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Can Diabetes Cause Tooth Pain?

What Is The Link Between Diabetes And Sensitive Teeth?

What Is The Link Between Diabetes And Sensitive Teeth?

Gum disease is the link between diabetes and sensitivity. Diabetic patients tend to develop gum disease more readily. As bone is lost around teeth the gums follow and leave the underlying tooth root surface exposed. This can lead to sensitivity as the cementum on the root surface is much softer then the enamel on the crown of the tooth and can wear away much faster and cause sensitivity. Controlling the blood sugar can help with controlling the rate that the gum disease progresses. There is no direct connection between diabetes and sensitive teeth. However, when diabetes is poorly controlled, levels of blood glucose (sugar) can remain high; this can exacerbate serious gum disease. As diseased gums pull away from the teeth, the cementum layer on the roots is readily worn away, leaving the underlying dentin exposed, and sensitive teeth result. Gum disease can progress from the early stage of gingivitis to more serious conditions, such as periodontitis; eventually, people with untreated periodontitis can lose their teeth from chronic gum infection and inflammation. Periodontitis can cause further problems for people with diabetes, who need their teeth in order to follow a healthy diet. Research has shown that it may even be more difficult for diabetics to control their blood glucose if they have periodontitis. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Tooth Pain

Diabetes And Tooth Pain

Diabetes can have a negative effect on the oral health. For instance, periodontal disease or gum disease can lead to painful chewing difficulties and even tooth loss. Dry mouth, often a symptom of uncontrolled diabetes, can have a sore and burning mouth sensation. Ulcers in the mouth that have difficulty healing can also become painful, making it difficult to eat and brush your teeth. Tooth decay, also very common can lead to root canal infections if not dealt with promptly. However other times, we might have gum and teeth problems taking place without pain. Periodontal disease or gum disease is known to be silent, meaning it will not have apparent symptoms most of the times. Decay, can also be present in the mouth allowing your teeth to rot without you noticing it. Some of the signs and symptoms of gum disease might include: Red, swollen or tender gums Occasional bleeding when brushing and flossing Gums that are receding or pulling away from the teeth, causing the teeth to look longer than before Loose or separating teeth Occasional bad taste or breath Some of the signs and symptoms of decay might include: Tooth sensitivity Discoloration on the tooth A chipping tooth Pain or tenderness on biting If you are uncertain of the health of your mouth and would like to have piece of mind, contact us for a consultation and we will ensure 02075639980. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes affects your body’s ability to utilize glucose, or blood sugar, for energy. Diabetes can cause many complications. These include nerve damage, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and even blindness. Another common health complication is gum disease and other oral health problems. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are at higher risk for gingivitis, gum disease, and periodontitis (severe gum infection with bone destruction). Diabetes affects your ability to fight off bacteria that can cause gum infections. Gum disease can also affect the body’s blood sugar control. Diabetes is associated with increased risk for thrush, a type of fungal infection. Additionally, people with diabetes are likely to have a dry mouth. This has been associated with increased risk for mouth ulcers, soreness, cavities, and dental infections. What the research says A 2013 study published in the journal BMC Oral Health looked at 125 people with type 2 diabetes. Researchers measured factors including missing teeth, the incidence of periodontal disease, and the amount of reported dental bleeding. The study found that a combination of the longer people had diabetes, the higher their fasting blood glucose, and the higher their hemoglobin A1C (a measurement of a person’s average blood sugar over three months), the more likely they were to have periodontal disease and dental bleeding. Those who did not report careful self-management of their condition were more likely to have missing teeth than those who did work to control their blood sugar levels. Some people with diabetes are at greater risk for oral health problems than others. For example, people who don’t maintain tight control over their blood sugar levels are more likely to get gum disease. Al Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

Resize font A- A A+ Diabetes and Oral Health During the past 10 years, much research has been undertaken on the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is the sixth leading complication of diabetes. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease, with a higher rate of more severe levels of bone loss and gum infection.1 What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a serious disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and other foods into energy. Normally, insulin helps get sugar from the blood to the body's cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble making and/or using insulin, so your body does not get the fuel it needs and your blood sugar stays too high. High blood sugar sets off processes that can lead to complications, such as heart, kidney, and eye disease, or other serious problems.2,3 If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease. Are There Different Types of Diabetes? It is estimated that more than 20 million adults and children in the United States have some form of diabetes–14 million having been diagnosed with the disease and 6 million being unaware they have it. There are different types of the disease: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Most Americans (around 90%) who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.2,3 What Is Periodontal Disease? Periodontal disease, or gum disease, is a bacterial infection of the gums, ligaments, and bone that support your teeth and hold them in the jaw. If left untreated, you may experience tooth loss. The main cause of periodontal disease is bacterial Continue reading >>

Treating Dental Sensitivity

Treating Dental Sensitivity

Does ice cream give your teeth a jolt? What about a hot cup of coffee? On a cold winters day, do you find yourself pressing your lips together to protect your teeth from the cold air? Does the thought of a dental hygienist using a scaler on your teeth make you shudder? These reactions are typical for people with dental sensitivity, which might be more accurately described as hypersensitivity. Sensitivity can result from any number of triggers: most commonly cold but also heat, sugary foods, and physical stimulation. It is extremely common; some studies suggest that more than half of all people experience it. But just because it is common does not mean it should be accepted as a fact of life. However mild or severe, whatever brings it on, dental sensitivity can now be relieved through a variety of treatments. This article gives an overview of what exactly sensitivity is and what you can do about it. A short anatomy lesson will help explain how teeth become sensitive, and how both over-the-counter and professional products work to stop the sensitivity. There are two main parts to each tooth (plus the center, where the main nerve and blood supply are located). The first part of the tooth the crown is the visible part, the part thats used for chewing. The crown is covered by a very hard outer shell called enamel. A bacterial infection or acidic foods can dissolve the enamel, creating tiny holes that can get bigger and lead to the formation of what is commonly called a cavity. If left untreated, a cavity can continue to enlarge until the bacteria and acid reach the nerve and blood supply of the tooth, causing pain. This type of pain is very different from normal sensitivity: It typically hurts more, and its underlying causes are different. If you have pain caused by a cavit Continue reading >>

Toothache

Toothache

Since the weekend I've had a sporadic toothache. My BG has been higher since Monday. I visited my dentist, she says she can't really tell if I need a root canal or not....but she could send me to an endodontist an hour drive away, which I would end up paying for out of pocket, plus miss work. I declined the referral. I was told tooth grinding can cause the same symptoms, and I should try a bite guard for a few nights to see if the symptoms clear up. Today my BG was right around 160 all day long. I'm frustrated. I guess I just need to ride this out to see if my BG gets better or not / my tooth gets better or not. Does your tooth hurt when you chew on it, or is it sensitive to cold? Years ago, I had a molar with cold sensitivity due to eroded enamel sealed by my dentist. That and Sensodyne toothpaste cleared up the problem. You could also have a cracked tooth or filling, which is usually but not always detectable by X-rays done at the regular dentist's office. An endodontist uses a more powerful and higher resolution X-ray that reveals problems that may go undetected by the general dentist. I currently need a root canal and two crowns on molars that had a cusp break off. If your symptoms persist, and your dentist still can't find the cause, I would recommend going to the endodontist. An untreated cracked tooth can eventually develop an abscess or have to be extracted. My wife recently had a root canal done on a back molar. Her jaw hurt for a day or two from being open for 40 minutes, and it hurt to chew for a few days. She only needed Advil during the first two days. She's scheduled to get a post and crown next week, which is typically required after a root canal. Installing the crown is quick and painless - she's already had one done. It's gonna be expensive - $about $5 Continue reading >>

Diet, Diabetes And Tooth Decay

Diet, Diabetes And Tooth Decay

If you are one of the 16 million Americans with diabetes, you're probably aware that the disease can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. What you may not know is that diabetics are more susceptible to developing oral infections and gum (periodontal) disease than those who do not have diabetes. Diet and tooth decay Your teeth are covered with plaque, a sticky film of bacteria. After you have a meal, snack or beverage that contains sugars or starches, the bacteria release acids that attack tooth enamel. Repeated attacks can cause the enamel to break down and may eventually result in cavities. When diabetes is not controlled properly, high glucose levels in saliva may help bacteria and plaque thrive. Plaque that is not removed can eventually harden into tartar. When tartar collects on your teeth, it makes a thorough cleaning of your teeth more difficult. This can create conditions that lead to chronic inflammation and infection in the mouth. Diabetes lowers your resistance to infection and can slow the healing process. What you can do Reduce or eliminate sugars and starches from your diet, eat healthy foods and exercise regularly. Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and clean once a day between your teeth with floss or an interdental cleaner to remove decay-causing plaque. Keep teeth and gums strong by keeping track of blood sugar levels. Also, have your triglycerides and cholesterol levels monitored. Treat dental infections immediately. Diabetics who combine good dental care with insulin control typically have a better chance of avoiding gum disease. Provide your medical and oral health histories to both your medical and dental care providers. Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth. Your mouth includes your teeth your gums your jaw tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath. Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control. What happens if I have plaque? Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the tissue that hold the teeth in place. If periodontitis is not treated, the gums, bones, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. Teeth may become loose and might need to be removed. If you hav Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

By Laura Martin, Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine Did you know that 29.1 million people living in the United States have diabetes ? That’s 9.3% of the population. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year—and 8.1 million people living with diabetes don’t even know they have it. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to process sugar. All food you eat is turned to sugar and used for energy. In Type I diabetes, the body doesn’t make enough insulin, a hormone that carries sugar from your blood to the cells that need it for energy. In Type II diabetes, the body stops responding to insulin. Both cases result in high blood sugar levels, which can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. So what does this have to do with that smile of yours — and how can you protect it? First, it’s important to understand the signs of diabetes and the roles they play in your mouth. The warning signs of diabetes affect every part of your body. After a blood test, you may be told by a doctor that you have high blood sugar. You may feel excessively thirsty or have to urinate a lot. Weight loss and fatigue are other common symptoms. Diabetes can also cause you to lose consciousness if your blood sugar falls too low. If diabetes is left untreated, it can take a toll on your mouth as well. Here's how: You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry. ( Dry mouth is also caused by certain medications.) Because saliva protects your teeth, you’re also at a higher risk of cavities. Gums may become inflamed and bleed often ( gingivitis ). You may experience delayed wound healing. You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth. For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlie Continue reading >>

Why Dental Problems Make It Hard To Control Blood Glucose

Why Dental Problems Make It Hard To Control Blood Glucose

The nearly 30 million people living with type 2 diabetes may be surprised to learn about another unintended difficulty: dental problems, namely gum disease. People with diabetes are at an increased risk for serious gum disease, or what's known as periodontitis, because they are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection, and have a decreased ability to fight bacteria that invade the gums. On the flip side, serious gum disease may have the potential to affect blood-glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes. Too much glucose or sugar in your blood from the diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your teeth and gums because it helps allow harmful bacteria to grow in your saliva. These bacteria combine with food to form plaque, a soft, sticky film that causes tooth decay or cavities. If you have uncontrolled blood sugar, you're more likely to develop gum disease than someone who doesn't have diabetes. Other dental complications related to uncontrolled diabetes include thrush, an oral fungus, and dry mouth, which can cause sores and ulcers. If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, the better you control your blood glucose, the lower your risk is for periodontitis. 5 Simple Ways to Prevent Diabetes-Related Gum Disease To help prevent dental problems: Brush your teeth at least twice daily. Floss once a day, pressing the floss against your teeth and not your gums. Check for areas where your gums are red or painful. See your dentist right away if you think you have a problem. If you are having dental work, be sure to remind the hygienist and dentist that you have diabetes. Many dental treatments can affect your blood sugar. Your dentist may decide to delay some procedures — including dental surgery — if your blood-glucose levels ar Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

What do brushing and flossing have to do with diabetes? Plenty. If you have diabetes, here's why dental care matters — and how to take care of your teeth and gums. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar can take a toll on your entire body — including your teeth and gums. The good news? Prevention is in your hands. Learn what you're up against, and then take charge of your dental health. Cavities and gum disease Whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, managing your blood sugar level is key. The higher your blood sugar level, the higher your risk of: Tooth decay (cavities). Your mouth naturally contains many types of bacteria. When starches and sugars in food and beverages interact with these bacteria, a sticky film known as plaque forms on your teeth. The acids in plaque attack the surfaces of your teeth (enamel and dentin). This can lead to cavities. The higher your blood sugar level, the greater the supply of sugars and starches — and the more acid wearing away at your teeth. Early gum disease (gingivitis). Diabetes reduces your ability to fight bacteria. If you don't remove plaque with regular brushing and flossing, it'll harden under your gumline into a substance called tartar (calculus). The longer plaque and tartar remain on your teeth, the more they irritate the gingiva — the part of your gums around the base of your teeth. In time, your gums become swollen and bleed easily. This is gingivitis. Advanced gum disease (periodontitis). Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to a more serious infection called periodontitis, which destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth. Eventually, periodontitis causes your gums and jawbone to pull away from your teeth, which in turn causes your teeth to loosen and possibly fall out. Periodontitis Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications - Dental Problems

Diabetes Complications - Dental Problems

Diabetes & Dental Problems Just as diabetes increases your risk of skin infections, it also increases infections in your mouth and gums. Normally, saliva protects against bacterial growth in the mouth, but if you have insufficient saliva (dry mouth), food particles may collect around your teeth, causing cavities and gum infections as well as dental plaques that can damage your gums. Individuals with diabetes are highly susceptible to cavities and to gum infection/inflammation (known as gingivitis), which can spread to the ligaments and bones that support the teeth (periodontitis). Dry mouth and diabetic nerve damage can also cause burning sensations in the mouth or on the tongue. Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by burning pain on the tongue, the gums, other parts of the mouth or the throat. This may come from dry mouth or an oral fungal infection. If you experience this sensation, see your dentist. He or she may prescribe saliva replacement tablets or an oral antifungal medication, depending on the cause. According to Natalie Strand, M.D., an interventional pain management specialist that has been living with type 1 diabetes since the age of 12, "People with diabetes are two times more likely to develop gum disease. Serious gum disease may adversely affect blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes. To reduce this risk, brush for two minutes twice a day with a toothpaste specially formulated for gum health, floss once a day and get regular dental checkups." Once again, controlling glucose levels is the best way to prevent these complications. Of course, preventing cavities and gum infections also means avoiding candy, soda, and other sugary foods as well as brushing and flossing your teeth every day. Q: Should I get dental sealants to pr Continue reading >>

Diabetes Took My Teeth But Not My Life

Diabetes Took My Teeth But Not My Life

Updated 7:02 AM ET, Fri February 21, 2014 Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. CNN Fit Nation's Sia Figiel now stocks up on fruits and vegetables along with lean meats and whole-grain carbohydrates. Sia Figiel is from American Samoa, where food is a big part of the culture Figiel developed diabetes and struggled to manage it Since moving to the United States, Figiel has lost 100 pounds Follow her journey training for a triathlon @TriHardSia I was diagnosed with diabetes 12 years ago. At the time, I was caring for my mother, who was on dialysis and had had her leg amputated. As a family, we knew very little about diabetes -- only that once you got it, you deteriorated and died. Like our father, who suffered a stroke and then died years later of a massive heart attack brought on by complications of diabetes. Both my parents, in fact, died from complications of diabetes. They were strong pillars of our family and community, taken way too soon by a disease that is the leading cause of death among Pacific Islanders. Before seeing the doctor, I had been experiencing extreme thirst, especially at night. The tips of my toes felt like bees lived there and were desperate to burst out of my skin. My vision became blurred after each meal. It was 2 p.m. and I hadn't eaten anything when the doctor tested my blood sugar level. It was in the high 200s. Normal is between 110 and 125. Fit Nation team starts journey to tri 02:30 You have diabetes, Ms. Figiel, the doctor said. He prescribed metformin and directed me to a dietitian. She further reiterated what the doctor had told me: how food was related to high blood glucose levels and how consistently high blood glucose levels will eventually lead to amputations, blindness, kidney fail Continue reading >>

Coast Dental Blog How Diabetes Can Affect Your Teeth And Gums

Coast Dental Blog How Diabetes Can Affect Your Teeth And Gums

Diabetes affects almost 26 million Americans, which is more than 8 percent of the U.S. population. The condition often requires them to make lifestyle changes, including what they eat, how they exercise and the medications they take. It also requires them to change the way they take care of their teeth and gums. About one-third of people with diabetes have severe periodontal disease which is causing the gum tissue and bone around the teeth to break down, according to the National Institutes of Health. People with poorly-controlled diabetes had a 2.9 times increased risk of developing periodontitis than non-diabetics, according to a large study published in 2002. The same study found people with well-controlled diabetes had no significant increase in the risk of periodontitis. There are several reasons why poorly-controlled diabetes can increase your chance of getting periodontal disease, said Dr. Dale Nash, a dentist at Coast Dental Wesley Chapel. In the past decade, Dr. Nash has seen an increase in the number of patients with diabetes. "People with diabetes are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection," Dr. Nash said. "Diabetics have high blood sugar, which basically coats the immune-fighting cells and affects the blood supply to many areas of the body including the patient’s mouth." Here’s how it works: The poor circulation affects the blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the gums, called the gingiva, and the cells in your mouth that help fight off infection. If the gums can’t get the nutrients they need, then it’s harder to fight infection. Also, poor circulation means the blood can’t carry away bad bacteria effectively. Research shows the functions of immune cells in poorly-controlled diabetics are altered in other ways.(1) One kind o Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Did you know that trouble keeping your blood sugars in control could lead to an infection? That infection could be in your gums. That’s right. People with diabetes have a higher incidence of gum disease or periodontal disease than people without diabetes. In this article, we will look at the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. We will look at what it is, what are the prevention and treatment options available, some other oral problems that are also linked to diabetes, and more. Just like high blood glucose makes it easier for you to get an infection in other places in your body, high blood glucose levels also make it easier to get a gum infection, or other infection in your mouth. Decaying teeth and poor oral habits contribute to periodontal disease, as does smoking. We will take a look at all of that here. First, let’s see why Martin contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Martin was interested in learning more about his high blood sugars and their effects on his teeth. He had been trying to get his blood sugar levels down, but nothing he seemed to do with diet, exercise, or medications helped in aiming his target range for blood sugars or in an A1C range that he was comfortable with. He was due to pay a visit to his dentist since his last visit was over a year ago. Martin’s dentist told him that he was at the start of a periodontal disease, and in addition, he had a gum infection. He wondered if the infection in his gums may be a reason for why he was unable to keep his blood glucose in a good range. An infection anywhere in your body could be a reason for unruly blood glucose. Let’s see if we can answer Martin’s question in depth. What is periodontal disease? Periodontal disease is an infection that develops of the gum, and underlying bone, that holds the Continue reading >>

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