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Can Diabetes Cause Swollen Feet?

5 Tips To Reduce Feet, Leg And Ankle Swelling

5 Tips To Reduce Feet, Leg And Ankle Swelling

Swollen ankles and feet can be painful, and are common for those with diabetes. Standing or walking for long periods of time can cause an abnormal fluid buildup in the ankles, feet and legs — especially among older adults. Here are some tips that may help. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

If you are diabetic, you need to worry about a lot more things like heart diseases and leg swelling. This causes peripheral edema in some cases and can be painful. If you see symptoms of swelling in your ankles, lower legs or feet, it is time to pay your physician an emergency visit. Diabetes expand blood circulation in an inappropriate way, which can cause swelling in the lower leg region. However, there could be other reasons as well that would cause the swelling. So a visit to the doctor is a must. Diabetes is a serious disease which gives rise to many further complications; swelling in the legs is one of them. Let’s discuss a few reasons that could be contributing to the swelling and its cure. What can lead to leg swelling? For any diabetic patient, it is a must to consult a doctor in case you notice any changes in the body. A patient who’s been living with diabetes for several years needs to be extra careful because this disease comes with so many attached risks. If you are diabetic and have noticed some leg swelling recently, the following could be a few reasons for it. The main reason for leg swelling in diabetes is peripheral edema. Fluids collect in the feet, ankles and leg and this condition can become quite severe if left untreated. A consultation with a doctor is a must. Sometimes, a diabetic may suffer from diabetic neuropathy. This is a condition that leads to numbness in legs and feet. As a result, the diabetic may not be able to feel an injury, maybe something even as severe as a sprain or a fracture and continue to use the limb. But the swelling caused by the injury is what will raise concern, which is why a consultation with the doctor becomes very important. Diabetics have low immunity towards infections and your swelling could very well be a sign Continue reading >>

6 Best Fixes For Pain And Swelling In Your Feet And Ankles

6 Best Fixes For Pain And Swelling In Your Feet And Ankles

Have you ever looked down at yourankles and feet, first not recognizing them as your own, then, realizing they are swollen?Whether from long days on your feet, travel or surgery, it happens. For pregnant women, it isalmost inevitable. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Swelling in your ankles and feet isuncomfortable, and sometimes it keeps you from moving freely. But, there are several ways to relieve swelling from everyday causes and sometimes you can even prevent it, sayspodiatric physician and surgeon Georgeanne Botek, DPM ,Head of the Section of Podiatry and Medical Director of the Diabetic Foot Clinic at Cleveland Clinic. She saysswelling (or what doctors refer to as edema ) happens when your body retains fluid in the lower legs, ankles and feet. It most often occurs on both sides of the body, and its not an emergency situation. When it comes to swelling, its about management and getting through the day, she says. Theres nothing thats necessarily curative. RELATED: Lymphedema: What You Should Know About Your Risk, Treatment Options How to relieveswollen, painful feet and ankles You can often treat the symptoms of swelling that occurs on both sides of your body yourself, Dr. Botek says. Here are some ideas that can help: 1. Compression socks. Available at your local drug or grocery store, compression socks provide pain relief and prevent fluid collection in your legs, ankles and feet. They come in light, medium and heavy weights, so be sure you select a pair that isnt too tight for your body. Dr. Botek suggests starting with lightweight ones that measure between 12-15 mm or 15-20 mm of mercury. 2. Elevation. Prop your legs u Continue reading >>

Type 2 - Swollen Feet And Ankles | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - Swollen Feet And Ankles | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Sorry to be a pain but my feet and ankles are very swollen, my feet are solid and feel like they may burst open at any minute. Should i be worried? Sent from my 5017X using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app Really need more info to comment to any effect. This all depends on all kinds of factors. Have you had this before? How long have you been diabetic and what are your levels like? What meds are you on...any that have this side effect? What is your weight like? Do you exercise? There are also all kinds of possible causes beyond diabetes. It could be very minor or not. best advice really is see your GP...That said, I really wouldn't panic...but best just call in the morning. Where are they swollen, below the ankle or above and below? Is it pitting edema? Do you regularly eat a lot of salty stuff or did you today? Did you have something with monosodium glutamate (MSG)? Which medicaitons are you taking? THese are some of the questions your do will ask you Debbie, my foot swelling began about the same time I crossed over from pre-diabetes to diabetes eleven years ago. It's important that you call your doctor so they can rule out any serious conditions. I found this information helpful because it's similar to the care I received when I initially saw a doctor about my foot swelling... During your appointment, your doctor will perform a physical examination and ask you about your symptoms. Be prepared to explain: the times of day when the swelling tends to be worse any other symptoms you may be experiencing any factors that appear to make the swelling better or worse To help diagnose the cause of the swelling, your doctor may order one or more of the followin Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

7 Tips For Diabetics To Reduce Swelling In The Feet

7 Tips For Diabetics To Reduce Swelling In The Feet

Most patients suffering from diabetes complain of swelling in the feet and legs. The main reason for this problem is improper blood circulation due to damaged blood capillaries as a result of increased pressure. Damaged capillaries cause peripheral oedema, leakage of fluids into surrounding tissues, which causes swelling. But, there can be several other reasons that could cause swelling in the feet. Therefore proper diagnosis is important. Poor circulation is also one of the reasons why wounds in diabetic patients don’t heal quickly. Mr Bhushan Hemade of Diaped, a chain of multi-disciplinary foot clinics says ‘Foot problems are common in people with diabetes and can quickly become serious.’ They increases the risk of infections and severe complications like foot ulcers and gangrene that can even lead to limb amputation. That’s why, you should not ignore even minor swelling in your feet. In most cases, when the swelling has just started, simple lifestyle changes can reduce swelling and provide relief to a great extent. 1. Exercise regularly: Mr Hemade says ‘Regular exercise will improve bone and joint health in your feet and legs, improve circulation to your legs, and will also help to stabilize your blood sugar levels. But you should consult your doctor prior to beginning any exercise program.’ Do not practice rigorous exercises as it can lead to exercise-induced oedema. 2. Elevate your legs: Elevation of feet (above the heart level) using a support or a pillow for 10-15 minutes every day can help to reduce swelling. Elevation drains out excess fluid from the surrounding tissues and improves circulation. 3. Use compression stockings and bandages: Compression products are now widely available for foot care in diabetics. They exert pressure on the affected are Continue reading >>

Swollen Ankles And Feet

Swollen Ankles And Feet

5. Infection Swelling in the feet and ankles can be a sign of infection. People with diabetic neuropathy or other nerve problems of the feet are at greater risk of foot infections. If you have diabetes, it is important to inspect your feet daily for blisters and sores, because nerve damage can blunt the pain sensation and foot problems can progress quickly. If you notice a swollen foot or blister that appears to be infected, seek medical advice straight away. 6. Blood clot Blood clots that form in the veins of the legs can stop the return flow of blood from the legs back to the heart and cause swelling in the ankles and feet. Blood clots can be either superficial (occurring in the veins just beneath the skin), or deep (a condition known as deep vein thrombosis). Deep clots can block one or more of the major veins of the legs. These blood clots can be life-threatening if they break loose and travel to the heart and lungs. If you have swelling in one leg, along with pain, a slight fever and possibly a change in colour of the affected leg, seek medical advice immediately. Treatment with blood thinners may be necessary. 7. Heart, liver or kidney disease Sometimes swelling can indicate a problem such as heart, liver or kidney disease. Ankles that swell could be a sign of heart failure. Kidney disease can also cause foot and ankle swelling. When kidneys are not functioning properly, fluid can build up in the body. Liver disease can affect the liver's production of a protein called albumin, which keeps the blood from leaking out of the blood vessels into the surrounding tissues. Inadequate albumin production can lead to fluid leakage. Gravity causes fluid to accumulate more in the feet and ankles, but fluid can also accumulate in the abdomen and chest. If your swelling is acco Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Causes Swollen Feet And 7 Ways To Help

How Diabetes Causes Swollen Feet And 7 Ways To Help

Swollen feet are a common problem of diabetes; you can stay active and try other measures like massage to reduce swelling. But talk to your doctor first. About 16 million people in the United States alone are suffering from diabetes. When your body fails to produce enough insulin or your body loses its ability to use insulin normally, you develop diabetes. The pancreas produces insulin to help process the food you eat. This in turn helps produce energy for your body to carry out different functions. You experience a number of problems when you develop diabetes – it happens because the disease can disrupt the vascular system and affect the kidneys, eyes, feet, and leg. Other issues are also associated with diabetes. Swollen feet, for instance, are common for people suffering from this disease. What exactly is the connection? Let's find out now. Diabetes can be divided into two categories – type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. You develop type 2 diabetes when your blood sugar levels go up due to obesity or bad diet. This leads to several complications and most of these problems are associated with the feet. The reason is that diabetes can cause nerve damage, which in turn can affect the shape of your feet. The damaged nerves fail to send messages to your foot muscles, which leads to muscle weakness and imbalance. Overtime, the bones of your toes and feet may shift as well. Some people also develop a condition called Charcot's foot, which destroys the soft tissue and joints in the foot. During the early stages of Charcot's foot, you notice fluid collecting in your joints and your bones eventually slip out of place. Due to nerve damage, most people do not sense any pain and they continue to use the affected foot, which aggravates the problems. You may even cause further Continue reading >>

7 Tips To Treat Swollen Feet In Diabetics

7 Tips To Treat Swollen Feet In Diabetics

Diabetics often complain of swelling in the feet and legs. It happens due to improper blood circulation because an increased pressure damages blood capillaries. Damaged capillaries cause peripheral oedema, leakage of fluids into surrounding tissues, which causes swelling. However, several other reasons can play a role in causing swollen feet in diabetics. The risk of infections and severe complications like foot ulcers and gangrene that can even lead to limb amputation can increase in diabetics with swollen feet. That’s why, you should not ignore even minor swelling in your feet. In most cases, when the swelling has just started, simple lifestyle changes can reduce swelling and provide relief to a great extent. Here are 7 tips for diabetics to reduce swelling in the feet. Image: Getty Continue reading >>

Diabetic Legs Swelling Causes And Remedies

Diabetic Legs Swelling Causes And Remedies

Many people suffering from diabetes complain about swelling in legs and feet. Usually, this swelling is painless and due to retention of fluid. There can be numerous reasons leading to such retention, from very high and uncontrolled sugar levels (which is dangerous for various organs) to the secondary complications of diabetes. Usually, fluid retention indicates that either heart of a diabetic person has become weak. Thus there is a poor flow of fluids, or kidneys are not functioning properly. In some cases, it may be due to liver disease or some anti-diabetic medications. Other reasons of such swelling could be a disease of blood vessels, or deficit of certain micronutrients and electrolytes(“Swelling and Diabetes – Swollen Legs, Ankle & Feet, Peripheral Edema,” n.d.). Let us look in detail at some leading causes of swelling of legs in diabetes. Congested heart failure The major complication of diabetes is weakening of heart and blood vessels. Congested Heart Failure (CHF) often coexists in diabetes(Nasir & Aguilar, 2012). In fact, a person suffering from diabetes is at much higher risk of heart failure(Nichols, Gullion, Koro, Ephross, & Brown, 2004). In CHF though the heart is functioning, but its pumping power is compromised, which means that it is not strong enough for blood to circulate properly in our body. Things are further made worse by stiffening of arteries(“Heart failure,” n.d.). All this leads to swelling and accumulation of fluids in the legs. Kidney failure More than one-third people suffering from diabetes have chronic kidney disease(“Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease,” 2014). Diabetes is slowly emerging one of the leading causes of chronic kidney disease. Almost half of people going for dialysis, also have diabetes(Cavanaugh, 2007). In d Continue reading >>

Facts On Diabetes And Feet Swelling

Facts On Diabetes And Feet Swelling

Diabetics must take extra special care of their feet. Swelling in the feet is a signal that there's a problem with circulation in the body, which can lead to neuropathy (nerve damage in the extremities). When this situation becomes serious, it can lead to amputation of a foot or leg. Diabetics should check their feet every day, visit their doctor regularly and have their feet examined to guard against this serious problem. Video of the Day Diabetics must take extra special care of their feet. Swelling in the feet is a signal that there's a problem with circulation in the body, which can lead to neuropathy (nerve damage in the extremities). When this situation becomes serious, it can lead to amputation of a foot or leg. Diabetics should check their feet every day, visit their doctor regularly and have their feet examined to guard against this serious problem. Continue reading >>

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Tweet Edema (known as oedema in the UK) is a build up of fluid in the body (water retention) which causes swelling. Edema commonly affects the legs, ankles, feet and wrist. Water retention is often treatable, with treatment varying depending on the cause. Symptoms of edema The main symptom of edema is swelling of the affected area. Other symptoms that may occur, along with swelling, include: Weight gain Aching limbs Stiff joints Discolouration of skin Hypertension (high blood pressure) What causes swelling in the legs, feet and ankles? Swollen ankles and legs will often be brought on, or aggravated, by long periods of standing. A number of medications can increase the risk of oedema. Such medications include corticosteroids, blood pressure medications and the contraceptive pill. Water retention may also be caused by a number of conditions including: A high intake of salt can increase the problems of swelling in people with kidney disease. Treatment for edema Treatment for edema may vary depending on the cause. Water retention may be resolved if the underlying cause can be adequately treated. Regular physical activity and preventing long periods of standing can help reduce water retention. A low dietary salt intake is advisable, particularly if fluid retention has been brought on by kidney disease. If you are overweight, weight loss can help with reducing fluid retention. Diuretics, also known as ‘water tablets’, help to remove fluid from the body and may be prescribed for some causes of oedema. Prevention You can reduce your risk of edema by taking steps to prevent kidney disease and heart failure from developing. This can be achieved through good control of blood glucose levels, regular exercise and a healthy diet. If you can avoid long periods of standing, this wi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Basics

Diabetes Basics

Basics of diabetes Diabetes is a condition caused by lack of a chemical in the body (a hormone) called insulin. There are two major forms of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes eventually no insulin is produced and individuals require insulin injections for survival. It used to be thought this only presented in children, but it is now clear this can occur at any age. The other more common form of diabetes called type 2 diabetes occurs due to the body's resistance to the effects of insulin in addition to an insufficient quantity of insulin. However, in this type of diabetes there is usually some insulin produced. For both types of diabetes, blood glucose levels are elevated. Furthermore, people with diabetes are prone to certain complications not seen in those without diabetes. These complications involve the eye (retinopathy), kidney (nephropathy) and nerves (neuropathy). People with diabetes also get early hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), leading to early heart attacks and strokes. The good news for people with diabetes is that with proper care all of these problems can be avoided. Immediate medical attention Uncontrolled diabetes presents with frequent thirst and urination. Over time, patients will become dehydrated as the glucose is "spilling" over into the urine. If insulin deficiency is severe enough, fat stores are used for energy as glucose cannot get into cells. This problem is much more common with type 1 diabetes and is called "ketoacidosis". It can be diagnosed at home with a simple urine test. When significant ketones are found in the urine, it is important to be in touch with a physician immediately. There are other conditions that require immediate attention. Blurry vision in someone with known diabetic eye disease or someone with a long history of di Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Article

Diabetic Foot Care Article

A A A Diabetes mellitus (DM) represents several diseases in which high blood glucose levels over time can damage the nerves, kidneys, eyes, and blood vessels. Diabetes can also decrease the body's ability to fight infection. When diabetes is not well controlled, damage to the organs and impairment of the immune system is likely. Foot problems commonly develop in people with diabetes and can quickly become serious. With damage to the nervous system, a person with diabetes may not be able to feel his or her feet properly. Normal sweat secretion and oil production that lubricates the skin of the foot is impaired. These factors together can lead to abnormal pressure on the skin, bones, and joints of the foot during walking and can lead to breakdown of the skin of the foot. Sores may develop. Damage to blood vessels and impairment of the immune system from diabetes make it difficult to heal these wounds. Bacterial infection of the skin, connective tissues, muscles, and bones can then occur. These infections can develop into gangrene. Because of the poor blood flow, antibiotics cannot get to the site of the infection easily. Often, the only treatment for this is amputation of the foot or leg. If the infection spreads to the bloodstream, this process can be life-threatening. People with diabetes must be fully aware of how to prevent foot problems before they occur, to recognize problems early, and to seek the right treatment when problems do occur. Although treatment for diabetic foot problems has improved, prevention - including good control of blood sugar level - remains the best way to prevent diabetic complications. People with diabetes should learn how to examine their own feet and how to recognize the early signs and symptoms of diabetic foot problems. They should also l Continue reading >>

Caring For Your Feet With Diabetes

Caring For Your Feet With Diabetes

When you have diabetes, taking good care of your feet is very important. Poor foot care can lead to serious problems, including possibly having to remove -- or amputate -- the foot or leg. As a person with diabetes, you are more vulnerable to foot problems, because the disease can damage your nerves and reduce blood flow to your feet. The American Diabetes Association has estimated that one in five people with diabetes who seek hospital care do so for foot problems. By taking proper care of your feet, most serious problems can be prevented. It's important that your doctor check your feet at least once a year for any problems. Here are some diabetes foot care tips to follow. Use mild soaps. Use warm water. Pat your skin dry; do not rub. Thoroughly dry your feet, especially between the toes. After washing, use lotion on your feet to prevent cracking. Do not put lotion between your toes. Check the tops and bottoms of your feet. Have someone else look at your feet if you cannot see them. Check for dry, cracked skin. Look for blisters, cuts, scratches, or other sores. Check for redness, increased warmth, or tenderness when touching any area of your feet. Check for ingrown toenails, corns, and calluses. If you get a blister or sore from your shoes, do not "pop" it. Apply a bandage and wear a different pair of shoes. Cut toenails after bathing, when they are soft. Cut toenails straight across and smooth with an emery board. Avoid cutting into the corners of toes. You may want a podiatrist (foot doctor) to cut your toenails. Walk and exercise in comfortable shoes. Do not exercise when you have open sores on your feet. Use this simple test to see if your shoes fit correctly: Stand on a piece of paper. (Make sure you are standing and not sitting, because your foot changes shape w Continue reading >>

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