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Can Diabetes Cause Itchy Skin?

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

Itchy Armpits (itchy Underarms) Causes, Symptoms, Treatments, And Home Remedies

Itchy Armpits (itchy Underarms) Causes, Symptoms, Treatments, And Home Remedies

There are many reasons for someone to experience itchy underarms, and oftentimes itchy armpits occur with no sign of a rash. Overall, itchy armpits aren’t a serious condition, but being in a crowd of people with a strong desire to start scratching your underarms can be annoying – embarrassing much? So let us help you rid yourself from the itchy sensation and help you understand the causes, symptoms, treatments, and home remedies for itchy underarms. Generally, the armpit is not the first area of study when it comes to learning about the human body. It is a hallow area of skin that grows hair – this much we know for sure. The armpit is located directly below the shoulder joints and contains several blood vessels and lymph nodes along with hair follicles and sweat glands. The most you think about your armpits is when you put deodorant on in the morning or when you bathe yourself, but we’re here to shed some light on a real armpit concern – itchy armpits. Causes of itchy underarms There are at least 19 different reasons as to why your underarm may itch – many of them harmless, but some do require medical attention. Lack of hygiene: Because your underarms sweat, without proper hygiene the growing bacteria can cause irritation and itchiness. Washing under your arms, especially after excessive sweating, can help reduce armpit itching. Laundry detergent: If you are sensitive to the ingredients in laundry detergent, you may find your armpits itch as a result. You may have to switch laundry detergents for one with fewer chemicals. Improper shaving: Using a dull razor, dry-shaving, or shaving too often can result in itchy bumps under the armpit. Always use a shaving cream and ensure your razor is sharp enough so you are not going over the area numerous times. Intertri Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Problems

Diabetes And Skin Problems

Diabetes can affect all body systems, but often the connection between diabetes and skin problems is missed. Up to one third of people with diabetes will experience skin problems related to the disease. If caught early, most conditions can be treated and resolved. Skin problems should be addressed and promptly treated to avoid serious consequences and complications. Here is a summary of common skin problems that occur more frequently in people with diabetes, along with some skin problems that are specifically related to the disease. If you have diabetes, and skin problems are a concern, the best way to prevent problems is to keep your diabetes in good control, keep blood sugar within recommended levels and practice good skin care. General Skin Problems that Often Occur in People with Diabetes Bacterial infections produce painful and swollen, inflamed skin that is often hot to the touch. These infections can usually be treated with antibiotics and improve with good blood sugar control. Bacteria can thrive in the presence of excess glucose. Examples of bacterial infections are boils, eyelid styes, carbuncles, nail infections and hair follicle infections. Staphylococcus is a common bacterium responsible for bacterial infections in people with diabetes. Fungal infections produce itchy rashes in moist areas of the body, such as skin folds. These rashes can be red, surrounded by scales or blisters and have a yeasty white film in the folds of the skin. Prescription medicines and good diabetes control help in treatment. As with bacterial infections, excess glucose is beneficial to fungus. Examples of fungal infections are: yeast infections, jock itch, ringworm and athlete's foot. Candida albicans is a common fungus responsible for fungal infections in people with diabetes. Dry Continue reading >>

​top Tips For Testicular Itching

​top Tips For Testicular Itching

Testicular itching can be easily managed. The Department of Dermatology, Singapore General Hospital (SGH) shares some tips on stopping the itch. There are many causes of the itch down there, but it is not advisable to use over-the-counter creams without a proper medical diagnosis. “It may be embarrassing to share your concerns about this uncomfortable itch,” says Dr Pang Shiu Ming, Senior Consultant, Department of Dermatology, Singapore General Hospital (SGH), a member of the SingHealth group. But more often than not, the cause of your testicular itching can be easily treated. What could be causing the itch? Actually, the term testicular itch is incorrect as the testicles are inside the scrotal sac and they don’t itch. What is commonly affected by an itchy rash is the skin of the scrotal sac and the groin. The pubic area, the shaft of the penis and the tip of the penis are less commonly affected. Types of itch that can affect the scrotal skin Eczema: “This is a chronic skin condition marked by itching, inflammation, redness, and swelling of the skin,” says Dr Pang. “While there’s no cure for eczema, it can be treated to prevent flare-ups.” Extramammary Paget’s disease of the scrotal skin is a skin cancer that may look similar to eczema. If an eczematous rash does not respond to treatment, this more serious condition is suspected. This rash sometimes involves the groin and the anal skin. Types of itch that can affect the groin Tinea cruris (dermatophyte infection – a kind of fungal infection also called jock itch): This is an itchy, irritable rash in the groin area that mostly affects men. It is typically associated with sweating and tight clothing. Dr Pang explains: “There is usually intense itching in the groin area. Sometimes, there might be a re Continue reading >>

Causes

Causes

The cause of itchy bottom isn't always known. However, it can sometimes be a symptom of another problem or underlying condition. Infection An itchy bottom may be a sign that your body is trying to deal with an infection. The infection may be: bacterial – such as the streptococcal bacteria that causes streptococcal infections, or the staphylococcal bacteria that causes staphylococcal infections fungal – such as the Candida albicans fungus that causes vaginal thrush (itching, irritation and swelling of the vagina and surrounding area) parasitic – such as threadworms (small worm parasites that infect the intestines), or scabies (tiny mites that burrow into the skin) viral – such as the herpes simplex virus, which causes cold sores An itchy bottom can sometimes be a symptom of a sexually transmitted infection (STI). If you've had unprotected sex and think you could have an STI, visit your local sexual health clinic. They can offer advice and provide testing and treatment. Gastrointestinal conditions Gastrointestinal conditions affect your digestive tract (your mouth, throat, stomach, intestines and anus). Gastrointestinal conditions that may cause an itchy bottom include: haemorrhoids (piles) – swellings in and around your anus that contain enlarged and swollen blood vessels anal fistula – where a small channel (tract) develops between your anal canal (the last section of the large intestine) and the surface of your skin, near the anus anal fissure – a tear or ulcer (open sore) that develops in the lining of the anal canal sphincter incompetence – where the sphincter (the ring of muscle that opens and closes your anus) stops working properly, causing bowel incontinence long-term diarrhoea – passing loose, watery stools long-term constipation – an inabili Continue reading >>

Itchy Feet And Ankles: The Most Common Causes And Treatment

Itchy Feet And Ankles: The Most Common Causes And Treatment

If you suffer from itchy feet and ankles, you probably know first-hand just how uncomfortable this condition can make you. You might be tempted to ignore this problem, thinking it is not very important, but be careful: while some of the reasons for itchy feet are minor and can be corrected easily, some can mask more serious conditions. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Read on to find out more about the most common causes of this problem. Infections One of the most common causes of red, itchy feet is an infection. Athlete’s foot (Causes, Symptoms, Treatment) Athlete’s foot is an infection caused by a fungus.(1) Its medical name is tinea pedis. This infection is contagious that can be picked up by walking barefoot in areas like public pools or locker rooms. Apart from itchiness, your feet may also be red and stinging and the skin may blister, peel or crack. There can also be oozing or weeping of the infected areas. It is also possible for this fungal infection to your hands (called tinea manuum) or to the groin (called tinea cruris). The good news? This uncomfortable condition is easily treated with over-the-counter anti-fungal infections like Lamisil or Lotrimin.(2) Scabies (Causes, Symptoms, Treatment) Scabies are another common infection, only this one is caused by a parasite called a human itch mite, which can find its way into the skin and lay its eggs.(3) Because of this cycle, the symptoms of this infection can go on for months or even years. Itchy feet are more common symptoms in children than adults with this condition.(4) In adults, itchiness can also occur on the arms and hands and the skin can blister, peel or scale. Another common sign is th Continue reading >>

Common Symptoms Of Diabetes...

Common Symptoms Of Diabetes...

The food we eat is converted into glucose (suger) which is used by our bodies for energy. The pancreas makes a hormone called insulin which helps cells assimulate glucose. Glucose and insulin are circulated to all parts of our body within our blood. When you have diabetes, your cells can't get enough glucose; this occurs either because your body doesn't have enough insulin or it can't use insulin very well because your cells have built up a resistance to insulin. This problem results in excessive glucose in your blood which causes premature aging of your cardiovascular system, kidneys, eyes, and immune system. This premature aging leads to what are called diabetic complications which include heart and kidney disease, stroke, poor circulation, difficulty walking or exercising, vision and nerve damage; all of which get worse with poor blood glucose control, stress, and increasing age and obesity. Overall, treating diabetes involves controlling your diet, exercising, managing your response to stress, monitoring your blood glucose to avoid low and high levels, monitoring your blood pressure, and initiating other regular tests to check on how well your diabetes is being controlled. Common symptoms of diabetes... Unusual thirst Frequent urination Extreme fatigue and weakness Blurred vision Abdominal pains Nausea and vomiting Rapid weight loss or gain Skin infections Impotence Fluid retention (especially in legs and feet) Poor healing of skin wounds Decreased tolerance to cold Chronic itching Irregular or rapid heart rate Dry scaly skin Numbness or tingling of fingers and toes Extreme hunger pangs Hot and sweaty with clammy perspiration Heart tremors and palpitations Apprehensive with no obvious reason Shaky and nervous Disoriented, confused, inability to concentrate Frequent Continue reading >>

Skin Complications And Diabetes

Skin Complications And Diabetes

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin.As many as one out of three people who are living with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In fact, sometimes such problems are the first sign that a person has diabetes. Some of these problems are skin conditions anyone can have, but people with diabetes get more easily. These include bacterial infections, fungal infections and itching. Other skin problems happen mostly, or only, to people with diabetes. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters and eruptive xanthomatosis. In addition to November being American Diabetes Month, it is also National Healthy Skin Month, so it’s the perfect time to talk about the topic of skin complications and diabetes. Luckily, most skin conditions can be prevented or easily treated if caught early. Good skin care is essential and there are several things you can do to head off skin problems. First and foremost, keeping your diabetes well managed is crucial to avoiding complications. People with high glucose levels tend to have dry skin and less ability to fend off harmful bacteria. Both conditions increase the risk of infection. In addition, here are some tips on how to properly care for your skin: Keep skin clean and dry. Use talcum powder in areas where skin touches skin, such as armpits and groin. Avoid very hot baths and showers. If your skin is dry, don’t use bubble baths. Moisturizing soaps may help. Afterward, use a standard skin lotion, but don’t put lotions between toes. The extra moisture there can encourage fungus to grow. Prevent dry skin. Scratching dry or itchy skin can open it up and allow infection to set in. Moisturize your skin to prevent chapping, Continue reading >>

Skin Problems In Children: Frequently Asked Questions

Skin Problems In Children: Frequently Asked Questions

What are some common skin problems in children? Probably the most common skin problems in children are things that most of us recognize, like bug bites, scrapes, and bruises. Diaper rash is incredibly common in babies. Eczema is also quite common as are problems with the sun and skin infections due to bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Are they often treatable by over-the-counter medications? Many skin conditions in children are treatable by over-the-counter medications, but some do require prescriptions. It is important to know exactly what you are treating so the appropriate therapy can be started. Are skin problems often triggered by allergies, etc.? There certainly are a number of skin problems that are triggered by allergies, such as poison ivy rashes which are very, very common in the spring and summer. Atopic dermatitis most commonly occurs in people who have allergies or asthma or a family history of allergies. What is serosis? How is psoriasis treated? There are a couple of different diseases that sound somewhat like the word in your question. One is psoriasis, which is a skin condition where one sees reddish/orange areas on the skin that have thick white scale. Psoriasis lesions are more frequent on the elbows, knees, and scalp. Psoriasis also frequently causes nail changes. Another skin condition that sounds very similar is xerosis. Xerosis is the medical term for dry skin. The guest that asked that question might want to follow-up on a question as to which of those conditions they were referring to. Are children more apt to be allergic to bug bites? Children are more likely to get bigger reactions to bug bites. Typically you may see much bigger bumps at the site of a bite on a child than one on an adult. Also, because children, as a group, spend more time playing Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Itchy Skin

Diabetes & Itchy Skin

Diabetes can lead to various complications. One of them is skin problems. In fact, most people with diabetes will experience skin problems at one point in their lives. Everyone can develop skin problems, but for people with diabetes, a seemingly small problem could develop into something worse. A very common skin condition amongst people with diabetes is itchy skin. Causes for itchy skin Itchy skin is usually an indication for dry skin. This is caused by dehydration. People with diabetes have very high blood glucose levels. The body wants to get rid of the excess glucose build up in the blood and starts secreting fluids. This affects the whole body, and causes the skin to become dry. A part from high blood glucose, the itching can also be caused by poor blood flow or a yeast infection. When a poor blood flow is the cause, the itching will occur at the lower legs and feet. A yeast infection will most often develop under the breasts, around nails, between fingers and toes, in armpits, under foreskin and around the vagina. Avoid scratching the skin when it itches because this could lead to cracks. When harmful bacteria invade these cracks, a serious infection can develop. How to treat an itchy skin Monitoring blood glucose levels and making sure they are not too high is the most important factor in preventing diabetic skin problems. A doctor can help you with this. Furthermore, proper skin care is important to prevent itching. Make sure you wash your skin with a mild, soap-free product and dry the skin carefully afterwards. After bathing or showering, you can use a moisturizing lotion to help keep the skin supple and moist. Continue reading >>

Causes Of Diabetic Itching

Causes Of Diabetic Itching

According to the Cleveland Clinic, itching skin, also known as pruritus, can have many causes in people with diabetes. Examples include yeast infections, dry skin and poor circulation. Most skin issues can be prevented or easily treated if caught early. If left untreated, however, some skin issues can lead to infection and other serious complications including amputation. Keeping diabetes under control is key to preventing skin-related complications. Video of the Day Candida albicans, a yeast-like fungus, is often responsible for itchy rashes with tiny blisters and scales. Fungal infections usually occur in warm, moist areas such as under the breasts, between fingers and toes, around the nails, in the corners of the mouth, the armpits and the groin. Three common forms of fungal infections include jock itch, athlete’s foot and ringworm. Medication may be necessary to treat fungal infections. According to the American Diabetes Association, eruptive xanthamatosis is often seen in individuals with uncontrolled blood glucose and high blood triglyceride levels. In this condition, itchy, yellow, firm, pea-like formations with a red halo develop on the skin, usually on the backs of hands, feet, arms, legs and buttocks. Once diabetes control has been restored, these bumps will disappear. Poor circulation, a result of the hardening and narrowing of blood vessels, often causes itching of the lower legs and feet. Lotion may aid in preventing itching from dry skin. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, keeping blood glucose levels under control, eliminating tobacco use and being physically active can help increase circulation and protect your legs and feet. Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum (NLD), a condition that can be itchy and painful, is caused by bloo Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Exocrine Pancreatic Cancer

Signs And Symptoms Of Exocrine Pancreatic Cancer

The symptoms of exocrine pancreatic cancers and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are often different, so they are described separately. Having one or more of the symptoms below does not mean you have pancreatic cancer. In fact, many of these symptoms are more likely to be caused by other conditions. Still, if you have any of these symptoms, it’s important to have them checked by a doctor so that the cause can be found and treated, if needed. Early pancreatic cancers often do not cause any signs or symptoms. By the time they do cause symptoms, they have often already spread outside the pancreas. Jaundice and related symptoms Jaundice is yellowing of the eyes and skin. Most people with pancreatic cancer (and nearly all people with ampullary cancer) will have jaundice as one of their first symptoms. Jaundice is caused by the buildup of bilirubin, a dark yellow-brown substance made in the liver. Normally, the liver excretes bilirubin as part of a liquid called bile. Bile goes through the common bile duct into the intestines, where it helps break down fats. It eventually leaves the body in the stool. When the common bile duct becomes blocked, bile can’t reach the intestines, and the level of bilirubin in the body builds up. Cancers that start in the head of the pancreas are near the common bile duct. These cancers can press on the duct and cause jaundice while they are still fairly small, which can sometimes lead to these tumors being found at an early stage. But cancers that start in the body or tail of the pancreas don’t press on the duct until they have spread through the pancreas. By this time, the cancer has often spread beyond the pancreas as well. When pancreatic cancer spreads, it often goes to the liver. This can also lead to jaundice. Dark urine: Somet Continue reading >>

Lichen Planus

Lichen Planus

SUN EXPOSURE is the leading cause of skin cancer. Ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun damage the skin's DNA. After cumulative UV exposure, cancer begins after many gene mutations and the body can no longer repair itself. What is lichen planus? Lichen planus is a relatively common inflammatory disease that affects the skin and/or inside the mouth, resulting in distinctive skin and/or oral lesions. Lichen planus of the skin usually causes itching. There seems to be a relationship between the oral form and the skin form of lichen planus. Almost half of those with the oral version also have skin lesions. The onset may be gradual or quick, but the exact cause of the inflammation that leads to lichen planus is not yet fully understood. It is important to note that lichen planus itself is not an infectious disease. Therefore, this disease is not passed from one person to another by any means. Lichen planus is not a type of cancer. Who gets lichen planus? Lichen planus affects around one percent of the general population. Both men and women can get lichen planus. Skin lichen planus affects men and women equally, but oral lichen planus affects women twice as often as men. Although it may occur at any age, it usually affects middle-aged adults. It is uncommon in the very young and elderly. This disease can affect any individual all over the world, regardless of the race, skin color and culture. What are the signs and symptoms of lichen planus? Lichen planus of the skin appears as small, flat-topped, red-to-purple bumps with round or irregular shape. You may have just a few small bumps or you may have many. If you take a closer look, you might see white scales or flakes on them. Some may have wispy, gray-to-white streaks called Wickham's Striae. Lichen planus causes itching with an Continue reading >>

10 Skin Problems And How To Treat Them

10 Skin Problems And How To Treat Them

One of the problems that diabetic patients face regularly is that there is very little information that is made available to them regarding the various symptoms of their disease. Usually doctors give precedence to symptoms which are more dangerous and require urgent care and attention, and the big pharmaceutical companies focus on one tiny treatment at a time to prolong the dependence of their patients on their expensive drugs so as to make the highest profits. All these factors overshadow the other insignificant symptoms. But these minor problems add up over time, and can finally cause severe complications in the body. Diabetes not only causes Diabetic Retinopathy and Peripheral Neuropathy, but it is known for affecting the skin in the direst ways imaginable. Here you will learn about the 10 skin problems caused by diabetes, and how you can treat them: Vitiligo: This causes irregular light blotchy patches on the skin. Diabetes can kill cells in the skin that are responsible for creating melanin. Melanin is a pigment that makes the skin darker, and protects it from harmful UV radiation of the sun. Fungal infection: People with diabetes often have candida albicans, which is a yeast-like infection. It can cause red rashes with blisters and scales. They usually grow in moist areas like between toes and in armpits. Bacterial Infections: This is one of the most common problems that diabetic patients face. Bacterial skin problems like boils, carbuncles, nail infections and eyelid styes can cause skin swelling and even affect the deep tissue underneath. Itching: Poor blood circulation, extremely dry and flaky skin, rashes and yeast infections can cause itching. Patients often break skin and draw blood because of continuous scratching, and this can increase the chance of bacter Continue reading >>

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