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Can Diabetes Cause Frequent Urination?

Frequent Urination (men) - Causes

Frequent Urination (men) - Causes

There are many potential causes of urinary frequency. Occasionally this is related to the amount or type of fluid consumed. Caffeine and alcohol can cause frequent urination in some patients. One of the more common causes of urinary frequency is a urinary tract infection (bladder or prostate). Frequent urination can be caused by prolapse of the bladder (dropped bladder). Sometimes urinary frequency can be caused by stones in the urinary tract. Bladder obstruction due to an enlarged prostate can lead to urinary frequency. The frequency can be caused by tumors in the bladder. Urinary frequency is occasionally related to neurologic conditions. Stroke, spinal cord injuries, and multiple sclerosis are often associated with frequent urination. Often urinary frequency is caused by abnormal pelvic nerve function and coordination. Urinary frequency can be associated with some serious diseases. Diabetes mellitus can cause frequent urination. Diabetes mellitus can lead to high volume frequent urination. Sometimes conditions that are not related to the bladder can cause a person to void more often. One example is vaginal atrophy, or loss of normal vaginal tissue with loss of estrogen with age or surgical removal of the ovaries. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

In this article we will cover everything you need to know about diabetes and your risk for Urinary Tract Infections. Do you have an increased risk of Urinary Tract Infections now that you have diabetes? We will cover what a Urinary Tract Infection is, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment guidelines, as well as why they are more common in people with diabetes. More importantly, we will discuss steps you can take to prevent them! What Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)? A urinary tract infection or UTI is an infection anywhere in your bladder, kidneys or in the urinary system. An infection of the upper urinary tract or the bladder is called a bladder infection or cystitis. An infection in the urethra is called urethritis. Women tend to be more at risk of these types of infections due to their anatomy; they have a much shorter area between the urethra and the opening to the urethra to the bladder. Urinary tract infections are rare in men under 50 due to their anatomy. A more serious infection of the lower urinary tract is an infection of the kidney and the ureters and is called pyelonephritis. This is a complication and occurs when the bladder infection progresses to the kidneys. I highly advise reading the following articles: According to the Stanford Medicine’s Michael Hsieh Lab, half of women and men will have experienced a urinary tract infection (UTI) during our lifetime at least once. They are the most common infection, and can lead to death in patients who are experiencing it severely. Antibiotics are the most effective therapy.The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases account 8.1 million visits to the clinic, hospitals for UTI purposes. For women, the risk of getting a UTI is 50 percent greater than a man. What Are The Symptoms of a UTI? L Continue reading >>

Frequent Urination

Frequent Urination

Is frequent urination normal? A surprising number of men and women experience issues relating to frequent urination at least once in their lives. For some patients, frequent urination can be an early sign of a larger issue regarding an overactive bladder. According to the Cleveland Clinic, over 17 million people in the United States suffer from overactive bladder. One out of six of these patients is over 40 years old. What many men and women don’t know is that sudden, frequent urination can actually be an early symptom for a urinary tract infection (UTI). It can be caused by bacteria that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract or a commonly found STD, like chlamydia, gonorrhea, or trichomoniasis. It’s estimated by the University of Maryland Medical Center, about 50% of women will experience at least one UTI in their lives, and between 30-40% of infections will recur within six months of the initial one. While it can be a side effect of a wide range of health and medical issues, many people who experience frequent urination don’t consider it to be directly related to their sexual health. Since most sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) don’t have clear early symptom warning signs, they can go undetected for a length of time and ultimately do more damage to a person’s health. If you’ve had unprotected sex recently, haven’t been tested recently, or had sex with a new partner, there is a chance that your frequent urination is an early symptom of an STD. The good news is that with today’s advances in modern medicine, STDs are easier to detect and treat - but you have to get tested first. Can frequent urination be a symptom of an STD? Yes. Getting tested regularly is the best way to stay up-to-date on your sexual health. If you are having unprotected sex or sex wit Continue reading >>

Increased Urination And Thirst In Dogs

Increased Urination And Thirst In Dogs

Frequent urination and excessive drinking are two non-specific symptoms that may be associated with many different diseases in dogs. Called polyuria and polydipsia, they frequently appear in combination. In general, increased production of urine is the primary cause, and dogs drink more to make up for the water being excreted. Hormone imbalance from endocrine disease and kidney failure are the most common reasons for polyuria. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) controls urine concentration that takes place in the kidneys; a reduction in ADH from the pituitary gland is called central diabetes insipidus, while a reduced response to the hormone in the kidneys is called nephritic diabetes insipidus. Either of these disorders produces large amounts of dilute urine with a low specific gravity. Other endocrine problem, such as diabetes mellitus, hyperadrenocorticism (Cushing’s disease), and hypoadrenocorticism (Addison’s disease) cause increased urination with a higher specific gravity as the body makes an effort to excrete solutes that the kidneys are not able to process. This also happens with direct renal failure and hepatic disease. Other conditions that can be related include electrolyte imbalance, other medications, and infections of the bladder or urinary tract. Rarely, some problems can be psychological or behavioral, in which case polydipsia will be the primary cause and polyuria will result from excessive drinking. Changes in a dog’s urination and drinking habits can be a sign of serious disease. Increased urination is called polyuria, while excessive thirst is known as polydipsia. The two symptoms frequently occur in combination. These are some of the signs you might see in a dog with polyuria and polydipsia. Frequently needing to urinate Accidents Water bowl constant Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

Common Causes Of Frequent Urination

Common Causes Of Frequent Urination

A A A Frequent Urination (cont.) Urinary tract infection: The lining of the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body) and bladder becomes inflamed and irritated due to byproducts of an infection (blood, white blood cells, bacteria). This irritation of the bladder wall causes the urge to empty the bladder frequently (called frequency). Diabetes: An early symptom of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can be frequent urination, as the body tries to rid itself of unused glucose (blood sugar) through the urine. Diabetes can also damage the nerves that control the bladder, causing frequent urination and difficulty controlling your bladder Diuretic use: Medications used to treat high blood pressure or fluid buildup work in the kidney and flush excess fluid from the body, causing frequent urination. Prostate problems: An enlarged prostate can press against the urethra and block the flow of urine, causing the bladder wall to become irritated. The bladder contracts even when it contains small amounts of urine, causing more frequent urination. Pregnancy: Hormonal changes and the growing uterus placing pressure on the bladder cause frequent urination, even in the early weeks of gestation. The trauma from vaginal childbirth can also cause damage to the urethra. Interstitial cystitis: This condition is characterized by pain in the bladder and pelvic region, often leading to frequent urination. Stroke or other neurological diseases: Damage to nerves that supply the bladder can lead to problems with bladder function, including frequent and sudden urges to urinate. Bladder cancer: Tumors taking up space or causing bleeding in the bladder may lead to more frequent urination. Overactive bladder syndrome: Often frequent urination is itself the problem. Involuntary Continue reading >>

Frequent Urination In Children: Causes, Diagnosis And Treatment

Frequent Urination In Children: Causes, Diagnosis And Treatment

Table Of Contents: Let’s face it. As mothers we get upset, maybe even angry, if our children want to go wee-wee at the most inopportune times. When you’re at a friend’s place, the grocery store, at the movies, or at a restaurant, invariably your kids will seem to demand a toilet break. And, until you satisfy their needs, you will get no peace. This is, of course, a typical scenario most mothers experience as children need to empty their bladder every two to four hours [1]. But, what happens if your child wants to wee every few minutes? Your kid could be suffering from frequency or frequent urination. So here, MomJunction sheds light on some important information about frequent urination in children. Read on to learn more. Frequent Urination In Children: If your child discharges large or small amounts of urine frequently, he suffers from frequency. If your child urinates more than seven times a day, it is a case of frequent urination [2]. In most cases, frequent urination usually is a symptom of urinary tract infection (UTI), And, UTIs are more common in girls than boys. The condition can also occur due to undiagnosed diabetes. If your kid wears a diaper, you may not know he suffers from frequent urination. But, you will know about it once you begin potty training your little one. Of course, by then you’ll begin to panic. Understanding frequent urination in kids will help you seek the right course of treatment, which resolves the underlying cause. Causes Of Frequent Urination In Children: If your child complains of frequent urination, it is important to take his concern seriously. Yes, it might be true that some kids may purposefully urinate to get more attention, and that happens when the mother devotes more time and focus to a younger sibling or her work. This Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Overactive Bladder?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Overactive Bladder?

Certain illnesses, like diabetes, can cause health problems that you might not think are related, like an overactive bladder. However, diabetes can affect many parts of your body and your bladder may be one of them. One of the common complications from diabetes is nerve damage. Some people experience this with a pins and needles feeling in their feet, for example. But this nerve damage (called diabetic neuropathy) can happen anywhere in the body, including the bladder. It’s estimated that up to one-fifth of people with type 2 diabetes also have symptoms of an overactive bladder and the older the person, the higher this risk. Symptom Confusion One of the symptoms of diabetes is the need to urinate often. So if you need to go to the bathroom a lot, it wouldn’t be unusual to think that these frequent trips to the bathroom are because of the diabetes itself. But frequent urination could be caused by diabetic neuropathy. As the nerves become damaged in the bladder, mixed signals are sent to the brain. You feel like you have to urinate, but there’s not much urine. If you are just beginning to experience symptoms of having to urinate often, it’s best to speak to your doctor or nurse practitioner about this. People with diabetes are also at higher risk of developing urinary tract infections, also called bladder infections or cystitis. One of the symptoms of these infections is the frequent need to urinate. Bladder infections should always be taken seriously because the infection could spread up to the kidneys. Other Illnesses and Overactive Bladder Diabetes is just one cause of overactive bladder. Others include: · Side effects of medications · Diseases that affect the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease · Enlarged prostate · Chronic Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes can cause serious health complications. That's why it is very important to know how to spot type 2 diabetes symptoms. Even prediabetes can increase the chance of heart disease, just like type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor about preventive measures you can take now to reduce the chance of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes due to high blood sugar may include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Loss of consciousness (rare) Contact your health care provider if you have any type 2 diabetes symptoms or if you have further questions about type 2 diabetes. It's important to get diabetes testing and start a treatment plan early to prevent serious diabetes complications. Type 2 diabetes is usually not diagnosed until health complications have occurred. Most often, there are no diabetes symptoms or a very gradual development of the above symptoms of type 2 diabetes. In fact, about one out of every four people with type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. Other symptoms of type 2 diabetes may include: Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching of the skin (usually around the vaginal or groin area) Recent weight gain or unexplained weight loss Velvety dark skin changes of the neck, armpit, and groin, called acanthosis nigricans Numbness and tingling of the hands and feet Erectile dysfunction (impotency) Continue reading >>

Frequent Or Painful Urination At A Glance

Frequent Or Painful Urination At A Glance

Frequent or painful urination occurs when a person urinates more often than is normal for him or her and when urinating causes pain, burning or stinging. Painful or frequent urination is most often a symptom of another condition. Most treatments for these conditions treat the underlying condition or include behavioral changes a person can make to feel better. What is frequent or painful urination? Urination is the process of passing liquid waste from the body in the form of urine. For most people, the bladder holds urine until it is convenient for them to use the toilet. Urination is normally painless. Most people urinate four to eight times a day depending on fluid intake. Frequent urination is when a person needs to urinate much more often, experiences an urgent need to urinate or when a person urinates more frequently than is normal for him or her. Painful urination (also called dysuria) is more common in women than in men. In both men and women it results in pain, discomfort, burning or stinging. Pain may be felt at the spot where urine leaves the body (urethra) or inside the body at the prostate (in men), bladder or behind the pubic bone at the lower part of the pelvis. Frequent urination or painful urination can indicate another physical problem and should be evaluated by a physician. Causes of frequent urination Sometimes frequent urination and painful urination go together. In women, painful urination is most often a symptom of a urinary tract infection (UTI). UTIs often include an urgent need to urinate, uncomfortable, painful or burning sense when urinating, fever, and a painful or uncomfortable abdomen. A variety of other problems can cause frequent urination, including: Diabetes. People who notice that they are urinating frequently, or an unusually large amo Continue reading >>

Urination: Frequent Urination

Urination: Frequent Urination

Frequent urination is an inconvenient condition that can affect both men and women. It is sometimes called overactive bladder or urgent urination. When this condition happens at night, it is called nocturia. Frequent urination can be a main problem, or the symptom of another problem. It can cause embarrassment and inconvenience during the day, and sleep problems at night. It is usually manageable, often by dealing with the underlying condition. Who experiences frequent urination? Frequent urination can affect anyone. However, it is most common in men and women in middle-age or older. It is also common in pregnant women. There are a number of different conditions that may cause frequent urination. The most common causes of frequent urination vary based on age and gender. They range from minor to serious. These causes include: Urinary tract infection (UTI): This is the most common cause of frequent urination. The inflammation caused by the infection reduces the bladder's ability to hold urine. Diabetes: Frequent urination can be a symptom of Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Prostate problems: This is a major cause of frequent urination in men. An enlarged prostate can block the flow of urine, causing the bladder to become irritated and contract. Pregnancy: Frequent urination is a harmless symptom of most pregnancies. As the uterus and baby grow, they place pressure on the bladder, causing the need to urinate. Interstitial cystitis: A condition that causes pelvic and bladder pain and the feeling of having to urinate constantly. Diuretics: Medicines used to treat other conditions such as high blood pressure can cause frequent urination as excess fluids are flushed from the body. Stroke: A stroke can damage nerves in the bladder and lead to frequent urination. Excessive alcohol or Continue reading >>

7 Signs You Could Have Type 1 Diabetes

7 Signs You Could Have Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes symptoms Type 1 diabetes symptoms usually arrive without warning. Suddenly, someone might have unexplained weight loss, constant thirst, and the need to go to the bathroom all the time. These are all signs that the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas have been destroyed by an immune system gone awry. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the pancreas to stop producing insulin. “We need insulin to convert food to energy and to take it to the organs,” explains Carlos Blaschke, MD, associate scientist with the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Without insulin to bring sugar to the cells, the cells starve, he says, and send distress signals–the first signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes–around the body. “Sugar also starts accumulating in the blood,” Dr. Blaschke adds, which can also spark symptoms. There’s no way to prevent or cure type 1 diabetes. The best thing you can do is watch for telltale symptoms that can become life-threatening quickly. The sooner you notice something is wrong, the sooner you can be treated. Talk to your doctor if you experience these signs of type 1 diabetes. Frequent urination Without insulin, sugar accumulates in your bloodstream. The kidneys, which would normally reabsorb sugar, quickly become overwhelmed. “As the blood glucose rises past a level that can be reabsorbed by the kidneys, glucose is lost in the urine and more water is lost as a result," says David A. Finken, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. Frequent urination, also called polyuria, is easier to detect in kids than in adults, especially in babies and infants. “Parents might notice more urine in the diaper, they’re changin Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes symptoms may occur when blood sugar levels in the body become abnormally elevated. The most common symptoms of diabetes include: increased thirst increased hunger excessive fatigue increased urination, especially at night blurry vision Symptoms can vary from one person to the next. They also depend on which type of diabetes you have. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes tend to begin abruptly and dramatically. Type 1 diabetes is most often seen in children, adolescents, and young adults. However, type 1 diabetes can develop at any age. In addition to the symptoms listed above, people with type 1 diabetes may notice a quick and sudden weight loss. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type. Although it primarily develops in adults, it’s beginning to be seen more frequently in younger people. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include being overweight, being sedentary, and having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 2 diabetes don’t experience any symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms are slow to develop. Oftentimes, your symptoms may seem harmless. The most common symptoms of diabetes, such as persistent thirst and fatigue, are often vague. When experienced on their own, symptoms such as these may not be anything to worry about. If you’re experiencing one or more of these symptoms, you should speak with your doctor about being screened for diabetes. Frequent thirst You’ve had glass after glass of water, but you still feel like you need more. This is because your muscles and other tissues are dehydrated. When your blood sugar levels rise, your body tries to pull fluid from other tissues to dilute the sugar in your bloodstream. This process can cause your body to dehydrate, prompting you to drink more water. Frequent urination Drinking excessive amou Continue reading >>

Excessive Thirst, Frequent Urination And Increased Urine Production

Excessive Thirst, Frequent Urination And Increased Urine Production

SHARE RATE★★★★★ Excessive thirst (polydipsia), frequent urination (more than eight times per day), and increased urine production (polyuria) (generally considered urine output of over 3 liters [about 100 ounces or 12.5 cups] per day) are classic symptoms of diabetes mellitus, resulting from the effects of high blood glucose. They are also symptoms of a dangerous complication of diabetes called diabetic ketoacidosis. To understand the cause of these symptoms, it’s necessary to understand a little about the role and function of the kidneys. The role of the kidneys is to filter waste out of the blood and maintaining a balance of chemical elements in the blood. The waste products that the kidney removes from the blood are sent to the bladder, which produces urine, which in turn is passed out of the body.1,2 Learn more about diabetic ketoacidosis. Uncontrolled diabetes with high levels of blood glucose can place a great deal of stress on kidney function and over time and can ultimately cause kidney disease (also called nephropathy). Excessive thirst, frequent urination, and increased urine production are signs that the kidney is working overtime to filter high levels of glucose out of the blood. To accomplish this, the kidneys produce a high volume of urine, which results in an increase in the frequency of urination and the need to urinate at night (this is called nocturne).1 Because of extra urine production, the body becomes easily dehydrated, resulting in excessive thirst. Often, an individual who experiences excessive thirst will consume carbonated drinks containing sugar to satisfy this thirst, a choice that results in a worsening of symptoms. Despite the efforts of the kidney to meet extra demands of filtering glucose out of the blood, over time high blood Continue reading >>

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