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Can Diabetes Cause Headaches And Nausea?

What Does A Diabetic Headache Feel Like?

What Does A Diabetic Headache Feel Like?

About Diabetes & Diabetic Headache When your body's ability to use or produce insulin gets impaired, it gives way to a disease known as diabetes. Insulin is a hormone which helps the body to use glucose or sugar derived from the food we eat to give us energy or store it for future use. Made in the pancreas, insulin also helps prevent the blood sugar levels from getting both too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia). There are 2 types of Diabetes. In the Type 1 Diabetes, the pancreas in unable to produce insulin without which excess amounts of sugar remain in the blood, become toxic over time and lead to headaches, blindness, neuropathy and fatigue. In Type 2 Diabetes, cellular resistance to insulin occurs in the body and is not diagnosed till severe symptoms such as diabetic headaches start to reveal itself. Understanding what a diabetic headache or the symptoms of a diabetic headache is not easy and in some cases the patient is unable to bear the pain associated with the same. Let us analyze what a diabetic headache feels like. What Does a Diabetic Headache Feel Like? The cause of the diabetic headache determines its feeling and extent. There are certain symptoms and signs which help determine the type of diabetic headache that you are suffering from. Let us analyze each of these types of diabetic headaches and the feeling associated with it. High blood glucose of hyperglycemia occurs when there is insufficient production of insulin in the pancreas or the body develops cellular resistance to the same. Occurring in both types of diabetes, it can prove to be fatal for some patients as the high concentration of glucose in the blood can prove toxic for the blood nerves or vessels. The problem with this condition is that many patients are unable to feel the symptom Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Headaches?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Headaches?

Diabetes is a condition where the body cannot make enough of the hormone insulin, or cannot use it properly, causing glucose to build up in the blood. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 29 million people in the United States have diabetes. Diabetes does not usually cause headaches. But, while headaches are not dangerous, they may be an indication of poor blood sugar control in a person with diabetes. Over time, periods of continuous high or low blood sugar can lead to serious and even life-threatening health complications, such as heart disease and kidney failure. This article looks at the connection between diabetes and headaches and suggests ways to relieve diabetes-induced headaches. Contents of this article: Types of headache According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, published by the International Headache Society, there are over 150 types of headaches. Broadly speaking, headaches can be classified as either primary or secondary: Primary headaches are ones that are not linked to another medical condition. Examples of primary headaches include migraines and tension headaches. Secondary headaches are caused by underlying medical conditions or health issues and include the type of headache often experienced by people with diabetes. Other causes of secondary headaches include: hormone fluctuations infection nerve disorders overuse of medication trauma The pain associated with either primary or secondary headaches can vary in severity and duration. Some people may not experience headaches often, while others can get a headache several days each week. Depending on the type of headache, other symptoms may be present. For example, migraines can be linked with nausea and increased sensitivity to sound or light. Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Hypoglycemia?

What Are The Symptoms Of Hypoglycemia?

Taking certain glucose-lowering medication for diabetes can push blood sugar too low (hypoglycemia), as can skipping a meal or eating too little, exercising more than usual or drinking alcohol. You will know your blood sugar is low -- 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or less -- when you feel one or more of the following: dizzy or light-headedness hungry nervous and shaky sleepy confused sweaty Test your glucose to make sure it's low, and if it is at or below 70 mg/dL, consume 15 grams (g) of carbohydrate -- for example, drinking a half cup of juice or three-fourths of a cup of regular (not diet!) soda or taking three to four glucose tabs. Low blood sugar is about 70 mg/dL or less. Along with checking your blood sugar, watch out for these symptoms of low blood sugar: Shakiness or dizziness Sweating Hunger Headache Feeling cranky, sad, or confused The neurogenic symptoms include tremor, palpitations, and anxiety/arousal (catecholamine-mediated, adrenergic) and sweating, hunger, and paresthesias (acetylcholine-mediated, cholinergic). In the patient without diabetes, the presence of neuroglycopenic symptoms provides more clinically compelling evidence of an underlying hypoglycemic disorder, as the neurogenic symptoms are particularly nonspecific. Recognition of neurogenic symptoms by patients with diabetes can lead to prompt self-treatment. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include the following: Shakiness Dizziness Sweating Hunger Headache Pale skin color Sudden moodiness or behavior changes, such as crying for no apparent reason Clumsy or jerky movements Seizure Difficulty paying attention, or confusion Tingling sensations around the mouth Continue reading >>

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness is a symptom that is often applies to a variety of sensations including lightheadedness and vertigo. Vertigo is the sensation of spinning, while lightheadedness is typically described as near fainting, and weakness. Some of the conditions that may cause lightheadedness in a patient include low blood pressure, high blood pressure, dehydration, medications, postural or orthostatic hypotension, diabetes, endocrine disorders, hyperventilation, heart conditions, and vasovagal syncope. Vertigo is most often caused by a problem in the balance centers of the inner ear called the vestibular system and causes the sensation of the room spinning. It may be associated with vomiting. Symptoms often are made worse with position changes. Those with significant symptoms and vomiting may need intravenous medication and hospitalization. Vertigo is also the presenting symptom in patients with Meniere's Disease and acoustic neuroma, conditions that often require referral to an ENT specialist. Vertigo may also be a symptom of stroke. Most often, dizziness or lightheadedness is a temporary situation that resolves spontaneously without a specific diagnosis being made. Introduction to dizziness (feeling dizzy) Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms that will prompt a person to seek medical care. The term dizziness is sometimes difficult to understand since it means different things to different people. It is either the sensation of feeling lightheaded as if the individual is weak and will pass out, or it describes vertigo or the sensation of spinning, as if the affected person just got off a merry-go-round. Lightheadedness is often caused by a decrease in blood supply to the brain, while vertigo may be caused by disturbances of the inner ear and the balance centers of the brain. Continue reading >>

Migraines And Diabetes

Migraines And Diabetes

Migraines and diabetes. Is there a connection? Although the two diseases can be comorbid, statistics don’t show that people with Migraine are more likely to have diabetes than people with Migraine; nor do they show that people with diabetes are more likely to have Migraine disease. One study did show that, among Migraineurs, those who have Migraine with aura have diabetes more commonly than those who have Migraine without aura.1 No reason was identified for this. As with any condition, diabetes can, however impact Migraine attacks, and Migraine attacks can impact diabetes. Our bodies are their own ecosystem. Everything affects everything else. Many Migraineurs report that missing a meal or needing to fast triggers a Migraine attack. Peroutka makes a quite accurate observation, “The Migraine patient does not react well to change from within or without.”2 He goes on to remark about Migraine triggers that are changes in sleep patterns, hormone levels, weather, and diet to say: “These seemingly diverse trigger factors are all united in that they all cause physiologic “stress” to the nervous system, and each may activate the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), as evidenced by the release of stress-related neurotransmitters and hormones such as norepinephrine, epinephrine, and cortisol.”2 Some Migraineurs also report that eating sugar or a large amount of carbohydrate also triggers a Migraine. Both missing a meal or fasting and eating sugar or a large amount of carbohydrates are stressful to the body. Fasting can cause the depletion of glycogen stored in the liver. Eating a large amount of carbohydrates can cause reactive hyperglycemia (increased blood glucose levels). To avoid these triggers, it’s recommended that Migraineurs eat on a regular schedule. Peroutka Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Headaches: Soothing That Aching Head

Diabetes And Headaches: Soothing That Aching Head

We’ve all had headaches. Some more than others, I suspect. I woke up the other morning with a pounding headache, as a matter of fact. Having a headache is definitely not the way to start your day. Perhaps not surprisingly, people who have diabetes can certainly get headaches, and apart from the “usual” culprits, these headaches can stem from fluctuations in blood sugar. There are ways to treat and manage them, however. Read on to learn more. What is a headache anyway? Simply put, a headache is a pain that occurs in any part of the head — on the side, in the front, or in the back. The type of headache pain can vary widely, from sharp, to dull, to throbbing. And the frequency of pain may be different — the pain may come on all of a sudden, or more gradually, and it can last an hour or last days. Types of headaches A headache is a headache, right? Not exactly. There are two main forms of headaches: primary and secondary. A primary headache is due to a problem with or overactivity of pain structures in the head, such as blood vessels, nerves, or muscles. Examples of primary headaches include: • Migraines • Cluster headaches • Tension headaches Secondary headaches occur as a symptom of a disease or condition, such as: • Blood clot • Brain aneurysm • Brain freeze (also known as “ice cream headache”) • Brain tumor • Carbon monoxide poisoning • Flu • Ear infection • Sinus infection • Stroke • Concussion • Monosodium glutamate (MSG) • Panic attacks • Changes in hormones Why might diabetes cause headaches? Having diabetes doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ll automatically have headaches. However, diabetes headaches tend to occur due to changes in blood sugar levels. The more “up and down” your blood sugars are, the more likely Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Hypoglycemia And Headaches

The Connection Between Hypoglycemia And Headaches

❮ GO BACK TO Common Headaches Hypoglycemia is a condition marked by low blood sugar in the body, which is significant because the brain needs a constant supply of glucose to function properly. When glucose levels drop, the brain is among the first organs affected. Common symptoms of hypoglycemia are weakness, lightheadedness, sweating, and a shift in one’s level of consciousness. But what many people don’t realize is that hypoglycemia can actually be responsible for triggering headaches too. This is because a lack of glucose in the brain can cause severe pain and pressure. This article will explore the connection between hypoglycemia and headaches, as well as lifestyle habits that trigger the onset of these conditions. Causes of Hypoglycemia There are many different causes of hypoglycemia because various factors affect blood sugar production, regulation, absorption, and storage in the body. For example, certain medications that are used to treat diabetes can result in low blood sugar. For individuals who do not have diabetes, hypoglycemia can be caused by other types of medications, such as those used to treat kidney failure and malaria. Liver, kidney, and anorexia nervosa are all illnesses that can lead to hypoglycemic symptoms as well. Hormone deficiencies and excessive alcohol consumption may play a role as well in some individuals. Finally, diet plays a significant role in the way the human body processes sugars. Therefore, it is important to eat enough calories per day to keep blood sugar at a healthy level. Habits That Make Hypoglycemia Worse Bad eating habits can make an existing condition of hypoglycemia worse, such as excessive dieting, fasting, skipping meals, and exercising on an empty stomach. Interestingly, eating meals with too much sugar can actuall Continue reading >>

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) goes up and down in a small range throughout the day. In people with diabetes, the range can be much wider. It is important to understand the fine balance between treating the high sugars and avoiding the low sugars. If you have diabetes and take certain diabetes drugs or insulin, you may experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia [hy-po-gly-SEE-me-uh]) from time to time. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar of less than 70 mg/dL. However, some people have symptoms of low blood sugar even at higher blood sugar levels. This can happen when blood sugar is dropping too quickly or if the person has had very high blood sugars for a long time. Severe hypoglycemia means the person needs someone to treat them, which is a very serious condition! Even mild hypoglycemia symptoms are hard on your body and on your emotions. By learning more about the signs and causes of low blood sugar, you can take steps to keep it from happening again. Frequent low blood sugars are serious because the body becomes less able to show the warning signals of a low blood sugar. The blood sugar can then fall to dangerously low levels. What causes low blood sugar and what are the symptoms? Low blood sugar is usually caused by eating less or later than usual, changing your physical activity or taking a diabetes medicine that is not right for your needs. Even mistakes in dosing can lead to hypoglycemia. For example, you could mistake one insulin for another or forget that you had already taken your diabetes pills! A recent large study showed that the most common causes of hypoglycemia were smaller than usual food intake, delay in eating, or skipping a meal. Common symptoms of low blood sugar are: Feeling dizzy, shaky, or lightheaded Feeling nervous or anxious Having a fast heart beat Sweating Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia

Hypoglycaemia

Hypoglycaemia is the medical condition of having an abnormally low blood sugar (glucose) level, and can be responsible for triggering or exacerbating migraine and other headaches The importance of blood-glucose We need energy to function, and most of this energy comes from consuming carbohydrates (sugars). Our bodies convert these carbohydrates into glucose (which is easier to use), and is then carried in the blood to whichever parts of the body need it. The brain requires a continuous supply of glucose from the blood in order to function, and if glucose levels drop (as in hypoglycaemia) the brain is one of the first organs affected. Maintaining blood-glucose levels Our bodies have to keep their blood-glucose levels from becoming too low or too high, and they do this using two fast-acting hormones: insulin and glucagon. When blood-glucose levels get too high, insulin acts to bring them down; when levels get too low, glucagon pushes them back up. Causes of hypoglycaemia If we don’t eat enough calories for our bodies’ needs, then our blood-glucose levels drop too low. This can happen if we skip meals, fast, diet, or exercise on insufficient food. Eating a high-sugar meal can cause ‘reactive hypoglycaemia’, because the sudden rise in blood-glucose from the sugary food triggers an over-production of insulin, which in turn makes the blood-glucose levels fall too low. If diabetes patients inject too much insulin into their bodies, it can also cause their blood-glucose levels to fall too low. Symptoms of hypoglycaemia The brain not receiving enough glucose causes most of the symptoms of hypoglycaemia, which include: headache, migraine, confusion, nausea, sweating, faintness, and hypothermia. If the hypoglycaemia is very severe and prolonged, it can even cause loss-of-c Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes: Low Blood Sugar

www.CardioSmart.org Hypoglycemia means that your blood sugar is low and your body (especially your brain) is not getting enough fuel. Your blood sugar can go too low if you take too much insulin, miss a meal, or take too much of your other diabetes medicine. A snack or drink with sugar in it will raise your blood sugar and should ease your symptoms right away. What are the symptoms of low blood sugar? Watch for these early signs of low blood sugar: • You have nausea. • You are hungry. • You feel nervous, cranky, or shaky. • You have cold, clammy, wet skin. • You sweat when you are not exercising. • You have a fast heartbeat. • You feel confused. • You feel anxious. If your blood sugar drops while you are sleeping, your partner or other family members may notice that you are sweating and behaving differently. Signs of low blood sugar at night include: • Restlessness. • Making unusual noises. • Trying to get out of bed or accidentally rolling out of bed. • Sleepwalking. • Nightmares. • Sweating. You may wake up with a headache in the morning if your blood sugar was low during the night. How do you prevent low blood sugar? • Themost important way to prevent low blood sugar is to test your blood sugar level often each day and to follow your doctor's instructions. It is especially important to check at times when your blood sugar has been low in the past. • Eat small meals more often so that you do not get too hungry between meals. Do not skip meals. • Balance extra exercise with eating more. Not everyone will have low blood sugar right after exercise. Check your blood sugar and learn how it changes after exercise. If your blood sugar stays at a normal level, you may not nee Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diagnosed in a pregnant woman with no history of any kind of diabetes in her life. Like the general form, the gestational type is characterized by abnormally high blood glucose levels [1]. High glucose levels in the blood can be dangerous both for the mother and child. Gestational diabetes is usually diagnosed later in pregnancy; so, if you have diabetes in the first trimester that often means you have had it before getting pregnant [2]. Gestational Diabetes Classification Gestational diabetes mellitus or GDM (common) [3] Gestational diabetes insipidus or GDI (rare) [4] What causes diabetes during pregnancy? Researches are still being carried out to find the exact factors triggering high blood glucose levels in pregnancy. But, the hormonal and other changes occurring in your body are known to be responsible for the problem. Certain genetic factors have also been recognized to play a role in some cases [5]. Pathophysiology of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus The body changes during pregnancy make your body somewhat resistant to insulin [6]. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas to help your body use glucose for producing energy. The reduced functioning of insulin during pregnancy causes glucose build up in the blood, leading to diabetes. Gestational diabetes is more likely to occur late in the second trimester or during the third trimester as the pregnancy hormone levels gradually becomes higher with the advancement of your pregnancy [7]. What are the risk factors for gestational diabetes? Being overweight before conceiving Being over 25 years of age [7] History of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Family history of type 2 diabetes Carrying twins A tendency to have high blood glucose levels, but not hi Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Causing My Nausea?

Is Diabetes Causing My Nausea?

Nausea comes in many forms. Sometimes it can be mild and short-lived. Other times, it can be severe and last for a long time. For people with diabetes, nausea is a common complaint. It can even be a sign of a life-threatening condition that requires swift medical attention. 5 common causes of nausea Factors related to your diabetes may cause you to feel nausea. Medication Metformin (Glucophage) is one of the more common medications used to treat diabetes. Nausea is a potential side effect for people taking this medication. Taking metformin on an empty stomach may make nausea worse. Injectable medications used to treat diabetes, such as exenatide (Byetta), liraglutide (Victoza), and pramlintide (Symlin), may also cause nausea. The nausea may go away after extended use. Your doctor may also start you on a lower dosage to try to reduce or eliminate nausea. Hypo- and hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar levels) or hypoglycemia (blood sugar levels that are too low) may cause nausea. Check your blood sugar and respond appropriately if you suspect abnormal blood sugar levels. To avoid hypo- and hyperglycemia, stick to your diabetes meal plan, monitor your blood sugar, and take your medication as prescribed. You should also avoid exercising in extreme temperatures and keep cool by drinking cold liquids during outside activities, advises Sheri Colberg, PhD, author, exercise physiologist, and expert on diabetes management. Diabetic ketoacidosis Severe nausea may be a sign of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a dangerous medical condition that must be treated to avoid coma or even death. Symptoms include: nausea excessive thirst frequent urination abdominal pain weakness or fatigue shortness of breath confusion fruity-scented breath If you suspect diabetic ketoacidosis, Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Pituitary Tumors

Signs And Symptoms Of Pituitary Tumors

Not all pituitary tumors (called pituitary adenomas) cause symptoms. But when they do, they can cause many different types of symptoms. The first signs of a pituitary adenoma often depend on whether the tumor is functional (making excess hormones) or non-functional (not making excess hormones). Functional adenomas can cause problems because of the hormones they release. Most of the time, a functional adenoma makes too much of a single pituitary hormone. These tumors are often found while they are still fairly small (microadenomas). Symptoms from functional adenomas are described below, based on which hormone they make. Tumors that aren’t making excess hormones (non-functional adenomas) often become large (macroadenomas) before they are noticed. These tumors don't cause symptoms until they press on nearby nerves, parts of the brain, or other parts of the pituitary. Non-functional adenomas that cause no symptoms are sometimes found because of an MRI or CT scan done for other reasons. These tumors are now being found more often as more MRI and CT scans of the brain are done. These might be the most common pituitary tumors. As long as they aren’t causing problems, they'e often just watched closely without needing treatment. Large tumors (macroadenomas) and pituitary carcinomas Pituitary macroadenomas (benign tumors larger than 1 cm) and carcinomas (cancers), whether functional or not, can be large enough to press on nearby nerves or parts of the brain. This can lead to symptoms such as: Eye muscle weakness so the eyes don't move in the same direction at the same time Blurred or double vision Loss of peripheral vision Sudden blindness Headaches Facial numbness or pain Dizziness Loss of consciousness (passing out) Vision problems occur when the tumor “pinches” the ner Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

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