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Can Diabetes Cause Painful Urination

Diabetic Bladder

Diabetic Bladder

A term referring to bladder problems caused by diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The bladder’s function is to store the urine produced by the kidneys. Ordinarily, once urine is collected in the bladder, the pressure on the inner wall of the bladder is sufficient to signal the urge to urinate. Urine flows out of the bladder and the body through a narrow channel called the urethra, and this flow is controlled by a ring of muscles known as the urinary sphincter. Various nerves are responsible for signaling the brain that we need to urinate, signaling the bladder to contract to force the urine out, and controlling the tone of the urinary sphincter to allow us to urinate—and then stop urinating when we’re done. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy can damage any or all of these nerves, causing individuals to urinate less often, have difficulty completely emptying the bladder, have a weak stream of urine, have difficulty starting to urinate, or have dripping afterward. One complication of a diabetic bladder is infection of the bladder or urinary tract. Having urine in the bladder for a long time allows bacteria to gain a foothold in the urethra and possibly move into the bladder itself, especially if there is glucose in the urine. From there, the bacteria can also infect the rest of the urinary tract, including the kidneys. The symptoms of a bladder or urinary tract infection (UTI) include frequent urination of only small amounts of urine, pain or burning when urinating, being unable to urinate despite feeling the urge, and cloudy or discolored urine. If you have signs of a UTI, call your health-care provider. Usually, antibiotics can clear up the problem. People with diabetic bladder should drink plenty of fluids and go to the bathroom every two hours, whether they feel the need Continue reading >>

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to have an erection and the inability to sustain an erection. Estimates of the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes vary widely, ranging from 20 to 75 percent. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than men who do not have diabetes. Among men with erectile dysfunction, those with diabetes may experience the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Research suggests that erectile dysfunction may be an early marker of diabetes, particularly in men ages 45 and younger. In addition to diabetes, other major causes of erectile dysfunction include high blood pressure, kidney disease, alcohol abuse, and blood vessel disease. Erectile dysfunction may also occur because of the side effects of medications, psychological factors, smoking, and hormonal deficiencies. Men who experience erectile dysfunction should consider talking with a health care provider. The health care provider may ask about the patient's medical history, the type and frequency of sexual problems, medications, smoking and drinking habits, and other health conditions. A physical exam and laboratory tests may help pinpoint causes of sexual problems. The health care provider will check blood glucose control and hormone levels and may ask the patient to do a test at home that checks for erections that occur during sleep. The health care provider may also ask whether the patient is depressed or has recently experienced upsetting changes in his life. Treatments for erectile dysfunction caused by nerve damage, Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

Diabetics Should Take Extra Precautions Against Kidney Damage

Diabetics Should Take Extra Precautions Against Kidney Damage

Diabetics must be extra vigilant in protecting against urologic conditions that could further damage their kidneys Diabetes can cause chronic kidney disease and, ultimately, kidney failure. March is Kidney Health Month, and the AUA and AUA Foundation are encouraging patients with diabetes to be well informed about the impact this disease can have if not treated or managed properly. Diabetes is associated with high blood glucose and secondarily elevated blood pressure levels. It is the main cause of kidney failure in the United States. The kidney is responsible for filtering blood, getting rid of waste and providing clean blood to the rest of the body. High blood glucose and blood pressure resulting from diabetes can damage the kidney’s filters, called glomeruli, causing decreased kidney function and even kidney failure. “One third of diabetic patients will suffer from chronic kidney disease,” said AUA Foundation Executive Director Sandra Vassos, MPA. “Many cases take 10 to 15 years to develop. Because kidney disease progresses slowly, it is extremely important for diabetic patients to avoid additional strain on the kidneys by maintaining their urologic health.” Several urologic conditions can cause harm to the kidneys, including infections and urinary retention. Taking certain medications (anti-inflammatory pain relievers) can also result in kidney damage. Early treatment of these conditions is especially important so as not to further damage the kidneys. Urinary Tract Infections (UTI): Frequent and sometimes painful urination is a common symptom of a UTI. Urine may also be cloudy, or have a stronger odor than usual. In some cases, there may also be hematuria, or blood in the urine. Hematuria is a UTI symptom that may also be caused by a more serious problem i Continue reading >>

Urinary Problems And Injuries, Age 11 And Younger

Urinary Problems And Injuries, Age 11 And Younger

Urinary Problems and Injuries, Age 11 and Younger Urinary Problems and Injuries, Age 11 and Younger Urinary problems and injuries are a concern in children. A young child may not be able to tell you about his or her symptoms, which can make it hard to decide what your child needs. An older child may be embarrassed about his or her symptoms. When your child has a urinary problem or injury, look at all of his or her symptoms to determine what steps to take next. The urethra , bladder , ureters , and kidneys are the structures that make up the urinary tract . Pain during urination (dysuria) and a frequent need to urinate are common symptoms in young children. When your child has only one of these symptoms, or when the symptoms are mild, home treatment may be all that is needed to prevent the problem from getting worse and help relieve symptoms. Mild symptoms include: A frequent need to urinate. A child's bladder is small and does not hold as much urine as an adult's bladder. For this reason, frequent urination is common and is not necessarily a sign of a urinary problem. Your child may urinate more because he or she is drinking extra fluid, feeling nervous, or simply from habit. Burning pain when urine touches irritated skin around the vagina or urethra. Pain during urination because of skin irritation occurs more often in girls (genital skin irritation) than it does in boys. Pain during urination and a frequent need to urinate can also mean your child has a urinary tract infection . Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common bacterial infection in children. When your child has an infection, bacteria grow in the bladder and irritate the bladder wall. This causes pain as soon as a very small amount of urine reaches the bladder. You may find your child tryin Continue reading >>

Frequent Urination: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Frequent Urination: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Frequent urination means having an urge to pass urine more often than usual. It can disrupt one's normal routine, interrupt the sleep cycle, and it can be a sign of an underlying medical condition. Many people live with frequent urination, known medically as frequency. When one urinates more than 3 liters a day of urine, this is known as polyuria. Often, there is often a simple cause that can be put right through treatment. Frequency is not the same as urinary incontinence, where there is leakage of urine. Sometimes, frequent urination can indicate a more serious condition. Early identification of the problem can lead to a timely and effective treatment and prevent complications. Contents of this article: Here are some key points about frequent urination. More detail is in the main article. Urinary frequency, or just frequency, is different from urinary incontinence. Most people urinate 6 or 7 times in 24 hours. Urinating more often than this may be referred to as frequency, but everyone is different. It is normally only a problem if it affects a person's quality of life. Frequency can often be treated with exercises, but if there is an underlying condition, such as diabetes, this will need attention. What is frequent urination? Urination is the way the body gets rid of waste fluids. Urine contains water, uric acid, urea, and toxins and waste filtered from within the body. The kidneys play a key role in this process. Urine stays in the urinary bladder until it reaches a point of fullness and an urge to urinate. At this point, the urine is expelled from the body. Urinary frequency is not the same as urinary incontinence, which refers to having little control over the bladder. Urinary frequency just means needing to visit the bathroom to urinate more often. It can occur a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Its Impact On Your Urinary And Sexual Health

Diabetes And Its Impact On Your Urinary And Sexual Health

Diabetes and urological health issues are closely connected. Diabetics are prone to urinary tract infections (UTIs), bladder issues and sexual dysfunction. Diabetes can often make your urologic conditions even worse because it can impact blood flow, nerves and sensory function in the body. Roughly 29.1 million people or 9.3 % of Americans have diabetes. Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose (blood sugar) levels are too high. Glucose is the body's main source of fuel and comes from the foods you eat. After your body breaks down food, glucose enters the bloodstream. The cells in your body need this sugar for energy, but a hormone called insulin must be present for the glucose to enter the cells. Your pancreas, a large gland that sits behind the stomach, is what makes the insulin. In people without diabetes, the pancreas makes the right amount of insulin to move the sugar from the blood into the cells. But, in people with type 1 diabetes, the body doesn't make insulin at all. In people with type 2 diabetes, the body doesn't make or use insulin the right way. This is called insulin resistance. Without enough insulin, glucose stays in the blood. Having too much of this in the bloodstream can harm your kidneys, eyes and other organs. The A1C test is used by doctors to see how well you're taking care of your diabetes. This blood test gives facts about a person's blood sugar levels over the past two to three months. The American Diabetes Association suggests an A1C of 7 percent or below. Bladder Conditions and Urinary Tract Infections "Diabetes can affect the function and structure of the lower urinary tract, which in turn may play a role in patients with diabetes having more UTIs, overactive or underactive bladder, and problems with urination," says Michael J. Kenn Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

In this article we will cover everything you need to know about diabetes and your risk for Urinary Tract Infections. Do you have an increased risk of Urinary Tract Infections now that you have diabetes? We will cover what a Urinary Tract Infection is, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment guidelines, as well as why they are more common in people with diabetes. More importantly, we will discuss steps you can take to prevent them! What Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)? A urinary tract infection or UTI is an infection anywhere in your bladder, kidneys or in the urinary system. An infection of the upper urinary tract or the bladder is called a bladder infection or cystitis. An infection in the urethra is called urethritis. Women tend to be more at risk of these types of infections due to their anatomy; they have a much shorter area between the urethra and the opening to the urethra to the bladder. Urinary tract infections are rare in men under 50 due to their anatomy. A more serious infection of the lower urinary tract is an infection of the kidney and the ureters and is called pyelonephritis. This is a complication and occurs when the bladder infection progresses to the kidneys. I highly advise reading the following articles: According to the Stanford Medicine’s Michael Hsieh Lab, half of women and men will have experienced a urinary tract infection (UTI) during our lifetime at least once. They are the most common infection, and can lead to death in patients who are experiencing it severely. Antibiotics are the most effective therapy.The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases account 8.1 million visits to the clinic, hospitals for UTI purposes. For women, the risk of getting a UTI is 50 percent greater than a man. What Are The Symptoms of a UTI? L Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Overactive Bladder?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Overactive Bladder?

Certain illnesses, like diabetes, can cause health problems that you might not think are related, like an overactive bladder. However, diabetes can affect many parts of your body and your bladder may be one of them. One of the common complications from diabetes is nerve damage. Some people experience this with a pins and needles feeling in their feet, for example. But this nerve damage (called diabetic neuropathy) can happen anywhere in the body, including the bladder. It’s estimated that up to one-fifth of people with type 2 diabetes also have symptoms of an overactive bladder and the older the person, the higher this risk. Symptom Confusion One of the symptoms of diabetes is the need to urinate often. So if you need to go to the bathroom a lot, it wouldn’t be unusual to think that these frequent trips to the bathroom are because of the diabetes itself. But frequent urination could be caused by diabetic neuropathy. As the nerves become damaged in the bladder, mixed signals are sent to the brain. You feel like you have to urinate, but there’s not much urine. If you are just beginning to experience symptoms of having to urinate often, it’s best to speak to your doctor or nurse practitioner about this. People with diabetes are also at higher risk of developing urinary tract infections, also called bladder infections or cystitis. One of the symptoms of these infections is the frequent need to urinate. Bladder infections should always be taken seriously because the infection could spread up to the kidneys. Other Illnesses and Overactive Bladder Diabetes is just one cause of overactive bladder. Others include: · Side effects of medications · Diseases that affect the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease · Enlarged prostate · Chronic Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections

People whose diabetes is not properly controlled have twice the risk of developing infections. In addition to diabetes, you could be more susceptible to urinary tract infections if: Your blood glucose (sugar) levels are not properly controlled. Sugar in the urine promotes bacterial growth. Your nervous system is already affected by diabetes (neuropathy). You could have a “lazy bladder” that does not empty completely. You are a woman. Certain anatomical traits, such as having a shorter urethra, increase the risk of bacterial contamination. You already have diabetes complications in your kidneys or blood vessels. This could be a sign that your diabetes is not properly controlled. You have had a urinary tract infection within the last year. People who have had infections within the last year are more at risk of a recurrence. When to consult? To avoid urinary tract infections, consult your doctor if one or more of these symptoms occur: Fever More frequent urination Burning sensation when urinating Urine has an unpleasant odour False urge to urinate Blood in the urine Abdominal pain when urinating Prevention As is the case for all types of infections if you have diabetes, it is crucial that you maintain your blood glucose (sugar) levels within the target range. Wash your hands often. Do not ignore the urge to urinate. Be sure to stay well hydrated. Quit smoking if you are a smoker. What about cranberry juice? Although studies on cranberry juice seem promising, none has clearly shown that cranberry juice can be used to treat or prevent urinary tract infections. If you nevertheless decide to drink cranberry juice, be aware of the amount of sugar in the juice or cocktail, especially if you are diabetic. Research and text: Diabetes Québec Team of Health Care Professionals S Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes symptoms may occur when blood sugar levels in the body become abnormally elevated. The most common symptoms of diabetes include: increased thirst increased hunger excessive fatigue increased urination, especially at night blurry vision Symptoms can vary from one person to the next. They also depend on which type of diabetes you have. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes tend to begin abruptly and dramatically. Type 1 diabetes is most often seen in children, adolescents, and young adults. However, type 1 diabetes can develop at any age. In addition to the symptoms listed above, people with type 1 diabetes may notice a quick and sudden weight loss. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type. Although it primarily develops in adults, it’s beginning to be seen more frequently in younger people. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include being overweight, being sedentary, and having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 2 diabetes don’t experience any symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms are slow to develop. Oftentimes, your symptoms may seem harmless. The most common symptoms of diabetes, such as persistent thirst and fatigue, are often vague. When experienced on their own, symptoms such as these may not be anything to worry about. If you’re experiencing one or more of these symptoms, you should speak with your doctor about being screened for diabetes. Frequent thirst You’ve had glass after glass of water, but you still feel like you need more. This is because your muscles and other tissues are dehydrated. When your blood sugar levels rise, your body tries to pull fluid from other tissues to dilute the sugar in your bloodstream. This process can cause your body to dehydrate, prompting you to drink more water. Frequent urination Drinking excessive amou Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections - Utis

Urinary Tract Infections - Utis

A urinary tract infection is a bacterial infection that grows within the urinary tract - anywhere from the kidneys, the ureters, the bladder and through to the urethra. Urinary tract infections can be a particular problem for people with diabetes as sugar in the urine makes for a fertile breeding ground for bacteria. This is supported by data from the American Diabetes Association (a report at the 73rd Scientific Sessions of the ADA), which showed 9.4% of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes had a UTI compared to only 5.7% of people without diabetes. [92] What are the symptoms of a urinary tract infection? Urinary tract infections are characterised by two types: Lower urinary tract infections or Cystitis - bacterial infection affecting the bladder and the tube that transports urine from your bladder out of your body via the penis or vagina (urethra) Upper urinary tract infections or Pyelonephritis - bacterial infection affecting the kidneys and the tubes connecting the kidneys to the bladder (ureters) Lower urinary tract infection (affecting the bladder and urethra): Pain or stinging when passing urine (dysuria) Persistent feeling of the need to urinate Cloudy and foul-smelling urine Strong and bad smell of urine Abdominal pan (stomach pain) Back pain Blood in the urine (hematuria) Upper urinary tract infection (affecting the kidneys and ureters): High temperature / fever Constant shivering Vomiting Back pain Pain in your side (flank pain) How serious are urinary tract infections? Some people may find themselves particularly prone to UTIs. Upper urinary tract infections (pyelonephritis) are the more serious of the two. In this case the bacteria have managed to reach the tubes connecting the bladder (ureters) to the kidneys. If the bacterial infection reaches the kidney Continue reading >>

Frequent Or Painful Urination At A Glance

Frequent Or Painful Urination At A Glance

Frequent or painful urination occurs when a person urinates more often than is normal for him or her and when urinating causes pain, burning or stinging. Painful or frequent urination is most often a symptom of another condition. Most treatments for these conditions treat the underlying condition or include behavioral changes a person can make to feel better. What is frequent or painful urination? Urination is the process of passing liquid waste from the body in the form of urine. For most people, the bladder holds urine until it is convenient for them to use the toilet. Urination is normally painless. Most people urinate four to eight times a day depending on fluid intake. Frequent urination is when a person needs to urinate much more often, experiences an urgent need to urinate or when a person urinates more frequently than is normal for him or her. Painful urination (also called dysuria) is more common in women than in men. In both men and women it results in pain, discomfort, burning or stinging. Pain may be felt at the spot where urine leaves the body (urethra) or inside the body at the prostate (in men), bladder or behind the pubic bone at the lower part of the pelvis. Frequent urination or painful urination can indicate another physical problem and should be evaluated by a physician. Causes of frequent urination Sometimes frequent urination and painful urination go together. In women, painful urination is most often a symptom of a urinary tract infection (UTI). UTIs often include an urgent need to urinate, uncomfortable, painful or burning sense when urinating, fever, and a painful or uncomfortable abdomen. A variety of other problems can cause frequent urination, including: Diabetes. People who notice that they are urinating frequently, or an unusually large amo Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems

Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems

Troublesome bladder symptoms and changes in sexual function are common health problems as people age. Having diabetes can mean early onset and increased severity of these problems. Sexual and urologic complications of diabetes occur because of the damage diabetes can cause to blood vessels and nerves. Men may have difficulty with erections or ejaculation. Women may have problems with sexual response and vaginal lubrication. Urinary tract infections and bladder problems occur more often in people with diabetes. People who keep their diabetes under control can lower their risk of the early onset of these sexual and urologic problems. Diabetes and Sexual Problems Both men and women with diabetes can develop sexual problems because of damage to nerves and small blood vessels. When a person wants to lift an arm or take a step, the brain sends nerve signals to the appropriate muscles. Nerve signals also control internal organs like the heart and bladder, but people do not have the same kind of conscious control over them as they do over their arms and legs. The nerves that control internal organs are called autonomic nerves, which signal the body to digest food and circulate blood without a person having to think about it. The body's response to sexual stimuli is also involuntary, governed by autonomic nerve signals that increase blood flow to the genitals and cause smooth muscle tissue to relax. Damage to these autonomic nerves can hinder normal function. Reduced blood flow resulting from damage to blood vessels can also contribute to sexual dysfunction. What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to h Continue reading >>

When You Have Diabetes And Urinary Problems

When You Have Diabetes And Urinary Problems

When You Have Diabetes and Urinary Problems By Elizabeth Woolley | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Diabetes and urination problems often go hand in hand which can be stressful. Dealing with these issues can affect your daily living and quality of life. According to the National Institutes of Health, more than half of people with diabetes have bladder dysfunction. Difficulties with urination can happen as you get older, but when you have diabetes, bladder problems, and urinary tract infections can start earlier in life and occur more often. This is because diabetes can cause damage to the nerves that are responsible for urinary system health and function. In general, women are more likely to experience leakage or urinary incontinence than men because of different anatomical structures and bodily changes from pregnancy and delivery. Men may experience dribbling, weak stream, intermittent flow and urethral obstruction. Bladder problems can be caused by diabetes nerve damage, nerve damage from other causes, injuries, infections and other diseases. High blood sugar levels can cause frequent urination. The risk is increased with poor diabetes management, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, excess weight, advanced age, smoking and a sedentary lifestyle. Insulin use increases the risk for urinary incontinence. Overactive bladder : Bladder spasms or contractions cause an urgent strong need to urinate more than eight times a day or more than two times at night. Urine leakage or urinary incontinence can be a problem. Treatment options for overactive bladder include medication, bladder training methods such as timed voiding, electrical stimulation, Kegel exercises and surgery. Poor sphincter muscle control: The sphincter muscles are internal muscles that control the opening Continue reading >>

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