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Can Diabetes Cause Delusions

Diabetes-related Causes Of Delusions

Diabetes-related Causes Of Delusions

Our information shows that 2causes of Delusions are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 176total causes).These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Delusions if the patient has diabetes,is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. Depressive disorders - severe cases can lead to delusions arising in the negative frame of mind: The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins may possibly cause Delusions as a side effect. Drug interactions may be a possible cause of Delusions . [See detailed list of 2drug interaction causes of Delusions ] Conditions listing medical symptoms: Delusions: The following list of conditionshave ' Delusions ' or similarlisted as a symptom in our database.This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete.Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the causeof any symptom. Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions whichinclude a symptom of Delusions or choose View All. Continue reading >>

The Link Between Schizophrenia And Diabetes

The Link Between Schizophrenia And Diabetes

The link between schizophrenia and diabetes Current Psychiatry. 2012 October;11(10):28-46 Lead Physician, Mental Health and Metabolism Clinic, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Assistant Professor, Departments of Psychiatry and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario Vigilant metabolic monitoring informs treatment decisions 1. Kohen D. Diabetes mellitus and schizophrenia: historical perspective. Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 2004;47:S64-S66. 2. Dixon L, Weiden P, Delahanty J, et al. Prevalence and correlates of diabetes in national schizophrenia samples. Schizophr Bull. 2000;26(4):903-912. 3. De Hert M, van Winkel R, Van Eyck D, et al. Prevalence of diabetes, metabolic syndrome and metabolic abnormalities in schizophrenia over the course of the illness: a cross-sectional study. Clin Pract Epidemol Ment Health. 2006;2:14.- 4. Juvonen H, Reunanen A, Haukka J, et al. Incidence of schizophrenia in a nationwide cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007;64(8):894-899. 5. Hales CN, Barker DJ. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis. Br Med Bull. 2001;60:5-20. 6. Ryan MC, Sharifi N, Condren R, et al. Evidence of basal pituitary-adrenal overactivity in first episode, drug naive patients with schizophrenia. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2004;29(8):1065-1070. 7. Odawara M, Isaka M, Tada K, et al. Diabetes mellitus associated with mitochondrial myopathy and schizophrenia: a possible link between diabetes mellitus and schizophrenia. Diabet Med. 1997;14(6):503.- 8. Siuta MA, Robertson SD, Kocalis H, et al. Dysregulation of the norepinephrine transporter sustains cortical hypodopaminergia and schizophrenia-like behaviors in neuronal rictor null mice. PLoS Biol. 2010;8(6):e1000393.- 9. Strassnig M, Brar JS, Ganguli R. Nut Continue reading >>

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Relationship Between Blood Glucose Level and Self-Control Blood sugar can make people do crazy things. According to a recent scientific study on the link between low blood glucose level and relationship clashes (Bushman et al, 2014), being hungry makes an individual generally cranky and act more hostile to others. In the study, couples who are hungry tend to have a much higher tendency to exhibit aggression towards each other and become more impulsive in their reactions. This phenomenon is often referred to “hangry” (meaning feeling angry when you are hungry). If this irritable state can happen to any healthy person who experiences a change in their blood glucose level, imagine the ordeals individuals with diabetes frequently go through on a daily basis. However, do not jump to the conclusion that diabetes leads to aggression. In fact, scientists find a more direct correlation between blood glucose level and self-control. I recommend reading the following articles: In a way, you can visualize self-control as a muscle that requires a lot of energy to sustain so that it does not become ineffective quickly. This energy source comes from the glucose in the blood. So what kind of activities can wear out this “muscle”? Any daily activities that require self-discipline such as forcing yourself to get out of bed early to exercise, resisting from having a soda drink or another cookie with your meal, stopping yourself from smoking, dealing with stressful situations at work and at home, and abstaining yourself from road rage. As you can see, self-control plays a crucial part in restraining inappropriate and aggressive behaviors. So when people are low in glucose, the self-control mechanism cannot function properly to prevent these outbursts of hostile actions. In a researc Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mental Health

Diabetes And Mental Health

A diabetes diagnosis can be a life altering event. Whether it be type 1 diabetes where the body does not make any insulin at all or type 2 diabetes when the pancreas makes some insulin but not enough, it can mean changes to your lifestyle that you may not be ready for and can also be hard on relationships with friends or family. As you establish a new routine it is important to establish good habits in managing your mental health. Proper diabetes management requires awareness of your symptoms. Just as you take insulin to ensure your blood glucose levels are where they should be, its important to take measures to prevent mental health crises by being aware of how you are feeling mentally and emotionally. Just like taking care of your body, taking care of your mind is equally as important to living a healthy life. When left untreated, mental health conditions like depression and anxiety can make diabetes worse. Likewise, existing diabetes can make mental health conditions worse. How are diabetes and mental health connected? A diabetes diagnosis can feel like not just a threat to health, it can also seem like a threat to a persons way of life, because managing diabetes means making changes to your day-to-day routine. Your doctor might instruct you to change your diet by eating certain kinds of foods, avoiding sugary beverages, or restricting alcohol intake which can be difficult for anyone regardless of a diabetes diagnosis. Added responsibilities like tracking blood glucose and insulin can be hard to remember at first, doctors appointments can cause time away from work, and the costs of appropriate care may be burdensome. These changes can be emotionally draining, and you might start to notice that you are feeling a bit off or have very little energy left to carry out im Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Hallucination?

What Causes Diabetes Hallucination?

Diabetes hallucination is one of the least talked about symptom and which many are unaware of. Many diabetes patients experience hallucinations. If you are one of them, it is important to know that your hallucinations may be an indication of a more serious problem that may not be related to diabetes. According to health experts, diabetes hallucination is often a result of Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome (HHNS). Such condition is more common in people suffering from Type 2 Diabetes. However, it can also appear in people who have Type 1 Diabetes. HHNS is usually a result of an existing infection or illness, and it can escalate quickly to become a fatal illness. The hallucinations are cause by rapid increase of ones blood sugar level, which can lead to extreme thirst and dehydration . Anyone who is suffering from diabetes hallucination will hear or see things that do not exist in reality. They may also hear voices and music that none other hear. In some cases, they will see certain figures in the room, which do not exist. Hallucination can be upsetting since the images and sounds that the person see or hear will seem to be very real. If you or anyone you know is suffering from hallucinations, whether you are diabetic or not, you should see a doctor immediately in order to seek the best treatment. Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes Hallucination More symptoms of HHNS may also appear as well in conjunction with the hallucinations. Among these symptoms are dry skin, dry mouth, fever, vision loss, confusion and weakness of one side of the body. Furthermore, the color of urine might appear to be unusually dark as a result of the body trying to eliminate excess sugar off the urine. People with diabetes must check their blood sugar level regularly in order to avoid HH Continue reading >>

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Comprehensive Guide to Research on Risk, Complications and Treatment Substance abuse is described as the excessive use of a substance such as alcohol or drugs that results in significant clinical impairments as well as the loss of ability to function academically, professionally, and socially [1]. An individual who was healthy before the substance abuse began will typically begin to experience serious health problems over time, but extensive damage may be avoided or reversed if effective substance abuse treatment is received. This is not the case, however, for individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes, and although this is a manageable disease with proper treatment, substance abuse may cause it to become life-threatening. This guide will discuss, in detail, how substance abuse can negatively impact the life and health of a person with diabetes. Diabetes, also referred to as diabetes mellitus, is a condition in which the body is unable to properly regulate blood sugar levels. There are two forms known as type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but in order to better understand the difference between the two types, the role that insulin plays in the regulation of healthy blood sugar levels will be briefly described. During the digestive process, carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is a form of sugar that easily enters the bloodstream and is used by the body for energy. The pancreas normally responds to increasing blood sugar levels by initiating the production of the hormone known as insulin. As insulin levels increase, it signals the transfer of glucose into cells throughout the body and it also ensures that excess glucose will be stored in the liver in order to prevent high blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes, which is also called juvenile or insulin dependent Continue reading >>

Domestic Violence, Anger, And Diabetes

Domestic Violence, Anger, And Diabetes

By Debra Manzella, RN | Reviewed by a board-certified physician You may be wondering if anger is a normal part of dealing with diabetes. Is it normal for someone with type 1 diabetes to erupt into violent anger and take it out on his or her partner? Frustration and anger are often experienced by people who deal with chronic illnesses like diabetes. Fluctuating blood glucose levels can also contribute to mood swings and cause people to exhibit angry behavior. But when does that kind of anger cross the line into domestic abuse? Anger and frustration can be common reactions when someone has a chronic disease like diabetes . It's a lot to cope with, and at times it may really be upsetting to have to deal with diabetes day after day for a lifetime. Plus, physiologically, when someone's blood sugar fluctuates, spikes, or drops, it can produce feelings of anger, anxiety, or depression that are really out of the control of the person experiencing them. Your partner's diabetes may make it easier for you to overlook or make excuses for angry reactions , which is okay to an extent. However, anger that escalates into physical, verbal, or emotional abuse is not a normal reaction. Every person has a right to get angry sometimes, but if that anger is expressed violently to hurt or scare you, then it becomes domestic abuse. Learn which foods to enjoy and avoidand start feeling great! Abuse can be actual physical contact, like hitting, slapping, pushing, or otherwise inflicting bodily harm, but it can also be threatening, belittling, or making you feel intimidated or scared. What to Do If You're Struggling With Diabetes and Anger If you have diabetes and anger is a problem for you, whether it's because you're angry that you have the condition or because you have frequent blood sugar fl Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

Hallucinations: Causes, Symptoms And Diagnosis

Hallucinations: Causes, Symptoms And Diagnosis

Conditions list medically reviewed by George Krucik, MD, MBA Hallucinations are sensations that appear real but are created by your mind. They can affect all five of your senses. For example, you might hear a voice that no one else in the room can hear or see an image that isnt real. These symptoms may be... Read More Hallucinations are sensations that appear real but are created by your mind. They can affect all five of your senses. For example, you might hear a voice that no one else in the room can hear or see an image that isnt real. These symptoms may be caused by mental illness, the side effects of medications, or physical illnesses like epilepsy or alcoholism. You may need to visit a psychiatrist, a neurologist, or a general practitioner depending on the cause of your hallucinations. Treatment may include taking medication to cure a physical or mental illness. Your doctor may also recommend adopting healthier behaviors like drinking less alcohol and getting more sleep. Hallucinations may affect your vision, sense of smell, taste, hearing, or bodily sensations. Visual hallucinations involve seeing things that arent there. The hallucinations may be of objects, visual patterns, people, or lights. For example, you might see a person who is not in the room or flashing lights that no one else can see. Olfactory hallucinations involve your sense of smell. You might smell an unpleasant odor when waking up in the middle of the night or feel that your body smells bad when it doesnt. This type of hallucination can also include scents you find enjoyable, like the smell of flowers. Gustatory hallucinations are similar to olfactory hallucinations, but they involve your sense of taste instead of smell. These tastes are often strange or unpleasant. Gustatory hallucinations (oft Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Hallucinations

Symptoms Of Diabetic Hallucinations

Diabetes is a condition that develops when the body does not produce any or enough insulin, making it difficult to regulate blood sugar. Depending on individual cases, diabetes can be controlled through diet or medication, though complications do occasionally arise. Diabetics sometimes experience hallucinations, which are often an indicator of a more serious problem that may or may not be related to their diabetes. Identification According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetic hallucinations are frequently a result of a condition known as Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome, or HHNS. This condition is more common in people with type 2 diabetes, but can appear in people with type 1 as well. HHNS usually develops from an existing illness or infection, and can quickly escalate to become fatal. The hallucinations are caused by a rapid rise in blood sugar levels, which can lead to intense thirst and dehydration. Effects A person who is experiencing diabetic hallucinations is seeing or hearing things that are not actually there. They may hear music that no one else hears, or see creatures in the room that do not exist. This can be very upsetting for the affected person, as the sounds and images will seem very real to them. If you or someone you know is experiencing hallucinations, see a doctor immediately to figure out the best course of treatment. Prevention/Solution Diabetics should check their blood sugar regularly to avoid HHNS. Do this several times a day, before or after meals. A doctor should determine a target blood sugar range for each diabetic, and create a plan for what to do if the blood sugar level is out of range. When a diabetic person is sick, they should pay special attention to their blood sugar, checking the levels even more frequently a Continue reading >>

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory loss can be caused by a number of factors, from short term causes such as low blood sugar or medication side effects to long term health issues such as dementia. Treatment for long term memory loss will depend on what is causing it. Evidence from research suggests that good control of diabetes can help prevent memory problems developing over the longer term. Memory loss tends to become more prevalent as we get older. The NHS notes that around four in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. The NHS notes that around 4 in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. How can diabetes affect memory loss? Memory loss in diabetes can be a short term problem brought on by too low or high blood glucose levels. During hypoglycemia, for example, you may struggle to remember words. This is not necessarily a sign of a long term problem. In most cases, raising sugar levels over 4 mmol/l should get your memory back to normal. If memory problems happen at other times and this significantly affects your life, speak to your GP. Diabetes can increase the risk of developing long-term memory problems if blood glucose levels are less well controlled. High blood glucose levels, over a number of years, can damage the nerves, including those of the brain, which can increase the risk of dementia. Research shows that good diabetes management can help prevent memory problems from developing or advancing. Symptoms of memory loss Symptoms of memory loss could include: Not being able to recall an important event in your life Forgetting what you have just done Forgetting where things in your home are Forgetting the names of people close to you Some of these can happen to all of us from ti Continue reading >>

Hallucinating Low Blood-sugars?

Hallucinating Low Blood-sugars?

I have been a type-1 diabetic since I was 11 years old; thats now over 48 years. I have had plenty of professional medical evaluations attesting to my condition; certainly many hospital stays concerning such, as well as personal hypo- and hyper-glycemic episodes. I feel it necessary to mention this because of whats been happening with me lately. I will wake up during the night totally discombobulated; my limbs flailing in every direction and my thoughts and feelings caged in some kind of hallucinatory disarray. Sometimes I have been so out of it that Ive fallen out of bed onto the floor, doing damage to the objects around me... and myself. Before continuing, I must admit that I dont do blood sugars. My reasons are not relevant here. Suffice to say that I cant confirm my levels when these situations occur. Even more befuddling, there is always an almost unbearable need to urinate. When one is in such a state, it can make for a most distressing and confusing conundrum what to do first... eat and then go to the bathroom, or vice-versa? Last night, though my brain was quite addled, I went to the bathroom first. After five minutes or so, my sense of extreme bewilderment seemed to settle itself. I had hurt myself from falling on the floor and I was bleeding profusely. The amount of it on the floor and everywhere else was so disconcerting to my sense of neatness that I proceeded to try to clean up the mess. I still hadnt eaten anything, but I no longer felt it was a priority. In fact, I didnt partake of any food for almost an hour after my tumble from the precipice of sanity. This is not the first time this sort of hypoglycemic adventure has occurred. For the past couple of years, when I have gone through an incident in the middle of the night, I have noticed the quickness of Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia may be described as low levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. This is commonly seen in people who are diabetic, and their blood sugar levels fall too low - either because they took their medications and did not eat properly, or the dosage of medication is too high for them. Normal blood Glucose (sugar) levels are 60-110 mg/dL. Normal values may vary from laboratory to laboratory. Levels much lower than these can indicate hypoglycemia. Causes of Hypoglycemia: Causes of hypoglycemia may include: Excessive exercise, or lack of food intake Certain forms of alcohol may cause low blood sugar levels Certain kinds of tumors, affecting the pancreas (insulinomas) After stomach surgery People with kidney failure, who are on dialysis, may experience hypoglycemia. If you have liver disease, you may be at risk for hypoglycemia. You may have problems with your thyroid, adrenal, or pituitary glands. You may not be absorbing food that you eat very well, thus resulting in hypoglycemia. Symptoms of Hypoglycemia: You may feel sweaty, shaky or hungry. You may feel faint. Extremely low blood sugar levels may cause you to be confused, or disoriented. Severely low levels of blood sugar may cause coma. You may have a fast heartbeat, or feel palpitations. Things You Can Do About Hypoglycemia: If you are experiencing low blood sugar levels as a result of your treatment of diabetes, your healthcare provider may instruct you on the use of close blood sugar monitoring during this time. Follow all of your healthcare provider's instructions. Try to exercise. Low blood sugar levels are often temporary. If you are diabetic, you will have high blood sugars as well. Make a daily walk either alone, or with a friend or family member a part of your routine. Even light wal Continue reading >>

Delirium In Diabetes -

Delirium In Diabetes -

That sentence, in all its simplistic glory, contains so much more than the five words visible. Being diagnosed at the age of 9, you would think that managing this disease would have gotten easier. Unfortunately, I fear that the opposite is true. For me, day to day life is a scary guessing game from the moment I wake until the moment I lay down to sleep.. and honestly, every second in between as well. During childhood years, I can remember waking up in the middle of the night with low blood sugars but cant exactly remember what the trigger was that woke me from sound sleeping. I cant remember if it was the shaky feeling that came along with low glucose, feeling like I was on fire and sweating through my sheets, or any other odd reaction. I know that sometimes I wouldnt entirely wake but would wander into my parents bedroom- seemingly sleep walking- mumbling gibberish over their sleeping bodies until theyd wake to realize something was awry and quickly rush downstairs to get juice and peanut butter crackers for me to inhale at the foot of their bed. As an adult, night time lows, while similar to those adolescent episodes, are much scarier and have morphed into much more than a physical response. Now, my mental state is being tested and stretched beyond where any one person should be capable of going. I have dealt with seizures, black outs, hypoglycemia induced vomiting.. but there is nothing that has ever come close to the newest diabetic nightmare I have come to know. Its name induces a physical response- a visible discomfort whenever I speak about it. A hellish vivid nightmare state that my glucose deprived brain works all too hard at convincing me is real. My first experience with diabetic delirium happened late last September. It started much like any other middle of Continue reading >>

Can Having Diabetes Cause Hallucinations? How Can These Be Prevented?

Can Having Diabetes Cause Hallucinations? How Can These Be Prevented?

While during “chronic” state diabetes may not directly related to hallucination, it is logical to think the acute conditions in diabetic patients as a precipitating factor to hallucinations. Hypoglycaemia, as well as hyperglycaemia may pose metabolic derangement and cause the fluctuating disturbance of consciousness, also known as delirium. Delirium presents with myriad signs and symptoms, including disorientation, cognitive impairments, emotional instability, delusion, as well as hallucinations. The hallucinations often described as visual, rather than auditoric type (which is often seen is psychiatric-state). Continue reading >>

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