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Can Diabetes Cause Retinal Detachment

What Is Diabetic Retinopathy?

What Is Diabetic Retinopathy?

Age Related Macular Degeneration AMD and Nutritional Supplements Amsler Grid Central Serous Chorioretinopathy Choroidal Melanoma Cystoid Macular Edema Diabetic Retinopathy Epiretinal Membrane Flashes and Floaters Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Lattice Degeneration Macular Hole Ocular Histoplasmosis Syndrome Retinal Artery Occlusion Retinal Detachment Retinal Tears Retinal Vein Occlusion Retinitis Pigmentosa Retinopathy of Prematurity Uveitis/Ocular Inflammation Vitreomacular Traction Syndrome The retina is the layer of specialized nerve tissue lining the back of the eye that allows you to see. A healthy retina is critical for normal vision. The abnormally high levels of blood sugar associated with diabetes can cause damage to the small blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the retina. Without the proper amount of oxygen and nutrients over time, the retina can become damaged. This damage to the retinal blood vessels is called diabetic retinopathy. The disease affects half of all people diagnosed with diabetes. What are the different types of Diabetic Retinopathy and what symptoms do they cause? Diabetic retinopathy is classified as non-proliferative (NPDR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). There are various levels of severity of each kind of diabetic retinopathy and each is associated with different complications that can affect the vision. Mild diabetic damage to the retina may go unnoticed because early symptoms can be subtle, and tend to get worse over the years. Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Prolonged exposure to high blood sugars damages the small blood vessels in the retina. Over time the blood vessels develop tiny weak areas called microaneurysms. These microaneurysms can rupture and leak, resulting in retinal bleeding and swelling (fig Continue reading >>

Elevation Of Vitreous Leptin In Diabetic Retinopathy And Retinal Detachment

Elevation Of Vitreous Leptin In Diabetic Retinopathy And Retinal Detachment

purpose. Leptin is a cytokine that regulates energy metabolism and is linked to diabetes mellitus through its metabolic actions. Leptin is angiogenic and promotes wound healing, and therefore this investigation was conducted to determine whether leptin is associated with neovascular and fibrotic complications of diabetes and other retinopathies. methods. Serum and vitreous samples were collected from patients classified by the presence and type of diabetic retinopathy or other ocular diseases. Leptin was measured in serum and vitreous by radioimmunoassay, and leptin and leptin receptor were localized in epiretinal membranes immunohistochemically. results. Leptin levels in serum and vitreous were higher in patients with diabetes than in those without, and vitreous leptin concentrations were especially elevated in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy or retinal detachment. Leptin and leptin receptor were detected in fibrovascular epiretinal membrane of patients with diabetes. conclusions. Leptin in human vitreous is elevated in proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and retinal detachment and is present in fibrovascular epiretinal tissue. These data suggest an involvement of leptin in retinal disease. Leptin is a pleiotropic cytokine with circulating serum concentrations that are directly proportional to the size of the subcutaneous adipose mass. 1 Leptin synthesis was initially localized within adipose tissue, where it is produced by adipocytes. 2 It has since been detected in other tissues, including placenta, ovaries, mammary gland, gastric mucosa, and hepatic stellate cells. 3 4 5 6 7 8 Since the discovery that the defective gene in certain genetically obese mice encodes leptin or its receptor, 9 10 leptin has been proposed to function as an adipose-derived e Continue reading >>

» For More Information On Retina Or To Make An Appointment, Call Us At Either Our Philadelphia Office 215-627-1515 Or Our Ardmore Office 610-649-7616.

» For More Information On Retina Or To Make An Appointment, Call Us At Either Our Philadelphia Office 215-627-1515 Or Our Ardmore Office 610-649-7616.

To welcome patients of every age with any visual problem and provide a friendly environment where patients can receive excellent eyecare using the latest technology. Text Size: A A A Retina Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that weakens the blood vessels that supply nourishment to the retina (the light-sensitive lining in the back of the eye where vision is focused). These weak vessels can leak, swell or develop thin branches, causing a loss of vision. Changes to your vision may not be noticeable at first. But in its advanced stages, the disease can cause blurred or cloudy vision, floaters and blind spots – and, eventually, blindness. This damage is irreversible. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye complication and a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Macular edema, which is leaking fluid that causes blurred vision, often occurs with diabetic retinopathy. Fortunately, diabetic retinopathy is preventable. People with diabetes are most susceptible to developing it, but your risk is reduced if you follow your prescribed diet and medications, exercise regularly, control your blood pressure, and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Regular eye exams are an integral part of making sure your eyes are healthy. Diabetic retinopathy can be detected through a dilated eye exam. Although damage caused by diabetic retinopathy cannot be corrected, patients diagnosed with the condition can be treated to slow its progression and prevent further vision loss. Treatment modalities include injections of certain medications, laser and surgical procedures. The macula is a part of the retina in the back of the eye that ensures that our central vision is clear and sharp. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) occurs when the vison processing cells in the Continue reading >>

Retinal Detachment

Retinal Detachment

Separation of the retina from the layer of cells behind it. The retina is a light-sensitive layer of tissue lining the inside of the eye; it sends visual signals to the brain. Detachment of the retina may cause permanent blindness and should be regarded as a medical emergency. So-called tractional retinal detachment can occur in advanced stages of the common complication of diabetes known as diabetic retinopathy. (A detached retina may also result from a tear in the retina or from injury or inflammation of the eye.) In diabetic retinopathy, uncontrolled blood glucose levels damage the small blood vessels called capillaries within the retina, causing changes in blood flow and weakening blood vessel walls. The weakened walls can allow blood or fluid to leak into the retina. Diabetic retinopathy begins as a relatively mild condition known as nonproliferative, or background, retinopathy, in which the retina receives less blood and nourishment. If not treated, the eye may compensate for this lack of blood supply by growing abnormal new blood vessels on the retina. This growth of new blood vessels, called neovascularization, is the hallmark of the advanced stage known as proliferative retinopathy. These abnormal new blood vessels — which may also grow into the vitreous, the jellylike substance that fills the inside of the eye — tend to bleed and leak fluid into the vitreous. Blood leaking into the vitreous can give rise to “floaters” and in severe cases may blur or block vision. Floaters, which can range in size from small specks to large dark spots, are a common occurrence even in people without retinopathy. But if they appear suddenly, or become more numerous, or if you see light flashes, you should have your eyes checked by a doctor. If the new blood vessels that f Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Bleeding/scarring of the retinal blood vessels caused by Diabetes Diabetes is a disease that occurs when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or the body is unable to process it properly. Insulin is the hormone that regulates the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Diabetes can affect children and adults. How does diabetes affect the retina? Patients with diabetes are more likely to develop eye problems such as cataracts and glaucoma, but the disease's affect on the retina is the main threat to vision. Most patients develop diabetic changes in the retina after approximately 20 years. The effect of diabetes on the eye is called diabetic retinopathy. Over time, diabetes affects the circulatory system of the retina. The earliest phase of the disease is known as background diabetic retinopathy. In this phase, the arteries in the retina become weakened and leak, forming small, dot-like haemorrhages. These leaking vessels often lead to swelling or oedema in the retina and decreased vision. The next stage is known as proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this stage, circulation problems cause areas of the retina to become oxygen-deprived or ischemic. New, fragile, vessels develop as the circulatory system attempts to maintain adequate oxygen levels within the retina. This is called neovascularisation. Unfortunately, these delicate vessels haemorrhage easily. Blood may leak into the retina and vitreous, causing spots or floaters, along with decreased vision. In the later phases of the disease, continued abnormal vessel growth and scar tissue may cause serious problems such as retinal detachment and glaucoma. Signs and Symptoms The affect of diabetic retinopathy on vision varies widely, depending on the stage of the disease. Some common symptoms of diabetic retinopat Continue reading >>

Tractional Retinal Detachment

Tractional Retinal Detachment

Background Anytime subretinal fluid accumulates in the space between the neurosensory retina and the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a retinal detachment occurs. Depending on the mechanism of subretinal fluid accumulation, retinal detachments traditionally have been classified into rhegmatogenous, tractional, and exudative. A tractional retinal detachment (TRD) is the second most common type of retinal detachment after a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Continue reading >>

Retinal Conditions

Retinal Conditions

Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetes mellitus is a disorder that is caused by a deficiency in insulin (Type 1) or an inability of existing insulin (Type 2 ) to keep blood sugars under control. Over time patients with diabetes, especially those with poorly controlled blood sugar may develop eye, kidney, heart, nerve and skin problems. In the eye, diabetes mainly affects the retina and causes diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes affects small blood vessels all over the body and makes them abnormally leaky. In the retina, capillaries (the tiniest of blood vessels) that supply nutrients and remove waste products become leaky and allow contents of blood (serum, lipids, and blood cells) to leak into the retina, causing the retina to swell (edema). This stage of retinopathy is called non-proliferative or background retinopathy. When swelling occurs in the macula (the part of the retina responsible for color and fine vision), vision becomes blurred and permanent damage can occur to the retina. Your retina specialist will examine your eye to determine if there is swelling in the macula that requires treatment (clinically significant macular edema). Treatment can be performed with laser in the office and may be repeated one or more times over the course of the lifetime of the patient. In some cases injections of steroid into the eye may be performed to help reduce swelling. In severe cases, vitrectomy surgery (removal of the vitreous gel) may be necessary, especially if laser and steroids have failed. In more severe cases of diabetic retinopathy, leaky capillaries may become permanently damaged and may not work at all. This capillary damage results in lack of blood flow to sections of the retina (ischemia). Ischemia results in the production of chemical messengers in the retina that lead to d Continue reading >>

Retinal Detachment

Retinal Detachment

What are complications of surgery for a retinal detachment, and what is recovery like after retinal detachment surgery? Retinal detachment facts A retinal detachment is a separation of the retina from its attachments to the underlying tissue within the eye. Most retinal detachments are a result of a retinal break, hole, or tear. Most retinal breaks, holes, or tears are not the result of trauma but are due to preexisting factors such as high levels of myopia, prior ocular surgery, and other eye diseases. Flashing lights and floaters may be the initial symptoms of a retinal detachment or of a retinal tear that precedes the detachment itself. Early diagnosis and repair of retinal detachments are important since visual improvement is much greater when the retina is repaired before the macula or central area is detached. The surgical repair of a retinal detachment is usually successful in reattaching the retina. The retina is an extremely thin tissue that lines the inside of the back of the eye. When we look around, light from the objects we are trying to see enters the eye. The light image is focused onto the retina by both the cornea and the lens. This light striking the retina causes a complex biochemical change within layers of the retina and this, in turn, stimulates an electrical response within other layers of the retina. Nerve endings within the retina transmit these electrical signals to the brain through the optic nerve. Within specific areas of the brain, this electrical energy is received and processed to allow us both to see and to understand what we are seeing. The retina has been compared to the film of a camera. However, once used, film has a permanent image on it. The retina, in contrast, continually renews itself chemically and electrically, allowing us to Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

If you have diabetes, you probably know that your body can't use or store sugar properly. When your blood sugar gets too high, it can damage the blood vessels in your eyes, which is why an annual comprehensive eye exam is important. This damage may lead to diabetic retinopathy. In fact, the longer someone has diabetes, the more likely they are to have retinopathy (damage to the retina). In its advanced stages, diabetes may lead to new blood vessel growth over the retina. The new blood vessels can break and cause scar tissue to develop, which can pull the retina away from the back of the eye. This is known as retinal detachment, and it can lead to blindness if untreated. In addition, abnormal blood vessels can grow on the iris, which can lead to glaucoma. People with diabetes are 25 times more likely to lose vision than those who are not diabetic, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. If you are concerned about diabetic retinopathy don't wait, contact an eye doctor near you today! Symptoms of Diabetic Retinopathy and Other Diabetes-Related Eye Problems The symptoms of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and other eye problems related to diabetes are: Fluctuating vision Eye floaters and spots Development of a scotoma or shadow in your field of view Blurry and/or distorted vision Corneal abnormalities such as slow healing of wounds due to corneal abrasions Double vision Eye pain Near vision problems unrelated to presbyopia Cataracts During an eye examination, your eye doctor will look for other signs of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic eye disease. Signs of eye damage found in the retina can include swelling, deposits and evidence of bleeding or leakage of fluids from blood vessels. For a definitive diagnosis, you may need to undergo a test called a fluorescein angiog Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy | Thomasville Ga | Moultrie Ga | Tallahassee Fl

Diabetic Retinopathy | Thomasville Ga | Moultrie Ga | Tallahassee Fl

Diabetic retinopathy is a potentially blinding complication of diabetes affecting over half of Americans diagnosed with the disease. As a result of the body’s inability to use and store sugars, the tiny blood vessels that nourish the retina are affected. Damage to the retina, the light sensitive tissue lining the back portion of the eye that transmits visual images to the brain, can result in severe loss of vision and ultimately blindness. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people under the age of 65. A diabetic is 10-15 times more apt to go blind than a nondiabetic. Fluctuation in blood sugar levels in diabetic patients leads to an increased risk in diabetic retinopathy. In the early stages, vessels in the retina swell and begin to leak into surrounding tissue. Vision is rarely affected during this stage. In the more advanced stages, new blood vessels begin to grow on the retina. These abnormal blood vessels cause blurred vision, resulting in the formation of scar tissue which can lead to permanent vision loss. Symptoms range from none at all in the early stages, to blurry or fluctuating vision affecting both side and central vision. Spots, which are small specks of blood, often appear in your vision. As the leakage progresses, vision becomes cloudy and blind spots can occur. If left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can cause blindness. Diabetic retinopathy can be detected during a comprehensive eye examination during which your eye doctor examines the health of your retina using specialized instruments and lenses. Once detected, your doctor may recommend additional testing to assess the progression of the disease and determine treatment. Individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes or have a family history of the disease should have their eyes examine Continue reading >>

Questions / Comments: Please Include Non-medical Questions And Correspondence Only.

Questions / Comments: Please Include Non-medical Questions And Correspondence Only.

A healthy retina is essential to maintaining clear vision and overall eye functioning. A retinal exam may be recommended by your doctor if any potential retinal abnormalities were detected during a general eye exam, or for patients at a higher risk of developing retinal conditions such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, retinal detachment and more. During a retinal exam and consultation, your doctor will perform series of diagnostic procedures in order to evaluate the retina for any signs of disease or abnormalities. These tests may include visual field test, fluorescein angiography, fundus photography and more. Your doctor will take the time to discuss the results of your exams, as well as any potential risks of retinal disease with you. Patient education and understanding is a top priority of our practice, as it often help patients achieve the most effective treatment as they know how to care for their condition. Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that weakens the blood vessels that supply nourishment to the retina (the light-sensitive lining in the back of the eye where vision is focused). These weak vessels can leak, swell or develop thin branches, causing a loss of vision. Changes to your vision may not be noticeable at first. But in its advanced stages, the disease can cause blurred or cloudy vision, floaters and blind spots – and, eventually, blindness. This damage is irreversible. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye complication and a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Macular edema, which is leaking fluid that causes blurred vision, often occurs with diabetic retinopathy. Fortunately, diabetic retinopathy is preventable. People with diabetes are most susceptible to developing it, but your risk Continue reading >>

Retinal Detachment

Retinal Detachment

Tweet Retinal detachment is a rare age-related condition that occurs when the blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the layer of cells at the back part of your eye (retina) start to pull away. A detached retina is a serious problem which can lead to complete loss of vision in the affected eye. What is the retina? The retina is a layer of tissue at the back of your eye that contains millions of nerve cells. These cells take the light that enters the eye and convert it into nerve signals for the brain, which gives us our eyesight. However, a lack of constant blood supply to the retina can destroy these nerve cells, increasing the risk of severe vision loss or even blindness. What causes retinal detachment? As we age, the retina part of our eye becomes thinner and more fragile. This often leads to tiny holes appearing inside the retina, which allow fluid between the retina and the lens of the eye to leak underneath the retina. Too much fluid underneath the retina can cause it to start pulling away from the small underlying blood vessels. This starves the retina of oxygen, which in turn destroys the light-converting nerve cells. Diabetic retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy, or retinopathy, is one of the common long-term complications of diabetes and also a leading cause of blindness in adults. Retinopathy is bought on by prolonged levels of high blood sugar - the hallmark of diabetes - which damage the small blood vessels within the retina. This damage can cause scar tissue to form, which can pull the retina out of position See our guide on diabetic retinopathy Other causes Other less common causes of retinal detachment include: Uveitis and other conditions that cause swelling inside the eye Eye injuries - a direct injury to the eye can cause holes to develop insid Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Diabetic retinopathy is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina. When these blood vessels are damaged, they may leak blood and grow fragile new vessels. When the nerve cells are damaged, vision is impaired. These changes can result in blurring of your vision, hemorrhage into your eye, or, if untreated, retinal detachment. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness in the United States. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy, Testing, and Treatments Watch these video animations to learn more about diabetic retinopathy, the affect that the diabetic retinopathy has on the eyes, and tests and treatments options for the condition. Topics covered Symptoms Blurred vision Sudden loss of vision in one eye Seeing rings around lights Dark spots or flashing lights The symptoms described above may not necessarily mean that you have diabetic retinopathy. However, if you experience one or more of these symptoms, contact your ophthalmologist for a complete exam. It is also important to note that pregnancy and high blood pressure may aggravate diabetic retinopathy. Causes People with untreated diabetes are 25 times more at risk for blindness than the general population. The longer a person has had diabetes, the higher the risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. Fortunately, with regular, proper eye care and treatment when necessary, the incidence of severe vision loss has been greatly reduced. If you have diabetes, your ophthalmologist can help to prevent serious vision problems. Diabetic retinopathy can cause vision loss in two ways: Macular Edema Macular edema is a condition where your retinal blood vessels develop tiny leaks. When this occurs, blood and fluid leak from the retinal blood vessels and f Continue reading >>

Diabetic Tractional Retinal Detachment

Diabetic Tractional Retinal Detachment

What is a Tractional Retinal Detachment? Diabetic tractional retinal detachment is the most advanced form of diabetic retinal disease. "Tractional" means that there is pulling on the retinal surface and "retinal detachment" means that the pulling is strong enough to separate the light-sensing retina from the back of the eye. The traction in diabetic eye disease comes from extensive growth of abnormal blood vessels in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The abnormal blood vessels grow from the damaged vasculature of the retina into the jelly of the eye called the vitreous. The vitreous acts as a builder's scaffold or as empty framework for the vessels to grow into. As these blood vessels grow into the jelly they become denser and mature into membranes of fibrous scar tissue. Eventually, the scar tissue contracts and the pulling from this detaches the retina. Sometimes, the stress on the retina is so great that tears or holes are formed. How is tractional detachment Treated? Sometimes a tractional retinal detachment can be stopped before it affects the central vision. A small area of retinal detachment far from the center of the vision can sometimes be watched if it stops growing due to laser or injection treatment and improvement in blood sugars control. Other times, a tractional retinal detachment affects the central vision significantly enough to require surgical repair. The surgery performed is called a vitrectomy, or removal of the jelly in the back of the eye that the abnormal vessels are growing into. In this diagnosis, vitrectomy is also combined with careful microscopic dissection of the fibrous scars left by the abnormal blood vessels from the surface of the retina. Laser is often performed simultaneously to reduce the risk of the vessels recurring or to treat s Continue reading >>

Retinal Detachment

Retinal Detachment

What is retinal detachment? The retina is a light-sensitive membrane located at the back of the eye. When light passes through your eye, the lens focuses an image on your retina. The retina converts the image to signals that it sends to your brain through the optic nerve. The retina works with the cornea, lens, and other parts of your eye and brain to produce normal vision. Retinal detachment occurs when the retina separates from the back of your eye. This causes loss of vision that can be partial or total, depending on how much of the retina is detached. When your retina becomes detached, its cells may be seriously deprived of oxygen. Retinal detachment is a medical emergency. Call your doctor right away if you suffer any sudden vision changes. There’s a risk of permanent vision loss if retinal detachment is left untreated or if treatment is delayed. There’s no pain associated with retinal detachment, but there are usually symptoms before your retina becomes detached. Primary symptoms include: blurred vision partial vision loss, which makes it seem as if a curtain has been pulled across your field of vision, with a dark shadowing effect sudden flashes of light that appear when looking to the side suddenly seeing many floaters, which are small bits of debris that appear as black flecks or strings floating before your eye There are three types of retinal detachment: rhegmatogenous tractional exudative Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment If you have a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, you have a tear or hole in your retina. This allows fluid from within your eye to slip through the opening and get behind your retina. The fluid separates the retina from the retinal pigment epithelium, which is the membrane that provides your retina with nourishment and oxygen, causing t Continue reading >>

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