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Can Diabetes Cause Depression And Anxiety?

Can Hypoglycemia Cause Anxiety?

Can Hypoglycemia Cause Anxiety?

Diabetes and issues with blood sugar are all over the news. Every day there are more and more reports of the effects that foods and chemicals have on your long term health, and it's not uncommon to worry about developing these types of problems. That's why so many people with anxiety wonder if they have hypoglycemia - or low blood sugar. Hypoglycemia occurs when there is not enough glucose in the body, starving the brain. This article explores whether or not hypoglycemia may be causing your anxiety and how. You Can Manage Hypoglycemia Anxiety Even if your anxiety is related to your blood sugar levels, you can control it with the right anxiety treatments. Take my anxiety test to look at the symptoms of your anxiety and recommend an effective treatment option. Worried About Hypoglycemia? See a Doctor Your blood sugar is one of the easiest things to diagnose. You can take a simple blood test after fasting for 12 hours and have results in no time. So if you're worried about your blood sugar, talk to your doctor. You should also take my free anxiety test to find out more about your anxiety. Health Causes of Anxiety Most people that suffer from anxiety worry that it has a physical cause. In fact, one of the main problems affecting those with anxiety attacks is the constant, nagging feeling that the physical symptoms are too severe to be something as "harmless" as anxiety, and they often look for other explanations for why they may be feeling these symptoms. First, you need to remember that anxiety causes you to think this way. Anxiety alters thought processes so that "worst case scenario" thinking is more common. In addition, anxiety symptoms can be incredibly severe, and genuinely mimic the symptoms of major health disorders. As much as it may seem hard to believe, your symp Continue reading >>

Kids With Type 1 Diabetes At Risk For Mental Health Problems

Kids With Type 1 Diabetes At Risk For Mental Health Problems

(Reuters Health) – In a new Swedish study, kids diagnosed with type 1 diabetes were more likely than their healthy siblings to develop a psychiatric disorder or to attempt suicide. “We suspected that we would find higher risk of common psychiatric disorders such as depression or anxiety, as observed among adults with diabetes,” said lead author Agnieszka Butwicka of the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. “What was surprising was that risk was high for many different psychiatric disorders,” which may mean that applying the results of adult studies to kids is too simplistic, she told Reuters Health by email. More than 200,000 kids in the U.S. had diabetes in 2012, according to the National Diabetes Education Program, and most of them had type 1, which results from the body not producing enough insulin. The condition, previously known as juvenile diabetes, is often diagnosed early in life. People with type 1 diabetes must use insulin injections every day to regulate their blood sugar, and past research has shown that managing the disease is stressful for kids, especially in the period right after they are diagnosed. Butwicka and her colleagues used a national register to compare more than 17,000 children with diabetes born in Sweden between 1973 and 2009 with more than 1,000,000 similar but healthy kids, as well as with the healthy siblings of the diabetic group. They looked in medical records for diagnoses of common psychiatric disorders, such as depression, suicide attempt, anxiety, eating disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism or other behavioral problems. About 8 percent of kids with type 1 diabetes were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. Those with diabetes were twice Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Mental Health

Diabetes & Mental Health

The mental health impact of a disease such as diabetes is often overlooked. Through mind and body techniques, and stress management, depression can be lifted. An often forgotten, and even neglected, aspect of type 2 diabetes is the mental health burden that patients with this disease face. Thankfully, there are lifestyle strategies and natural supplements that may help patients cope with diabetes-related stress and depression. Diabetes: mind and body Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder caused by an absolute or relative lack of insulin. Type 1 diabetes mellitus typically begins in childhood with the inability of the pancreas to secrete insulin and properly regulate blood sugar. The more common type 2 diabetes mellitus typically begins in adulthood due to poor lifestyle habits, and is characterized by insensitivity to insulin, which cannot be overcome by the pancreas. There is much hope today for patients with both types of diabetes, since many natural health products and pharmaceuticals are available to improve blood sugar regulation while also reducing risk factors for kidney failure, nerve damage, blindness, and cardiovascular events such as strokes and heart attacks. However, many clinicians approach type 2 diabetes by primarily focusing on the hormonal, visual, nerve, cardiovascular, and kidney issues, yet seldom discuss and manage the mental health implications of living with the disease. Type 2 diabetes affects both the mind and body, so it is imperative that clinicians take a holistic approach in their management of the disease. Mental health concerns The mental health burden that patients with diabetes face is worrisome. Compared to non-diabetic patients, there is a two-fold increase in the severity of depression and anxiety among diabetes patients. The com Continue reading >>

Physical Causes Of Depression And Anxiety

Physical Causes Of Depression And Anxiety

by: Dr. Craig A. Maxwell Anxiety and depression affects millions of men and women worldwide. Though we live in an age of modern medicine, 300,000 people in the United States commit suicide each year. Why is this? If you’re struggling with depressed mood or are feeling anxious everyday, it’s important to truly understand the mental health condition you’re experiencing and what natural steps you can take to treat it. What is Depression? Depression is a chronic and often debilitating mental health condition characterized by feelings of extreme sadness, despondency, hopelessness, irritability, mental confusion, pain, and fatigue. Depression doesn’t just mean you feel “sad” or “blue”; it affects every aspect of your life and can make you feel powerless, helpless, and useless for long periods of time. Symptoms of Depression Symptoms of depression vary from person to person and will often present differently for men than it will for women. For example, men with depression often find themselves feeling irritable, angry, frustrated, anxious, and indecisive. They may struggle with insomnia or sleep too much. Men with depression may also experience bouts of erectile dysfunction and contemplate suicide. Women, on the other hand, will often withdraw into themselves and experience feelings of guilt, fatigue, and sadness often accompanied by insomnia or periods of sleeping too much. Women with depression often experience aches and pains and lose interest in activities they used to enjoy, including sex. Appetite and weight changes are also common. What is Anxiety? Anxiety is a blanket term used to describe feelings of nervousness, fear, and anticipation. These feelings are common before a major life event such as a job interview, birth or marriage, but when these feelin Continue reading >>

-chapter 2- Low Blood Sugar & Mental Health Problems

-chapter 2- Low Blood Sugar & Mental Health Problems

low blood sugar depression and neurotransmitters Natural Treatment and Remedies The premise of this chapter is that in people with mental health problems including depression, anxiety, addiction and bipolar syndrome fluctuations in blood sugar can exacerbate and trigger intense bouts of worse symptoms. The human brain requires a huge amount of fuel to make enough energy to function and it suffers an immediate decline in function when it runs low on fuel. The brain relies almost exclusively on glucose or sugar for energy which it draws directly from the blood, furthermore the brain does not store glucose and only stores tiny amounts of glycogen (reserve glucose) in reserve for times when our blood sugar levels fall. The brains high demand for glucose and its lack of reserves means the brain is highly dependent on a steady supply of sugar from the blood and when blood sugar levels fall either too low or just too quickly the first part of the body to suffer is the brain and consequently our mental function. What happens when blood sugar drops is it diminishes the brains capacity to produce neurotransmitters, transmit signals and perform essential maintenance. Almost everyone will be familiar with this effect, it’s the ‘spaced out’ shaky, irritable feeling and difficulty in concentrating we experience when we haven’t eaten anything for too long. In people without mental health problems this is just an unpleasant experience but in people with mental health problems that already have poor brain function a bout of low blood sugar that compromises brain function even further can trigger a bout of more intense symptoms of the problem, for example it could trigger a wave of increased depression, anxiety or OCD and as you may have already noticed once an intense bout of yo Continue reading >>

Anxiety And Depression Support

Anxiety And Depression Support

Losing a loved one, getting fired from a job, going through a divorce, and other difficult situations can lead a person to feel sad, lonely and scared. These feelings are normal reactions to life's stressors. Most people feel low and sad at times. However, in the case of individuals who are diagnosed with depression as a psychiatric disorder, the manifestations of the low mood are much more severe and they tend to persist. Depression occurs more often in women than men. Some differences in the manner in which the depressed mood manifests has been found based on sex and age. In men it manifests often as tiredness, irritability and anger. They may show more reckless behavior and abuse drugs and alcohol. They also tend to not recognize that they are depressed and fail to seek help. In women depression tends to manifest as sadness, worthlessness, and guilt. In younger children depression is more likely to manifest as school refusal, anxiety when separated from parents, and worry about parents dying. Depressed teenagers tend to be irritable, sulky, and get into trouble in school. They also frequently have co-morbid anxiety, eating disorders, or substance abuse. In older adults depression may manifest more subtly as they tend to be less likely to admit to feelings of sadness or grief and medical illnesses which are more common in this population also contributes or causes the depression. There are different types of depressive disorders, and while there are many similarities among them, each depressive disorder has its own unique set of symptoms. The most commonly diagnosed form of depression is Major Depressive Disorder. In 2015, around 16.1 million adults aged 18 years or older in the U.S. had experienced at least one major depressive episode in the last year, which represe Continue reading >>

Depression In Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes

Depression In Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Objective: To investigate the incidence of depression in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Materials and One hundred newly diagnosed (4 – 12 weeks) T2DM participants were evaluated for depressive symptoms by using the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS). Blood glucose (HBA1C), urinary albumin, BMI, and blood pressure were measured. Sexual function was evaluated by a self-score on IIEF-5 Questionnaires in male participants below 60 years of age. Twenty-eight (28%) of these had depressive scores, 18 (18%) had mild scores, six (6%) had moderate scores, and four had (4%) severe ones. In those who took oral medication, the percentage of depression was 18.5% (10/54) and in those who were treated by insulin the percentage was 39.1% (18/46). The levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG), HBA1c, and urinary albumin were higher in those with depression. The SDS score was negatively correlated with age and annual household income (r = 0.151,0.139, P < 0.05); 17% of the (8/48) males below 60 years of age was diagnosed with erectile dysfunction (ED) by II EF-5score < 20 and the severity of depressive symptoms was negatively correlated with II EF-5score (r = 0.131, P < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings indicated that depressive symptoms are common in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. A variety of factors could be influencing the severity of depressive symptoms. Keywords: Diabetes, depression, erectile dysfunction Continue reading >>

Is There A Link Between Diabetes And Depression? Know The Facts

Is There A Link Between Diabetes And Depression? Know The Facts

Some studies show that having diabetes doubles your risk of developing depression. If diabetes-related health problems emerge, your risk for depression can increase even further. It remains unclear exactly why this is. Some researchers suggest that this could be due to diabetes' metabolic effect on brain function as well as the toll day-to-day management can take. It’s also possible that people with depression are more likely to develop diabetes. Because of this, it’s recommended that people who have a history of depression be screened for diabetes. Keep reading for more on the connection between diabetes and depression, as well as information on diagnosis, treatment, and more. Although more research is needed to fully understand the link between diabetes and depression, it’s clear that there’s a connection. It’s thought that alterations in brain chemistry tied to diabetes may be related to the development of depression. For example, damage resulting from diabetic neuropathy or blocked blood vessels in the brain may contribute to the development of depression in people with diabetes. Conversely, changes in the brain due to depression may cause an increased risk for complications. Studies have shown that people with depression are at higher risk for diabetes complications, but is has been difficult to determine which causes which. It hasn’t been determined if depression increases the risk for complications, or vice versa. Symptoms of depression can make it more difficult to successfully manage diabetes and prevent diabetes-related complications. A 2011 study found that people who have type 2 diabetes and experience symptoms of depression often have higher blood sugar levels. Additionally, the results of a separate 2011 study suggest that people who have both Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Anxiety

Diabetes And Anxiety

Tweet Anxiety can be defined as a fear-based mental state, normally felt as a discomforting emotional state accompanied with physical sensations in the body. Anxiety based mental disorders (i.e. people diagnosed with SAD or GAD) are people who appear anxious about almost everything. This has a detrimental effect on their ability to carry out normal day to day activities. What are the symptoms of anxiety? Symptoms include excessive worry and unnecessary anxiety for numerous activities with symptoms being present and continuous for a minimum of 6 months. Anxiety is difficult to control and is accompanied by somatic symptoms including: Shaking Heart palpitations Excessive perspiration Crying Often it will be a state of mind that is reached after years of dealing with the condition. People diagnosed with diabetes are approximately 20% more likely to suffer from anxiety than those without diabetes. [33] What are the causes of anxiety? Being diagnosed with diabetes can instigate anxiety in a number of ways. People with diabetes may potentially be anxious about how their condition will be perceived by others including friends, family and work colleagues. Anxiety may also arise over what could happen if they were experience a hypo while driving or whilst looking after their children. Excessive worrying can lead to social anxiety. Symptoms of social anxiety include Being fearful of leaving the house or place of comfort Anxiety of being around people, known or strangers Avoidance of social interaction Why might I be anxious? People diagnosed with diabetes may be anxious about the long term implications of their condition. Greater than 70%, of diabetics could develop macrovascular conditions including heart attack and stroke. Furthermore, between 5% and 10% are reported to experie Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Imbalance And Its Impact On Your Mental Health

Blood Sugar Imbalance And Its Impact On Your Mental Health

Riding the blood sugar roller coaster day after day can impact your mental health. The highs followed by crashes may accentuate the symptoms of a mood disorder. Research has tied processed, refined sugar consumption to an increased risk of depression and can worsen the outcomes of schizophrenia. Blood sugar in the form of glucose is the basic fuel for all brain operation and activity. If it is inadequate, mental health systems can start to shut down. Glandular imbalances will result as the glands struggle to regulate the sugar level. This can cause symptoms such as high adrenaline which can look like anxiety, panic attacks or violence. Just by making tweaks to your diet you can improve your blood sugar regulation and your mental health. The Impact of Blood Sugar Dysregulation on our Mental Health By now, most of know that sugar and processed foods are bad for our heart, cholesterol and waistline. But not as much attention is giving to what it does to our brain. Here is what Happens You eat a meal or have a drink with excess sugar. Say you start your day with a bagel, muffin or donut, or have cereal with milk, banana and some OJ. The pancreas releases insulin to bring glucose to the cells but because of the high amount of sugar, the insulin response is excessive About 2 hours later so much sugar has been put into storage that you now have low blood sugar and are feeling weak, shaky, brain fog, fatigue, change in mood (depression) and cravings The body responds to this as an emergency so it dumps adrenaline into the system. This causes anxiety, racing heart, irritability, anxiousness, panic, outbursts and more You reach for a processed carb or sugar product to get your sugar levels back up. Thus, the cycle begins again. This cycle contributes to chronic inflammation in th Continue reading >>

Why Sugar Is Poison For Depression

Why Sugar Is Poison For Depression

I have a theory: Many people who suffer from chronic severe depression and anxiety are allergic to sugar and foods like white flour that the human body processes like sugar. Like most of my theories, I have tested this one on my 13-year-old son, because his brain is most like mine in our family (poor guy). After he has consumed three pumpkin muffins, his character completely changes, like the Green Goblin (Norman Osborn) in Spider-Man. Depending on the amount of fructose corn syrup in the muffins, his head sometimes spins around like Linda Blair's in The Exorcist, and his pupils can do a 360 in the eye sockets. He is horribly obnoxious for about three hours — twerking at the refrigerator, riding his lacrosse stick like a horse through the living room — and then he starts sobbing: “I hate my life!! Someone please shoot me!” Often the next morning he will wake up hungover, with purple circles under his swollen eyes. You would think that two somewhat intelligent parents would have picked up on this connection between his behavior and his diet in the first decade of his life, but it has only been in the last year we’ve been documenting the experiment. It’s harder than you think to get your kid excited about vegetables and steer him away from any kind of food offered in a vending machine. Whenever we try to encourage positive eating habits, something seems to go terribly wrong. Like the time we thought we’d have a fun family outing at Potbelly. Eric: “David, do you think you could get a salad?” Katherine (11-year-old): “I’m getting a sub!” David (crying): “It’s not fair! I hate my brain!” Eric: “Well, Katherine didn’t get the skinny gene.” Katherine (crying): “You think I’m fat!” Eric: “Let’s just go home. I feel badly for my lit Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Anxiety And Depression Among Outpatients With Type 2 Diabetes In The Mexican Population

Prevalence Of Anxiety And Depression Among Outpatients With Type 2 Diabetes In The Mexican Population

Abstract Depression and anxiety are common in diabetic patients; however, in recent years the frequency of these symptoms has markedly increased worldwide. Therefore, it is necessary to establish the frequency and factors associated with depression and anxiety, since they can be responsible for premature morbidity, mortality, risk of developing comorbidities, complications, suffering of patients, as well as escalation of costs. We studied the frequency of depression and anxiety in Mexican outpatients with type 2 diabetes and identified the risk factors for depression and anxiety. Methods and Findings We performed a study in 820 patients with type 2 diabetes. The prevalence of depression and anxiety was estimated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, respectively. We calculated the proportions for depression and anxiety and, after adjusting for confounding variables, we performed multivariate analysis using multiple logistic regressions to evaluate the combined effect of the various factors associated with anxiety and depression among persons with type 2 diabetes. The rates for depression and anxiety were 48.27% (95% CI: 44.48–52.06) and 55.10% (95% CI: 51.44–58.93), respectively. Occupation and complications in diabetes were the factors associated with anxiety, whereas glucose level and complications in diabetes were associated with depression. Complications in diabetes was a factor common to depression and anxiety (p<0.0001; OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.29–2.4). Our findings demonstrate that a large proportion of diabetic patients present depression and/or anxiety. We also identified a significant association between complications in diabetes with depression and anxiety. Interventions are necessary to hinder the appearance of comp Continue reading >>

Depression, Anxiety & Illness

Depression, Anxiety & Illness

Thyroid conditions If the thyroid is not working properly your metabolism can be affected. Some thyroid conditions can lead to depression or anxiety. Thyroid conditions affect women five times more often than men. About your thyroid Your thyroid is a small butterfly or bow tie shaped gland, located in your neck, wrapped around the windpipe. The thyroid gland takes iodine (mostly found in foods such as seafood and salt) to produce thyroid hormones. Two key thyroid hormones are: triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). These hormones help oxygen get into cells and regulate the body's metabolism. The thyroid hormones affect important functions such as growth. Hypothyroidism & depression If your thyroid is under active, the thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones and symptoms of hypothyroidism may occur. The signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism vary widely depending on the severity of the hormone deficiency. Depression is one of those symptoms. Other symptoms include: fatigue mental fogginess and forgetfulness feeling excessively cold constipation dry skin fluid retention non-specific aches and stiffness in muscles and joints heavy periods As well as the physical symptoms, Dr Jennifer Wong a consultant endocrinologist (hormone specialist) says “there may be emotional impacts for women too. Weight gain may lead to body image and self–image concerns, but often women have no motivation or energy to exercise. This negative cycle can make women even more depressed.” Hyperthyroidism & anxiety An overactive thyroid gland produces excess thyroid hormones and is called hyperthyroidism. This happens in almost four per cent of women and 0.2 per cent of men. Signs and symptoms can be similar to anxiety symptoms including: rapid heart rate breathlessness irritability anxie Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression: A Toxic Combo For Suicide

Diabetes And Depression: A Toxic Combo For Suicide

Diabetes and Suicide More teenagers and young adults die from suicide than from cancer, heart disease, AIDS, diabetes, stroke, pneumonia, influenza, and chronic lung disease, COMBINED. It is the 2nd leading cause of death in kids aged 10-24 and the 4th leading cause of death of people aged 25-54. Depression, especially when combined with other disorders and diseases, can make you feel like your back is against the wall with no moves left to make with a feeling of hopelessness, sparking suicidal thoughts. Add the burden of diabetes, the (at times) seemingly impossible management, health care costs, and a slew of other problems brought on by diabetes, depression can really cloud better judgment in both kids and adults struggling with the disease. After looking into suicide rates in the Type 1 diabetes community, I was speechless in what I found. Depression and Diabetes: A Toxic Combo for Suicide Ask anyone with the condition—Diabetes management is a grueling process that requires 100% attention to detail, day in and day out. There is no downtime. No breaks. From endless medication administration to restrictive food choices to the blood sugar roller coasters that occur to diabetic complications like blindness, heart and kidney failure, and limb amputation, are all occurrences that people who are non-diabetics don’t have to deal with. It can be very frustrating and depressing— especially if you don’t know many other people who can empathize or relate. The link between diabetes and suicide is depression. Roughly 16 percent of the general population experience depression, but the percentage is nearly doubled for diabetics as seen in a meta-analysis reviewing 39 studies with a combined total of 20,218 subjects. “Mortality rates in people who have both diabetes and de Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Take A Toll On Your Emotions

Diabetes Can Take A Toll On Your Emotions

And this psychological component may make it harder to control the blood-sugar disorder, experts say Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, May 17, 2012 (HealthDay News) -- Many people know diabetes -- both type 1 and type 2 -- can take a serious toll on physical health. But these blood-sugar disorders also can affect your emotions and, in turn, your emotions can wreak havoc on your diabetes control. Extremes in blood-sugar levels can cause significant mood changes, and new research suggests that frequent changes in blood-sugar levels (called glycemic variability) also can affect mood and quality of life for those with diabetes. Depression has long been linked to diabetes, especially type 2. It's still not clear, however, whether depression somehow triggers diabetes or if having diabetes leads to being depressed. More recent research in people with type 1 diabetes has found that long periods of high blood-sugar levels can trigger the production of a hormone linked to the development of depression. People with type 1 diabetes no longer can make their own insulin; people with type 2 diabetes need insulin treatment because their bodies can no longer produce it in sufficient quantities. "Diabetes gives you so much to worry about that it's exhausting. It can make you feel powerless," said Joe Solowiejczyk, a certified diabetes educator and a manager of diabetes counseling and training at the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute in Milpitas, Calif. "I think it's important to ackno Continue reading >>

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