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Can Diabetes Cause Oxygen Deprivation?

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

According to National Sleep Foundation, 63% of American population do not get enough daily sleep. Do you also know that most people who suffer from diabetes often have poor sleeping habits? This includes irregular sleeping schedule, difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep. And although little has been mentioned about caregivers and parents of diabetes patients, they are more likely to acquire poor sleeping habits and have a higher tendency to suffer from sleeping problems and consequently develop Type 2 diabetes themselves. So if you have diabetes or are currently caring for someone who has diabetes, this article will educate you more about how sleeping disorders can affect your health and how you can get better sleep. This article will cover the following topics: Relationship Between Sleep and Diabetes Your health and sleep go hand in hand. When you do not sleep enough, your body does not get the needed time to repair. As a result, you tend to be unfocused and irritable, and you suddenly have the urge to eat. If this scenario sounds too familiar to you, maybe you should rethink about the relationship between sleep and your diabetes. The Missing Link — Hormones Sleep plays a crucial role in restoring our body cells. Under healthy conditions, after eating, the pancreas secretes insulin to signal fat cells and muscles to absorb the glucose from food to be used for energy creation and prevents the body from using fat as energy source. This chain of reaction causes the blood glucose levels to resume normal. And to prevent the individual from feeling hungry, the body produces the hormone leptin to depresses the appetite. However, when it comes to diabetes individuals, the muscle and fat cells fails to respond to insulin. This causes a high glucose level in the bloodst Continue reading >>

Glucose Induces Sensitivity To Oxygen Deprivation And Modulates Insulin/igf-1 Signaling And Lipid Biosynthesis In Caenorhabditis Elegans

Glucose Induces Sensitivity To Oxygen Deprivation And Modulates Insulin/igf-1 Signaling And Lipid Biosynthesis In Caenorhabditis Elegans

Glucose Induces Sensitivity to Oxygen Deprivation and Modulates Insulin/IGF-1 Signaling and Lipid Biosynthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans *Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 Department of Mathematics, University of North Texas, Denton Texas 76203 *Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 Department of Mathematics, University of North Texas, Denton Texas 76203 1These authors contributed equally to this work. 2Corresponding authors: University of North Texas, Department of Biological Sciences, Denton, TX 76203. E-mail: [email protected] ; and University of North Texas, Department of Biological Sciences, Denton, TX 76203. E-mail: [email protected] Received 2015 Jan 15; Accepted 2015 Mar 2. Copyright 2015 by the Genetics Society of America This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diet is a central environmental factor that contributes to the phenotype and physiology of individuals. At the root of many human health issues is the excess of calorie intake relative to calorie expenditure. For example, the increasing amount of dietary sugars in the human diet is contributing to the rise of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes have compromised oxygen delivery, and thus it is of interest to investigate the impact a high-sugar diet has on oxygen deprivation responses. By utilizing the Caenorhabditis elegans genetic model system, which is anoxia tolerant, we determined that a glucose-supplemented diet negatively impacts responses to anoxia and that the insulin-like signaling pathway, through fatty acid and ceramide synthesis, modulates anoxia survival. Additionally, a glucose-supplemented diet alters lipid localization and initiates a posit Continue reading >>

Is Oxygen Key To Insulin Resistance?

Is Oxygen Key To Insulin Resistance?

Oxygen is key to life but could it also be a key factor in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes? We take a look at the evidence behind this idea and also which methods could use oxygen towards our advantage in tackling insulin resistance. A 2014 study found a link between the lack of oxygen on Everest and insulin resistance. Some research studies appear to show quite conclusively that restricting oxygen intake does indeed result in increased insulin resistance. A study carried out by researchers from the University of Southampton and University College London, published in 2014, investigated the effects of low oxygen levels on insulin resistance by taking adults up Mount Everest. The researchers found that as the participants reached higher altitudes, and were thus exposed to low levels of oxygen to breathe, they developed insulin resistance. Oxygen chamber improves insulin sensitivity By contrast, the opposite effect has also been observed. Researchers from the University of Adelaide tested the effects by exposing people with type 2 diabetes to a total of six periods of 90 minutes of hyperbaric oxygen therapy over a five-week period. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves spending time in a pressurised diving chamber containing 100% oxygen. The technique resulted in a dramatic 40% improvement in insulin sensitivity, an effect that would usually require a 13% loss of body weight. It seems apparent from this that the more oxygen we get, the better insulin sensitivity we have. Could oxygen also explain why people get insulin resistance in normal life at normal non-mountainous altitudes? It is notable that sleep apnea, a problem that results in disrupted breathing during sleep, is very closely related with type 2 diabetes. Sleep apnea shares obesity as a common major risk f Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or the body is unable to process it properly. Insulin is the hormone that regulates the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Diabetes can affect children and adults. Patients with diabetes are more likely to develop eye problems such as cataracts and glaucoma, but diabetic retinopathy visionis the main threat to vision. Most patients develop diabetic changes in the retina after approximately 20 years.The effect of diabetes on the eye is called diabetic retinopathy. Over time, diabetes affects the circulatory system of the retina. The earliest phase of the disease is known as background diabetic retinopathy. In this phase, the arteries in the retina become weakened and leak, forming small, dot-like hemorrhages. These leaking vessels often lead to swelling or edema in the retina and decreased vision. The next stage is known as proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this stage, circulation problems cause areas of the retina to become oxygen-deprived or ischemic. New, fragile, vessels develop as the circulatory system attempts to maintain adequate oxygen levels within the retina. This is called neovascularization. Unfortunately, these delicate vessels hemorrhage easily. Blood may leak into the retina and vitreous, causing spots or floaters, along with decreased vision. In the later phases of the disease, continued abnormal vessel growth and scar tissue may cause serious problems such as retinal detachment and glaucoma. The affect of diabetic retinopathy on vision varies widely, depending on the stage of the disease. Some common symptoms of diabetic retinopathy are listed below, however, diabetes may cause other eye symptoms. Blurred vision (this is often linked to blood sugar levels) Diab Continue reading >>

The Diabetes-sleep Apnea Link

The Diabetes-sleep Apnea Link

By Marianne Wait Maybe your bedmate has noticed that you snore loudly and stop breathing for seconds or even minutes at a time, and then start again with a loud snort or gasp. Or perhaps you’re inexplicably tired during the day despite getting a solid seven or eight hours of sleep. If this sounds like you, you may have sleep apnea. What is Sleep Apnea? People with sleep apnea stop breathing or have periods of very shallow breathing while sleeping, usually multiple times a night. It’s no wonder they wake up exhausted. The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea, in which the airway collapses or becomes blocked during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnea is more common in people who are overweight, but it can affect anyone. Central sleep apnea is less common. It occurs if the area of the brain that controls breathing fails to send the right signals to the breathing muscles. Symptoms of Sleep Apnea Most people who have sleep apnea don’t know they have it. Other signs and symptoms include morning headaches, dry mouth, or a sore throat; difficulty concentrating; irritability or depression; and waking up often to urinate. If your doctor suspects sleep apnea, he or she may refer you to a sleep specialist. That expert may prescribe a sleep study, either at home using portable monitors or in a sleep lab, to help make the diagnosis. How Diabetes and Sleep Apnea are Connected People with type 2 diabetes are at much higher than average risk for sleep apnea—and in a vicious cycle, having untreated sleep apnea can raise blood glucose levels. On the positive side, if you have type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea, treating your sleep apnea may help you manage your blood sugar levels and could even improve your insulin sensitivity, according to the American Academy of Sl Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Oxygen And Diabetes

The Connection Between Oxygen And Diabetes

A lack of O2 in fat cells triggers inflammation and insulin resistance in obesity Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have, for the first time, described the sequence of early cellular responses to a high-fat diet, one that can result in obesity-induced insulin resistance and diabetes. The findings, published in the June 5 issue of Cell, also suggest potential molecular targets for preventing or reversing the process. “We’ve described the etiology of obesity-related diabetes. We’ve pinpointed the steps, the way the whole thing happens,” said Jerrold M. Olefsky, MD, associate dean for Scientific Affairs and Distinguished Professor of Medicine at UC San Diego. “The research is in mice, but the evidence suggests that the processes are comparable in humans and these findings are important to not just understanding how diabetes begins, but how better to treat and prevent it.” More than 25 million Americans have diabetes – 8.3 percent of the population – with another 79 million Americans estimated to be pre-diabetic, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels poorly regulated by either inadequate insulin production or because cells to not respond properly to the regulating hormone. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States and a major risk factor for other life-threatening conditions, including heart disease and stroke. Past research by Olefsky and others has shown that obesity is characterized by low-grade inflammation in adipose or fat tissues and that this inflammatory state can become chronic and result in systemic insulin resistance and diabetes. In today’s Cell paper, the scientists describe the earliest stages of the process, which Continue reading >>

Mom’s Diabetes May Affect Child’s Brain

Mom’s Diabetes May Affect Child’s Brain

Blood sugar may influence a critical period in the development of the hippocampus The many pregnant women who have diabetes or develop it during pregnancy have another reason control their blood sugar: Abnormal glucose levels could affect their child’s memory, and damage might not be reversible. A continuing study based at the University of Minnesota has tested children of diabetic mothers from day one through age 8 (and counting) and found consistent problems with their memory; specifically, their ability to recognize their mother’s voice (at birth), face (at 6 months), and sequences of actions (ages 3 and up). Researchers suspect that the impairment is caused by damage to the hippocampus, which rapidly develops during the third trimester of pregnancy. “If the glucose levels in the mother fluctuate greatly … the fetus will also have high fluctuations in their glucose levels, which then leads to iron deficiency and oxygen deficiency” to the brain, says Tracy DeBoer of the University of California at Davis, one of the researchers. These deficiencies have been shown in animals to be especially damaging to hippocampus development, she says. Much of our ability to remember the events we experience (called episodic memory) depends on the hippocampus, a small, metabolically active structure tucked deep into each hemisphere of the brain. “Other research has shown that infants of diabetic mothers, when they do reach school age, have ‘poor cognitive outcomes,’ and that’s a very global term,” DeBoer says. “We’re really trying to be more neurally specific,” to pinpoint which aspects of memory might be affected. A Battery of Tests The study is part of a 20-year collaboration. Neonatologist Michael Georgieff at the University of Minnesota noticed that infan Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Harms The Brain

How Diabetes Harms The Brain

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. When blood sugar levels start to climb in diabetes, a number of body systems are harmed—and that list includes the brain, since studies have linked diabetes with a higher risk of stroke and dementia. Now, a new study published in the journal Neurology reports that changes in blood vessel activity in the brains of diabetics may lead to drops in cognitive functions and their ability to perform daily activities. Dr. Vera Novak, associate professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and her colleagues followed a group of 65 older people. About half had type 2 diabetes, and half did not. After two years, the diabetic patients had lower scores on cognitive tests compared to when they began, while people without diabetes showed little change on the tests. MORE: The Strange Way a Diabetes Drug May Help Skin Scars What drove the decline, says Novak, were changes in the brains of the diabetic patients. Diabetes can cause blood vessels to be less responsive to the ebb and flow of demand in different parts of the brain. Normally, flexible vessels will swell slightly to increase blood flow and oxygen to areas that are more intensely active, such as regions involved in memory or higher reasoning during intellectual tasks. But unchecked blood sugar can make these vessels less malleable and therefore less responsive. “When doing any task, from cognition to moving your fingers, you need to increase blood flow to that specific area of the brain,” says Novak. “With diabetes, however, that vasodilation ability is reduced, so you have fewer resources to perform any task.” MORE: Statins May Seriously Increase Diabetes Risk In the study, Novak measured the changes in the flexibility of the blood v Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea And Type 2 Diabetes:

Sleep Apnea And Type 2 Diabetes:

The epidemic of diabetes in the United States is being fueled by multiple medical, social, and demographic forces. Among those forces is sleep apnea , which is now recognized as a major contributor to the development of diabetes. In sleep apnea, people stop breathing for periods of 10 seconds or more while theyre asleep, sometimes hundreds of times a night. These periods without breathing, known as apneas, both disrupt sleep and lower the level of oxygen in the blood. When breathing restarts after an apnea, it is generally with a loud gasp or snort. People with sleep apnea are more than twice as likely to have diabetes as those who dont. In addition, 50% of men with Type 2 diabetes have sleep apnea, compared to an estimated 4% of middle-aged men overall. Several recent studies have suggested that insulin sensitivitythe bodys ability to respond to insulindecreases as sleep apnea severity increases. A high body-mass index (BMI, a measure of body mass that takes both height and weight into consideration) is a risk factor for both sleep apnea and diabetes. A number of mechanisms are thought to be involved in the interaction between sleep apnea and diabetes, including the following: Stress response. Repeated arousals from sleep and interruptions in the delivery of oxygen to the bodys tissues caused by sleep apnea lead to the stress, or fight or flight, response. In the short term, the stress response causes increased heart rate and increased blood pressure. When it occurs repeatedly over time, it is a risk factor in the development of chronic high blood pressure, insulin resistance (one of the hallmarks of Type 2 diabetes), and cardiovascular disease. Increased cortisol levels. Sleep deprivation or fragmentation may increase blood levels of cortisol (a stress hormone), whic Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cause: Low Oxygen In Cells Due To Heavy Breathing

Diabetes Cause: Low Oxygen In Cells Due To Heavy Breathing

What causes diabetes? On a cell level, the cause of diabetes is simple. Several medical research groups (Moritz et al, 2002; Carroll & Ashcroft, 2006; Regazzetti et al, 2009; Halberg et al, 2009; Heinis et al, 2010; Cheng et al, 2010) have recently discovered that oxygen levels in pancreatic beta-cells regulate activity of pancreatic cells through hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha. Tissue hypoxia and reduced perfusion lead to poor glucose and insulin control, and insulin resistance. There are many other problems caused by tissue hypoxia. The reasons behind low body O2 is heavy breathing. This fact was confirmed by all 5 clinical studies that measured breathing rates in people with diabetes mellitus. Minute ventilation numbers explain the diabetes cause *One row corresponds to one research paper or medical science article Condition Minute ventilation Number of patients All references or click below for abstracts var ezzns22 = {0.50:504556,1.80:504655,4.50:504667,1.50:504652,1.60:504653,3.00:504664,0.05:504099,0.80:504559,1.00:504647,1.30:504650,0.35:504552,2.60:504660,3.50:504665,0.30:504551,0.45:504555,0.60:504557,0.70:504558,0.40:504554,0.90:504560,2.00:504657,5.00:504669,2.40:504659,2.80:504661,0.10:504141,0.15:504144,1.40:504651,1.90:504656,1.70:504654,2.20:504658,4.00:504666,0.20:504145,0.25:504548,1.10:504648,1.20:504649,}; var ezoflbf_2_22 = function() { __ez.queue.addFunc('ReloadFromP_1022', 'IL11ILILIIlLLLILILLLLIILLLIIL11111LLILiiLIliLlILlLiiLLIiILL.ReloadFromP', 1022, false, ['banger.js'], false, false, false, true); }; var ezoflbf_22 = function() { eval(ez_write_tag([[300,250],'normalbreathing_com-medrectangle-4','ezslot_4'])); };ezoflbf_22(); var __ezfl_sss_1022 = function() { setTimeout(function(){ var ezflaun = IL11ILILIIlLLLILILLLLIILLLIIL11111LLILiiLIliLl Continue reading >>

The Problem Of Tissue Oxygenation In Diabetes Mellitus. I. Its Relation To The Early Functional Changes In The Microcirculation Of Diabetic Subjects.

The Problem Of Tissue Oxygenation In Diabetes Mellitus. I. Its Relation To The Early Functional Changes In The Microcirculation Of Diabetic Subjects.

The problem of tissue oxygenation in diabetes mellitus. I. Its relation to the early functional changes in the microcirculation of diabetic subjects. The underlying cause leading to the reversible functional changes in the microcirculation of insulin-dependent diabetic subjects early during the disease prior to any clinical signs of retinopathy and nephropathy (functional microangiopathy) is discussed. It is suggested that the initial microvascular dilation observed in diabetics is due to an autoregulatory response to relative tissue hypoxia providing an increased tissue perfusion in order to improve tissue oxygen delivery. Supporting evidence for this suggestion is derived from the findings that diabetics simultaneously may show increased tissue oxygen consumption and decreased ability of the circulating blood to release oxygen to the tissues. The latter defect is likely to be caused by two interrelated factors: 1. an increased proportion of haemoglobin A1c with high oxygen affinity, and 2. difficulties of maintaining a sufficiently high concentration of plasma inorganic phosphate in order to provide an optimal 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) content in the erythrocytes. The basal oxygen demand of diabetics may fluctuate even within a few hours dependent upon the state of metabolic control and is increased at times of poor regulation. Hence, diabetics may suffer from innumerable cellular hypoxic injuries, which during the first years of the disease are counteracted in the microcirculation by an autoregulatory response. These microvascular reactions associated with increased plasma permeation may over the years be of major importance for the development of the degenerative microangiopathy in diabetes. Continue reading >>

Hypoxia (medical) - Wikipedia

Hypoxia (medical) - Wikipedia

A condition in which the body or a region of the body is deprived of adequate oxygen at the tissue level Cyanosis of the hand in an elderly person with low oxygen saturation Hypoxia [1] is a condition in which the body or a region of the body is deprived of adequate oxygen supply at the tissue level. Hypoxia may be classified as either generalized, affecting the whole body, or local, affecting a region of the body. Although hypoxia is often a pathological condition, variations in arterial oxygen concentrations can be part of the normal physiology, for example, during hypoventilation training [2] or strenuous physical exercise. Hypoxia differs from hypoxemia and anoxemia in that hypoxia refers to a state in which oxygen supply is insufficient, whereas hypoxemia and anoxemia refer specifically to states that have low or zero arterial oxygen supply. [3] Hypoxia in which there is complete deprivation of oxygen supply is referred to as anoxia. Generalized hypoxia occurs in healthy people when they ascend to high altitude , where it causes altitude sickness leading to potentially fatal complications: high altitude pulmonary edema ( HAPE ) and high altitude cerebral edema ( HACE ). [4] Hypoxia also occurs in healthy individuals when breathing mixtures of gases with a low oxygen content, e.g. while diving underwater especially when using closed-circuit rebreather systems that control the amount of oxygen in the supplied air. Mild, non-damaging intermittent hypoxia is used intentionally during altitude training to develop an athletic performance adaptation at both the systemic and cellular level. [5] Hypoxia is a common complication of preterm birth in newborn infants. Because the lungs develop late in pregnancy, premature infants frequently possess underdeveloped lungs. To imp Continue reading >>

Feeding The Diabetic Brain

Feeding The Diabetic Brain

The brain, despite its meager weigh-in at two percent of the body's mass, is our most voracious organ. Our brains consume 60 percent of the sugar coursing through our bloodstreams, a total of about 450 calories each day, a couple candy bars worth of energy. And because the brain can't store energy as fat or glycogen—a storage molecule made of glucose—like other parts of the body can, it needs a continuous supply of fuel. Demand surges when we are faced with complicated mental tasks, like puzzling over a tax form or grasping for the perfect word to complete the perfect sentence. Neuroscientist Ian Simpson has spent the past 10 years understanding what and how our brains eat. The "what" is easy. Basically the brain is picky, like a kid who eats only green peas, and only if they're arranged in neat rows on the tines of a fork. Simpson puts it a different way: "Like every cell in the body, brain cells use glucose for energy, but that's all they'll eat," he says. It's one of the few molecules allowed to pass through the protective barrier that separates the brain from the bloodstream. (The brain does have an "alternative mechanism" for getting energy, Simpson concedes. In the absence of glucose—during a period of starvation or when someone is on the Atkins diet or in the case of a breastfed infant—the body will convert fatty acids to acids known as ketone bodies that can pass into the brain and serve as food.) Much less is known about how the brain eats, how it regulates supply and demand of energy. "The brain is this little engine that burns through an enormous amount of calories," says Simpson, "but we're still not sure what it does with all that energy." And when something goes wrong—in the case of diabetes, for example—that balance of supply and demand gets p Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Relates To Heart Disease & Stroke

How Diabetes Relates To Heart Disease & Stroke

Being diagnosed with diabetes usually means you have to watch your blood sugar, mainly through diet, exercise, and medication. However, diabetes can cause a variety of complications throughout the entire body—but how? The answer is the circulatory system. The circulatory system is responsible for the transportation of blood throughout the body, providing nutrients and oxygen to cells, as well as transporting waste and carbon dioxide away from them. When the body begins producing and retaining too much glucose (blood sugar), the substance is not isolated to one sector of the body. The circulatory system pushes and pulls the glucose throughout the entirety of the body via the blood. The excessive amounts of sugar cause damage to blood vessels and the organs that are associated with those vessels suffer the consequences. Diabetes and Heart Disease One of the organs that most severely feels the effects of diabetes is the heart. Simply being diagnosed with diabetes dramatically raises a patient’s chances of encountering heart disease. The chances of getting heart disease at a younger age than most, as well as the severity of the heart disease itself, are increased when diabetes enters a patient’s life. As the vessels supplying blood to the heart become damaged, clogged, or hardened by the high presence of glucose, the heart’s ability to receive (and therefore send out) blood is negatively affected. Types of heart disease that are specific to diabetes are Coronary Heart Disease (a buildup of a substance called “plaque” in the arteries), Heart Failure (when the heart is unable to pump the necessary amount of blood), and Diabetic Cardiomyopathy (a disease that damages the actual function and structure of the heart). Diabetes and Stroke Another major organ that suffe Continue reading >>

Chronic Diseases Caused By Low Oxygen In Cells

Chronic Diseases Caused By Low Oxygen In Cells

Chronic Diseases Caused by Low Oxygen in Cells Article contributed by Nirvana science consultant dr.Artour Rakhimov ( ). We already discovered that people with chronic diseases have ineffective or heavy breathing pattern 24/7 with deep breathing 24/7 (for clinical studies, visit the Homepage of this site). While considering carbon dioxide effects, we also found that chronic overbreathing leads to reduced oxygen transport to cells. As a result, ineffective breathing patterns cause tissue hypoxia, chronic inflammation, immunosuppression, and many other negative effects caused by low body-oxygen levels and hypocapnia (reduced CO2 levels). Meanwhile, it is known that tissue hypoxia is the driving force for cancer, heart disease, diabetes, chronic fatigue and many other health conditions. Hence, the more people breathe, the more severe health problems, diseases , and symptoms they are going to experience. In this Section we are going to focus on some common chronic diseases : (overview of the main symptoms and signs of asthma, its causes and treatment). - Symptoms of asthma : a more detailed analysis of main asthma signs - Bronchial asthma (destructive effects of hyperventilation of lungs and airways in humans) - What causes asthma web page provides details of effects of hyperventilaiton on people with asthma - How to stop acute asthma Exacerbation educates about a simple breathing exercise that can be used instead of relievers (like Ventolin) - Sports induced asthma and how to prevent it with one very simple trick - Asthma treatment is based on elimination of overbreathing since chronic overbreathing leads to low body O2, bronchospasm, chronic inflammation and other signs and symptoms of asthma - Cure asthma with breathing normalization. If one has normal breathing 24/7, a Continue reading >>

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