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Can Diabetes Cause Headaches And Dizziness?

Diabetic Headache Symptoms

Diabetic Headache Symptoms

Diabetes impairs your body’s ability to produce or use insulin, which regulates blood glucose levels and generates energy. In type I diabetes, the pancreas does not produce insulin. Without insulin, too much sugar remains in the blood and becomes toxic, leading to fatigue, neuropathy, headaches, blindness and death if left untreated. Type II diabetes is developmental and involves cellular resistance to insulin, which doctors usually don't diagnose until patients report obvious symptoms such as chronic headaches. Video of the Day Hyperglycemia occurs when too much glucose circulates in the blood owing to either lack of insulin production in the pancreas or cellular resistance to insulin. Hyperglycemia is a hallmark of both types of diabetes and is a serious condition because high concentrations of glucose are toxic to nerves and blood vessels. According to the Mayo Clinic, headache is an early symptom of hyperglycemia and frequently includes blurred vision, fatigue and confusion. In the absence of insulin therapy, hyperglycemia can cause a buildup of ketones, which are waste products in the blood and urine, leading to coma and death. Hypoglycemia occurs when too little glucose is in the blood or getting into cells, where the body uses it for energy. If you have diabetes, hypoglycemia can occur if you mismanage your insulin therapy and take too much. If you don't have diabetes, failure to eat enough nutrients such as carbohydrates that the body can easily break down to glucose molecules can result in hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is a serious condition because glucose is the primary source of energy for brain function. According to the American Heart Association, a dull headache is a common, early sign of hypoglycemia and often includes related symptoms such as dizziness, Continue reading >>

What's Causing My Dizzy Spells?

What's Causing My Dizzy Spells?

At different times of the day (no regular pattern) I feel very lightheaded and very dizzy, like when you have had too much to drink. During these attacks I struggle to find my bearings. It's like I don't have enough oxygen. I am a fitness instructor so I would like to say that I am rather fit. Your advice would be appreciated. I would have liked to have known whether these feelings occur in any particular circumstances, such as if you are hungry, or just had something to eat, or when (and if) you feel anxious. Dizziness and lightheadedness can be one of the most difficult symptoms to pin down. Very often it is due to some form of tension or anxiety, and can occur particularly when the breathing gets disturbed, as can happen with acute anxiety. This is often accompanied by feelings of wanting to take deep breaths, but feeling you can't, and sometimes tingling feelings around the lips or in the fingers. Physical causes include a low blood sugar. This may occur after a meal or sweet drink, which initially boosts the blood sugar, then causes a release of insulin, after which there is overcompensation and the blood sugar goes too low. This is nothing to do with diabetes. You can usually determine if this is the case by taking a couple of glucose tablets or a sweet drink, which should abolish the symptoms quickly. A very rare cause is a condition where too much insulin is produced in short bursts from abnormal tissue in the pancreas (an insulinoma), which can produce feelings of disorientation and sometimes bizarre behaviour. Another rare cause would be a form of temporal lobe epilepsy. This may not result in fits, but can make the patient feel strange and disorientated. However I think the explanation of the symptoms you describe will not prove to be anything so serious as t Continue reading >>

Dizziness

Dizziness

A A A Dizziness What about dizziness during pregnancy? Dizziness caused by metabolic disorders When should I seek medical care for dizziness? How is dizziness diagnosed? Dizziness is a common description for many different feelings. Some people may refer to it as giddiness, or a "dizzy spell." Vertigo is similar to, but not the same as, dizziness, and it describes a spinning sensation of a person's surroundings, usually caused by head movement or positioning. Several diseases of the balance organs of the inner ear can cause vertigo, or it may be a symptom of a tumor or stroke. Causes of dizziness include medications (blood pressure and pain medications, and antibiotics), psychiatric conditions (anxiety, stress, and depression) other illnesses (allergies, sinus infections, . Signs and symptoms of dizziness include lightheadedness, feeling faint or passing out, spinning, whirling, or motion - either of themselves or of the surroundings, weakness, tiredness, confusion, feeling off balance, headache or head pressure, chest pain or tightness, nausea, or vomiting. Dizziness may be a symptom of a condition or disease that is something more dangerous and should always be discussed with a doctor. Medical treatment for dizziness depends on the underlying cause and should be evaluated by a medical professional. The prognosis for dizziness depends on the cause. Most causes of dizziness are harmless, and the problem goes away on its own. Sometimes dizziness will be the only symptom of serious disease, the course of which may be life-threatening or be easily treatable. Continue Reading A A A Dizziness (cont.) Dizziness is a common symptom during pregnancy. One of the reasons women feel dizziness during pregnancy is due to rising hormones that cause blood vessels to dilate, which incr Continue reading >>

Complications

Complications

The two main complications of diabetes insipidus are dehydration and an electrolyte imbalance. Complications are more likely if the condition goes undiagnosed or is poorly controlled. Dehydration If you have diabetes insipidus, your body will find it difficult to retain enough water, even if you drink fluid constantly. This can lead to dehydration (a severe lack of water in the body). If you or someone you know has diabetes insipidus, it's important to look out for the signs and symptoms of dehydration. These may include: dizziness or light-headedness sunken features (particularly the eyes) confusion and irritability Dehydration can be treated by rebalancing the level of water in your body. If you're severely dehydrated, you may need intravenous fluid replacement in hospital. This is where fluids are given directly through a drip into your vein. Read more about treating dehydration. Electrolyte imbalance Diabetes insipidus can also cause an electrolyte imbalance. Electrolytes are minerals in your blood that have a tiny electric charge, such as sodium, calcium, potassium, chlorine, magnesium and bicarbonate. If the body loses too much water, the concentration of these electrolytes can go up simply because the amount of water they're contained in has gone down. This dehydration disrupts other functions of the body, such as the way muscles work. It can also lead to: headache fatigue (feeling tired all the time) irritability muscle pain Next review due: 01/04/2019 Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) (cont.) If hyperglycemia persists for at least two or three days, or if ketones appear in the urine, call a doctor. Generally, people with diabetes should test their blood sugar levels at least four times a day: before meals and at bedtime (or following the schedule advised by the prescribed individual diabetes care plan). The urine should be checked for ketones any time the blood sugar level is over 250 mg/dL. When blood sugar stays high despite following a diabetic diet and plan of care, call the nurse, diabetes health educator, or physician for adjustments in the diet. If blood sugars are high because of illness, check for ketones and contact a health professional. Vomiting Confusion Sleepiness Shortness of breath Dehydration Blood sugar levels that stay above 160 mg/dL for longer than a week Glucose readings higher than 300 mg/dL The presence of ketones in the urine Ketoacidosis or diabetic coma is a medical emergency. Call 911 for emergency transport to a hospital or similar emergency center. Please ask your health care professional about the following: How to recognize high blood sugar levels How to treat a high blood sugar level when it occurs in you, a family member, or coworkers How to prevent the blood sugar level from becoming too high How to contact the medical staff during an emergency What emergency supplies to carry to treat high blood sugar Additional educational materials regarding high blood sugar Check blood sugar levels with a blood glucose meter. If blood sugar level is higher than normal, but there are no symptoms, continue routine care such as: Take all diabetes medications on schedule. Eat regular meals. Drink sugar-free and caffeine-free liquids. Take a blood sugar reading every four hours (write it down) u Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Pituitary Tumors

Signs And Symptoms Of Pituitary Tumors

Not all pituitary tumors (called pituitary adenomas) cause symptoms. But when they do, they can cause many different types of symptoms. The first signs of a pituitary adenoma often depend on whether the tumor is functional (making excess hormones) or non-functional (not making excess hormones). Functional adenomas can cause problems because of the hormones they release. Most of the time, a functional adenoma makes too much of a single pituitary hormone. These tumors are often found while they are still fairly small (microadenomas). Symptoms from functional adenomas are described below, based on which hormone they make. Tumors that aren’t making excess hormones (non-functional adenomas) often become large (macroadenomas) before they are noticed. These tumors don't cause symptoms until they press on nearby nerves, parts of the brain, or other parts of the pituitary. Non-functional adenomas that cause no symptoms are sometimes found because of an MRI or CT scan done for other reasons. These tumors are now being found more often as more MRI and CT scans of the brain are done. These might be the most common pituitary tumors. As long as they aren’t causing problems, they'e often just watched closely without needing treatment. Large tumors (macroadenomas) and pituitary carcinomas Pituitary macroadenomas (benign tumors larger than 1 cm) and carcinomas (cancers), whether functional or not, can be large enough to press on nearby nerves or parts of the brain. This can lead to symptoms such as: Eye muscle weakness so the eyes don't move in the same direction at the same time Blurred or double vision Loss of peripheral vision Sudden blindness Headaches Facial numbness or pain Dizziness Loss of consciousness (passing out) Vision problems occur when the tumor “pinches” the ner Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

Relief For Diabetic Headache

Relief For Diabetic Headache

Type 2 diabetics are more prone to both migraines and regular headaches than an otherwise healthy person. However, relief for a diabetic headache should not come in an over-the-counter painkiller. More often than not, your headache is trying to tell you that your blood sugar levels are out of balance. So instead of treating the headache and masking the problem, learn to associate the pain with your blood sugar levels and treat the cause of your pain. Hypoglycemia Low blood sugar--also known as hypoglycemia or insulin reaction-- is a common cause of headache in diabetics. A hypoglycemia-related headache often results after missing a meal, over-exercising, drinking alcohol, or taking too much insulin or other medication. If you think your headache is related to low blood sugar, confirm it by checking your blood glucose level with your meter. If your levels are below 70 mg/dL, take one of these remedies immediately: 3 glucose tablets or 1 serving of glucose gel 1/2 cup of fruit juice 1/2 cup of soda (not diet) 1 cup of milk 1 tbsp. of sugar or honey (However, be advised that if you are taking Acarbose or Miglitol your blood glucose levels can only be raised by taking a pure glucose tablet or gel.) After the dose, re-check your blood glucose level to make sure that it is above 70 mg/dL. Then, have a snack if your next meal is more than an hour away. Hyperglycemia High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, also can cause headaches in diabetics. High blood sugar can develop over several days or hours and can be the result of eating too much or too frequently, exercising too little, taking too little diabetes medication, stress, illness or injury. If your headache arrives in conjunction with any of those factors or your meter reading is high for you, eat a piece of vinegar soaked in Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

7 0 We’ve written before about the signs and symptoms of diabetes. While there are a lot of sources about what symptoms diabetes causes, and even some good information about why they’re bad for you, what you don’t often get are the “whys”. And while the “whys” aren’t necessarily critical for your long-term health, they can help you to understand what’s going on with your body and why it acts the way it does. That, in turn, can help with acceptance and understanding of how to better treat the symptoms, which in turn can help you stay on a good diabetes management regimen. In short, you don’t NEED to know why diabetes causes excessive thirst, but knowing the mechanism behind it can make your blood glucose control regimen make more sense and help you stick to it. So why DOES diabetes cause thirst? First, we’d like to start by saying that excessive thirst is not a good indicator of diabetes. For many people, the symptom creeps up so slowly that it’s almost impossible to determine if your thirst has noticeably increased (unless you keep a spreadsheet of how much water you drink, in which case you also probably get tested pretty regularly anyway). It’s also a common enough symptom that a sudden increase in thirst can mean almost anything. Some conditions that cause thirst increases include allergies, the flu, the common cold, almost anything that causes a fever, and dehydration caused by vomiting or diarrhea. So while excessive thirst is one of those diabetes symptoms that happens, and needs to be addressed, it’s not always a great sign that you should immediately go out and get an A1C test. Why does diabetes cause thirst? Excessive thirst, when linked to another condition as a symptom or comorbidity, is called polydipsia. It’s usually one of the Continue reading >>

Headaches And Dizziness

Headaches And Dizziness

You have a headache or migraine and, to top it off, you feel like your head is spinning. Having a headache or feeling dizzy can be unsettling on its own, and together they’re even more perplexing. Examining the source of your dizziness can help you and your doctor find relief for your symptoms. The first challenge is to accurately describe your dizziness. The challenge with dizziness is that it “can mean different things to different people,” says headache expert Peter Goadsby, MD, director of the Headache Center at the University of California, San Francisco. “For example, you may be feeling lightheadedness — like you’re going to pass out — or you may feel a sense of movement, like you might be spinning or the world might be spinning.” The spinning sensation is properly described as vertigo. Before you talk to your doctor about dizziness, think about the best way to describe what you’re experiencing. Make note of when your dizziness feels worst, such as when you get up suddenly from sitting or lying positions, and what helps it subside. Your doctor will also want to know about other health conditions you may have, such as diabetes or pregnancy, which can trigger these symptoms. Low blood pressure is another possible cause of dizziness or lightheadedness. Because there are so many ways to describe the sensation of dizziness — and so many potential causes — you and your doctor may need to spend some time discussing your health to get to the root of the problem. There are a number of possible links between headaches and dizziness: Migraines. Migraines are a common cause of headache pain and disability. They also can be associated with at least one form of dizziness. “A sense of instability can be found in migraine,” says Goadsby. “There is cons Continue reading >>

Lifecoach: Low Blood Sugar Level Symptoms

Lifecoach: Low Blood Sugar Level Symptoms

DOUBTS ABOUT DIABETES Q I have been through the diabetic checklist online and I don’t think I am diabetic. However, from time to time I get light-headed and shaky, and desperately need food. This often happens midmorning even if I have eaten a big bowl of bran flakes for breakfast. Any suggestions? Marion T, by email A SARA STANNER WRITES: Feeling sick or light-headed when you don’t eat can indicate a condition called hypoglycaemia, which is a low blood sugar level. While most cells in the body can use a variety of nutrients for fuel, your brain needs glucose. Related Articles Lifecoach: how can I treat my migraines 11 Apr 2012 Lifecoach: What is the best way to treat psoriasis? 27 Mar 2012 Lifecoach: eye strain caused by an LED computer screen 20 Mar 2012 Lifecoach: Contracting "flu" even after a flu jab 13 Mar 2012 Lifecoach: Is swimming the best exercise for a bad back? 29 Jan 2012 Lifecoach: Do breathing exercises help with long-term asthma? 13 Feb 2012 Hormones in the body keep your blood sugar from rising too high or dropping too low but it can vary slightly after meals, strenuous exercise, or periods of fasting. It can occur in some people if they wait too long to eat. Because your brain cells need glucose, the lack of ingested calories accompanied by a falling glucose level triggers a chain of events that cause the symptoms associated with hypoglycaemia – nausea, lightheadedness, palpitations, weakness, nervousness, sweating, intense hunger, headache or irritability. Some people will never know that their blood sugar level has dropped because, once detected, their bodies make the necessary adjustments. It isn’t clear why others experience symptoms, although some researchers suggest certain people may be more sensitive to the body’s release of some horm Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Dizziness?

What Causes Diabetes Dizziness?

Have You Experienced Dizziness Related to Your Diabetes? Dizziness is not a pleasant feeling. It can strike unexpectedly anytime, anywhere, leaving you unable to carry on with everyday tasks. This lightheaded sensation is typically accompanied by a sudden flush of heat and often seems to occur at the most inconvenient time possible, which can be embarrassing. As awkward as sudden dizziness can be, you should always alert someone nearby to the fact that you have diabetes. Feeling lightheaded can be the first warning that your blood glucose levels are awry, and you want someone close knowing how to help you. What Causes Dizziness? There are many reasons why someone might feel dizzy, not all of them related to diabetes. Maybe the room is too hot, or the person feeling dizzy is overdressed or dehydrated. Sometimes certain medications, an ear infection or a migraine can cause dizziness. Stress can also bring on the room-spinning feeling or sensation you may faint. If dizziness often strikes after you sit or stand up suddenly, but goes away when you sit or lie down, it is probably due to postural hypertension (a sudden drop in blood pressure), which is quite common in older people. With dizziness caused by stress or heat, a cool glass of water or a bit of fresh air will help you recover completely within a very short time. Maybe a trip to your doctor is in order if you suspect your medication or an ear infection is to blame. But since there is a chance your body is using dizziness as an early warning system, you should always check your blood sugar levels if you self-test, or get them checked if dizzy spells become frequent if you don’t test your sugar levels with finger prick testing. Dizziness and Blood Glucose Levels As is often the case with fairly vague symptoms like d Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

Some people who have type 2 diabetes may not have any symptoms early on. Many people with the disease don't even know they have it at first. But with time, diabetes starts to cause symptoms. High blood sugar Common symptoms of high blood sugar include: Being very thirsty. Urinating a lot. Having blurry vision. See more about symptoms of high blood sugar. The higher your blood sugar rises, the more likely you are to have symptoms. If you have higher-than-normal blood sugar and don't drink enough liquids, you can get dehydrated. This can make you feel dizzy and weak, and it can lead to an emergency called a hyperosmolar state. To learn what to do in an emergency, see When to Call a Doctor. Low blood sugar When your blood sugar is too low, it can also cause problems. And it can happen suddenly. Quickly treating low blood sugar can help you avoid passing out (losing consciousness). You can pass out when your blood sugar gets very low. Low blood sugar can also lead to a heart attack. Common symptoms of low blood sugar include: See more about symptoms of low blood sugar. If you aren't able to tell when your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemic unawareness), it's a good idea to test your blood sugar often. But you're not likely to get low blood sugar unless you take insulin or other diabetes medicines. To learn what to do in an emergency, see When to Call a Doctor. Know what your results mean Rhonda O'Brien, certified diabetes educator As important as regular testing is, you also need to know what the results mean and how to use them. "Look for patterns. If your blood sugar is always high before lunch, take a look at what you had for breakfast. Maybe you need to make some changes."-Rhonda This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Headaches: Soothing That Aching Head

Diabetes And Headaches: Soothing That Aching Head

We’ve all had headaches. Some more than others, I suspect. I woke up the other morning with a pounding headache, as a matter of fact. Having a headache is definitely not the way to start your day. Perhaps not surprisingly, people who have diabetes can certainly get headaches, and apart from the “usual” culprits, these headaches can stem from fluctuations in blood sugar. There are ways to treat and manage them, however. Read on to learn more. What is a headache anyway? Simply put, a headache is a pain that occurs in any part of the head — on the side, in the front, or in the back. The type of headache pain can vary widely, from sharp, to dull, to throbbing. And the frequency of pain may be different — the pain may come on all of a sudden, or more gradually, and it can last an hour or last days. Types of headaches A headache is a headache, right? Not exactly. There are two main forms of headaches: primary and secondary. A primary headache is due to a problem with or overactivity of pain structures in the head, such as blood vessels, nerves, or muscles. Examples of primary headaches include: • Migraines • Cluster headaches • Tension headaches Secondary headaches occur as a symptom of a disease or condition, such as: • Blood clot • Brain aneurysm • Brain freeze (also known as “ice cream headache”) • Brain tumor • Carbon monoxide poisoning • Flu • Ear infection • Sinus infection • Stroke • Concussion • Monosodium glutamate (MSG) • Panic attacks • Changes in hormones Why might diabetes cause headaches? Having diabetes doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ll automatically have headaches. However, diabetes headaches tend to occur due to changes in blood sugar levels. The more “up and down” your blood sugars are, the more likely Continue reading >>

How To Spot Pre Diabetes Symptoms

How To Spot Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes is one of the most common and troublesome chronic health problems in North America. Prediabetes is not far away from that. In-depth research revealed that as many as nine out of ten adults in North America have prediabetes symptoms or signs, yet only one in 20 knows it. Nobody wants to be a diabetic, but many forget that type 2 diabetes does not happen overnight. T2 diabetes usually go through a prodromal phase with abundant symptoms of prediabetes. Prediabetes symptoms start here Long before becoming a diabetic and even prediabetic a person is usually enters a state called dysglycemia. Dysglycemia is a medical term for blood sugar fluctuations. These fluctuations are small at first, seldom detected by standard blood tests. Only much later when glucose swings to a much larger larger magnitude lab tests prove to be of value. The initial stages of dysglycemia causes only minor blood sugar changes, changes that are not enough for diagnosis of hypoglycemia or diabetes. Although not picked up by a laboratory the dysglycemic state is felt by the body. Here is a list of common dysglycemic and prediabetes symptoms. When sugar tends toward high the following can happen: Weight increase and a person has difficulty losing weight Fat tends to accumulate around the waist Waist to hip ratio changes from ideal 0.7 to above 0.75 in women and above 0.8 in men Cholesterol increases and triglycerides are excessive There is a higher chance for fatty liver This is what you can do with it: Not everyone starts with increased weight, body heaviness, higher cholesterol, and spiked blood pressure. Some may feel weak, flabby, chilled, and dizzy. When sugar tends toward low watch for different symptoms: Cravings for sweets and carbohydrates, worse before menstruation in women Low energy, Continue reading >>

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