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Can Diabetes Cause Kidney Infection?

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: What You Need To Know

The urgent need to go. The burning pain when you do. The cloudy, foul-smelling urine. If you've experienced a urinary tract or bladder infection, you'd probably prefer to avoid another one. Unfortunately, if you have diabetes, you are up to twice as likely as those without the disease to develop these often painful infections. They’re especially common among women. But there’s a lot you can do to avoid them and to ease your discomfort when they do strike. Making healthy lifestyle choices is key to managing type 2 diabetes, but it can be hard to stay on track. Dr. Anthony Cardillo explains that focusing on diet, exercise and stress reduction can help you maintain control of your diabetes. 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. Why Diabetes Poses a Risk Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, occur when bacteria or other bugs invade your body’s drainage system. Normally, your immune defenses banish these bugs before they can grow and multiply. But if you have diabetes, the following factors interfere: Diabetes impairs some parts of your immune response. You have fewer white blood cells and T cells to fight off invading bacteria, viruses, and fungi. For the same reason, diabetics often develop UTIs caused by less commonly encountered germs. Routine antibiotics may be ineffective. Nerve damage can keep your bladder from emptying, either by weakening muscles or scrambling the signals between your brain and urinary system. Urine that remains in your body too long poses a greater infection risk. Sugar in your blood and urine can also contribute to a greater risk for UTI. Besides pain and Continue reading >>

Chronic Kidney Failure

Chronic Kidney Failure

Your kidneys are responsible for filtering excess fluids and waste products from your blood. This waste is then eliminated in your urine. Chronic kidney failure refers to the loss of kidney function over months or years. In advanced stages, dangerous levels of wastes and fluids back up in your body. This condition is also called chronic kidney disease. If you’re in the early stages of chronic kidney failure, you may or may not have symptoms. Many of the early signs of kidney failure can be confused with other illnesses and conditions. This makes diagnosis difficult. Early symptoms include: nausea and vomiting loss of appetite itching chest pain uncontrollable high blood pressure unexpected weight loss If the damage to your kidneys gets worse, you will eventually notice symptoms. However, this may not happen until a lot of damage is already done. Later-stage symptoms include: difficulty staying alert cramps and twitches numbness in your limbs weakness fatigue bad breath skin that’s darker or lighter than usual bone pain excessive thirst bleeding and bruising easily insomnia urinating much more or less than usual hiccups swollen feet and ankles absent menstrual periods shortness of breath Chronic kidney disease can also lead to serious complications, including: high blood pressure fluid buildup in your lungs or other areas vitamin D deficiency, which can affect your bone health nerve damage that can lead to seizures Diabetes and high blood pressure are the most common conditions that lead to chronic kidney failure. Other causes include: damage to kidney function recurring kidney infections inflammation in your kidneys’ filtration system congenital kidney disease obstruction of your urinary tract autoimmune disorders You’re at a higher risk of chronic kidney failur Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease Tests And Treatments

Kidney Disease Tests And Treatments

The vast majority of people with kidney disease don't know it. That's because it damages the organs slowly over many years before causing symptoms. And left untreated, the condition can eventually require people to spend hours hooked up to a dialysis machine or get a kidney transplant. Even mild kidney problems can contribute to anemia, bone loss, worsened heart disease, and premature death. All that is particularly worrisome now because several factors have conspired to make kidney disease more common than ever. One is the increasing number of people who take multiple medications, which travel through the kidney as they leave the body, taxing the organ. Another is the growing, and related, epidemic of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, both of which further strain the kidneys. People over age 60 are especially vulnerable both because they tend to take more drugs, and because kidney function normally declines somewhat with age. Protecting the body's filters Fortunately, there are several steps you can take to ward off or rein in kidney damage. And you might be able to spot some early warning signs of kidney problems by watching for changes in your urinary habits or your urine's appearance (see the accompanying chart, How to read your urine). More important, improved—but underused—tests can now help diagnose the problem early, when it's most treatable. Your blood passes through a labyrinth of tiny filters in the kidneys that separate substances that the body needs, such as calcium, sodium, and water, from wastes created by the breakdown of food and drugs. The kidneys maintain a balance of the useful substances and eliminate the waste and excess fluid as urine. Diabetes and high blood pressure can overload the kidneys' precision workings, causing irreversible sc Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Kidney Failure

Diabetes And Kidney Failure

One of the causes of kidney failure is diabetes mellitus, a condition characterised by high blood glucose (sugar) levels. Over time, the high levels of sugar in the blood damage the millions of tiny filtering units within each kidney. There is no cure, and treatment must become ever more aggressive as the kidneys deteriorate towards failure. Treatment options include medications, dialysis and kidney transplant. On this page: The main job of the kidneys is to remove waste from the blood and return the cleaned blood back to the body. Kidney failure means the kidneys are no longer able to remove waste and maintain the level of fluid and salts that the body needs. One cause of kidney failure is diabetes mellitus, a condition characterised by high blood glucose (sugar) levels. Over time, the high levels of sugar in the blood damage the millions of tiny filtering units within each kidney. This eventually leads to kidney failure. Around 20 to 30 per cent of people with diabetes develop kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy), although not all of these will progress to kidney failure. A person with diabetes is susceptible to nephropathy whether they use insulin or not. The risk is related to the length of time the person has diabetes. There is no cure for diabetic nephropathy, and treatment is lifelong. Another name for the condition is diabetic glomerulosclerosis. People with diabetes are also at risk of other kidney problems, including narrowing of the arteries to the kidneys, called renal artery stenosis or renovascular disease. Symptoms of kidney failure For people with diabetes, kidney problems are usually picked up during a check-up by their doctor. Occasionally, a person can have type 2 diabetes without knowing it. This means their unchecked high blood sugar levels may be Continue reading >>

Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic Kidney Disease

What is chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the progressive and irreversible destruction of the kidneys. Your kidneys are essential parts of your body. They have several functions, including: helping maintain the balance of minerals and electrolytes in your body, such as calcium, sodium, and potassium playing an essential role in the production of red blood cells maintaining the delicate acid-base (pH) balance of your blood excreting water-soluble wastes from your body Damaged kidneys lose their ability to perform these functions. The most common causes of CKD are high blood pressure and diabetes. Each kidney contains about 1 million tiny filtering units, called nephrons. Any disease that injures or scars the nephrons can cause kidney disease. Diabetes and high blood pressure can both damage your nephrons. High blood pressure can also damage the blood vessels of your kidneys, heart, and brain. The kidneys are highly vascularized, meaning they contain lots of blood vessels. So, blood vessel diseases are generally dangerous to your kidneys. Autoimmune diseases such as lupus can damage blood vessels and can make antibodies against kidney tissue. There are various other causes of CKD. For example, polycystic kidney disease is a hereditary cause of CKD. Glomerulonephritis can be due to lupus. It can also appear after a streptococcal infection. The risk of CKD increases for people older than 65 years. The condition also runs in families. It’s more likely to occur in African-Americans, Native Americans, and Asian-Americans. Other risk factors for CKD include: cigarette smoking obesity diabetes (types 1 and 2) obstructive kidney disease, including bladder obstruction caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia narrowing of the artery that supplies your ki Continue reading >>

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor For Kidney Disease

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor For Kidney Disease

Diabetes mellitus, usually called diabetes, is a disease in which your body does not make enough insulin or cannot use normal amounts of insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar in your blood. A high blood sugar level can cause problems in many parts of your body. The most common ones are Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children. It is also called juvenile onset diabetes mellitus or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this type, your pancreas does not make enough insulin and you have to take insulin injections for the rest of your life. Type 2 diabetes, which is more common, usually occurs in people over 40 and is called adult onset diabetes mellitus. It is also called non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In Type 2, your pancreas makes insulin, but your body does not use it properly. The high blood sugar level often can be controlled by following a diet and/or taking medication, although some patients must take insulin. Type 2 diabetes is particularly prevalent among African Americans, American Indians, Latin Americans and Asian Americans. With diabetes, the small blood vessels in the body are injured. When the blood vessels in the kidneys are injured, your kidneys cannot clean your blood properly. Your body will retain more water and salt than it should, which can result in weight gain and ankle swelling. You may have protein in your urine. Also, waste materials will build up in your blood. Diabetes also may cause damage to nerves in your body. This can cause difficulty in emptying your bladder. The pressure resulting from your full bladder can back up and injure the kidneys. Also, if urine remains in your bladder for a long time, you can develop an infection from the rapid growth of bacteria in urine that h Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Infections

Diabetes And Infections

For people with diabetes, high blood sugars increase the risk of infections starting and spreading more quickly. High blood sugars also slow down the healing process and make infections more resistant to treatment. The first line of defense when it comes to managing the risk for infections is to manage your blood sugar levels as close to your target range as possible because high blood sugar can slow or limit your body’s ability to fight off infection. Some of the more likely places for infections in people with diabetes include the bladder, vagina, feet, kidneys, skin and gums. The Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism published a study by scientists who explain that the greater frequency of infections in people with diabetes is caused by numerous factors such as: high blood sugar levels that weaken the immune system micro- and macro-angiopathies (blood vessel disease) neuropathy which masks pain signals of an injury decrease in antibacterial activity of urine gastrointestinal and urinary function impairment frequent medical interventions due to other health issues People with diabetes are much more likely than people without diabetes to have a bladder infection which is also known as a urinary tract infection (UTI). UTI infections may involve the ureters, urethra, kidneys or bladder and you may experience pain, tiredness, nausea and fever. If you have a UTI, it is crucial to treat the infection because if not, the bacteria may spread to your kidneys and cause a dangerous kidney infection. An American Diabetes Association (ADA) published article states that more than 50% of men and women with diabetes live with some type of bladder dysfunction which involves symptoms like “urinary urgency, frequency, nocturia, and incontinence.” Early detection and treat Continue reading >>

What Causes Kidney Infection?

What Causes Kidney Infection?

Although the urinary system is designed to keep bacteria out, problems can occur. Escherichia coli (E. coli) or other bacteria found in the intestines can enter the urinary tract through the urethra. These bacteria can travel up into the bladder. When this happens it can cause cystitis (inflammation of the bladder). It can also cause a urinary tract infection (UTI). Cystitis occurs in 1-3% of adult women per year. If the infection continues up to the kidneys, it can cause kidney infection. This problem is rare but it can be severe. About 1 in every 30 cases of UTI leads to a kidney infection. You are more likely to get a kidney infection if you have frequent bladder infections or have a structural problem in the urinary tract. Urine normally flows only in one direction—from the kidneys to the bladder. If the flow of urine is blocked or flows in the wrong direction, infections can happen. Urine flow can be blocked by many things, including: tumors inside or outside the urinary tract and structural problems of the urinary tract. People with diabetes or a weak immune system are at high risk for infections. Pregnant women with UTIs should be seen by their health care provider and treated as soon as possible. A kidney infection in a pregnant woman can be very serious. Symptoms Diagnosis Continue reading >>

Chronic Kidney Disease: Symptoms And Treatment

Chronic Kidney Disease: Symptoms And Treatment

MORE Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the gradual and permanent loss of kidney function over time, usually over the course of months or years. Kidneys are responsible for filtering waste from the body. When these organs stop functioning properly, waste builds up to high levels in the blood, which can make a person feel sick. Over time, other health complications can develop as a result of decreased kidney function, including high blood pressure, anemia (decreased red blood cells), weak bones, poor nutritional health and nerve damage, according to the National Kidney Foundation. The most common causes of chronic kidney disease — also known as chronic renal disease — are diabetes and high blood pressure, which are responsible for up to two-thirds of all cases of the disease, according to Dr. Joseph Vassalotti, chief medical officer for the National Kidney Foundation (NKF). These health conditions damage the kidneys' small blood vessels, diminishing that organ's ability to filter metabolic waste from the blood. "As kidney disease advances and kidney function declines, the likelihood of high blood pressure increases. So kidney disease can be caused by high blood pressure, but high blood pressure can also complicate kidney disease from other causes," Vassalotti told Live Science. About 2.6 million people in the United States have chronic kidney disease, and millions of others are at risk of developing the disease. However, early detection can help prevent the progression of kidney disease to kidney failure, according to the National Kidney Foundation. With good care, fewer than 10 percent of diabetics develop CKD, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Signs & symptoms CKD is sometimes called a "silent disease." Patients rarely feel sick until their kidney Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Disease

Diabetic Kidney Disease

Diabetic kidney disease is a complication that occurs in some people with diabetes. It can progress to kidney failure in some cases. Treatment aims to prevent or delay the progression of the disease. Also, it aims to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke which are much more common than average in people with this disease. To find out more about the kidneys and urine see also separate leaflet called The Kidneys and Urinary Tract. What is diabetic kidney disease? Diabetic kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy) is a complication that occurs in some people with diabetes. In this condition the filters of the kidneys, the glomeruli, become damaged. Because of this the kidneys 'leak' abnormal amounts of protein from the blood into the urine. The main protein that leaks out from the damaged kidneys is called albumin. In normal healthy kidneys only a tiny amount of albumin is found in the urine. A raised level of albumin in the urine is the typical first sign that the kidneys have become damaged by diabetes. Diabetic kidney disease is divided into two main categories, depending on how much albumin is lost through the kidneys: Microalbuminuria: in this condition, the amount of albumin that leaks into the urine is between 30 and 300 mg per day. It is sometimes called incipient nephropathy. Proteinuria: in this condition the amount of albumin that leaks into the urine is more than 300 mg per day. It is sometimes called macroalbuminuria or overt nephropathy. How does diabetic kidney disease develop and progress? A raised blood sugar (glucose) level that occurs in people with diabetes can cause a rise in the level of some chemicals within the kidney. These chemicals tend to make the glomeruli more 'leaky' which then allows albumin to lea Continue reading >>

Are Your Kidneys Working? Recognizing And Preventing Chronic Kidney Disease: A Silent Epidemic

Are Your Kidneys Working? Recognizing And Preventing Chronic Kidney Disease: A Silent Epidemic

Are you at risk for kidney disease? More than 26 million American adults are living with kidney disease and don’t know it. One in three American adults is at risk for kidney disease. Anyone can develop kidney disease, but some people are at greater risk. Kidney disease is most often caused by diabetes or high blood pressure, both can cause permanent harm to your kidneys. When your kidneys have been permanently damaged, it’s called chronic kidney disease (CKD). How to determine if you are at risk: Do you have diabetes? Do you have high blood pressure? Do you have heart disease? Did your mother, father, sister, or brother have kidney disease? (Kidney disease runs in families. A family history of kidney disease puts you at higher risk.) Are you over 60? If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, you are at risk for kidney disease. In the early stages symptoms are subtle. Once the disease process begins, the damage progresses quickly in most cases. The early signs of CKD are subtle making it difficult to recognize, which often results in late diagnosis. It can take years to go from chronic kidney disease (CKD) to end stage kidney failure. This is the primarily the cause for the increased burden of the disease in our country making it a “Silent Epidemic.” Kidney disease is usually a progressive disease, which means the damage is permanent and irreversible. Kidney disease also increases the risks for heart disease and stroke. The good news is kidney disease can be treated effectively if caught in the early stages. Early intervention by education and an individual treatment plan can help prevent the progression of CKD. Symptoms of Kidney Disease Symptom 1: Changes in urine frequency, quality, character. Kidneys make urine, so when the kidneys are failing, you may Continue reading >>

Diabetics Should Take Extra Precautions Against Kidney Damage

Diabetics Should Take Extra Precautions Against Kidney Damage

Diabetics must be extra vigilant in protecting against urologic conditions that could further damage their kidneys Diabetes can cause chronic kidney disease and, ultimately, kidney failure. March is Kidney Health Month, and the AUA and AUA Foundation are encouraging patients with diabetes to be well informed about the impact this disease can have if not treated or managed properly. Diabetes is associated with high blood glucose and secondarily elevated blood pressure levels. It is the main cause of kidney failure in the United States. The kidney is responsible for filtering blood, getting rid of waste and providing clean blood to the rest of the body. High blood glucose and blood pressure resulting from diabetes can damage the kidney’s filters, called glomeruli, causing decreased kidney function and even kidney failure. “One third of diabetic patients will suffer from chronic kidney disease,” said AUA Foundation Executive Director Sandra Vassos, MPA. “Many cases take 10 to 15 years to develop. Because kidney disease progresses slowly, it is extremely important for diabetic patients to avoid additional strain on the kidneys by maintaining their urologic health.” Several urologic conditions can cause harm to the kidneys, including infections and urinary retention. Taking certain medications (anti-inflammatory pain relievers) can also result in kidney damage. Early treatment of these conditions is especially important so as not to further damage the kidneys. Urinary Tract Infections (UTI): Frequent and sometimes painful urination is a common symptom of a UTI. Urine may also be cloudy, or have a stronger odor than usual. In some cases, there may also be hematuria, or blood in the urine. Hematuria is a UTI symptom that may also be caused by a more serious problem i Continue reading >>

Infections And Chronic Kidney Disease

Infections And Chronic Kidney Disease

What is an infection? An infection occurs when harmful bacteria or viruses enter the body. These germs can enter the body through touch, through the air we breathe or through our mouths. Your body’s immune system is on constant alert for infection and has a variety of strategies to combat it. One way is by increasing blood flow to the infected site. This transports white blood cells and antibodies to fight the invading germs. Sometimes this increased blood flow can cause inflammation and it’s one of the first signs of a bacterial infection. When an infection isn’t specific to one area, but affects your entire body, you may develop a fever. Increasing the body’s internal temperature is one way your immune system weakens the bacteria or virus, allowing your antibodies to fight them. A fever is also one of the first signs your body is fighting bacteria or a virus. You may feel tired fighting infection. This is a sign that your body wants you to rest. Sometimes an infection can be overwhelming to your body and medical attention is necessary. Why are people with kidney disease prone to infections? People with kidney disease can be more prone to infection because of related conditions such as diabetes, inadequate calorie and protein intake, and the access site can be vulnerable to infection. Diabetes-related infections If you’ve diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD), you may also be at risk for diabetes-related infections. Too much glucose(sugar) in the blood prevents white blood cells from doing their jobs. It’s important to monitor and maintain good glucose levels. Also routinely examine your feet for blisters, sores or ingrown nails. Go to the dentist to make sure you don’t have gum disease or infected teeth. A viral infection from the flu, or a bacterial Continue reading >>

Kidney Infection

Kidney Infection

Definition | Causes | Risk Factors | Symptoms | Diagnosis | Treatment | Prevention Definition Kidney infections may occur in one or both kidneys. The kidneys remove waste from the body through urine. They also balance the water and mineral content in the blood. An infection may prevent them from working properly. Normal Anatomy of the Kidney Causes Kidney infections are caused by a bacteria. The specific type of bacteria can vary. The bacteria most often comes from an untreated bladder infection. Risk Factors Bacteria may be introduced to the urinary tract and ultimately the kidneys by: Sexual activity Conditions that block or slow the flow of urine such as: Tumors Enlarged prostate gland Kidney stones Birth defect of the urinary tract, including vesicoureteral reflux Having a test to examine the bladder— cystoscopy Having a catheter or stent placed in the urinary tract Conditions that impair bladder emptying like multiple sclerosis and spina bifida Other medical conditions that increase your risk of infection include: Pregnancy Recurrent urinary tract infection Diabetes Weakened immune system Symptoms Symptoms of kidney infection may include: Pain in the abdomen, lower back, side, or groin Frequent urination Urgent urination that produces only a small amount of urine Sensation of a full bladder—even after urination Burning pain with urination Fever and chills Nausea and vomiting Pus and blood in the urine Loss of appetite Diagnosis You will be asked about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. Your bodily fluids will be tested. This can be done with: Blood tests Urine tests Images may be taken of your bodily structures. This can be done with: Treatment Complications from untreated or poorly treated kidney infection can lead to: A serious, Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Overview Predisposition to urinary tract infections (UTIs) in diabetes mellitus results from several factors. Susceptibility increases with longer duration and greater severity of diabetes. [1] High urine glucose content and defective host immune factors predispose to infection. Hyperglycemia causes neutrophil dysfunction by increasing intracellular calcium levels and interfering with actin and, thus, diapedesis and phagocytosis. Vaginal candidiasis and vascular disease also play a role in recurrent infections. Recently, the use of SGLT2 inhibitors, such as dapagliflozin, has produced concern about an increased risk of urinary tract infections in recipients of these medications. Levels of urinary glucose increased with greater doses of the medication; however, the incidence of urinary tract infections did not. Nonetheless, such patients do appear to be at a 3- to 5-fold increased risk of genital infections. [2, 3] Over time, patients with diabetes may develop cystopathy, nephropathy, and renal papillary necrosis, complications that predispose them to UTIs. Long-term effects of diabetic cystopathy include vesicourethral reflux and recurrent UTIs. In addition, as many as 30% of women with diabetes have some degree of cystocele, cystourethrocele, or rectocele. All of these may contribute to the frequency and severity of UTIs in female diabetics. Complicated UTIs in patients who have diabetes include renal and perirenal abscess, emphysematous pyelonephritis, emphysematous cystitis, fungal infections, xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, and papillary necrosis. The current article focuses on emphysematous UTIs, with which diabetes is closely associated. Diabetes mellitus and obstruction of the urinary tract are the predominant risk factors for developing emphysematous UTIs. T Continue reading >>

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