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Can Diabetes Cause Rheumatoid Arthritis?

The Connection Between Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

The Connection Between Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

Recent research has revealed certain connections between rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes. Both are autoimmune diseases that require diagnoses and ongoing treatment to give the patient relief. Find out more about the connection between rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes and what you can do about it. In rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system attacks the thin membrane that lines the joints. This causes inflammation, pain, swelling, heat, redness and can lead to joint destruction if the condition is not treated. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce or use the hormone insulin, which carries sugar to the cells to convert into energy. Without insulin blood sugar levels rise and cells do not get essential energy. This leads to fatigue, inflammation, and nerve damage and could result in problems such as eye damage, kidney damage, heart disease and stroke. While rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes are not directly related, often the diseases overlap. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than half of people with diabetes also have rheumatoid arthritis. Research has also revealed genetic connections between rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes type 1. Inflammation is associated with both conditions. Levels of inflammatory markers such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are often high in those with rheumatoid arthritis and people with diabetes. A gene called PTPN22 has been linked with the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes type 1 as well as other autoimmune diseases. While genetics are beyond our control, early diagnosis helps. If your family has a history of autoimmune diseases including arthritis and/or diabetes, talk to your doctor about testing and preventative treatments. Rheumatoid arthritis does not caus Continue reading >>

The Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

The Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

Having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) makes you about 50 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those without the autoimmune disease. Experts aren’t exactly sure what’s behind the connection, but many say that the link may be due to the inflammation that occurs with RA. “A lot of inflammation causes insulin resistance, which increases blood sugar levels,” says Scott Zashin, MD, a rheumatologist and clinical professor of medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. Being sedentary because of RA pain further increases your risk for type 2 diabetes. And any steroid drugs you take for RA can make it harder to control blood sugar. “When you have a lot of steroids in your body, your body makes glucose because it assumes you’re going to need it for some kind of ‘fight or flight’ response,” says Wayne Evron, MD, an endocrinologist and medical director of the Joslin Diabetes Center in Pittsburgh. “But if you’re giving them to someone to control their RA, it can make their sugars higher.” The connection between type 2 diabetes and RA isn’t yet set in stone. “The data is kind of mixed,” Dr. Zashin warns. “There have been studies published showing an association between RA and diabetes, and some that haven’t shown an association.” Type 1 diabetes, which occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the pancreas, may also be a risk for people with RA. Though it used to be called juvenile diabetes, people can develop type 1 diabetes at any age. And because type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are both autoimmune diseases, they can occur together. Dr. Evron explains that they may be prevalent in families that tend to get autoimmune diseases And researchers have recently identified a gene named PTPN22 that can increas Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Joints

Diabetes And Your Joints

Diabetes can cause changes in your musculoskeletal system, which is the term for your muscles, bones, joints, ligaments, and tendons. These changes can cause numerous conditions that may affect your fingers, hands, wrists, shoulders, neck, spine, or feet. Symptoms of diabetes-related musculoskeletal problems include muscle pain, joint pain or stiffness, lessened ability to move your joints, joint swelling, deformities, and a “pins and needles” sensation in the arms or legs. Some musculoskeletal problems are unique to diabetes. Others also affect people without diabetes. For instance, diabetes can cause skin changes such as thickening, tightness, or nodules under the skin, particularly in the hands. Carpal tunnel syndrome is frequently seen in people with diabetes, as is trigger finger (a catching or locking of the fingers), although these conditions are commonly seen in people without diabetes, as well. The shoulder joint may also be affected in diabetes. And, of course, the feet are susceptible to problems caused by diabetes. Most of these conditions can be successfully treated with anti-inflammatory medications, steroid injections, or other therapies. It is important to mention any troubling symptoms to your doctor. Ask yourself the following questions, which address some of the more frequent symptoms people have when diabetes affects their muscles, ligaments, tendons, or joints. If you answer “yes” to any, consult your doctor. • Do you have stiffness in your hands that affects your ability to move or use them? • Do your fingers get “locked” in certain positions? • Do you have numbness or tingling in your hands, arms, or legs? • Do you have stiffness or decreased motion in your shoulders? • Do you have muscle pain or swelling? View Abstract Edito Continue reading >>

10 Facts About Diabetes And Ra

10 Facts About Diabetes And Ra

1. Your body breaks food down into glucose. It then uses insulin produced by the pancreas to convert that glucose to energy. If your body doesn’t produce enough insulin itself, you may develop diabetes. Almost 24 million people in the US live with diabetes, approximately 3 percent of the population. 2. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the immune system attacks insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. It typically develops during childhood, but may also affect adults. People who have Type 1 diabetes must take insulin every day. 3. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes, affecting 90-95 percent of people living with the condition. This type of diabetes tends to be associated with obesity, age, physical inactivity and previous history of gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is usually treated with monitoring blood sugars, healthy eating, exercise and possibly diabetes medication. 4. There appears to be no link between RA and Type 1 diabetes. However, people with RA may be at higher risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. People with RA may be more sedentary, experience weight gain due to lack of physical activity or medications or take prednisone, all of which are risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. 5. It’s important for people with RA to stay ahead of a number of possible comorbidities, including the increased risk of developing diabetes. Regular checks of your cholesterol and blood sugar levels (both simple blood tests) and monitoring your blood pressure will enable you to deal with problems early. This can help you manage the risks of diabetes and heart disease. 6. People who have developed Type 2 diabetes often have no symptoms. Those who do have symptoms may experience any of a variety, including increased thirst or hunger (especially a Continue reading >>

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Diabetes and joint pain are considered to be independent conditions. Joint pain may be a response to an illness, injury, or arthritis. It can be chronic (long-term) or acute (short-term). Diabetes is caused by the body not using the hormone insulin correctly, or insufficient production of it, which affects blood sugar levels. What would a hormone and blood sugar-related condition have to do with joint health? Diabetes is associated with widespread symptoms and complications. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of people with arthritis also have diabetes. There is an undeniably strong link between the two conditions. Diabetes can damage joints, a condition called diabetic arthropathy. Unlike pain caused by immediate trauma, the pain of arthropathy happens over time. Other symptoms include: thick skin changes in the feet painful shoulders carpal tunnel syndrome A joint is the place where two bones come together. Once a joint wears down, the protection it provides is lost. Joint pain from diabetic arthropathy comes in different forms. Charcot’s joint occurs when diabetic nerve damage causes a joint to break down. Also called neuropathic arthropathy, this condition is seen in the feet and ankles in people with diabetes. Nerve damage in the feet is common in diabetes, which may lead to Charcot’s joint. A loss of nerve function leads to numbness. People who walk on numb feet are more likely to twist and injure ligaments without knowing it. This places pressure on the joints, which can eventually cause them to wear down. Severe damage leads to deformities in the foot and other affected joints. Bone deformities in Charcot’s joint may be prevented through early intervention. Signs of the condition include: painful joints swelling or redn Continue reading >>

Diabetes Or Rheumatoid Arthritis - Conditions Put You At Greater Risk Of This Disease

Diabetes Or Rheumatoid Arthritis - Conditions Put You At Greater Risk Of This Disease

Cardiovascular disease describes a set of conditions which affect the heart or blood vessels - which includes life-threatening problems such as heart attacks and stroke. Rheumatoid arthritis is a long-term condition that causes pain, swelling and stiffness in the joints and mainly affects the hands feet and wrists. The National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society (NRAS) - has set out to help people with rheumatoid arthritis to understand why they are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease - and the impact the condition can have on the heart. Dr Holly John, consultant rheumatologist, said: “The increased risk of CVD for RA sufferers has the same level of severity as those who suffer with type 2 diabetes. “It’s astonishing how many people with RA don't know that their condition could be detrimental to their heart.” The NRAS has launched a programme Love Your Heart, developed in partnership with Dr Holly John. The organisation is making the programme widely available to everyone with this serious autoimmune condition so that they have the opportunity to lower their CVD risk. Dr John said: “Once aware, it’s very easy to manage risk factors from home with a healthier lifestyle, so Love Your Heart will be able to significantly raise awareness of this and help to address this major co-morbidity which can shorten the lives of those with RA.” It’s astonishing how many people with rheumatoid arthritis don't know that their condition could be detrimental to their heart While experts said it is not clear exactly why people with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk, experts suggest people can reduce their risk of the condition by making sure arthritis is well controlled and even stopping smoking, eating more healthily and exercising regularly. People with diabete Continue reading >>

A Specific Association Exists Between Type 1 Diabetes And Anti-ccp Positive Rheumatoid Arthritis

A Specific Association Exists Between Type 1 Diabetes And Anti-ccp Positive Rheumatoid Arthritis

Go to: Abstract The co-occurrence of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been reported in individuals and families. We studied the strength and nature of this association at the population level. We conducted a case-control study of 1419 incident RA cases and 1674 controls between 1996 and 2003. Subjects were recruited from university, public and private rheumatology units throughout Sweden. Blood samples were tested for the presence of antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP), rheumatoid factor (RF) and the presence or absence of the 620W PTPN22 allele. Information on history of diabetes was obtained by questionnaire, telephone interview, and medical record review. The prevalence of T1D and type 2 diabetes (T2D) was compared between incident RA cases and controls and further stratified by anti-CCP, RF status, and the presence of the PTPN22 risk allele. T1D was associated with an increased risk of RA, OR 4.9 (95% CI 1.8–13.1), and was specific for anti-CCP+ RA, OR 7.3 (95% CI 2.7–20.0), but not anti-CCP negative RA. Further adjustment for PTPN22 attenuated the odds ratio for anti-CCP+ RA in individuals with T1D to 5.3 (95% CI 1.5–18.7). No association was observed between RA and T2D. The association between T1D and RA is specific for a particular RA subset, anti-CCP+ RA. The risk of type 1 diabetics developing RA later in life may be attributed in part to the presence of the 620W PTPN22 allele, suggesting a common pathway for the pathogenesis of these two diseases. Continue reading >>

The Risk Of Diabetes Among Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, And Psoriasis

The Risk Of Diabetes Among Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, And Psoriasis

Go to: Abstract We examined the risk of DM among subjects with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis or psoriasis (PsA/PsO), compared with non-rheumatic controls. We assembled study cohorts using linked health care utilization data from British Columbia. All persons with at least two diagnoses of RA or PsA/PsO were included and compared with a cohort of persons without any known rheumatic disease. The outcome of interest was a diagnosis of new onset DM, as defined by initiation of an anti-diabetic medication. Incidence rates (IR) per 1,000 person-years and incidence rate ratios (IRR) were calculated and Cox regression models examined to determine the hazard ratio (HR) for diabetes by age, gender, systemic immunosuppressive and glucocorticoid use. The study cohort consisted of 48,718 subjects with RA, 40,346 with PsA/PsO, and 442,033 without any rheumatic disease. The IR for DM among subjects with RA was 8.6 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI 8.5 – 8.7), PsA/PsO 8.2 (95% CI 8.1 – 8.3), and for non-rheumatic controls 5.8 (95% CI 5.8–5.8). The adjusted HR for RA compared with non-rheumatic controls was 1.5 (95% CI 1.4–1.5) and 1.4 (95% CI 1.3 – 1.5) for PsA/PsO. RA and PsA/PsO appear to be associated with an increased risk of DM. The ability of potent anti-rheumatic treatments to reverse this trend warrants study. Diabetes incidence rates (per 1,000 person years), age and gender stratified Rheumatoid arthritis Psoriatic arthritis/Psoriasis Non-rheumatic # cases Person-years Rate (95% CI) # cases Person- years Rate (95% CI) # cases Person-years Rate (95% CI) Total cohort 1,949 227,838 8.6 (8.5 – 8.7) 1,564 191,534 8.2 (8.1 – 8.3) 10,732 1,847,202 5.8 (5.8–5.8) Female 1212 155,599 7.7 (7.7 – 7.8) 730 95,771 7.6 (7.7– 7.8) 6,299 1,118,944 5.6 (5.6 – Continue reading >>

Arthritis & Diabetes

Arthritis & Diabetes

What do diabetes and arthritis have in common? Plenty. People with diagnosed diabetes are nearly twice as likely to have arthritis, indicating a diabetes-arthritis connection. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce or use the hormone insulin sufficiently. Insulin shuttles glucose from foods into cells so it can be converted into energy. Without insulin, glucose remains in your blood (raising blood glucose levels), your cells create less energy and you feel fatigued. What starts off as a hormonal problem can evolve into joint problems, in addition to the widely known cardiovascular problems. Diabetes causes musculoskeletal changes that lead to symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness; swelling; nodules under the skin, particularly in the fingers; tight, thickened skin; trigger finger; carpal tunnel syndrome; painful shoulders; and severely affected feet. After having had diabetes for several years, joint damage – called diabetic arthropathy – can occur. Continue reading >>

Inflammatory Arthritis And Diabetes: Managing Both

Inflammatory Arthritis And Diabetes: Managing Both

Inflammation is one link between arthritis and diabetes, but there are other factors involved. Almost half (47%) of adults with arthritis also have another chronic condition. Of the 52.5 million US adults with arthritis, 16% (7.3 million) have type 2 diabetes, and 47% of adults with diabetes have arthritis. Is there a connection? Does having one condition lead to the other? Inflammatory Arthritis Inflammatory arthritis is a general term used for a group of autoimmune diseases in which the immune system attacks a person’s own tissues – the joints but also other organs throughout the body. The resulting joint symptoms include inflammation, pain, stiffness and swelling. The most common forms of inflammatory arthritis are rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) – affecting approximately 4 million people in the US. Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is also an autoimmune condition that causes the body to not produce, use, or metabolize the hormone insulin sufficiently. In a healthy person, insulin is produced in the pancreas and helps the body convert sugars to energy. A person with type 1 diabetes does not produce insulin because their immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas; although the reason why this occurs is unknown, genes and possibly viral infections are thought to be responsible. It is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes begins with insulin resistance, in which the pancreas gradually loses its ability to produce sufficient amounts of insulin. Technically considered a metabolic disorder, this type of diabetes is associated with older age, obesity, family history and other factors. In adults, nearly all diagnosed cases are type 2 diabetes. The Relationship Betw Continue reading >>

Risk Of Rheumatoid Arthritis In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Nationwide Population-based Case-control Study

Risk Of Rheumatoid Arthritis In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Nationwide Population-based Case-control Study

Go to: Introduction The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has rapidly increased in many Asian populations, including the Taiwanese, thought to be the result of a combination of a sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy dietary habits. In Taiwan, the crude incidence of type 2 diabetes was 8 per 1,000 with a prevalence of 8.3% in 2007 [1]. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by pancreatic β cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. Obesity can trigger chronic low-grade inflammation and the resulting inflammatory mediators are detrimental to β cell function [2], [3]. Modulating inflammatory reactions in patients with type 2 diabetes with the use of salsalate has been shown to improve glycemic control [6], strongly suggesting that inflammatory pathways are involved in the metabolic abnormalities of type 2 diabetes. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and disabling disease characterized by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and the presence of autoantibodies [7]. The annual incidence of RA in Taiwan was 15.8 cases per 100,000 population with a female to male ratio of 4 to 1 [8]. Inflammatory mediators such as C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α are frequently elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes [4], [5] as well as in the sera of patients many years before the clinical onset of RA [9], suggesting a critical role in the immunopathogenesis of this disease. This observation also suggests that low-grade inflammation should have already existed in patients with RA during the preclinical phase. In addition, smoking causes chronic lung inflammation and could subsequently lead to the production of autoantibodies, resulting in the development of RA among genetically susceptible individuals [10]. Therefore, it is plausible that chroni Continue reading >>

Abnormal Glucose Metabolism In Rheumatoid Arthritis

Abnormal Glucose Metabolism In Rheumatoid Arthritis

BioMed Research International Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9670434, 6 pages 1Department of Rheumatology, Jiangxi Provincial People’s Hospital, Nanchang 330006, China 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003, China Academic Editor: Brant R. Burkhardt Copyright © 2017 Hui Pi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract The incidence of abnormal glucose metabolism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was considerably higher than the general population. The persistent systemic inflammatory state in rheumatoid arthritis might be associated with the glucose metabolism dysfunction. In this context, insulin resistance, islet β cell apoptosis, inflammatory cytokines, and other aspects which were linked with abnormal glucose metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis were reviewed. This review will be helpful in understanding the abnormal glucose metabolism mechanism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and might be conducive to finding an effective treatment. 1. Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic, symmetry, and destructive poly-articular synovitis. Although its pathogenesis remains unclear, it has shown that inflammation induced by abnormal immune response plays a crucial role in the development of RA. Recent studies show that RA patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) prevalence rate was about 15% to 19%, which was significantly higher than the prevalence rate of 4% to 8% of global middle-aged population DM [1, 2]. In a study, which consists of 48,718 cases of RA patients Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Arthritis: Is There A Connection?

Diabetes And Arthritis: Is There A Connection?

Diabetes mellitus (also known as ‘sugar’ diabetes) interferes with the body’s ability to use sugar. It is a long-term condition requiring treatment by diet, pills and often injections of insulin. Generally doctors recognise two types of diabetes. Type I typically occurs in younger people and often requires treatment with insulin. Type 2 occurs in older overweight people and is treated with tablets but there can be a lot of overlap between the two types. There is often a family history of diabetes in both. Early symptoms of diabetes include thirst and passing a lot of urine, and some people lose a lot of weight. The problems with handling sugar, and specifically high blood sugar levels, can eventually lead to complications in the blood vessels, kidneys, eyes, and the nerves to the hands and feet. These complications can be delayed and minimised by controlling the blood sugar with treatment. People with diabetes are also prone to a number of musculoskeletal complications but the relationship between these complications and the diabetic control is not clear. Many of these problems are not unique to diabetes but occur more frequently in this condition. This short article describes the complications and offers advice on treatment and prevention. Shoulder problems Shoulder pain is probably the most common musculoskeletal disorder which I see associated with diabetes. Specifically the shoulder becomes stiff and painful due to inflammation and thickening of the tissue surrounding the shoulder joint – sometimes known as frozen shoulder. The pain may start following a minor injury or just come out of the blue. Typically the pain builds up to a constant nagging pain which limits the movement of the joint and causes sleep disturbance. The pain is worse in the first 3 months Continue reading >>

Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes: Are They Linked?

Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes: Are They Linked?

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and diabetes are very different diseases. But there's a connection between them. Having one may mean you're more likely to develop the other. In fact, research shows that RA raises your risk for diabetes by about 50%. And diabetes raises your risk of having arthritis, including RA and arthritis-related issues, by about 20%. Nearly half of American adults who have diabetes also have arthritis. Experts aren't sure why these two diseases are linked. They believe that a variety of things play a role, including: RA and type 1 diabetes are both autoimmune diseases. The immune system's job is to destroy germs and other sickness-causing invaders. Sometimes, the system goes haywire and turns against the body's own healthy cells. RA attacks the joints. Type 1 diabetes targets the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, a hormone that helps your body process blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes is typically diagnosed in children and young adults and makes up less than 5% of all diabetes cases. Research suggests that some people tend to have more than one autoimmune disease. This may be partly due to genetics. And scientists have identified a gene that raises the risk for both type 1 diabetes and RA. RA causes chronic inflammation. In the short run, inflammation helps the body heal. But when it's ongoing, it causes the body to stop responding to insulin the way it should. This is called insulin resistance. Over time, the condition raises the risk for type 2 diabetes. This occurs when the body doesn't make enough insulin or resists its effects. Diabetes also triggers inflammation. On the flipside, chronic inflammation from diabetes may pave the way for RA. RA is caused by genetics and environmental factors. Research suggests that inflammation may cause people w Continue reading >>

How Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Affect Your Blood Sugar

How Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Affect Your Blood Sugar

When you hear the word “arthritis,” you probably think of joint pain, swelling and stiffness. But rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a disease that causes inflammation in your joints, can affect the rest of your body, too—sometimes in surprising ways. For example, studies have shown that people with RA are more likely to also have diabetes, a condition characterized by high blood sugar levels. From Joint Pain to Blood Sugar Woes It turns out that inflammation, which is a key feature of RA, may cause a buildup of sugar in the blood. Luckily, there’s a silver lining to the relationship between RA and blood sugar: Certain things that help manage your RA, like some lifestyle choices and medications, may also help prevent or control diabetes. Inflammation and Insulin Resistance So, how can inflammation lead to high blood sugar? The answer has to do with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps a person’s cells absorb sugar from the blood so it can be used for energy. If the cells are unable to use insulin effectively, a condition known as insulin resistance, excess sugar can start to build up in the blood. Eventually, the person may develop type 2 diabetes. Remember that RA can cause widespread inflammation throughout the body. This inflammation, in turn, may increase the body’s risk of developing insulin resistance. Researchers are still studying exactly how inflammation contributes to insulin resistance. Two likely culprits are tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), proteins that are involved in joint inflammation. There’s evidence that both TNF and IL-6 may interfere with insulin’s ability to work properly. Tips to Help Manage Both Conditions Having RA doesn’t automatically mean you’ll develop insulin resistance or diabetes. But your risk is inc Continue reading >>

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