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Can Diabetes Cause Headaches And Dizziness?

Dizziness

Dizziness

A A A Dizziness What about dizziness during pregnancy? Dizziness caused by metabolic disorders When should I seek medical care for dizziness? How is dizziness diagnosed? Dizziness is a common description for many different feelings. Some people may refer to it as giddiness, or a "dizzy spell." Vertigo is similar to, but not the same as, dizziness, and it describes a spinning sensation of a person's surroundings, usually caused by head movement or positioning. Several diseases of the balance organs of the inner ear can cause vertigo, or it may be a symptom of a tumor or stroke. Causes of dizziness include medications (blood pressure and pain medications, and antibiotics), psychiatric conditions (anxiety, stress, and depression) other illnesses (allergies, sinus infections, . Signs and symptoms of dizziness include lightheadedness, feeling faint or passing out, spinning, whirling, or motion - either of themselves or of the surroundings, weakness, tiredness, confusion, feeling off balance, headache or head pressure, chest pain or tightness, nausea, or vomiting. Dizziness may be a symptom of a condition or disease that is something more dangerous and should always be discussed with a doctor. Medical treatment for dizziness depends on the underlying cause and should be evaluated by a medical professional. The prognosis for dizziness depends on the cause. Most causes of dizziness are harmless, and the problem goes away on its own. Sometimes dizziness will be the only symptom of serious disease, the course of which may be life-threatening or be easily treatable. Continue Reading A A A Dizziness (cont.) Dizziness is a common symptom during pregnancy. One of the reasons women feel dizziness during pregnancy is due to rising hormones that cause blood vessels to dilate, which incr Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

Blood sugar concentrations or blood glucose levels are the amount of sugar or glucose present in your blood stream. Your body naturally regulates blood sugar (glucose) levels as a part your body”s metabolic processes. Glucose or sugar is the primary energy mechanism for cells and blood lipids. Glucose or blood sugar is transported from your intestines or liver to the cells in your body via the bloodstream. The absorption of glucose is promoted by insulin or the hormone produced in the pancreas. If your sugar levels are not balanced you may have high or low blood sugar issues. Low sugar issues are hypoglycemia and high blood sugar indicates that you have hyperglycemia or hyperglycemia symptoms. High or low blood sugar levels cause different problems. Low blood sugar levels can cause dementia, comas or death. High blood sugar is a major cause of damage to your body”s internal organs. Low Blood Sugar Low blood sugar or hypoglycemia indicates the level of glucose in your blood has dramatically dropped below what your body need to function. When your blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter symptom will develop. You may feel tired and anxious or weak and shaky. Your heart rate may be rapid and you feel as if you are having a heart attack. Eating something sugary will bring your sugar levels back to normal almost immediately and symptoms will subside. Sugar levels that are below 40 mg/dL cause you to have behavior changes. You may feel very irritable and become weak and confused. You may not realize you need to eat to raise your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels below 20 mg/dL will most certainly cause a loss of consciousness or perhaps you will experience seizures. You will need medical care immediately. Hypoglycemia symptoms happen very quickly. If you a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) goes up and down in a small range throughout the day. In people with diabetes, the range can be much wider. It is important to understand the fine balance between treating the high sugars and avoiding the low sugars. If you have diabetes and take certain diabetes drugs or insulin, you may experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia [hy-po-gly-SEE-me-uh]) from time to time. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar of less than 70 mg/dL. However, some people have symptoms of low blood sugar even at higher blood sugar levels. This can happen when blood sugar is dropping too quickly or if the person has had very high blood sugars for a long time. Severe hypoglycemia means the person needs someone to treat them, which is a very serious condition! Even mild hypoglycemia symptoms are hard on your body and on your emotions. By learning more about the signs and causes of low blood sugar, you can take steps to keep it from happening again. Frequent low blood sugars are serious because the body becomes less able to show the warning signals of a low blood sugar. The blood sugar can then fall to dangerously low levels. What causes low blood sugar and what are the symptoms? Low blood sugar is usually caused by eating less or later than usual, changing your physical activity or taking a diabetes medicine that is not right for your needs. Even mistakes in dosing can lead to hypoglycemia. For example, you could mistake one insulin for another or forget that you had already taken your diabetes pills! A recent large study showed that the most common causes of hypoglycemia were smaller than usual food intake, delay in eating, or skipping a meal. Common symptoms of low blood sugar are: Feeling dizzy, shaky, or lightheaded Feeling nervous or anxious Having a fast heart beat Sweating Continue reading >>

Suffering From Headaches And Dizziness After Cutting Back On Sweeteners? Is Gatorade Good To Drink? —mary Lou Rhoades

Suffering From Headaches And Dizziness After Cutting Back On Sweeteners? Is Gatorade Good To Drink? —mary Lou Rhoades

Q: I was a diet ice tea drinker until I read your article 14 things to avoid on a diabetic diet. In it you stated that tea is ok, its the artificial sweeteners you need to watch. Why? Ive cut way back on my habit and have been developing headaches and dizziness. My doctor says it could be caffeine withdraw. I've also cut way back to bread and lunch meats. The doctor says to drink Gatorade for the enzymes and salt. Is this good for a diabetic? I'm afraid you may have misinterpreted something in the article on 14 foods to avoid on a low-carbohydrate diet. Sugar-free iced tea is fine to drink in moderation because it will not raise blood sugar. However, some people get headaches or develop digestive trouble when they consume certain sugar substitutes. This includes both natural sweeteners like stevia and artificial sweeteners like aspartame. Although stevia, erythritol, and other natural sweeteners are generally considered healthier than artificial sweeteners, any sweeteners can be used in moderation if they don't cause side effects. As far as your doctor's recommendation to drink Gatorade, this isn't a good way to get electrolytes because it also contains sugar. Although there are sugar-free electrolyte replacement beverages like Powerade Zero, it's better to add small amounts of salt to your food to ensure adequate sodium intake and to consume low-carb foods that are high in potassium and magnesium like avocado, fish, nuts, and Greek yogurt. Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, “Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a s Continue reading >>

Headaches And Dizziness

Headaches And Dizziness

You have a headache or migraine and, to top it off, you feel like your head is spinning. Having a headache or feeling dizzy can be unsettling on its own, and together they’re even more perplexing. Examining the source of your dizziness can help you and your doctor find relief for your symptoms. The first challenge is to accurately describe your dizziness. The challenge with dizziness is that it “can mean different things to different people,” says headache expert Peter Goadsby, MD, director of the Headache Center at the University of California, San Francisco. “For example, you may be feeling lightheadedness — like you’re going to pass out — or you may feel a sense of movement, like you might be spinning or the world might be spinning.” The spinning sensation is properly described as vertigo. Before you talk to your doctor about dizziness, think about the best way to describe what you’re experiencing. Make note of when your dizziness feels worst, such as when you get up suddenly from sitting or lying positions, and what helps it subside. Your doctor will also want to know about other health conditions you may have, such as diabetes or pregnancy, which can trigger these symptoms. Low blood pressure is another possible cause of dizziness or lightheadedness. Because there are so many ways to describe the sensation of dizziness — and so many potential causes — you and your doctor may need to spend some time discussing your health to get to the root of the problem. There are a number of possible links between headaches and dizziness: Migraines. Migraines are a common cause of headache pain and disability. They also can be associated with at least one form of dizziness. “A sense of instability can be found in migraine,” says Goadsby. “There is cons Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Headaches: Soothing That Aching Head

Diabetes And Headaches: Soothing That Aching Head

We’ve all had headaches. Some more than others, I suspect. I woke up the other morning with a pounding headache, as a matter of fact. Having a headache is definitely not the way to start your day. Perhaps not surprisingly, people who have diabetes can certainly get headaches, and apart from the “usual” culprits, these headaches can stem from fluctuations in blood sugar. There are ways to treat and manage them, however. Read on to learn more. What is a headache anyway? Simply put, a headache is a pain that occurs in any part of the head — on the side, in the front, or in the back. The type of headache pain can vary widely, from sharp, to dull, to throbbing. And the frequency of pain may be different — the pain may come on all of a sudden, or more gradually, and it can last an hour or last days. Types of headaches A headache is a headache, right? Not exactly. There are two main forms of headaches: primary and secondary. A primary headache is due to a problem with or overactivity of pain structures in the head, such as blood vessels, nerves, or muscles. Examples of primary headaches include: • Migraines • Cluster headaches • Tension headaches Secondary headaches occur as a symptom of a disease or condition, such as: • Blood clot • Brain aneurysm • Brain freeze (also known as “ice cream headache”) • Brain tumor • Carbon monoxide poisoning • Flu • Ear infection • Sinus infection • Stroke • Concussion • Monosodium glutamate (MSG) • Panic attacks • Changes in hormones Why might diabetes cause headaches? Having diabetes doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ll automatically have headaches. However, diabetes headaches tend to occur due to changes in blood sugar levels. The more “up and down” your blood sugars are, the more likely Continue reading >>

8 Symptoms Women Over 40 Shouldn’t Ignore

8 Symptoms Women Over 40 Shouldn’t Ignore

Most minor discomfort is a sign of ... not much. Maybe you had a heavy meal, a stressful day, a hard workout — and by the next day you feel fine again. But a handful of trivial-sounding symptoms can sometimes be red flags for something more serious. Since it's often hard to distinguish between the no big deal and the dire, most of us err on the side of ignoring the problem and hoping it goes away. "Women in midlife are often juggling 20 things at once, so they tend to neglect their own health," says Nieca Goldberg, MD, author of "Dr. Nieca Goldberg's Complete Guide to Women's Health." "That's why it's especially important for them to be informed about what really needs medical attention." Here, a guide to eight important symptoms: when you should see a doctor and when you can just keep cruising. Pain and swelling in your calf Likely cause: Pulled muscle Worst-case scenario: Blood clot in the leg Calf pain is the most common symptom of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a clot in a deep vein, which is a potentially fatal condition that strikes an estimated 350,000 to 600,000 people in the U.S. every year — most of them 40 and over. "The clot blocks blood flow, causing pain and swelling," says Stephan Moll, MD, of the National Alliance for Thrombosis and Thrombophilia. Other signs it may be serious: Symptoms of a clot can be pronounced, with significant swelling, redness, and pain, but they can also be mild and easily mistaken for a cramp. The skin may also be warm to the touch. If you're short of breath, coughing, experiencing chest pain, or having difficulty breathing, a clot may have broken free and traveled to your lungs, clogging a blood vessel there. You're at increased risk for DVT if you're on hormone therapy, the pill, patch, or ring; if you smoke or are pregnant; i Continue reading >>

Diabetic Headache Symptoms

Diabetic Headache Symptoms

Diabetes impairs your body’s ability to produce or use insulin, which regulates blood glucose levels and generates energy. In type I diabetes, the pancreas does not produce insulin. Without insulin, too much sugar remains in the blood and becomes toxic, leading to fatigue, neuropathy, headaches, blindness and death if left untreated. Type II diabetes is developmental and involves cellular resistance to insulin, which doctors usually don't diagnose until patients report obvious symptoms such as chronic headaches. Video of the Day Hyperglycemia occurs when too much glucose circulates in the blood owing to either lack of insulin production in the pancreas or cellular resistance to insulin. Hyperglycemia is a hallmark of both types of diabetes and is a serious condition because high concentrations of glucose are toxic to nerves and blood vessels. According to the Mayo Clinic, headache is an early symptom of hyperglycemia and frequently includes blurred vision, fatigue and confusion. In the absence of insulin therapy, hyperglycemia can cause a buildup of ketones, which are waste products in the blood and urine, leading to coma and death. Hypoglycemia occurs when too little glucose is in the blood or getting into cells, where the body uses it for energy. If you have diabetes, hypoglycemia can occur if you mismanage your insulin therapy and take too much. If you don't have diabetes, failure to eat enough nutrients such as carbohydrates that the body can easily break down to glucose molecules can result in hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is a serious condition because glucose is the primary source of energy for brain function. According to the American Heart Association, a dull headache is a common, early sign of hypoglycemia and often includes related symptoms such as dizziness, Continue reading >>

Dizziness

Dizziness

Tweet Because diabetes is such a diverse disease with many complications, it can cause dizziness in many ways by affecting different parts of the body. Dizziness is an episode of unsteadiness and unbalance as a result of something affecting the brain or ears. However, dizziness can also be a symptom of many things other than diabetes. So if you are experiencing recurrent dizzy spells, you should contact your doctor who will be able to diagnose the cause. Causes of dizziness A dizzy spell can be brought on by many things, but in cases of diabetes the most common causes are: Low blood pressure Dizziness can be cause by the heart's inability to pump blood up to the brain sufficiently, especially when suddenly standing up from a sitting or a lying position. As the blood momentarily fails to reach the brain, a spinning sensation, unsteadiness or even fainting can occur. Dehydration High blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) can cause polyuria, which in turn can lead to dehydration by passing too much fluid out of the body in an attempt to remove excess glucose. With low levels of water in the body, the brain may struggle to function correctly and cause light headedness. Hypoglycemia Having a low amount of sugar in your blood (hypoglycemia) can lead to dizziness by causing the brain cells to malfunction. Certain medications Some medications, including those used to treat people with diabetes, can cause dizzy spells. The instruction leaflet that comes with a medicine will list any possible side effects of the drug. When to see your doctor If you are suffering from bouts of dizziness that are recurrent or persistent you should go and see a doctor. They will likely ask questions to gauge whether there is a pattern to the feelings of dizziness, so keeping a record of dizzy spells pr Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of High Blood Pressure?

What Are The Symptoms Of High Blood Pressure?

If you are looking for a list of symptoms and signs of high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension), you won’t find them here. This is because most of the time, there are none. Myth: People with high blood pressure will experience symptoms, like nervousness, sweating, difficulty sleeping or facial flushing. Truth: High blood pressure is a largely symptomless “silent killer.” If you ignore your blood pressure because you think a certain symptom or sign will alert you to the problem, you are taking a dangerous chance with your life. DO NOT attempt to diagnose yourself. Clinical diagnosis should only be made by a healthcare professional. Know your blood pressure numbers and make changes that matter to protect your health. In most cases, high blood pressure does not cause headaches or nosebleeds The best evidence indicates that high blood pressure does not cause headaches or nosebleeds, except in the case of hypertensive crisis, a medical emergency when blood pressure is 180/120 mm Hg or higher. If your blood pressure is unusually high AND you have headache or nosebleed and are feeling unwell, wait five minutes and retest. If your reading remains at 180/120 mm Hg or higher, call 9-1-1. If you are experiencing severe headaches or nosebleeds and are otherwise unwell, contact your doctor as they could be symptoms of other health conditions. Other inconclusively related symptoms A variety of symptoms may be indirectly related to, but are not always caused by, high blood pressure, such as: Blood spots in the eyes Blood spots in the eyes (subconjunctival hemorrhage) are more common in people with diabetes or high blood pressure, but neither condition causes the blood spots. Floaters in the eyes are also not related to high blood pressure. However, an eye doctor (ophthalmologis Continue reading >>

Excess Carbohydrates Equals Lightheadedness And Fatigue

Excess Carbohydrates Equals Lightheadedness And Fatigue

Introduction Many people are familiar with the occasionally sensation of feeling light-headed when getting up out of bed or after bending over to pick up an item or tie their shoes. This lightheadedness can sometimes be accompanied by visual changes such as seeing black spots, burred vision or transient vertigo. On occasion, the lightheadedness can be so extreme as to cause the individual to pass out completely; this is known as syncope. It is estimated that 20-30% of all adults will experience an episode of syncope sometime in their lifetime. Although the brain represents only 3% of our body’s weight, the brain requires 25% of all our body’s energy, 20% of our oxygen supply and 20% of our blood blow. As you can see, the brain is very dependent on well-regulated blood flow. And when the blood flow to the brain decreases below our minimal needs, we can feel lightheaded as well as other symptoms associated with orthostatic hypotension. Lightheadedness and Syncope Lightheadedness is most commonly due to a phenomenon known as orthostatic hypotension (OH). The symptoms of OH are due to a transient drop in a person’s blood pressure that occur quickly after standing and often last only a few seconds (20–30 seconds). The symptoms are most common when we stand after laying flat for a prolonged period of time such as when we sleep or after getting up from the sitting or squatting position. Normally, our body’s blood pressure is regulated by the autonomic nervous system to maintain normal levels of blood flow to the brain in spite of rapid changes in body position. When our autonomic nervous system (ANS) is not functioning properly, our blood pressure mechanism does not work properly. If we can’t effectively regulate our brain’s blood pressure when we stand up, we ex Continue reading >>

Diabetes Related Vertigo: Causes And Treatment

Diabetes Related Vertigo: Causes And Treatment

Vertigo is an abnormal sensation of motion that can happen when a person is sitting still or when their movement through space is inaccurately sensed. Knowing where we are in space and how we are moving requires reliable information from five senses: Our vision orients movement by taking cues from vertical objects and the horizon. Our inner ear orients us to angular movements as we turn our head and to our acceleration as we move forward. Touch orients us as our weight presses us against things (e.g., feet to the ground, butt to a chair). Proprioception detects the position of our neck and limbs as we move. Our hearing orients us to objects reflecting sound and to sound emitting objects. Any impairment of these senses can lead to an experience of vertigo, disequilibrium or dizziness. Medical issues, including diabetes and heart disease, can potentially disrupt the functioning of these senses through nerve damage or circulation impairment. Vertigo and Disequilibrium Spinning vertigo is when either the environment appears to be spinning or a person feels that they are spinning within the environment. Positional vertigo is a spinning sensation occurring after a person repositions their head. A spinning sensation is often caused by inner ear problems. Disequilibrium is the sensation of an impending fall or the need of external assistance to maneuver from here to there. Some people describe a floating sensation or that the floor or room appears tilted. This can be an inner ear or other motion-sensory issue, or it can originate in the central nervous system. All experiences of vertigo and disequilibrium should be reported to your physician. Treatment, which might bring resolution or involve lifestyle adjustments, will depend on discovering and addressing the cause or causes. Continue reading >>

What's Causing My Dizzy Spells?

What's Causing My Dizzy Spells?

At different times of the day (no regular pattern) I feel very lightheaded and very dizzy, like when you have had too much to drink. During these attacks I struggle to find my bearings. It's like I don't have enough oxygen. I am a fitness instructor so I would like to say that I am rather fit. Your advice would be appreciated. I would have liked to have known whether these feelings occur in any particular circumstances, such as if you are hungry, or just had something to eat, or when (and if) you feel anxious. Dizziness and lightheadedness can be one of the most difficult symptoms to pin down. Very often it is due to some form of tension or anxiety, and can occur particularly when the breathing gets disturbed, as can happen with acute anxiety. This is often accompanied by feelings of wanting to take deep breaths, but feeling you can't, and sometimes tingling feelings around the lips or in the fingers. Physical causes include a low blood sugar. This may occur after a meal or sweet drink, which initially boosts the blood sugar, then causes a release of insulin, after which there is overcompensation and the blood sugar goes too low. This is nothing to do with diabetes. You can usually determine if this is the case by taking a couple of glucose tablets or a sweet drink, which should abolish the symptoms quickly. A very rare cause is a condition where too much insulin is produced in short bursts from abnormal tissue in the pancreas (an insulinoma), which can produce feelings of disorientation and sometimes bizarre behaviour. Another rare cause would be a form of temporal lobe epilepsy. This may not result in fits, but can make the patient feel strange and disorientated. However I think the explanation of the symptoms you describe will not prove to be anything so serious as t Continue reading >>

Dizziness: Causes, Diagnosis And Treatment

Dizziness: Causes, Diagnosis And Treatment

What is dizziness? Dizziness is also called lightheadedness and describes sensations such as feeling unsteady, balance problems or the room spinning. Feeling dizzy at times is common. Different people may experience slightly different feelings of dizziness. Severe dizziness is called vertigo. A feeling of being unsteady is also called disequilibrium. If dizziness happens often, causes falls, or if you have concerns - seek medical advice. Doctors will be more concerned about a person being dizzy if they also lose consciousness or faint. What causes dizziness? Dizziness can have many causes, including: Ear infections and conditions, including labyrinthitis and Ménière's disease, affecting balance Stress Anxiety Low blood sugar levels ( hypoglycaemia) that can affect people with diabetes, also called 'hypos' Blood pressure falling when standing up, called postural hypotension, that can affect older people Dehydration Heat exhaustion Lack of blood flow to the brain, called vertebrobasilar insufficiency Neurological (brain) conditions, including stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS) Anaemia Alcohol abuse Side-effects of some medication Irregular heartbeat Carbon monoxide poisoning Head injury Vision problems, adjusting to new glasses Sea, air or rail travel - along with travel sickness or motion sickness. Diagnosing dizziness Dizziness is a symptom of something else rather than a condition in its own right. A diagnosis is not an easy task because of many causes and possibly vague symptoms. A doctor will ask about the symptoms felt during spells of dizziness, how often it happens and whether it happened when standing up or at any time, including when lying down. They may perform a physical examination, and will look at the person's medical history for any conditions or medicat Continue reading >>

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