectile dysfunction may also occur because of the side effects of medications, psychological factors, smoking, and hormonal deficiencies. Men who experience erectile dysfunction should consider talking with a health care provider. The health care provider may ask about the patient's medical history, the type and frequency of sexual problems, medications, smoking and drinking habits, and other health conditions. A physical exam and laboratory tests may help pinpoint causes of sexual problems. The health care provider will check blood glucose control and hormone levels and may ask the patient to do a test at home that checks for erections that occur during sleep. The health care provider may also ask whether the patient is depressed or has recently experienced upsetting changes in his life. Treatments for erectile dysfunction caused by nerve damage, Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Utis

What You Need To Know About Utis

Burning when you urinate. A frequent urge to urinate. Pain in your back or abdomen. Do any of these symptoms sound familiar? These are all symptoms of a urinary tract infection, or UTI, for short. Studies show that people with Type 2 diabetes have a greater risk of getting a UTI than people without diabetes. Despite the fact that UTIs are all too common and downright annoying, they can also lead to more serious situations if they’re not caught and treated. What is a UTI, anyway? A UTI is an infection in your urinary tract. Your urinary tract includes your kidneys, bladder, ureters, urethra, and, in men, prostate. Most UTIs occur in your bladder, the organ that stores your urine. What causes a UTI? A UTI is caused by bacteria, usually from the bowels. Normally, the urinary tract system has safeguards to protect against infection. For example, the ureters, which are the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder, have one-way valves to prevent urine from backing up into the kidneys. The process of emptying your bladder (called urination) also helps to flush out bacteria and other microbes. And a healthy immune system helps protect against infection, as well. Why are UTIs more common in people with diabetes? UTIs are the second most common type of infection. Women are 10 times more likely to get a UTI than men because of their anatomy. In fact, more than 50% of women will have a UTI at some point in their lives. If you’re a woman with Type 2 diabetes, your risk may be even higher, according to two recent studies. In one study, 9% of the subjects with diabetes had UTIs compared with 6% of those without diabetes. And the second study showed that people with diabetes had a 60% higher risk of getting a UTI compared to those without diabetes. Why are people with Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: The Case Against A Pre-emptive Strike

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: The Case Against A Pre-emptive Strike

One of the most frustrating things about diabetes is the myriad of ways it can hurt you. Regular readers of this Viewpoint know that patients with diabetes are more prone to heart attacks, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease, as well as damage to the eyes, nerves, and kidney. As if this wasn’t enough, there is another common complication of diabetes that gets less attention, yet which affects thousands of patients every year. I’m talking about infections. Infections can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or other pathogens, and patients with diabetes are more prone to a whole slew of them. Some of these infections are rare and potentially lethal, like mucormycosis, which almost never affects people without diabetes. Others are more common, like athlete’s foot, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. While anyone can come down with these conditions, folks with diabetes are more likely than those with normal blood sugar to be affected. Furthermore, the complications of those infections can be much more severe in people with diabetes, and can be more difficult to treat. Take urinary tract infections, for example. Women with diabetes are about two to three times more likely to have bacteria in their bladders than women without diabetes (interestingly, the same does not appear to be true for men). There also seems to be an increased risk of the infection spreading upwards into the kidneys in diabetic patients, and diabetic women with urinary tract infections are also more likely to require hospitalization than non-diabetic women. Why is this the case? Well, diabetes affects many systems that protect against infection in general, and against urinary tract infections specifically. Poor circulation in diabetes reduces the ability of infection-fighting white blood Continue reading >>

Overactive Bladder Vs. Urinary Incontinence And Uti: Whats The Difference?

Overactive Bladder Vs. Urinary Incontinence And Uti: Whats The Difference?

OAB happens when the muscles that control bladder function start to act involuntarily. There are many possible reasons for OAB, including lifestyle. For example, you may experience OAB if you drink alcohol and caffeine in large quantities. Alcohol and caffeine act as diuretics , which cause the body to produce more urine. Simply drinking lots of fluids in general caffeinated, alcoholic, or not can contribute to OAB symptoms. Serious health conditions can also lead to OAB. A stroke or nervous system problems, such as multiple sclerosis (MS) or Parkinsons disease , can cause OAB. Diabetes and kidney disease can too. In men, an enlarged prostate often results in OAB. Acute UTIs can lead to symptoms that are similar to those of OAB in both men and women. The most common UTIs occur when bacteria travel up the urethra, the tube that connects to your bladder and leads urine out of your body. Women have a shorter urethra, making it easier for bacteria to reach the bladder and grow compared to men. About 5060 percent of women will get a UTI in their lifetime. Cystitis is the most common type of UTI in adult premenopausal women. The infection involves only the bladder and urethra. These infections typically occur when bacteria spread from the anus to the urethra. Some women are more prone to these infections following sexual activity. Also, the loss of estrogen after menopause makes the urinary tract more vulnerable to infection. Treatment options for OAB vary. Pelvic floor exercises can help by strengthening the muscles around the bladder neck and urethra. Weight loss and the timing of fluid intake can also help. Your doctor may prescribe oral medications to relieve symptoms. More invasive treatments include Botox injections into the bladder to better control muscle movement. S Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Review Of Prevalence, Diagnosis, And Management

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Review Of Prevalence, Diagnosis, And Management

Go to: Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by variable degrees of insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and increased glucose production. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of infections, with the urinary tract being the most frequent infection site.1–4 Various impairments in the immune system,5,6 in addition to poor metabolic control of diabetes,7,8 and incomplete bladder emptying due to autonomic neuropathy9,10 may all contribute in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections (UTI) in diabetic patients. Factors that were found to enhance the risk for UTI in diabetics include age, metabolic control, and long term complications, primarily diabetic nephropathy and cystopathy.11 The spectrum of UTI in these patients ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) to lower UTI (cystitis), pyelonephritis, and severe urosepsis. Serious complications of UTI, such as emphysematous cystitis and pyelonephritis, renal abscesses and renal papillary necrosis, are all encountered more frequently in type 2 diabetes than in the general population.12,13 Type 2 diabetes is not only a risk factor for community-acquired UTI but also for health care-associated UTI,14 catheter-associated UTI,15 and post-renal transplant-recurrent UTI.16 In addition, these patients are more prone to have resistant pathogens as the cause of their UTI, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive Enterobacteriaceae,17 fluoroquinolone-resistant uropathogens,18 carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae,19 and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci.20 Type 2 diabetes is also a risk factor for fungal UTI, mostly caused by Candida.21 Diabetes is also associated with worse outcomes of UTI, including longer hospitalizations and incre Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Overview Predisposition to urinary tract infections (UTIs) in diabetes mellitus results from several factors. Susceptibility increases with longer duration and greater severity of diabetes. [1] High urine glucose content and defective host immune factors predispose to infection. Hyperglycemia causes neutrophil dysfunction by increasing intracellular calcium levels and interfering with actin and, thus, diapedesis and phagocytosis. Vaginal candidiasis and vascular disease also play a role in recurrent infections. Recently, the use of SGLT2 inhibitors, such as dapagliflozin, has produced concern about an increased risk of urinary tract infections in recipients of these medications. Levels of urinary glucose increased with greater doses of the medication; however, the incidence of urinary tract infections did not. Nonetheless, such patients do appear to be at a 3- to 5-fold increased risk of genital infections. [2, 3] Over time, patients with diabetes may develop cystopathy, nephropathy, and renal papillary necrosis, complications that predispose them to UTIs. Long-term effects of diabetic cystopathy include vesicourethral reflux and recurrent UTIs. In addition, as many as 30% of women with diabetes have some degree of cystocele, cystourethrocele, or rectocele. All of these may contribute to the frequency and severity of UTIs in female diabetics. Complicated UTIs in patients who have diabetes include renal and perirenal abscess, emphysematous pyelonephritis, emphysematous cystitis, fungal infections, xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, and papillary necrosis. The current article focuses on emphysematous UTIs, with which diabetes is closely associated. Diabetes mellitus and obstruction of the urinary tract are the predominant risk factors for developing emphysematous UTIs. T Continue reading >>

More in diabetes