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Can Diabetes Cause Paranoia

When The Paranoia Subsides

When The Paranoia Subsides

1. Read last weeks blog entry ( "The Paranoid Moments" ) if you havent done so yet. (Im asking nicely.) 2. Read the comments several people wrote in response to last weeks blog entry. (Please.) 3. Return to this page and read the rest of this weeks entry. (That right there is sugar-coated!) On Tuesday afternoon, I got a phone call at work from my primary care physician. She wanted to talk to me about the ultrasound. (See! Right there: If you havent followed my instructions for reading this entry [tsk tsk], well, you wont be completely out of the loop, but theres not much context to go on.) At no time in what follows will I directly quote what my doctor said. If anything is erroneous or sounds wrong to those of you with more knowledge on the subject than I have, its entirely my fault in the telling. I may get some of the details wrong. The overview, however, is correct; its just that I may venture witlessly into medical-speak and get somewhat lost. Im trying, though. In fact, I share so much on the blog, but I debated about whether or not to write this weeks blog entry about the ultrasound results. Several of you wanted a follow-up, and because I dont know how many people read this blog (there are those of you who lurk and dont comment), I figured I might as well answer the questions of those who give voice. You know, keep you reading! When the doctor called, she first apologized for not having gotten back to me sooner. Shed been on vacation and had just gotten back into the office. The results regarding my liver and what they saw from the ultrasound were pretty much what had been expected. My liver was echogenic, which Ive since learned refers to structures in the liver having strong reflectors of sound. When the livers echogenic, I gather that it means its consistent Continue reading >>

Another Diabetes Paranoia - No More Panic

Another Diabetes Paranoia - No More Panic

My name is Mike and I'm real bad case of hypochondriac. I'm 26 years old and I've been having panic attacks ever since i was 16. It first started after my mom died when I was 16 (she died because of diabetes). After that I became realy obsessed with this diseasse. I'm not scared of cancer as I'm scared of diabetes. Because of that I started to develop certain symptoms, most common is frequent urination., dry mouth (smoker), and for the last 2 years my general state is realy low, feeling lightheaded, constantly afraid of failure, I lost my girlfriend because of my uncertanty. Getting back to diabetes. As I told you before about my mother, just to get genetics out of the question, I was adopted and i know my real parents, who don't have diabetes, neither them nor my natural grandparents. I got my blood tested twice 2 years ago and in different locations and the results were perfectly fine, but I still have this weird sensation like I'm constantly stoned only without smoking (i'm not doing any druggs cause it makes my axiety worse). A few weeks ago i ended up in the emergecy room because of these symptoms, again had a urine sample tested, and again I am healthy as newborn, no glucose, no protein, no nothing. How can the mind simply make up symptoms out of nowhere. I admit it, I have used Dr. Google in the last period, only to make things worse. Next week I'm scheduleled for another blood test with another doctor just to rule out any diseases and know clearly if what I'm facing is a mental disorder. Has anybody been through smt like this before and managed to survive? I have the exact same issue with both diabetes and my reflux, my anxiety has definitely made my reflux worse and aa far as diabetes I got weighted and checked at my last hospital appointment and I'm still sli Continue reading >>

What Does It Feel Like To Have High Blood Sugar Levels?

What Does It Feel Like To Have High Blood Sugar Levels?

The human body naturally has sugar, or glucose, in the blood. The right amount of blood sugar gives the body's cells and organs energy. The liver and muscles produce some blood sugar, but most of it comes from food and drinks that contain carbohydrates. In order to keep blood sugar levels within a normal range, the body needs insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes blood sugar and delivers it to the body's cells. Contents of this article: What does it feel like to have high blood sugar levels? Blood sugar is fuel for the body's organs and functions. But having high blood sugar doesn't provide a boost in energy. In fact, it's often the opposite. Because the body's cells can't access the blood sugar for energy, a person may feel tiredness, hunger, or exhaustion frequently. In addition, high sugar in the blood goes into the kidneys and urine, which attracts more water, causing frequent urination. This can also lead to increased thirst, despite drinking enough liquids. High blood sugar can cause sudden or unexplained weight loss. This occurs because the body's cells aren't getting the glucose they need, so the body burns muscle and fat for energy instead. High blood sugar can also cause numbness, burning, or tingling in the hands, legs, and feet. This is caused by diabetic neuropathy, a complication of diabetes that often occurs after many years of high blood sugar levels. What does high blood sugar mean for the rest of the body? Over time, the body's organs and systems can be harmed by high blood sugar. Blood vessels become damaged, and this can lead to complications, including: Damage to the eye and loss of vision Kidney disease or failure Nerve problems in the skin, especially the feet, leading to sores, infections, and wound healing problems Causes of high blood sugar Continue reading >>

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated With Psychotic Symptoms In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated With Psychotic Symptoms In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

Go to: CASE PRESENTATION A 36-year-old woman from an urban background presented with acute onset psychotic illness of 15 days duration precipitated by poor adherence to insulin therapy. The patient had a history of T1DM since the age of 12 years, with a well-adjusted pre-morbid personality and no family history of mental illness. Detailed exploration of the history revealed that she had experienced 3 to 4 similar psychotic episodes, each lasting for 7 to 10 days, over the last seven months, during which she would exhibit symptoms of persecution, delusion of grandiosity, smiling and muttering to herself, emotional liability, abusive behavior, angry outbursts, excessive grooming, increased religiosity, poor self-care, decreased sleep, and decreased appetite. During these episodes, there would be no clouding of consciousness, disorientation, diurnal variation in symptoms, or disturbance of other cognitive functions. All of the psychotic episodes had temporal correlation with poor adherence to insulin therapy and a rise in fasting blood glucose levels from normal range to 300mg/dL. The psychotic episodes had no associated histories of fever, infection, high caloric intake, or substance abuse. During the index episode, her fasting blood glucose levels were in the range of 300 to 515mg/dL and post-prandial blood glucose levels were 398mg/dL. All other lab work results, including those for ketoacidosis, were within normal ranges. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her brain and physical examination did not reveal any abnormality in the patient, and on mental status examination, she was well-oriented to time, place, and person; her mini mental state examination score was 27/30. She had increased speech output, labile affect, delusion of persecution, delusion of reference, dist Continue reading >>

4 Ways Sugar Could Be Harming Your Mental Health

4 Ways Sugar Could Be Harming Your Mental Health

4 Ways Sugar Could Be Harming Your Mental Health A high-sugar diet impacts both physical and mental health. Most people know that eating too much dessert and processed food can contribute to physical health problems like obesity and type 2 diabetes. Far less attention has been given to the impact of a high-sugar diet on mental health, though numerous studies have shown the deleterious effects a sweet tooth can have on mood, learning and quality of life. In addition to inflating waistlines, sugar and other sweeteners, including high fructose corn syrup, honey, molasses and maple syrup, may contribute to a number of mental health problems: The roller coaster of high blood sugar followed by a crash may accentuate the symptoms of mood disorders. Research has tied heavy sugar consumption to an increased risk of depression and worse outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia . There are a couple theories explaining the link. Sugar suppresses activity of a hormone called BDNF that is low in individuals with depression and schizophrenia. Sugar is also at the root of chronic inflammation, which impacts the immune system, the brain and other systems in the body and also has been implicated in depression. Interestingly, countries with high sugar intake also have a high rate of depression. Although controversial, a growing body of evidence points to the addictive potential of sugar. Both drugs and, to a lesser extent, sugar and processed junk foods flood the brain with the feel-good chemical dopamine , over time changing the function of the brain. In a study by researchers at Yale University, the simple sight of a milkshake activated the same reward centers of the brain as cocaine among people with addictive eating habits. A 2007 study showed that rats actually prefer sugar water Continue reading >>

Paranoid | Diabetic Connect

Paranoid | Diabetic Connect

Here is the latest. The doctor I found that was supposed to be working with me, wouldn't take my pleas for help seriously. After being with him for almost 18 months, I had to leave. He would not take my cellullitis break outs seriously and would not give me the level of care that every person deserves. When I went to the new guy in November he did a blood workup on me and I was very angry. My HA1c had risen to 9.7 under the care of the last doctor. So now I have to really fight to get everything back to where it should be. I am now taking 180 units of Lantus (split into 2 doses), 20 mgs of Byetta (split into 2 doses) and 2550 mgs of Metofrming split into 3 doses. In about 10 hours I have to go back to the new guy who is a PA for a new blood workup. I am so hoping it will be better than it was in November. So that is where I am now. I get really scared when I hear people talk about someone they know that died from diabetes I have only been diagnosed for 1 1/2 years, but like you said in your post, I always consider that I take care of myself, eat what I am supposed to, take my meds and stay prayed up!! I have wondered if I was the only person who had these bouts with paranoiabut I can only imagine that anyone with this disease would be paranoid and depressed at some points during their journey. I only convince myself that having diabetes have forced me into living a much more healthy lifestyle and that is something I can appreciate. You'll be fine, as we all will. God bless you!! I think that anyone who has diabetes, or any chronic disease for that matter goes through periods where they are afraid. I know I certainly do. I think it's a part of being diabetic. We are told from day 1 that we are at risk for all kinds of complications like heart disease, stroke, cancer, bl Continue reading >>

The Link Between Schizophrenia And Diabetes

The Link Between Schizophrenia And Diabetes

The link between schizophrenia and diabetes Current Psychiatry. 2012 October;11(10):28-46 Lead Physician, Mental Health and Metabolism Clinic, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Assistant Professor, Departments of Psychiatry and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario Vigilant metabolic monitoring informs treatment decisions 1. Kohen D. Diabetes mellitus and schizophrenia: historical perspective. Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 2004;47:S64-S66. 2. Dixon L, Weiden P, Delahanty J, et al. Prevalence and correlates of diabetes in national schizophrenia samples. Schizophr Bull. 2000;26(4):903-912. 3. De Hert M, van Winkel R, Van Eyck D, et al. Prevalence of diabetes, metabolic syndrome and metabolic abnormalities in schizophrenia over the course of the illness: a cross-sectional study. Clin Pract Epidemol Ment Health. 2006;2:14.- 4. Juvonen H, Reunanen A, Haukka J, et al. Incidence of schizophrenia in a nationwide cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007;64(8):894-899. 5. Hales CN, Barker DJ. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis. Br Med Bull. 2001;60:5-20. 6. Ryan MC, Sharifi N, Condren R, et al. Evidence of basal pituitary-adrenal overactivity in first episode, drug naive patients with schizophrenia. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2004;29(8):1065-1070. 7. Odawara M, Isaka M, Tada K, et al. Diabetes mellitus associated with mitochondrial myopathy and schizophrenia: a possible link between diabetes mellitus and schizophrenia. Diabet Med. 1997;14(6):503.- 8. Siuta MA, Robertson SD, Kocalis H, et al. Dysregulation of the norepinephrine transporter sustains cortical hypodopaminergia and schizophrenia-like behaviors in neuronal rictor null mice. PLoS Biol. 2010;8(6):e1000393.- 9. Strassnig M, Brar JS, Ganguli R. Nut Continue reading >>

Will You Have Paranoia With Diabetes? - Ehealthme

Will You Have Paranoia With Diabetes? - Ehealthme

Paranoia is found among people with Diabetes, especially for people who are male, 50-59 old, take medication Metformin and have Quit smoking. This review analyzes which people have Paranoia with Diabetes. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 88 people who have Diabetes from FDA , and is updated regularly. On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our original studies have been referenced on 400+ peer-reviewed medical publications, including: The Lancet, and Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 88 people who have Diabetes and Paranoia are studied. Gender of people who have Diabetes and experience Paranoia *: Age of people who have Diabetes and experience Paranoia *: Top co-existing conditions for these people *: High Blood Cholesterol: 13 people, 14.77% Hallucination, Auditory (perceiving sounds without auditory stimulus): 11 people, 12.50% * Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information. How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood. Share you experience to help people like you We suggest these affordable tests for self monitoring. You can order them and receive results on eHealthMe. No doctor referral or insurance necessary. Diabetes can be treated by Metformin, Metformin hydrochloride, Lantus, Januvia, Glipizide ( latest reports from 291,118 Diabetes patients ) Paranoia (psychotic disorder characterized by delusions of persecution with or without grandeur) has been reported by people with depression, quit smoking, pain, stress and anxiety, schizophrenia ( latest reports from 15,270 Paranoia patients ). Analysis tools (to study 684 million drug outcomes from FDA) Ch Continue reading >>

Paranoia

Paranoia

Last week I was having certain diabetic-like symptoms such as constant dry mouth even after drinking water and going to the toilet every hour after drinking water. Random blurry vision. I lead a sedentary life, Im 178cm tall and about 90kg. I went to the GP last week for blood test, and all came back fine. My fasting blood sugar level was 92 mg/dl and my HBA1C was 5.2%. But after drawing blood the doctor did a finger prick and my blood glucose was about 108 mg/dl. lipid profile are all fine. No high blood pressure or high cholesterol. But I am having random paranoids thoughts that I am a Pre-diabetic or a diabetic. I should also also say that these symptoms are still lying around. D.D. Family type 2 since January 27th, 2016 Highly doubtful you are diabetic or prediabetic. Those numbers are perfect! If you seriously think something is wrong other than dry winter air then I would suggest continuing to look for other causes of those symptoms. If you need to reassure yourself, you could get a blood glucose meter and test yourself before a meal, one hour after a meal and two hours after a meal. This knowledge might be helpful. Yeah, your numbers are fine. But it can never hurt to get healthy. Get out and get some fresh air and exercise and youll probably feel better and be healthier. A1C: 10.0 12/17, 5.6 04/18. On Metformin 2 x 500 mg. Test Using Freestyle Lite ~5x daily. Sunday 7-day avg. 86 mg/dL (incl. post-meal). The symptoms you describe could be lots of things other than diabetes, or even symptoms of nothing at all. The finger prick test result is a very little higher than normal, but how long was it after you had eaten or drunk anything when it was taken? Did the doctor clean your finger carefully before the finger prick? Your HbA1c and fasting glucose are non-diabet Continue reading >>

Paranoia And Diabetes, Connection?

Paranoia And Diabetes, Connection?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My great uncle has diabetes, I am not sure which type. He is in his 80's and has said at his age he can't be bothered to adjust his lifestyle or to worry about this. I've advised him this is not a good idea and that he should listen to his doctor, but he is otherwise very independent and proud, and there is little I or the rest of the family can do about it. Suddenly, he had an episode of extreme paranoia. He has accused my mother of trying to kill him several weeks ago when she took him out for a meal. They spoke in between and things were fine, but he was suddenly convinced that she had been trying to kill him for his money. Obviously, we are very concerned. This was over the weekend so we couldn't reach his GP or ours to get advice. We had to call the out of hours support line, the person we spoke to said that the issue could be his blood sugar levels. We managed to get fold of a friend of his who called him and spoke to him about the issues with my mother, and he called her to apologize (we didn't want to go round as he was so convinced she was trying to murder him, we were worried it might make things worse). He said he couldn't remember most of the conversation and it was so odd he didn't think it had happened. We are going to see him Monday, and we are going to try to convince him to see his GP. He swears he is fine, so this will be a challenge. Has anyone heard of this before? I'm mostly looking for information I can give him to try to convince him he should speak to his GP. Dementia and a few other possibilities come to mind, as well, and I'm also trying to see what we need to rule out, and how we might be able to support him with what has ca Continue reading >>

Paranoia

Paranoia

It's pretty easy to get paranoid about diabetes and this ketoacidosis thing. I mean, the odds are pretty low that every one of us will eventually experience a ketoacidosis, right? Or be hospitalized due to dehydration from illness etc. So it's just like I am waiting for it to happen. :| And it's not good to know that it can happen to anyone with t1, almost anytime... Even if people in here several times have stated that it doesn't happen when you have enough insulin, but how do you know that you doesn't have enough insulin, when blood sugar can be fine? I am afraid that I am balancing right on the edge. I take my daily lantus, but I eat when I am hungry, and sometimes I don't take my insulin when I eat because I eat something low carb or so. I have figured out that what makes this whole diabetes thing so uncomfortable is that "it can happen anytime", like that from one minute from another, I suddenly have to call for emergency from ketones. I often feel bad and uncomfortable, especially in the mornings. I usually have fasting blood sugar from 7-8mmol, and I am afraid that I am close to this metabolic acidosis thing. Any ideas about how I can dispose those thoughts? Or should I dispose those thoughts? I want to do something with them now, because I don't want to end up in that bad state of mind with depression and paranoia. I would dispose those thoughts, I sure don't walk around worrying about DKA, or really my diabetes. I just do what I must and enjoy my life. You should go see your doctor if you really think you are close to DKA. You can check your ketones, ya know. This is why we check our bg, are aware of our bodies and changes that happen, recognize symptoms the indicate something is wrong, and call the doc if there is a problem. DKA usually develops slowly. But w Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

What Makes You Diabetic Can Also Make You Schizophrenic

What Makes You Diabetic Can Also Make You Schizophrenic

What makes you diabetic can also make you schizophrenic Insulin is even more important to your health than we thought - not only can problems with it cause diabetes, but they can also cause schizophrenia. The good news? This new discovery could lead to treatments for both conditions. This link was identified in a study conducted by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, who discovered a definite link between malfunctioning insulin regulation in the brains of mice and increased incidence of schizophrenia-like behavior. It's not just that the same risk factors for diabetes can also lead to schizophrenia; it's that one condition can actually exacerbate the severity of the other from a behavior perspective. Endocrinologist Kevin Niswender explains that recognition of this link could aid in the development of treatments that better address the multifaceted nature of patients' conditions: "We know that people with diabetes have an increased incidence of mood and other psychiatric disorders. And we think that those co-morbidities might explain why some patients have trouble taking care of their diabetes." The group, led by neurobiologist Aurelio Galli, had already that insulin doesn't just regulate glucose metabolism, but it also plays a major role in regulating the supply of the neurotransmitter dopamine to the brain. Problems in dopamine regulation can lead to depression, ADHD, Parkinson's, and schizophrenia. Now they've developed special mice that have helped them determine the precise molecular link between faulty insulin regulation, improper dopamine function, and schizophrenia-like behavior. They impaired insulin function in mice, but only in their neurons. This allowed them to restrict their analysis purely to the brains of the mice. This impairment led t Continue reading >>

Paranoia (paranoid Thoughts): Check Your Symptoms And Signs

Paranoia (paranoid Thoughts): Check Your Symptoms And Signs

Paranoia refers to the perception or suspicion that others have hostile or aggressive motives in interacting with them (for example, "they are out to get me"), when in fact there is no reason for these suspicions. People experiencing paranoia believe that others are persecuting them and have delusional ideas about themselves as central figures in scenarios that in reality have little relevance to them. They may mistrust others and remain often in a state of suspicion. Minor feelings of paranoia are common, but severe paranoia can cause significant fear and anxiety and can have a pronounced effect on social functioning. Feelings of paranoia can be observed with many psychological disorders , including schizophrenia , as well as with a number of medical diseases that can affect brain function, ranging from Alzheimer's disease to multiple sclerosis . Intoxication from alcohol or drug abuse may also lead to feelings of paranoia. Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/14/2018 Continue reading >>

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Relationship Between Blood Glucose Level and Self-Control Blood sugar can make people do crazy things. According to a recent scientific study on the link between low blood glucose level and relationship clashes (Bushman et al, 2014), being hungry makes an individual generally cranky and act more hostile to others. In the study, couples who are hungry tend to have a much higher tendency to exhibit aggression towards each other and become more impulsive in their reactions. This phenomenon is often referred to “hangry” (meaning feeling angry when you are hungry). If this irritable state can happen to any healthy person who experiences a change in their blood glucose level, imagine the ordeals individuals with diabetes frequently go through on a daily basis. However, do not jump to the conclusion that diabetes leads to aggression. In fact, scientists find a more direct correlation between blood glucose level and self-control. I recommend reading the following articles: In a way, you can visualize self-control as a muscle that requires a lot of energy to sustain so that it does not become ineffective quickly. This energy source comes from the glucose in the blood. So what kind of activities can wear out this “muscle”? Any daily activities that require self-discipline such as forcing yourself to get out of bed early to exercise, resisting from having a soda drink or another cookie with your meal, stopping yourself from smoking, dealing with stressful situations at work and at home, and abstaining yourself from road rage. As you can see, self-control plays a crucial part in restraining inappropriate and aggressive behaviors. So when people are low in glucose, the self-control mechanism cannot function properly to prevent these outbursts of hostile actions. In a researc Continue reading >>

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