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Can Diabetes Cause Headaches And Dizziness?

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

Blood sugar concentrations or blood glucose levels are the amount of sugar or glucose present in your blood stream. Your body naturally regulates blood sugar (glucose) levels as a part your body”s metabolic processes. Glucose or sugar is the primary energy mechanism for cells and blood lipids. Glucose or blood sugar is transported from your intestines or liver to the cells in your body via the bloodstream. The absorption of glucose is promoted by insulin or the hormone produced in the pancreas. If your sugar levels are not balanced you may have high or low blood sugar issues. Low sugar issues are hypoglycemia and high blood sugar indicates that you have hyperglycemia or hyperglycemia symptoms. High or low blood sugar levels cause different problems. Low blood sugar levels can cause dementia, comas or death. High blood sugar is a major cause of damage to your body”s internal organs. Low Blood Sugar Low blood sugar or hypoglycemia indicates the level of glucose in your blood has dramatically dropped below what your body need to function. When your blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter symptom will develop. You may feel tired and anxious or weak and shaky. Your heart rate may be rapid and you feel as if you are having a heart attack. Eating something sugary will bring your sugar levels back to normal almost immediately and symptoms will subside. Sugar levels that are below 40 mg/dL cause you to have behavior changes. You may feel very irritable and become weak and confused. You may not realize you need to eat to raise your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels below 20 mg/dL will most certainly cause a loss of consciousness or perhaps you will experience seizures. You will need medical care immediately. Hypoglycemia symptoms happen very quickly. If you a Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

7 0 We’ve written before about the signs and symptoms of diabetes. While there are a lot of sources about what symptoms diabetes causes, and even some good information about why they’re bad for you, what you don’t often get are the “whys”. And while the “whys” aren’t necessarily critical for your long-term health, they can help you to understand what’s going on with your body and why it acts the way it does. That, in turn, can help with acceptance and understanding of how to better treat the symptoms, which in turn can help you stay on a good diabetes management regimen. In short, you don’t NEED to know why diabetes causes excessive thirst, but knowing the mechanism behind it can make your blood glucose control regimen make more sense and help you stick to it. So why DOES diabetes cause thirst? First, we’d like to start by saying that excessive thirst is not a good indicator of diabetes. For many people, the symptom creeps up so slowly that it’s almost impossible to determine if your thirst has noticeably increased (unless you keep a spreadsheet of how much water you drink, in which case you also probably get tested pretty regularly anyway). It’s also a common enough symptom that a sudden increase in thirst can mean almost anything. Some conditions that cause thirst increases include allergies, the flu, the common cold, almost anything that causes a fever, and dehydration caused by vomiting or diarrhea. So while excessive thirst is one of those diabetes symptoms that happens, and needs to be addressed, it’s not always a great sign that you should immediately go out and get an A1C test. Why does diabetes cause thirst? Excessive thirst, when linked to another condition as a symptom or comorbidity, is called polydipsia. It’s usually one of the Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Lots of people wonder if they have hypoglycemia (pronounced: hy-po-gly-SEE-mee-uh), but the condition is not at all common in teens. Teens who do have hypoglycemia usually have it as part of another health condition, such as diabetes. Hypoglycemia happens when a person's blood sugar levels are abnormally low, and it's a potentially serious condition. If you know someone who has diabetes, you may have heard them talk about "insulin shock," which is the common name for a severe hypoglycemic reaction. The body's most important fuel is glucose, a type of sugar. When you digest most foods, sugar is released, and that sugar ends up in your bloodstream as glucose. Your body, particularly your brain and nervous system, needs a certain level of glucose to function — not too much, and not too little. If your blood glucose level isn't right, your body will react by showing certain symptoms. People with diabetes may experience hypoglycemia if they don't eat enough or if they take too much insulin — the medicine most commonly used to treat diabetes. What Are the Symptoms? Some symptoms of hypoglycemia are caused when the body releases extra adrenaline (epinephrine), a hormone that raises blood sugar levels, into the bloodstream to protect against hypoglycemia. High blood levels of adrenaline can make the skin become pale and sweaty, and a person can also have symptoms such as shakiness, anxiety, and heart palpitations (a fast, pounding heartbeat). Other symptoms of hypoglycemia are caused when not enough glucose gets to the brain; in fact, the brain is the organ that suffers most significantly and most rapidly when there's a drop in blood sugar. These symptoms include headache, extreme hunger, blurry or double vision, fatigue, and weakness. At its most severe, insufficient gluco Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

GENERAL INFORMATION: What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is a condition that causes the sugar (glucose) in your blood to drop too low. This can happen in people who do not have diabetes. The 2 types of non-diabetic hypoglycemia are fasting hypoglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia often happens after the person goes without food for 8 hours or longer. Reactive hypoglycemia usually happens about 2 to 4 hours after a meal. When your blood sugar level is low, your muscles and brain cells do not have enough energy to work well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Fasting hypoglycemia: Certain medicines or herbal supplements such as fenugreek, ginseng, or cinnamon Alcohol Exercise Medical conditions such as liver disease, hypothyroidism, and tumors Eating disorders or malnutrition Stomach surgery or hemodialysis Reactive hypoglycemia: The causes of reactive hypoglycemia may be unknown. Hyperinsulinism Meals high in refined carbohydrates such as white bread or foods high in sugar Prediabetes Any surgery of the digestive system What are the signs and symptoms of non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Blurred vision or changes in vision Dizziness, lightheadedness, or shakiness Fatigue and weakness Fast or pounding heartbeat Sweating more than usual Headache Nausea or hunger Anxiety, Irritability, or confusion How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia diagnosed? Blood tests are done to measure your blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your hypoglycemia. Fasting tests may be done. You may have an overnight fasting test or a 72-hour fasting test. After you have fasted overnight, your blood sugar levels will be tested 2 times. For a 72-hour fasting test, you will not be given food for a period of up to 72 hours. During this Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Dizziness?

What Causes Diabetes Dizziness?

Have You Experienced Dizziness Related to Your Diabetes? Dizziness is not a pleasant feeling. It can strike unexpectedly anytime, anywhere, leaving you unable to carry on with everyday tasks. This lightheaded sensation is typically accompanied by a sudden flush of heat and often seems to occur at the most inconvenient time possible, which can be embarrassing. As awkward as sudden dizziness can be, you should always alert someone nearby to the fact that you have diabetes. Feeling lightheaded can be the first warning that your blood glucose levels are awry, and you want someone close knowing how to help you. What Causes Dizziness? There are many reasons why someone might feel dizzy, not all of them related to diabetes. Maybe the room is too hot, or the person feeling dizzy is overdressed or dehydrated. Sometimes certain medications, an ear infection or a migraine can cause dizziness. Stress can also bring on the room-spinning feeling or sensation you may faint. If dizziness often strikes after you sit or stand up suddenly, but goes away when you sit or lie down, it is probably due to postural hypertension (a sudden drop in blood pressure), which is quite common in older people. With dizziness caused by stress or heat, a cool glass of water or a bit of fresh air will help you recover completely within a very short time. Maybe a trip to your doctor is in order if you suspect your medication or an ear infection is to blame. But since there is a chance your body is using dizziness as an early warning system, you should always check your blood sugar levels if you self-test, or get them checked if dizzy spells become frequent if you don’t test your sugar levels with finger prick testing. Dizziness and Blood Glucose Levels As is often the case with fairly vague symptoms like d Continue reading >>

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness is a symptom that is often applies to a variety of sensations including lightheadedness and vertigo. Vertigo is the sensation of spinning, while lightheadedness is typically described as near fainting, and weakness. Some of the conditions that may cause lightheadedness in a patient include low blood pressure, high blood pressure, dehydration, medications, postural or orthostatic hypotension, diabetes, endocrine disorders, hyperventilation, heart conditions, and vasovagal syncope. Vertigo is most often caused by a problem in the balance centers of the inner ear called the vestibular system and causes the sensation of the room spinning. It may be associated with vomiting. Symptoms often are made worse with position changes. Those with significant symptoms and vomiting may need intravenous medication and hospitalization. Vertigo is also the presenting symptom in patients with Meniere's Disease and acoustic neuroma, conditions that often require referral to an ENT specialist. Vertigo may also be a symptom of stroke. Most often, dizziness or lightheadedness is a temporary situation that resolves spontaneously without a specific diagnosis being made. Introduction to dizziness (feeling dizzy) Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms that will prompt a person to seek medical care. The term dizziness is sometimes difficult to understand since it means different things to different people. It is either the sensation of feeling lightheaded as if the individual is weak and will pass out, or it describes vertigo or the sensation of spinning, as if the affected person just got off a merry-go-round. Lightheadedness is often caused by a decrease in blood supply to the brain, while vertigo may be caused by disturbances of the inner ear and the balance centers of the brain. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Headache Symptoms

Diabetic Headache Symptoms

Diabetes impairs your body’s ability to produce or use insulin, which regulates blood glucose levels and generates energy. In type I diabetes, the pancreas does not produce insulin. Without insulin, too much sugar remains in the blood and becomes toxic, leading to fatigue, neuropathy, headaches, blindness and death if left untreated. Type II diabetes is developmental and involves cellular resistance to insulin, which doctors usually don't diagnose until patients report obvious symptoms such as chronic headaches. Video of the Day Hyperglycemia occurs when too much glucose circulates in the blood owing to either lack of insulin production in the pancreas or cellular resistance to insulin. Hyperglycemia is a hallmark of both types of diabetes and is a serious condition because high concentrations of glucose are toxic to nerves and blood vessels. According to the Mayo Clinic, headache is an early symptom of hyperglycemia and frequently includes blurred vision, fatigue and confusion. In the absence of insulin therapy, hyperglycemia can cause a buildup of ketones, which are waste products in the blood and urine, leading to coma and death. Hypoglycemia occurs when too little glucose is in the blood or getting into cells, where the body uses it for energy. If you have diabetes, hypoglycemia can occur if you mismanage your insulin therapy and take too much. If you don't have diabetes, failure to eat enough nutrients such as carbohydrates that the body can easily break down to glucose molecules can result in hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is a serious condition because glucose is the primary source of energy for brain function. According to the American Heart Association, a dull headache is a common, early sign of hypoglycemia and often includes related symptoms such as dizziness, Continue reading >>

Dizziness

Dizziness

A A A Dizziness What about dizziness during pregnancy? Dizziness caused by metabolic disorders When should I seek medical care for dizziness? How is dizziness diagnosed? Dizziness is a common description for many different feelings. Some people may refer to it as giddiness, or a "dizzy spell." Vertigo is similar to, but not the same as, dizziness, and it describes a spinning sensation of a person's surroundings, usually caused by head movement or positioning. Several diseases of the balance organs of the inner ear can cause vertigo, or it may be a symptom of a tumor or stroke. Causes of dizziness include medications (blood pressure and pain medications, and antibiotics), psychiatric conditions (anxiety, stress, and depression) other illnesses (allergies, sinus infections, . Signs and symptoms of dizziness include lightheadedness, feeling faint or passing out, spinning, whirling, or motion - either of themselves or of the surroundings, weakness, tiredness, confusion, feeling off balance, headache or head pressure, chest pain or tightness, nausea, or vomiting. Dizziness may be a symptom of a condition or disease that is something more dangerous and should always be discussed with a doctor. Medical treatment for dizziness depends on the underlying cause and should be evaluated by a medical professional. The prognosis for dizziness depends on the cause. Most causes of dizziness are harmless, and the problem goes away on its own. Sometimes dizziness will be the only symptom of serious disease, the course of which may be life-threatening or be easily treatable. Continue Reading A A A Dizziness (cont.) Dizziness is a common symptom during pregnancy. One of the reasons women feel dizziness during pregnancy is due to rising hormones that cause blood vessels to dilate, which incr Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Hypoglycemia?

What Are The Symptoms Of Hypoglycemia?

Taking certain glucose-lowering medication for diabetes can push blood sugar too low (hypoglycemia), as can skipping a meal or eating too little, exercising more than usual or drinking alcohol. You will know your blood sugar is low -- 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or less -- when you feel one or more of the following: dizzy or light-headedness hungry nervous and shaky sleepy confused sweaty Test your glucose to make sure it's low, and if it is at or below 70 mg/dL, consume 15 grams (g) of carbohydrate -- for example, drinking a half cup of juice or three-fourths of a cup of regular (not diet!) soda or taking three to four glucose tabs. Low blood sugar is about 70 mg/dL or less. Along with checking your blood sugar, watch out for these symptoms of low blood sugar: Shakiness or dizziness Sweating Hunger Headache Feeling cranky, sad, or confused The neurogenic symptoms include tremor, palpitations, and anxiety/arousal (catecholamine-mediated, adrenergic) and sweating, hunger, and paresthesias (acetylcholine-mediated, cholinergic). In the patient without diabetes, the presence of neuroglycopenic symptoms provides more clinically compelling evidence of an underlying hypoglycemic disorder, as the neurogenic symptoms are particularly nonspecific. Recognition of neurogenic symptoms by patients with diabetes can lead to prompt self-treatment. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include the following: Shakiness Dizziness Sweating Hunger Headache Pale skin color Sudden moodiness or behavior changes, such as crying for no apparent reason Clumsy or jerky movements Seizure Difficulty paying attention, or confusion Tingling sensations around the mouth Continue reading >>

Headaches And Dizziness

Headaches And Dizziness

You have a headache or migraine and, to top it off, you feel like your head is spinning. Having a headache or feeling dizzy can be unsettling on its own, and together they’re even more perplexing. Examining the source of your dizziness can help you and your doctor find relief for your symptoms. The first challenge is to accurately describe your dizziness. The challenge with dizziness is that it “can mean different things to different people,” says headache expert Peter Goadsby, MD, director of the Headache Center at the University of California, San Francisco. “For example, you may be feeling lightheadedness — like you’re going to pass out — or you may feel a sense of movement, like you might be spinning or the world might be spinning.” The spinning sensation is properly described as vertigo. Before you talk to your doctor about dizziness, think about the best way to describe what you’re experiencing. Make note of when your dizziness feels worst, such as when you get up suddenly from sitting or lying positions, and what helps it subside. Your doctor will also want to know about other health conditions you may have, such as diabetes or pregnancy, which can trigger these symptoms. Low blood pressure is another possible cause of dizziness or lightheadedness. Because there are so many ways to describe the sensation of dizziness — and so many potential causes — you and your doctor may need to spend some time discussing your health to get to the root of the problem. There are a number of possible links between headaches and dizziness: Migraines. Migraines are a common cause of headache pain and disability. They also can be associated with at least one form of dizziness. “A sense of instability can be found in migraine,” says Goadsby. “There is cons Continue reading >>

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) goes up and down in a small range throughout the day. In people with diabetes, the range can be much wider. It is important to understand the fine balance between treating the high sugars and avoiding the low sugars. If you have diabetes and take certain diabetes drugs or insulin, you may experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia [hy-po-gly-SEE-me-uh]) from time to time. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar of less than 70 mg/dL. However, some people have symptoms of low blood sugar even at higher blood sugar levels. This can happen when blood sugar is dropping too quickly or if the person has had very high blood sugars for a long time. Severe hypoglycemia means the person needs someone to treat them, which is a very serious condition! Even mild hypoglycemia symptoms are hard on your body and on your emotions. By learning more about the signs and causes of low blood sugar, you can take steps to keep it from happening again. Frequent low blood sugars are serious because the body becomes less able to show the warning signals of a low blood sugar. The blood sugar can then fall to dangerously low levels. What causes low blood sugar and what are the symptoms? Low blood sugar is usually caused by eating less or later than usual, changing your physical activity or taking a diabetes medicine that is not right for your needs. Even mistakes in dosing can lead to hypoglycemia. For example, you could mistake one insulin for another or forget that you had already taken your diabetes pills! A recent large study showed that the most common causes of hypoglycemia were smaller than usual food intake, delay in eating, or skipping a meal. Common symptoms of low blood sugar are: Feeling dizzy, shaky, or lightheaded Feeling nervous or anxious Having a fast heart beat Sweating Continue reading >>

What Are The Causes Of Dizziness In Diabetics?

What Are The Causes Of Dizziness In Diabetics?

The American Diabetes Association and other health professionals are dedicated to the research and treatment of diabetes and associated conditions. They have found that the main reason diabetics experience dizziness is because of a lack of control of blood sugar and blood pressure levels. These levels need to be balanced and maintained. Video of the Day A medical doctor prescribes a certain amount of medication to many diabetic patients, to be taken at a certain time. Type 1 diabetics require insulin to maintain a proper blood sugar level; Type 2 diabetics may have to rely on oral medication. Medication instructions must be followed precisely. Variation may cause the blood sugar levels to be too high or too low. This is especially true of the Type 1 diabetic. Also, regular doctors visits are important. Blood sugar levels are checked and adjustments made to medication, if needed. Blood sugar levels must be checked at home as well. This is mandatory to keep the levels steady. The daily diet is also discussed during these appointments. Diet is just as essential as medication in controlling blood sugar levels, and for diabetics who do not need medication, diet is the source for controlling blood sugar levels. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetics with gastroparesis find it very difficult to control blood sugar levels. Gastroparesis is a condition in which the nerves in the stomach that aid digestion are impaired, leading to incomplete digestion, nausea, vomiting and pain. High blood pressure is common in diabetics because of shared causes of the diseases themselves, according to Dr. Patrick Lyden, professor of neuroscience and director of UC San Diego's Stroke Center. High blood pressure can cause dizziness, as can low blood pressure. Dr. Timothy Hain of Continue reading >>

Excess Carbohydrates Equals Lightheadedness And Fatigue

Excess Carbohydrates Equals Lightheadedness And Fatigue

Introduction Many people are familiar with the occasionally sensation of feeling light-headed when getting up out of bed or after bending over to pick up an item or tie their shoes. This lightheadedness can sometimes be accompanied by visual changes such as seeing black spots, burred vision or transient vertigo. On occasion, the lightheadedness can be so extreme as to cause the individual to pass out completely; this is known as syncope. It is estimated that 20-30% of all adults will experience an episode of syncope sometime in their lifetime. Although the brain represents only 3% of our body’s weight, the brain requires 25% of all our body’s energy, 20% of our oxygen supply and 20% of our blood blow. As you can see, the brain is very dependent on well-regulated blood flow. And when the blood flow to the brain decreases below our minimal needs, we can feel lightheaded as well as other symptoms associated with orthostatic hypotension. Lightheadedness and Syncope Lightheadedness is most commonly due to a phenomenon known as orthostatic hypotension (OH). The symptoms of OH are due to a transient drop in a person’s blood pressure that occur quickly after standing and often last only a few seconds (20–30 seconds). The symptoms are most common when we stand after laying flat for a prolonged period of time such as when we sleep or after getting up from the sitting or squatting position. Normally, our body’s blood pressure is regulated by the autonomic nervous system to maintain normal levels of blood flow to the brain in spite of rapid changes in body position. When our autonomic nervous system (ANS) is not functioning properly, our blood pressure mechanism does not work properly. If we can’t effectively regulate our brain’s blood pressure when we stand up, we ex Continue reading >>

Dizziness: Causes, Diagnosis And Treatment

Dizziness: Causes, Diagnosis And Treatment

What is dizziness? Dizziness is also called lightheadedness and describes sensations such as feeling unsteady, balance problems or the room spinning. Feeling dizzy at times is common. Different people may experience slightly different feelings of dizziness. Severe dizziness is called vertigo. A feeling of being unsteady is also called disequilibrium. If dizziness happens often, causes falls, or if you have concerns - seek medical advice. Doctors will be more concerned about a person being dizzy if they also lose consciousness or faint. What causes dizziness? Dizziness can have many causes, including: Ear infections and conditions, including labyrinthitis and Ménière's disease, affecting balance Stress Anxiety Low blood sugar levels ( hypoglycaemia) that can affect people with diabetes, also called 'hypos' Blood pressure falling when standing up, called postural hypotension, that can affect older people Dehydration Heat exhaustion Lack of blood flow to the brain, called vertebrobasilar insufficiency Neurological (brain) conditions, including stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS) Anaemia Alcohol abuse Side-effects of some medication Irregular heartbeat Carbon monoxide poisoning Head injury Vision problems, adjusting to new glasses Sea, air or rail travel - along with travel sickness or motion sickness. Diagnosing dizziness Dizziness is a symptom of something else rather than a condition in its own right. A diagnosis is not an easy task because of many causes and possibly vague symptoms. A doctor will ask about the symptoms felt during spells of dizziness, how often it happens and whether it happened when standing up or at any time, including when lying down. They may perform a physical examination, and will look at the person's medical history for any conditions or medicat Continue reading >>

Lifecoach: Low Blood Sugar Level Symptoms

Lifecoach: Low Blood Sugar Level Symptoms

DOUBTS ABOUT DIABETES Q I have been through the diabetic checklist online and I don’t think I am diabetic. However, from time to time I get light-headed and shaky, and desperately need food. This often happens midmorning even if I have eaten a big bowl of bran flakes for breakfast. Any suggestions? Marion T, by email A SARA STANNER WRITES: Feeling sick or light-headed when you don’t eat can indicate a condition called hypoglycaemia, which is a low blood sugar level. While most cells in the body can use a variety of nutrients for fuel, your brain needs glucose. Related Articles Lifecoach: how can I treat my migraines 11 Apr 2012 Lifecoach: What is the best way to treat psoriasis? 27 Mar 2012 Lifecoach: eye strain caused by an LED computer screen 20 Mar 2012 Lifecoach: Contracting "flu" even after a flu jab 13 Mar 2012 Lifecoach: Is swimming the best exercise for a bad back? 29 Jan 2012 Lifecoach: Do breathing exercises help with long-term asthma? 13 Feb 2012 Hormones in the body keep your blood sugar from rising too high or dropping too low but it can vary slightly after meals, strenuous exercise, or periods of fasting. It can occur in some people if they wait too long to eat. Because your brain cells need glucose, the lack of ingested calories accompanied by a falling glucose level triggers a chain of events that cause the symptoms associated with hypoglycaemia – nausea, lightheadedness, palpitations, weakness, nervousness, sweating, intense hunger, headache or irritability. Some people will never know that their blood sugar level has dropped because, once detected, their bodies make the necessary adjustments. It isn’t clear why others experience symptoms, although some researchers suggest certain people may be more sensitive to the body’s release of some horm Continue reading >>

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