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Can Diabetes Cause Right Arm Pain?

Hand & Arm Complications

Hand & Arm Complications

Chronically elevated blood sugars can damage the upper extremities. Hand and arm (upper extremity) complications include nerve damage and tissue damage from chronically elevated blood sugars. Hand complications Neuropathy Symptoms are tingling, pain and/or numbness in the fingers and hands. Less commonly, there can be muscle weakness and loss. Carpal tunnel or ulnar tunnel nerve entrapment syndrome: Nerves can get pinched by soft tissue buildup in the nerve tunnels in the wrist (carpal tunnel) and elbow (ulnar tunnel). This pressure on the nerves leads to pain, tingling, numbness and sometimes even muscle wasting. Dupuytren’s contracture This is a shortening of tendons in the palm of the hand that bends the fingers and keeps them from being straightened. Trigger finger In this condition, a nodule on the tendon gets caught and keeps the finger from fully straightening. Shoulder complications Frozen shoulder Buildup of connective tissue causes adhesions in the shoulder joint space. This restricts arm movement and can be very painful. Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Diabetes Complications, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review the information. Continue reading >>

Shoulder Manifestations Of Diabetes Mellitus.

Shoulder Manifestations Of Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract The musculoskeletal system can be affected by diabetes in a number of ways. The shoulder is one of the frequently affected sites. One of the rheumatic conditions caused by diabetes is frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis), which is characterized by pain and severe limited active and passive range of motion of the glenohumeral joint, particularly external rotation. This disorder has a clinical diagnosis and the treatment is based on physiotherapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroid injections and, in refractory cases, surgical resolution. As with adhesive capsulitis, calcific periarthritis of the shoulder causes pain and limited joint mobility, although usually it has a better prognosis than frozen shoulder. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy, also known as shoulder-hand syndrome, is a painful syndrome associated with vasomotor and sudomotor changes in the affected member. Diabetic amyotrophy usually affects the peripheral nerves of lower limbs. However, when symptoms involve the shoulder girdle, it must be considered in the differential diagnosis of shoulder painful conditions. Osteoarthritis is the most common rheumatic condition. There are many risk factors for shoulder osteoarthritis including age, genetics, sex, weight, joint infection, history of shoulder dislocation, and previous injury, in older age patients, diabetes is a risk factor for shoulder OA. Treatment options include acetaminophen, NSAIDs, short term opiate, glucosamine and chondroitin. Corticosteroid injections and/or injections of hyaluronans could also be considered. Patients with continued disabling pain that is not responsive to conservative measures may require surgical referral. The present review will focus on practice points of view about shoulder manifestations i Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With Exercise: 6 Tips For Nerve Pain

Managing Diabetes With Exercise: 6 Tips For Nerve Pain

What kind of exercise is safe -- and fun -- if you have nerve damage from diabetes, called diabetic neuropathy? And how can you stay motivated after that first flush of inspiration fades? "It depends on where you're starting," says Dace L. Trence, MD, an endocrinologist and director of the Diabetes Care Center at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. "For the person who has been doing nothing, you would certainly want to start doing something that's comfortable and enjoyable and can be maintained." If you have diabetic nerve pain in your feet, legs, arms, or hands, consider this: research published in The Journal of Diabetes Complications in 2006 showed significant benefits of exercise in controlling peripheral neuropathy. The study showed that for people who took a brisk, one-hour walk on a treadmill four times a week, exercise slowed how quickly their nerve damage worsened. There's no quick fix here, though; the study lasted four years. Let's face it: when it comes to managing a lifelong condition like diabetes, it makes sense to think long-term. It's all about lifestyle changes to protect yourself from diabetic nerve damage. Becoming more active can help you control blood sugar levels, feel good, and lighten the load on painful feet and legs, especially if you're overweight. These tips can help you start and stick with an exercise plan for more than the first few days. Continue reading >>

Am I The Heart Attack?

Am I The Heart Attack?

A few weeks ago, I woke up at 3 a.m. with excruciating chest, arm, neck, and back pain. It was the kind of pain that resembled everything I’d ever read or heard about the pain which precedes a heart attack. I don’t know what the typical response is for a man who senses that he’s experiencing a cardiac emergency, but my response was probably a textbook example of what not to do: I stayed in bed and let my thoughts run wild. This can’t be a heart attack. I’m not breaking out in a cold sweat. I’m a healthy and well-controlled type 1 diabetic. I’m not short of breath. I exercised last night and felt fine. I had carrots and celery for my nighttime snack last night. I can’t afford to have a heart attack. What does a room in the cardiac ICU cost, ten thousand dollars a day? What if I die? What will my wife and son do without me? Why did I neglect my diabetes in my 20s? I ate too much pizza in college. God, I really can’t miss work today. I wonder if I can get to the emergency room and be out in time to get to work. After about 30 minutes of panicking and waiting for things to get better, I vomited. I remembered that my father-in-law had experienced the same symptoms when he’d had a heart attack two years ago – chest pains then vomiting. I woke my wife, Theresa. “I need to get to the hospital,” I said. We dressed quickly and as we were walking out the front door, my compulsive need to know my blood glucose level at all times (which apparently persists even under threat of cardiac arrest) forced me to test. It was 180 mg/dl, quite high for the middle of the night. Before we were out of our neighborhood, my chest pain had worsened. So had my state of mind. I was trying to convince Theresa to drive faster, but she was thinking clearly and decided we shoul Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar & Pain In The Limbs

Blood Sugar & Pain In The Limbs

When your blood sugar is not controlled, you can experience symptoms ranging from irritability and palpitations to severe pain in your hands and legs. Both a low and a high blood sugar level can indicate serious medical conditions, such as tumors and diabetes, and as such, an evaluation by a physician is recommended. Managing your blood sugar can be as simple as changing your diet, but can also involve insulin replacement therapy. Video of the Day Glucose is the form of sugar that your body uses for energy. Glucose is a sugar molecule in the hexose family, which are sugars made of a ring of six carbon atoms. Other hexose sugars include galactose and fructose. You can obtain glucose directly from fruits and cane sugar, or your body can make it from other sugars like galactose. Your body also makes glucose by breaking down starches found in foods such as potatoes. Galactose is found in milk products and fructose is found in fruits, honey, and syrups. Normal Blood Sugar Your blood sugar level is regulated by insulin, a hormone secreted by your pancreas. If your sugar levels are high, your pancreas releases insulin, which signals your body to store the glucose not being used. When blood sugar levels are low, insulin secretion decreases, signaling your body to release some of the glucose stored in your cells and organs. Normal levels of glucose will be below 200 mg/dL at any time or below 126 mg/dL after an overnight fast. The minimal level of glucose before you can notice any symptoms is 60 mg/dL with brain dysfunction occurring at levels below 50 mg/dL. Diabetes is characterized by abnormally high glucose levels. This can result from an abnormal secretion of insulin, decreased glucose use by your tissues and increased production of glucose. Short-term complications of high Continue reading >>

The 411 On Diabetes + Frozen Shoulder

The 411 On Diabetes + Frozen Shoulder

Hey, it's winter... and frozen shoulder definitely sounds like something you might get after shoveling snow for too many hours — but it's actually one of several less-common complications of diabetes. Shoulder problems certainly aren't the first thing that comes to mind when it comes to diabetes. Most of our complications deal with vital, internal organs. But let's face it, the effects of excess sugar in the bloodstream seem to know no bounds! We've been covering the various complications of diabetes in our 411 series, and (sorry to say), we're not done yet. In fact, frozen shoulder is just one of five musculoskeletal complications that can affect people with diabetes. Frozen shoulder, more formally called "adhesive capsulitis," actually has nothing to do with the weather and everything to do with the ligaments in your shoulder. Frozen shoulder occurs when your shoulder joint capsule sticks to the head of the humerus bone. This causes extreme pain and stiffness in the shoulder joint and eventually leads to immobility, followed by a long period of "thawing" in which the shoulder slowly returns to normal. Where does the diabetes come in? Well, doctors still aren't exactly sure. But they believe that excess glucose impacts the collagen in the shoulder. Collagen is a major building block in the ligaments that hold the bones together in a joint. When sugar molecules attach to the collagen, it can make the collagen sticky. The buildup then causes the affected shoulder to stiffen, and the pain prevents you from moving your arm. Ouch! Frozen shoulder is estimated to affect about 20% of people with diabetes, compared with only 5% of people without diabetes, so clearly high blood sugar is a big risk factor. Diagnosis + Treatment If your initial pain doesn't go away with the usu Continue reading >>

Arm Pain | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Arm Pain | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was diagnossed withT2 about 18 months ago. I take Metformin, Rosovestatin, and Actos. About December I started getting an ache in my upper left arm. Over time it has been getting worse. It's muscular rather than the joint. My GP has prescribed anti-inflamatories but they don't help. Could this be a result of my medication or T2? what can I say other than "snap"..only mine is my upper right arm...it's as though your arm has been bent back against itself....if I am walking through woodland and grab a tree to swing around on it hurts like hell....I'm sure Ive read somewhere on this forum that it is a possible side effect of metformin but intend to ask my nurse about it when I visit her next month..maybe somebody on the forum may enlighten us...don't do any arm wrestling! I'm diet only and I have experienced pains in my left arm, both pre and post T2 diagnosis. I'm pretty sure mine is neuropathy (as I also experience pains in my hands and legs/feet too) so I would hazzard a guess this is what you have too. I was diagnossed withT2 about 18 months ago. I take Metformin, Rosovestatin, and Actos. About December I started getting an ache in my upper left arm. Over time it has been getting worse. It's muscular rather than the joint. My GP has prescribed anti-inflamatories but they don't help. Could this be a result of my medication or T2? Whatever the cause is you need to get a second opinion if your GP is unable to do anything for you. There are many causes of pain such as you mention, not all of them may be realated to either medication or Diabetes. Discuss again with your GP or another one in the Practice, maybe get a referral if needed. Ask specifically a Continue reading >>

Pain In Left Arm | Diabetic Connect

Pain In Left Arm | Diabetic Connect

Hi friends I m having pain in my left arm since last week it's not curing is this related to our diabetic My suggestion to you is this, better to be safe than sorry! Unless you know exactly what is going on, make a visit to your local hospital or clinic. It could be something, or it can be nothing, either way you will have been diagnosed by a medical professional, and that should give you some peace of mind! It sounds like the pain is not serious and you just want to know the cause of it. If you don't want to go to doctor, I suggest you the way I always use to connect with doctors. Check out this interesting article here. It may benefit you a lot. If it were me and I had the pain for several days, I would be in a doctors office asking this question not on this website. Pain in the left arm could be a warning of heart attack or it could simply be a pulled or strained muscle. Either way it should be checked out. The body does give off warning signs of a heart attack and for some people, these warning signs could last for several days. Also signs of a heart attack can be different in women than in men. Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

Pain In Arm

Pain In Arm

Hi everyone I have a Question have any of you had pain in arm that has been around more than 1 year as my mom has had this and she been for xray and been on pain killers they think it is frozen sholder but nothing as work to kill the pain and she diabetic with type 2 for over five years any ideas thanks shelly I am diabetic, I will not let it stop me, I will win but most of all I will live I had it in one shoulder for over two years. It went away and then I got it in the other shoulder for a year or so before it went away. Tried a steroid shot in the first shoulder, but it didn't work. Yep, left arm ache down to my fingers. Came and went on its own but resting on my elbow seemed to always trigger it. It started about a year ago. finally had a doppler echo of my carotid arteries. My left vertebral artery is blocked and both carotids have some obstructions. I'm going for an MRA on Saturday; that's an awfully expensive piece of hardware so it's kept busy 24/7. Ask your mom if she gets easily dizzy, like when she gets up from sitting. Or does she get frequent, shallow headaches towards the sides and back of the head. Just because a person gets older doesn't have to mean that they get "growing old pains." There isn't any such thing. Consider that pain as a warning signal that something is wrong and finding out what it is, and getting it fixed before it gets worse, is usually a lot cheaper and easier than waiting too long. A frozen shoulder condition is usually bilateral, I have frozen shoulders now for ten years, as it waxes and wanes, weather affects it tremendously and it is caused from a spinal/cervical injury I had ten years ago, the pain radiates down into both hands and also has caused carpal tunnel syndrome, I was also diagnosed with fibromyalgia too, which is not as Continue reading >>

When Diabetes Leads To Nerve Damage

When Diabetes Leads To Nerve Damage

Tingling, numbness, pain in the arms, legs, hands, or feet — these are all common signs of diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage. Up to 70 percent of people with diabetes will develop some type of neuropathy, making it one of the most common side effects of this disease. Diabetes: Understanding Neuropathy Although tingling, numbness, or pain in the extremities are common signs of neuropathy, others may experience no symptoms at all. Nerve damage can also occur in internal organs, such as the heart or digestive tract. Diabetes-related neuropathy can affect muscle strength, sensation in various parts of the body, and even sexual function. People who develop diabetic neuropathy are typically those who have trouble controlling their blood glucose levels, blood pressure, cholesterol, and body weight. Although researchers haven't quite figured out exactly why this happens, they know that neuropathy can occur due to: Alcohol use and smoking Genetic predisposition Injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome Nerves that become inflamed related to autoimmune conditions Neurovascular issues that damage the blood vessels responsible for bringing nutrients and oxygen to your nerves Your risk also increases the older you get and the longer you have diabetes, with the highest rates of neuropathy occuring in people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetes: Where Neuropathy May Strike Here are some of the specific types of neuropathy that occur in people with diabetes: Autonomic neuropathy impairs the functioning of the digestive system, resulting in diarrhea or constipation as well as impaired bladder function. This type of neuropathy also affects how you perspire and even your sexual response — men may have trouble getting an erection and women may experience vaginal dryne Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness—loss of feeling—in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. What causes diabetic neuropathies? The causes are probably different for different types of diabetic neuropathy. Researchers are studying how prolonged exposure to high blood glucose causes nerve damage. Nerve damage is likely due to a combination of factors: metabolic factors, such as high blood glucose, long duration of diabetes, abnormal blood fat levels, and possibly low levels of insulin neurovascular factors, leading to damage to the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to nerves autoimmune factors that cause inflammation in nerves mechanical injury to nerves, such as carpal tunnel syndrome inherited traits that increase susceptibility to nerve disease lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use What are the symptoms of diabetic neuropathies? Symptoms depend on the type of neuropathy and which Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

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