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Can Diabetes Cause Depression

Depression During Pregnancy Linked To Gestational Diabetes

Depression During Pregnancy Linked To Gestational Diabetes

Depression during and after pregnancy may be linked to gestational diabetes, a new government study found. Women in the study who reported feeling depressed early in pregnancy were more likely to develop gestational diabetes later in pregnancy compared with those who did not report depression early in pregnancy, according to the study, from researchers at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The findings suggest that "depression and gestational diabetes may occur together," Stefanie Hinkle, a population health researcher at the NICHD and the lead author of the study, said in a statement. [9 Uncommon Conditions That Pregnancy May Bring] In addition, the researchers found that having gestational diabetes may increase women's risk for developing depression after pregnancy: Women in the study who had gestational diabetes were more likely to develop postpartum depression compared with those who did not have gestational diabetes, according to the study. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. When a person has diabetes, the body cannot properly control blood-sugar levels. During pregnancy, diabetes can put both the mother and the baby at risk; women can develop a high blood-pressure condition called preeclampsia, which can become life-threatening, and babies can grow too large within the uterus, which can make birth difficult. In the U.S., 9.2 percent of women develop gestational diabetes, and postpartum depression affects 10 to 15 percent of mothers within a year of giving birth, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In the study, the researchers looked at data from about 2,800 women who were enrolled in the NICHD Fetal Growth Studies-Singleton Cohort, a long-term study that tracked wome Continue reading >>

Depression In Diabetes Mellitus: A Comprehensive Review

Depression In Diabetes Mellitus: A Comprehensive Review

Go to: Mental disorders, in general, in patients with diabetes mellitus(DM) Patients with DM seem not to be at higher risk for a mental disorder in general compared to non-diabetic individuals. In a cross-sectional population-based study by Kruse et al1 among 141 patients with DM, identified out of a community sample of 4169 individuals, the prevalence of any mental disorder - assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) - was comparable between the patients with DM and the non-diabetic individuals [26.6% vs 26.0%; Odds Ratio(OR)=1.11; Confidence Interval (CI):0.73-1.69]. Notably, after adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic and family status, no significant difference between the two groups was found, concerning affective, somatoform, substance abuse/dependence disorders; only anxiety disorders were found to be significantly more prevalent in the diabetic group (OR=2.05; CI:1.22-3.43). Das-Munshi et al2 in another cross-sectional population-based study of 249 patients with diabetes, identified out of a sample of 8580 individuals, reported that the prevalence of any mental disorder - assessed with the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R) - was 21.6% in the diabetic group vs 16.3% in the non-diabetic group. The crude (unadjusted) odds ratio was non-significant (OR=1.4; CI:1.0-2.0), whereas after adjusting for age, sex and socioeconomical status it became significant (OR=1.5;1.1-2.2; p<0.05). Finally, after adjusting further for impairment in everyday functioning and medical comorbidity, the odds ratio was attenuated again in non-significant levels (OR=1.3; CI:0.9-1.9). The same pattern also apllied to mixed anxiety and depression, whereas the odds ratio concerning depressive, anxiety, comorbid anxiety depressive disorders was not statistica Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Cause Depression

Diabetes Can Cause Depression

Diabetes is a long-term condition that causes a person’s blood sugar level to become too high. It is a metabolic disease and chronic disorder, which results from defects in insulin secretion or action. Insulin is a hormone, which is secreted by pancreas and lowers the blood glucose level in the body. When insulin secretion or action is disturbed, diabetes mellitus develops. DEPRESSION It is a mood disorder and serious medical illness, which can alter the person’s thoughts, behaviour, feelings and sense of well-being. It is a disorder of brain, which can happen at any age, especially in teens and adults. World Health Organisation (WHO) describes depression as the major cause of disability, which is estimated to account for 12% of the global burden of disease. It is reported to affect approximately 450 million people. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIABETES AND DEPRESSION Depression is a very drastic condition becoming common in the general population i.e. approximately 1 in 4 people experience depression in their life and people with diabetes are at more risk to develop depression i.e. up to 50% of people with diabetes are thought to have mental illness such as depression or anxiety. Depressive patients are also at higher risk of developing diabetes. It is also reported that untreated depression can make it difficult to manage diabetes. CAUSES OF DEPRESSION IN DIABETES The hardship of managing diabetes can be stressful and can lead to symptoms of depression. Diabetes leads to many health complications that may worsen symptoms of depression. Family history of either condition Obesity Hypertension Inactivity Coronary artery disease According to the above data, the complications of diabetes are major reason behind the development of depression. By treating diabetes or its complic Continue reading >>

What Are You Tired Of Explaining To People?

What Are You Tired Of Explaining To People?

Holy mother of God! Where do I start?! There are some topics where it seems that no matter how much effort I put in, there is always that one person who will require me to restate the facts. Where do we start? Let me simply state a few that’s coming to mind right now: “Evolution is just a theory” I think the trouble with this particular one is a bit complicated of a matter. On one level, it is a linguistic problem. In the English language, the word theory is often used by the general public as a substitute for a hunch/guess. However, a Scientific Theory, such as the Theory of Evolution, is NOT A GUESS! A lot of people assume that it probably is somewhat of a hunch by the scientists studying the respective field. Otherwise why call it a theory? Why not a fact? Well, in science, there is no higher state of being than a theory. Facts don’t tell you much and neither do laws. They are just that! Facts and observations. It’s when you put all the facts together and integrate the observations into it that you get a Scientific Theory. A Scientific Theory not only explains the body of evidence/facts/observations, it makes predictions that can be shown to be true. It is interesting to note at this point that there is something in science that is kinda sorta analogue to a guess. It’s known as a Scientific Hypothesis. It is essentially an educated guess, which must be testable. The moment you test it and find out it doesn’t fit, you must discard it. If however, you see that your hypothesis indeed explains the body of evidence and passes the tests, then and only then you may call it a Scientific Theory. Another level of confusion about this matter arises simply from the mass marketing of anti-scientific propaganda materials throughout many religious circles. Put simply, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression: A Toxic Combo For Suicide

Diabetes And Depression: A Toxic Combo For Suicide

Diabetes and Suicide More teenagers and young adults die from suicide than from cancer, heart disease, AIDS, diabetes, stroke, pneumonia, influenza, and chronic lung disease, COMBINED. It is the 2nd leading cause of death in kids aged 10-24 and the 4th leading cause of death of people aged 25-54. Depression, especially when combined with other disorders and diseases, can make you feel like your back is against the wall with no moves left to make with a feeling of hopelessness, sparking suicidal thoughts. Add the burden of diabetes, the (at times) seemingly impossible management, health care costs, and a slew of other problems brought on by diabetes, depression can really cloud better judgment in both kids and adults struggling with the disease. After looking into suicide rates in the Type 1 diabetes community, I was speechless in what I found. Depression and Diabetes: A Toxic Combo for Suicide Ask anyone with the condition—Diabetes management is a grueling process that requires 100% attention to detail, day in and day out. There is no downtime. No breaks. From endless medication administration to restrictive food choices to the blood sugar roller coasters that occur to diabetic complications like blindness, heart and kidney failure, and limb amputation, are all occurrences that people who are non-diabetics don’t have to deal with. It can be very frustrating and depressing— especially if you don’t know many other people who can empathize or relate. The link between diabetes and suicide is depression. Roughly 16 percent of the general population experience depression, but the percentage is nearly doubled for diabetics as seen in a meta-analysis reviewing 39 studies with a combined total of 20,218 subjects. “Mortality rates in people who have both diabetes and de Continue reading >>

Is There A Link Between Diabetes And Depression

Is There A Link Between Diabetes And Depression

Some experts suggest individuals diagnosed with diabetes may present with depressive symptoms. Discover the link between diabetes and depression here, exploring the symptoms and have they may be overcome! Can Diabetes Cause Depression? Getting diagnosed with diabetes may not only be hard on the body, but hard on your mind. Diabetes is a chronic disease that requires lifestyle changes to prevent further health consequences. Especially if overwhelmed with all the new information and recommendations, dealing and managing diabetes may be mentally taxing. Though feeling down is considered normal every now, continued feelings of sadness and hopelessness may be indicative of serious depression, particularly if prolonged for more than two weeks. Depressive symptoms may include: • Disinterest in things you used to enjoy doing, including writing, reading, exercising, or interacting with a social group • A change in sleeping patterns that include trouble falling asleep, consistently waking up throughout the night, or wanting to sleep most of the day • Diet changes that trigger high appetite or none at all, ultimately causing extreme trends in weight gain and loss • Energy loss and increased feelings of tiredness • Crying more than usual • Experience exaggerated nervousness and anxiousness • Distracted by thoughts and feelings, compromising concentration and focus • Seeking out temporary, harmful rewards as a coping mechanism, including drugs, alcohol, and even food Depression and Coping Strategies New research further suggests people with type 2 diabetes who display symptoms of depression are more likely to be noncompliant with medications. Specifically, these individuals were more prone to skip or miss medications prescribed to treat blood sugar. Though treating b Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Stress & Depression

Diabetes: Stress & Depression

How is diabetes linked to emotion? You have been challenged with the diagnosis of diabetes. Whether it is a new diagnosis or a longstanding one, living with this challenge can trigger a flood of emotions. Some of these emotions can include: Grief Anxiety Frustration Disappointment Stress These emotions are natural responses and are experienced by many people, especially when they are first diagnosed with diabetes. These emotions might also be experienced by someone managing diabetes over the long term. Emotional issues may make it harder to take care of you—to eat right, exercise, and rest—which in turn can affect blood sugar control. In addition, you might find yourself trying to reduce stress with unhealthy behaviors, which can contribute to diabetes complications. What is stress? Most people experience stress as an emotional or physical strain. It can result in worry, anxiety, and tension. Everyday events or changes in life may create stress. Stress affects everyone to some degree, but it may be more difficult to manage when people learn that they have diabetes. Symptoms of stress can include: Nervousness A fast heartbeat Rapid breathing Stomach upset Depression Stress can make it more difficult to control your diabetes as it may throw off your daily routine and can result in wear and tear on your body. Hormones from stress increase your blood pressure, raise your heart rate, and can cause blood sugar to rise. High blood sugar can make you feel down or tired. Low blood sugar may result in your feeling upset or nervous. How can I reduce stress in my life? There are many things you can do to reduce stress. The following are some suggestions: Take your medications as directed and eat healthy meals. Use relaxation techniques such as deep breathing. Get some exercise. Continue reading >>

The Association Between Diabetes Mellitus And Depression

The Association Between Diabetes Mellitus And Depression

Go to: Depression occurrence is two to three times higher in people with diabetes mellitus, the majority of the cases remaining under-diagnosed. The purpose of this review was to show the links between depression and diabetes, point out the importance of identifying depression in diabetic patients and identify the possible ways to address both diseases. Possible common pathophysiological mechanisms as stress and inflammation were explained, while emphasis was made on screening for depression in diabetic patients. An important aspect for the diabetic specialist would be the understanding of the common origins of diabetes and depression and the awareness of this quite common comorbidity, in order to improve the outcomes of both diseases. Abbreviations: DALYS = disability adjusted life years, DSM-5 = American Psychiatric Association Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, DM1 = Type 1 diabetes mellitus, DM2 = Type 2 diabetes mellitus, HPA-axis = hypothalamus – pituitary – adrenal axis, SNS = sympathetic nervous system, BDI = Beck Depression Inventory, CES-D = Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, HADS = Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, PHQ = Patient Health Questionnaire. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, depression, comorbidity, epidemiology Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Depression: How To Deal With It

Diabetes & Depression: How To Deal With It

When you have diabetes, you are already dealing with a lot. Now add depression into the mix- you now have a double-whammy. This is what happens when you have diabetes- you are at increased risk for developing depression. So when you develop depression in addition to your diabetes, then this makes your diabetes worse. And the diabetes makes the depression worse. So what you get is a negative spiral, with out of control blood sugars, and ever increasing mood symptoms. Therefore, it is imperative to take care of your depression, so that your diabetes treatment can be optimized, and not sabotaged by untreated depression. Depression and Diabetes When you have diabetes, then depression is sure to follow. For people with diabetes, the risk for depression is two to three times higher.1 The reason depression and diabetes go together is that they have similar causes. Both diabetes and depression are caused by poor diet, lack of exercise, poor sleep, and psychosocial stressors. These factors cause diabetes and depression via the body’s stress response. So when you are dealing with high pressured stuff (like losing a job, financial difficulties, or relationship problems) or not taking care of your body (not eating properly, not sleeping, not exercising), then your body mounts a stress response. This stress response releases stress hormones (such as cortisol and adrenaline) and activates the sympathetic nervous system, which decreases the ability of your own insulin to utilize blood sugars. In addition, the stress response dumps a lot of glucose into your bloodstream to fuel your stress response, as the body is preparing for fighting or fleeing (or freezing). With chronic activation of the stress response, high blood sugar and diabetes result. This same stress response with the re Continue reading >>

New Links Seen Between Depression And Diabetes

New Links Seen Between Depression And Diabetes

Archives of Internal Medicine. "People usually think of these as two isolated conditions, but there is growing evidence that they are linked behaviorally and biologically,” says study researcher Frank Hu, MD, PhD, MPH, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. “This data provide strong evidence that we should not consider these two isolated conditions any longer.” About 23.5 million Americans have diabetes, and about 14.8 million Americans have major depressive disorder in a given year, according to statistics in the new report. Of the 65,381 women aged 50 to 75 in 1996 who were study participants, 2,844 women were newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and 7,415 women developed depression in the ensuing 10 years. Depression and Diabetes Risk Depression increased the risk for diabetes, and diabetes increased the risk for depression, the study shows. Specifically, women who were depressed were 17% more likely to develop diabetes even after the researchers adjusted for other risk factors such as weight and lack of regular exercise. Those women who were taking antidepressants were 25% more likely to develop diabetes than their counterparts who were not depressed, the study shows. Women with diabetes were 29% more likely to develop depression after taking into account other depression risk factors, and those women who took insulin for their diabetes were 53% more likely to develop depression during the 10-year study. While certain factors such as physical activity and body mass index may partially explain the link between depression and diabetes, they do not completely explain the connection, Hu tells WebMD. The common denominator may be stress, Hu says. People who are depressed have elevated levels of stress hormones such Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression Linked

Diabetes And Depression Linked

Fitness guru Jack LaLanne once asked, "What's the good of living if you can't have the things that give a little enjoyment?" He was referring to the need to indulge in a bit of junk food on occasion. Perhaps those diabetics who follow their sugarless diet rigorously have fallen victim to Jack's concerns, as a new study confirms a strong link between depression and diabetes. The link, it seems, goes both ways. Depression causes diabetes and diabetes causes depression. The latest study to confirm this relationship was out of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston and involved over 65,000 female participants between the ages of 50 and 75. The researchers found that the clinically depressed women in the sample group had a 17 percent higher incidence of diabetes than non-depressed subjects, even after adjusting for other risk factors such as obesity. Interestingly, those women taking antidepressants had an even higher rate of diabetes, at 25 percent. Conversely, for those women who already had diabetes, the risk of developing depression was alarmingly high -- 29 percent greater than in the population at large. And for those women taking insulin to control their diabetes, that percentage of depression jumped to a 53 percent increase over non-diabetic women. While earlier studies also found a link between diabetes and depression, this one used a far larger population, making it ever more clear that the two conditions -- diabetes and depression -- certainly are interrelated. Researchers think the interplay may be due to stress. Stress raises levels of the hormone cortisol, which affects blood sugar metabolism, increases insulin resistance, and can cause increased belly fat. All of these things contribute to the development of diabetes. At the same time, stress often caus Continue reading >>

Exploring The Diabetes-depression Link

Exploring The Diabetes-depression Link

Exploring the Diabetes-Depression Link Author Eric Nagourney Date June 12, 2001 Source Copyright Copyright (C) 2001 New York Times Company Concepts variables causal graphs confounders Keywords diabetes depression No one is sure why, but diabetics appear to be twice as likely to suffer from depression as those without the disease, and the incidence is even higher in women, a new study shows. Writing in this month's Diabetes Care, researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine and the Department of Veterans Affairs in St. Louis said they reached that conclusion after analyzing 25 years of data. Why the link is there is a bit of a chicken- and-egg problem. Does diabetes cause depression? Does depression cause diabetes? The lead author, Dr. Patrick J. Lustman of Washington University, said the issue was complex. "In some cases," he said, "depression can cause diabetes. And in other cases, diabetes can cause depression." "People have long assumed that diabetes can cause depression," Dr. Lustman said, "and that people can get depressed in relation to the hardship and complications or other stressors related to the disease." But the idea that the reverse could be true--that is, that depression could actually lead to diabetes--would have been considered far-fetched years ago, Dr. Lustman said. One clue may lie in the inactivity and overeating that often go with depression. Each can contribute to diabetes. The higher incidence of depression among diabetic women mirrors the pattern for the population as a whole, the researchers said. Diabetics who are depressed, the researchers added, should seek treatment not just for the diabetes but the depression. The article noted previous studies that found that treating the disorder helped diabetics control their blood sugar Continue reading >>

Stress, Depression Can Lead To Type 2 Diabetes

Stress, Depression Can Lead To Type 2 Diabetes

Improving the emotional and physical well-being of El Paso area residents has been a long-time goal of mine. Growing up in El Paso, I observed many people who experienced stressful circumstances such as financial strain, long work hours, family conflict, and the burden of health problems. It was not until I was older and began to speak with people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, that I noticed how stress influenced a person’s ability to manage the disease. I left El Paso in 2001 to earn a doctoral degree in public health and learn more about how stress influences Type 2 diabetes. I returned to my hometown 15 years later as an assistant professor at The University of Texas at El Paso’s Department of Public Health Sciences. My goal is to raise awareness about the impact of emotional well-being on type 2 diabetes. In the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that: 29 million adults have diabetes (1 in 11 people) 25 percent do not know they have the disease * 35 percent of U.S. adults have pre-diabetes, which means they have slightly more blood glucose but not enough to be diabetic 1 in 4 people in El Paso have Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is caused by a number of factors, including stress and depression. People who experience stress or depression may turn to tobacco, alcohol or unhealthy foods for relief. They may lack the energy or the motivation to exercise or do any physical activity. Together, these types of behaviors can lead to obesity and increase a person’s risks for Type 2 diabetes. Stress and depression also directly affect blood glucose levels. When someone experiences stress, the body produces hormones that increase blood glucose levels. Long periods of stress or depression can directly influence how your body regulates blood g Continue reading >>

Depression And Diabetes

Depression And Diabetes

By the dLife Editors Depression can strike anyone, but people who have diabetes appear to be at greater risk. In fact, studies suggest that people who have type 2 diabetes have a much as double the risk of depression as people who don’t. The rate of depression is thought to be at least three times higher in people with type 1 diabetes than in people without diabetes. In a vicious cycle, people with depression may be at greater risk for developing diabetes. Thus, the strong diabetes depression link. As diabetes complications get worse, it is common for depression to increase as well, which can lead to a lack of proper self-care. You have to live with diabetes, but you do not have to live with debilitating depression. Treatment for depression helps people manage symptoms of both diseases, thus improving the quality of their lives. What Is Depression? Depression isn’t just feeling “down” or being sad in response to a loss or challenge life throws at you. It’s a mood disorder that causes ongoing, persistent symptoms that disrupt your life, affecting how you feel, think, and handle daily activities, such as sleeping, eating, or working. While depression is serious, it’s also treatable. And since depression can affect nearly every aspect of a person’s well-being, it’s important to get help. Symptoms of Depression People experience depression differently. The severity, frequency, and duration of symptoms vary depending on the person and his or her particular illness. Symptoms of depression most commonly include: Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities that were once enjoyed, including sex Decreased energy, fatigue, being Continue reading >>

Does Emotional Stress Cause Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus? A Review From The European Depression In Diabetes (edid) Research Consortium

Does Emotional Stress Cause Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus? A Review From The European Depression In Diabetes (edid) Research Consortium

Specialty: Psychiatry, Epidemiology, Endocrinology Institution: Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University Address: Tilburg, Netherlands Author: Nina Kupper Specialty: Psychology, Biology Institution: Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University Address: Tilburg, Netherlands Author: Marcel C Adriaanse Specialty: Epidemiology, Psychology Institution: Section of Prevention and Public Health, Department of Health Sciences and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam Address: Amsterdam, 1081 HV, Netherlands Abstract: According to the World Health Organization, approximately 220 million people worldwide have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients with type 2 diabetes not only have a chronic disease to cope with, they are also at increased risk for coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. The exact causes of type 2 diabetes are still not clear. Since the 17th century, it has been suggested that emotional stress plays a role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus. So far, review studies have mainly focused on depression as a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Yet, chronic emotional stress is an established risk factor for the development of depression. The present review provides an overview of mainly prospective epidemiological studies that have investigated the associations between different forms of emotional stress and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results of longitudinal studies suggest that not only depression but also general emotional stress and anxiety, sleeping problems, anger, and hostility are associated with an increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes. Conf Continue reading >>

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