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Can Diabetes Cause Short Term Memory Loss?

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory loss can be caused by a number of factors, from short term causes such as low blood sugar or medication side effects to long term health issues such as dementia. Treatment for long term memory loss will depend on what is causing it. Evidence from research suggests that good control of diabetes can help prevent memory problems developing over the longer term. Memory loss tends to become more prevalent as we get older. The NHS notes that around four in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. The NHS notes that around 4 in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. How can diabetes affect memory loss? Memory loss in diabetes can be a short term problem brought on by too low or high blood glucose levels. During hypoglycemia, for example, you may struggle to remember words. This is not necessarily a sign of a long term problem. In most cases, raising sugar levels over 4 mmol/l should get your memory back to normal. If memory problems happen at other times and this significantly affects your life, speak to your GP. Diabetes can increase the risk of developing long-term memory problems if blood glucose levels are less well controlled. High blood glucose levels, over a number of years, can damage the nerves, including those of the brain, which can increase the risk of dementia. Research shows that good diabetes management can help prevent memory problems from developing or advancing. Symptoms of memory loss Symptoms of memory loss could include: Not being able to recall an important event in your life Forgetting what you have just done Forgetting where things in your home are Forgetting the names of people close to you Some of these can happen to all of us from ti Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Lead To Memory Loss?

Can Diabetes Lead To Memory Loss?

In 2012, 9.3 percent of people in the United States had diabetes. That means that about 29.1 million Americans had diabetes in 2012. This number is growing. Every year, doctors diagnose an estimated 1.4 million new cases in the United States. Diabetes is a disease that involves having higher-than-normal blood glucose levels. This is known as hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia occurs when your body can’t produce or respond to insulin. Your pancreas produces the hormone insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. Because of the reduced insulin production or resistance to the hormone, blood sugar levels tend to be high. Type 1 diabetes This is also known as juvenile diabetes. An autoimmune process may cause type 1 diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, your body’s antibodies attack the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas. You need insulin to help glucose molecules enter the cells. Once glucose enters the cells, your body can use it to create energy. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce adequate amounts of insulin. This leads to higher than normal levels of blood sugar. Insulin injections are a necessary part of life for people living with type 1 diabetes. As of 2012, approximately 1.25 million Americans had type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes This is the most common form of diabetes worldwide. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body produces insulin, but it can’t use it in the way that it should. This resistance causes the pancreas to produce more insulin. The added insulin increases the hormone levels in the bloodstream. This can have long-term negative effects on the brain. Check out: Diabetes by the numbers: Facts, statistics, and you » Memory loss is a normal phenomenon of aging. There are differences between memory loss that occurs with age and the complex memory Continue reading >>

Diabetes Could Lead To Dementia: Prevent Memory Loss And High Blood Sugar - But How?

Diabetes Could Lead To Dementia: Prevent Memory Loss And High Blood Sugar - But How?

Diabetes could lead to dementia: So what can you do to prevent it? So memory loss could be prevented by preventing high blood sugar levels - but what can you do to ensure your blood sugar stays at a healthy level? Prevent the symptoms of dementia by preventing high blood sugar levels - but how? If you find yourself becoming easily fatigued, it can be worth trying a natural supplement. Nutritionist and fitness trainer Cassandra Barns said: CuraLin [avalable at www.curalife.co] is a specially formulated dietary supplement containing ten herbs and plant extracts traditionally used to support insulin sensitivity and help keep blood glucose under control. A word of caution, however: if youre being treated for type 2 diabetes, consult your doctor before changing your diet or exercise or starting a supplement. CuraLin can also help with the regulation and consumption of sugary foods as its natural ingredients can reduce cravings for sugars and other processed carbohydrates, as well as helping to restrict their absorption in the blood stream. Nutrition and weight loss coach Pippa Campbell said: Eating protein at each meal will help to balance blood sugars and feel full for longer. Try eating eggs for breakfast or add some protein powder to yoghurt. Nutritionist Cassandra said: Struggling to keep track of your eating habits? Try logging what you eat. This can help you monitor what food groups you may be over indulging in and can make it easier to control your portion size. It'll help you stay accountable for what you've eaten. Diabetes could lead to dementia: Prevent sugar binges with protein 7 things you should do EVERY day to stave off dementia Diabetes could lead to dementia: Swap sugar for natural alternatives You need to become a label reader to understand what is in the f Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes May Lead To Short-term Memory Loss

Type 2 Diabetes May Lead To Short-term Memory Loss

Type 2 diabetes, which has been found to impact dexterity and sensory function in the hands, may also impact the short-term memory of those living with the disease. Stacey Gorniak is an assistant professor in the University of Houston Department of Health and Human Performance. She studies the impact of changes in the brain due to chronic health conditions, movement disorders and aging. Currently, she is studying cognitive, sensory and motor changes of middle aged and older adults who control their type 2 diabetes with medication. “We’re seeing mild cognitive impairment, particularly in working memory, or short-term memory,” she said. “The tests we administered included visual spacial examinations, time orientation and delayed recall, which involved asking them to remember a list of words, immediately and then a few minutes after they heard the words.” Additionally, when patients were asked to perform a simple activity with their hands—for example holding an object like a smartphone—and were asked to repeat a set of words while interacting with the object, patients with type 2 diabetes exhibited difficulty in recalling words and performing the activity. Gorniak’s next step is to identify changes to brain structures that are involved in cognitive, sensory and motor functions. “By better understanding both structural and functional brain changes with type 2 diabetes, clinicians will have a better idea of how to modify treatment plans to better accommodate the challenges faced by diabetic patients,” she said. Another ongoing study she is pursuing is an examination of how the disease may affect the sense of touch. It builds on her previous work that found type 2 diabetes affected dexterity and sensory function in the hands. As part of a new study, partic Continue reading >>

Could Diabetes Trigger Dementia? People With Type 2 Suffer 'memory Loss And Declining Decision-making Skills'

Could Diabetes Trigger Dementia? People With Type 2 Suffer 'memory Loss And Declining Decision-making Skills'

People with type 2 diabetes lose brain power as their ability to regulate blood flow drops, research suggests. A study by experts at Harvard Medical School suggests that the impact can be seen in memory and cognition tests - with the decrease in thinking skills dropping over just two years. Some 3.5 million people in Britain are thought to have type two diabetes - an increase of 62 per cent in the last nine years. The dramatic increase in the disease, which now affects one in every 16 adults in the country, is linked to spiralling rates of obesity and lack of exercise. The US researchers tracked 40 people over two years, and found a significant decrease in cognitive power, which impacted their ability to cook and bathe themselves. Study leader Dr Vera Novak, whose work was published in the journal Neurology, said: ‘Normal blood flow regulation allows the brain to redistribute blood to areas of the brain that have increased activity while performing certain tasks. ‘People with type two diabetes have impaired blood flow regulation. ‘Our results suggest that diabetes and high blood sugar impose a chronic negative effect on cognitive and decision-making skills.’ The study involved 40 people with an average age of 66. Of those, 19 had type two diabetes and 21 did not have diabetes. At the beginning of the study the participants were tested for cognition and memory, given MRI scans to look at brain volume and blood flow, and blood tests to measure control of blood sugar and inflammation. After two years, they were tested again – and those with diabetes showed marked decreases in their ability to regulate blood flow in the brain. They also had lower scores on several tests of memory and thinking skills - and found it harder to carry out daily tasks such as bathing an Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Lead To Memory Loss, Dementia In Elderly

Diabetes May Lead To Memory Loss, Dementia In Elderly

Inflammation playing a role in type-2 diabetes is nothing new, but the reduced blood flow that results has also been linked to memory loss and dementia in the elderly. Over the last decade more research has looked at diabetes and the brain. Just this summer, a study published in the journal Neurology outlined that reduced blood flow and blood vessel capability speeds up cognitive impairment. In fact, the study showed that diabetes and memory loss are closely related. Researchers studied 65 people between the ages of 57 and 75. Thirty-five of them had been treated for type-2 diabetes. At the beginning of the study they were tested for memory and brain function. Blood tests, blood pressure, inflammation markers, as well as MRI scans were taken into consideration. None of the participants had memory loss or other cognitive impairment. Two years later, the people who had type-2 diabetes showed severe memory loss, while none of the non-diabetic participants showed any memory loss. People suffering from diabetes are encouraged to pay careful attention to their blood sugar levels so that they never get too high or too low. Monitoring how much physical exercise they get and what kind of foods they eat is key. Research shows that diabetes left uncontrolled can lead to cognitive impairment, particularly in the elderly. There is a limited space for storage of glucose in the brain. It has to pass through the blood-brain barrier where its intake is in fact regulated. Our brain requires a constant supply of glucose to keep functioning properly. Studies show that when a person has too much glucose or too little glucose the brain starts to suffer. Just the right amount of glucose feeds the neurotransmitters in our brain. When we are learning new information or trying to remember someth Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels Linked To Memory Loss

High Blood Sugar Levels Linked To Memory Loss

New research suggests that people with high blood sugar levels, even those who do not have diabetes, may have an increased risk for developing cognitive impairment. This is according to a study published in the journal Neurology. Previous research has shown that people with type 2 diabetes - a disorder that causes a person's blood sugar levels to become too high - may increase the risk of dementia. According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is considered a risk factor for vascular dementia as it can damage blood vessels in the brain. This form of dementia is often caused by reduced or blocked blood flow to the brain. But researchers from Germany now say that even those without diabetes who have high blood sugar levels may be at risk for impaired memory skills. Scanning the hippocampus To reach their findings, the researchers analyzed 143 people with an average age of 63, who were free of diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired glucose intolerance). The researchers excluded those who were overweight, consumed more than 3.5 servings of alcohol per day, and those who already had memory and thinking impairments. The participants underwent blood glucose tests and were required to carry out memory tests. One of the tests required subjects to recall a list of 15 words 30 minutes after hearing them. The researchers also carried out scans of the participants' brains in order measure the size of the hippocampus - a region of the brain linked to memory. Results showed that participants who had lower blood sugar levels obtained higher scores on the memory tests, compared with those who had higher blood sugar levels. In the word recall test, the researchers found that remembering fewer words was linked to higher blood sugar levels. They break this down, stating that an increase of 7 mmol/mol Continue reading >>

Nine Tips To Keep Your Memory With Diabetes

Nine Tips To Keep Your Memory With Diabetes

First, the good news. People, in general, are living longer. And people who have diabetes can and do live long, healthy lives. Now, the not-so-good news: People who have diabetes are more likely to experience memory problems than people without the condition. According to a study out of the University of South Florida in Tampa, older adults who had diabetes and high blood sugars performed worse on memory tests at the start of the study and showed a greater decline in memory by the end of the study compared to older adult without diabetes. What’s behind the memory decline in diabetes? Previous studies have shown that people with Type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s is a kind of dementia that causes issues with memory, thinking, and behavior. It’s progressive and irreversible, and it eventually destroys a person’s ability to carry out even the simplest of tasks. While memory loss is a key feature of Alzheimer’s, there are differences between the memory loss that occurs with aging and memory loss due to Alzheimer’s. However, both are more likely to occur in people with Type 2 diabetes. Researchers think that damage to blood vessels, which can occur in diabetes, is what can lead to cognitive problems and vascular dementia. It’s also possible that high blood sugar levels cause damage in the hippocampus, a part of the brain that’s involved in memory. Actually, high blood sugars appear to be detrimental to brain health, in general. But even people whose diabetes is in good control are more likely to experience memory problems and impairments in cognitive function. It’s also worth noting that having too many very low blood sugars (if you’re at risk for lows) may potentially also affect your memory and cognition. The g Continue reading >>

Will Type 2 Diabetes Affect My Memory?

Will Type 2 Diabetes Affect My Memory?

Diabetes does cause memory loss. It may not be a progressive process that is clinical Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, but it can happen related to the acute symptoms of diabetes. Interestingly, Alzheimer’s disease has been called “Type 3 Diabetes” or “Alzheimer ’s disease of the Brain” lately. In this article, we will look at how your diabetes affects memory and when and why this happens. To do this, we need to understand the four different types of memory loss. Also, looking at the symptoms and causes of memory loss will be helpful as we seek to learn how our Type 2 Diabetes may affect our memory. To further break it down, we will look at the two types of memory loss that results from Type 2 Diabetes, short and long-term memory loss. Types of memory loss or amnesia There are four different types of memory loss. The two that are most common, and that you may have heard of, are short-term memory loss and long-term memory loss. The other two types of memory loss, sensory memory loss and working memory loss, may not be as well-known. However, they are important to the preservation of human memory, thought and cognitive processes. As with many parts of the human body, memory loss is a complex issue. It involves many different factors, of which Type 2 Diabetes is one. Short-term memory loss The first sign of cognitive decline and one of the first symptoms of memory loss is short-term memory loss. I see this with my mother, when she doesn’t remember my dog’s name, or anything about the story that I just told her related to when I got him, how old he is, and all those details about pets that people may ask. Forgetting where they placed everyday objects, or forgetting what they went into a room to get can become an everyday occurrence. A set of keys becomes m Continue reading >>

7 Common Causes Of Forgetfulness

7 Common Causes Of Forgetfulness

Memory slips are aggravating, frustrating, and sometimes worrisome. When they happen more than they should, they can trigger fears of looming dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. But as I write in this month’s Harvard Men’s Health Watch, there are many mundane—and treatable—causes of forgetfulness. Here are seven common ones. Lack of sleep. Not getting enough sleep is perhaps the greatest unappreciated cause of forgetfulness. Too little restful sleep can also lead to mood changes and anxiety, which in turn contribute to problems with memory. Medications. Tranquilizers, antidepressants, some blood pressure drugs, and other medications can affect memory, usually by causing sedation or confusion. That can make it difficult to pay close attention to new things. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you suspect that a new medication is taking the edge off your memory. As shown in the table below, alternatives are usually available. Medications that may affect memory and possible substitutes If you take these drugs… … ask about switching to one of these drugs paroxetine (Paxil) another antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac) or sertraline (Zoloft), or a different type of antidepressant such as duloxetine (Cymbalta) or venlafaxine (Effexor) cimetidine (Tagamet) a different type of heartburn drug, such as lansoprazole (Prevacid), omeprazole (Prilosec), or esomeprazole (Nexium) oxybutynin (Ditropan) or tolterodine (Detrol, Detrusitol) other medications for an overactive bladder, such as trospium (Sanctura), solifenacin (Vesicare), or darifenacin (Enablex) amitriptyline (Elavil), desipramine (Norpramin), or nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor) another type of medication, depending on why your doctor has prescribed a tricyclic antidepressant (neuropathic pain, depression, Continue reading >>

Relation Between Diabetes And Short Term Memory Loss - Common Ailments

Relation Between Diabetes And Short Term Memory Loss - Common Ailments

Diabetes is an incurable lifestyle disease. The bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin to metabolize the sugar present in the body cause high blood glucose levels. One of the complications of diabetes is short-term memory loss. Latest studies show that the complications of diabetes may extend to brain that affects memory, cognitive skills, and concentration of the patient. Memory loss is one of the lesser known symptoms of diabetes . However, poorly-controlled diabetes can cause memory loss. In order to maintain normal function of the brain, people need a constant supply of glucose from their blood. During periods of high blood sugar or low blood glucose, memory loss and reduced brain functioning occur as the brain runs on glucose and brain glucose storage is limited. People with high levels of blood sugar experience memory loss. Due to the high blood sugar, the blood vessels in the brain get damaged, resulting in the decreasing amount of oxygen reaching the brain. The functioning of the brain begins to decline and memory loss could begin to occur. Recent researches show that diabetics have a high risk of developing diseases such as Alzheimers. The passage of signals from one nerve cell to another is known as neurotransmission, and to function properly, the brain requires a constant supply of glucose. There is a risk of failing of the neurotransmission in diabetics, resulting in short term memory problems. Further, the hippocampus is region of the brain regulates a persons ability to remember facts and events. A recent study shows that people with high blood sugar levels have much smaller hippocampus region when compared to normal, healthy people. This also explains memory loss in diabetes. Additionally, low blood glucose levels directly affect the memory of an Continue reading >>

8 Steps To Reverse Memory Loss

8 Steps To Reverse Memory Loss

Q: “My parents are getting older and I want to do everything I can to help them prevent Alzheimer’s, considering both my grandmothers had this disease, and I am worried about getting it too.” writes this week’s house call. “What can we do to prevent dementia?” A: The truth is, dementia is a very big problem that’s becoming bigger every day. Statistics are grim. 10 percent of 65-year-olds, 25 percent of 75-year-olds, and 50 percent of 85-year-olds will develop dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. And the fastest growing segment of our population is the 85-year-olds. Researchers predict Alzheimer’s will affect 106 million people by 2050. It’s now the seventh leading cause of death. Scientists now call Alzheimer’s disease “Type 3 diabetes.” What’s the link between Alzheimer’s and diabetes? Well, new research shows insulin resistance, or what I call diabesity (from eating too many carbs and sugar and not enough fat) is one of the major factors that starts the brain-damage cascade, which robs the memory of over half the people in their 80s, leading to a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. But don’t think too much insulin affects only older folks’ memories. It doesn’t just suddenly occur once you’re older. Dementia actually begins when you’re younger and takes decades to develop and worsen. Here’s the bad news/good news. Eating sugar and refined carbs can cause pre-dementia and dementia. But cutting out the sugar and refined carbs and adding lots of fat can prevent, and even reverse, pre-dementia and early dementia. More recent studies show people with diabetes have a four-fold risk for developing Alzheimer’s. People with pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome have an increased risk for having pre-dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) Continue reading >>

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Memory?

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Memory?

Q&A with Elizabeth Seaquist, MD, professor of medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School's Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism. Q. How does type 2 diabetes affect memory? A. Studies show that people with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. They're also more likely to get vascular dementia -- memory loss caused by blood vessel damage and poor blood flow to the brain. And, they're at greater risk for mild cognitive impairment, memory problems that can sometimes lead to Alzheimer's disease. Yet we don't know exactly why people with diabetes are more likely to develop memory loss. We do know that diabetes damages blood vessels and increases the risk for stroke, which can make you more likely to get vascular dementia. The connection might also have to do with insulin resistance. In people with diabetes, the body doesn't respond well to the hormone insulin, which normally moves sugar from the bloodstream into the cells. Some scientists believe that people with diabetes may also have insulin resistance in their brain. We need insulin to keep our brain cells healthy, and insulin resistance could damage brain cells enough to cause memory loss. In fact, researchers are investigating whether an insulin nasal spray might help ward off dementia. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar under control to protect your blood vessels and prevent complications like nerve damage, kidney disease, and vision loss. Yet you don't want to overcorrect. Very low blood sugar can also harm your memory and mental function. Work with your doctor to keep your blood sugar within a healthy range. You also want to stay on top of your cardiovascular disease risks, because heart and blood vessel problems can contribute to memory loss. Watch your blood pres Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Causes Of Memory Loss

5 Surprising Causes Of Memory Loss

You can't find your keys or you forget an appointment. For many people in middle age or older, simple acts of forgetfulness like these are scary because they raise the specter of Alzheimer's disease. But Alzheimer’s is not the only health issue that can lead to forgetfulness, which is often treatable if you know the cause, according to the National Institute on Aging. Memory loss can happen at any age and for a number of reasons. “Patients might experience memory loss and describe their symptoms similarly, but a doctor can tease apart what parts of the brain are affected,” says Seth Gale, MD, a neurologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He points out things like polypharmacy (taking several medications), significant depression, and poor sleep that can lead to memory complaints. “When you drill down and find out what is actually happening with brain function, you can reassure someone. They have the capacity to learn and store information but because of their overloaded mental resources, they are having trouble,” says Dr. Gale. Talk with your doctor about concerns you may have about your memory, so the condition responsible for your symptoms can be addressed. Discussing your symptoms and taking various tests, possibly including an MRI, may help your doctor determine what is affecting your memory, Gale says. In some cases, one or more of the following issues could play a role. 1. Sleep Apnea This common but treatable sleep disorder causes breathing to stop briefly and frequently throughout the night. It is linked to memory loss and dementia, according to Constantine Lyketsos, MD, director of the Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center at Johns Hopkins Medicine and professor and chair of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Bayview. You might have sleep apnea Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Memory Loss

Diabetes And Memory Loss

Copyright © Mark Beselt Diabetes is an incurable disease characterized by high blood glucose levels. This is the result of the body's inability to produce or use insulin. One of the complications of diabetes is short term memory loss - and in this article we'll look at the different variations of the disease and how each type can be a cause of memory loss. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a group of diseases which affects nearly 24 million (8%) of the US population. The condition is is categorized into three different forms: Type 1 Diabetes is a genetic defect usually diagnosed in children and young adults. It arises from the inability to produce the hormone insulin, which is needed every time you eat to convert sugar and starches into energy. People with Type 1 diabetes usually need to inject insulin into their bodies and constantly be aware of their blood sugar levels. Fortunately, this most extreme form of diabetes only affects 5-10% of all sufferers but with no cure is does remain a lifelong condition. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and millions of Americans have been diagnosed, although many more are at high risk. This condition is often diagnosed later in life when the body can no longer produce enough insulin, or the cells begin to ignore the insulin. Without intervention, this can lead to serious complications including heart disease, high blood pressure and stroke. Gestational Diabetes is a temporary form of the disease which affects around 4% of all pregnant women at 28 weeks or later. It begins when hormones from the placenta block the action of the mother's insulin. The condition corrects itself after the birth but it is very important to maintain healthy blood sugar levels during pregnancy to avoid serious complications for both mother an Continue reading >>

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