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Can Diabetes Cause Delusions

Hallucinating Low Blood-sugars?

Hallucinating Low Blood-sugars?

I have been a type-1 diabetic since I was 11 years old; thats now over 48 years. I have had plenty of professional medical evaluations attesting to my condition; certainly many hospital stays concerning such, as well as personal hypo- and hyper-glycemic episodes. I feel it necessary to mention this because of whats been happening with me lately. I will wake up during the night totally discombobulated; my limbs flailing in every direction and my thoughts and feelings caged in some kind of hallucinatory disarray. Sometimes I have been so out of it that Ive fallen out of bed onto the floor, doing damage to the objects around me... and myself. Before continuing, I must admit that I dont do blood sugars. My reasons are not relevant here. Suffice to say that I cant confirm my levels when these situations occur. Even more befuddling, there is always an almost unbearable need to urinate. When one is in such a state, it can make for a most distressing and confusing conundrum what to do first... eat and then go to the bathroom, or vice-versa? Last night, though my brain was quite addled, I went to the bathroom first. After five minutes or so, my sense of extreme bewilderment seemed to settle itself. I had hurt myself from falling on the floor and I was bleeding profusely. The amount of it on the floor and everywhere else was so disconcerting to my sense of neatness that I proceeded to try to clean up the mess. I still hadnt eaten anything, but I no longer felt it was a priority. In fact, I didnt partake of any food for almost an hour after my tumble from the precipice of sanity. This is not the first time this sort of hypoglycemic adventure has occurred. For the past couple of years, when I have gone through an incident in the middle of the night, I have noticed the quickness of Continue reading >>

Diabetic Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

Diabetic Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

What is diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome? Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is a potentially life-threatening condition involving extremely high blood sugar, or glucose, levels. Any illness that causes dehydration or reduced insulin activity can lead to HHS. It’s most commonly a result of uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes. An illness or infection can trigger HHS. Failure to monitor and control blood glucose levels can also lead to HHS. When your blood sugar gets too high, the kidneys try to compensate by removing some of the excess glucose through urination. If you don’t drink enough fluids to replace the fluid you’re losing, your blood sugar levels spike. Your blood also becomes more concentrated. This can also occur if you drink too many sugary beverages. This condition is called hyperosmolarity. Blood that’s too concentrated begins to draw water out of other organs, including the brain. Some possible symptoms are excessive thirst, increased urination, and fever. Symptoms may develop slowly and increase over a period of days or weeks. Treatment involves reversing or preventing dehydration and getting blood glucose levels under control. Prompt treatment can relieve symptoms within a few hours. Untreated HHS can lead to life-threatening complications, including dehydration, shock, or coma. Go to an emergency room or call 911 if you have symptoms of HHS. This is a medical emergency. HHS can happen to anyone. It’s more common in older people who have type 2 diabetes. Symptoms may begin gradually and worsen over a few days or weeks. A high blood sugar level is a warning sign of HHS. The symptoms include: excessive thirst high urine output dry mouth weakness sleepiness a fever warm skin that doesn’t perspire nausea vomiting weight loss leg Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Causes Of Delusions

Diabetes-related Causes Of Delusions

Our information shows that 2causes of Delusions are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 176total causes).These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Delusions if the patient has diabetes,is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. Depressive disorders - severe cases can lead to delusions arising in the negative frame of mind: The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins may possibly cause Delusions as a side effect. Drug interactions may be a possible cause of Delusions . [See detailed list of 2drug interaction causes of Delusions ] Conditions listing medical symptoms: Delusions: The following list of conditionshave ' Delusions ' or similarlisted as a symptom in our database.This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete.Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the causeof any symptom. Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions whichinclude a symptom of Delusions or choose View All. Continue reading >>

"diabetes And Delusional Behavior": Diabetes Community - Support Group

I was not sure where to post this, but my mother has diabetes. She has now been in and out of the hospital 4 times, 3 different hospitals. All with hyponatremia, low sodium. The second time she went in she started acting strange, but it corrected itself as soon as the sodium was normal. The third and fourth time the psychosis/delirium/delusions were present and have persisted with waves of intensity. She is very anxious and has mostly paranoid auditory hallucinations. Now she mainly just worries about things and doesn't seem to be very present. The Adovan has seemed to make her 100% when she takes it. Also when she is distracted and concentrated on work or another task, she seems much better! She was hypovolemic, dehydrated, the third hospital visit. They had her on a fluid restriction. They still have her on a fluid restriction. No tests have come back positive, CAT scan, MRI, EEG, etc. They thought that she may have lupus, but the reumatoid test came back negative. They ran her on steroids for 3 days and that hasn't stopped the unusual behavior. The infectious diseases they have tested for have come back negative. They have done chest and head MRIs and CATs. They have done EEG. They have done a stomach biopsy. At one point she had VRE in her intestines, and she had a urinary tract infection. She saw a psychologist once, and he gave her some things to do to help the anxiety. We are trying to get her to a neorpsychologist, a psychiatrist, and a regular psychologist so they can do full work up. NIH has a rare undiagnosed disease clinic, but I was hoping that someone could help me figure out why she has these psychological symptoms and why she has the SAIDH? Or at least help me figure out what to do next. ami_nix replied to Homeostasis82 's response: have they checked he Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: 4 Signs Of Trouble

Type 2 Diabetes: 4 Signs Of Trouble

If your glucose levels get out of control, it can lead to serious diabetes problems. Knowing the signs of these diabetes conditions can help you take quick action to resolve them. Diabetes complications can occur if you don't regulate your blood sugar (glucose) levels properly. Blood sugar is produced in your liver and muscles, and most of the food you eat is converted into blood sugar. This is your body's source of energy, but when your blood sugar gets too high, diabetes is the result. Your pancreas produces the hormone insulin, which then carries blood sugar into your cells, where it’s stored and used for energy. When you develop insulin resistance, high levels of sugar build up in your blood instead of your cells and you start to experience signs and symptoms of diabetes. You may notice fatigue, hunger, increased thirst, blurred vision, infections that are slow to heal, pain and numbness in your feet or hands, and increased urination. For awhile, your pancreas will work to keep up with your body’s sugar demand by producing more insulin, but eventually it loses the ability to compensate and serious diabetes complications — including blindness, kidney failure, loss of circulation in your lower extremities, and heart disease — can develop. For most people with diabetes, the target blood sugar level is 70 to 130 mg/dL, but your doctor will work with you to pinpoint your individual target range. Your doctor can also help you learn what to eat and how to keep your blood sugar within a healthy range. Joel Zonszein, MD, director of clinical diabetes at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, says it’s very important to work with and see your doctor regularly and to consult a diabetes educator. If your diabetes is well-controlled and you're monitoring your bloo Continue reading >>

Acid, Tripping & Blood Sugar Levels

Acid, Tripping & Blood Sugar Levels

Individuals with diabetes may struggle with various symptoms caused by high or low blood sugar. High blood sugars tend to cause depressive feelings and mood swings, while low blood sugar may cause scattered thoughts while extreme lows can even cause hallucinations and delusional thinking. Tripping It was November of 1989, my freshman year of college; I had just passed the clock in the center of campus when I felt weak. As my legs gave out, I tripped and fell. My blood sugar had dropped to 17mg/dL, and I didn’t have any glucose on me. Luckily, I had gotten some strength up and stumbled my way to the campus restaurant where I downed a glass of juice and recovered. There wasn’t as much information back then as there is today, but I realized the hard way that having a role of Lifesavers in my pocket at all time was important. Without them, I may have ended up having a diabetes seizure. While working as a diabetes focused psychotherapist, I have listened to multiple stories involving delusions and hallucinations during extreme low blood sugar reactions. I have also experienced that state mind during my last low blood sugar that landed me in the hospital. It was 1994 and my last year of undergrad, and I had just turned 21 years old. I was studying for an exam one afternoon in late October, and it was 3pm. The sun was glaring as it entered my bedroom. I remember looking at the clock. The clock read 11:00 pm and as I believed it was time for bed I went downstairs to the bathroom and brushed my teeth. In reality, I froze at the bottom of the steps, and I spent five minutes staring at my roommate. Then I turned around, went back upstairs to my room and went to bed. At 4pm, I awoke to demons in my room. They strapped me to a board of wood, carried me downstairs and out the fro Continue reading >>

Hallucinations: Causes, Symptoms And Diagnosis

Hallucinations: Causes, Symptoms And Diagnosis

Conditions list medically reviewed by George Krucik, MD, MBA Hallucinations are sensations that appear real but are created by your mind. They can affect all five of your senses. For example, you might hear a voice that no one else in the room can hear or see an image that isnt real. These symptoms may be... Read More Hallucinations are sensations that appear real but are created by your mind. They can affect all five of your senses. For example, you might hear a voice that no one else in the room can hear or see an image that isnt real. These symptoms may be caused by mental illness, the side effects of medications, or physical illnesses like epilepsy or alcoholism. You may need to visit a psychiatrist, a neurologist, or a general practitioner depending on the cause of your hallucinations. Treatment may include taking medication to cure a physical or mental illness. Your doctor may also recommend adopting healthier behaviors like drinking less alcohol and getting more sleep. Hallucinations may affect your vision, sense of smell, taste, hearing, or bodily sensations. Visual hallucinations involve seeing things that arent there. The hallucinations may be of objects, visual patterns, people, or lights. For example, you might see a person who is not in the room or flashing lights that no one else can see. Olfactory hallucinations involve your sense of smell. You might smell an unpleasant odor when waking up in the middle of the night or feel that your body smells bad when it doesnt. This type of hallucination can also include scents you find enjoyable, like the smell of flowers. Gustatory hallucinations are similar to olfactory hallucinations, but they involve your sense of taste instead of smell. These tastes are often strange or unpleasant. Gustatory hallucinations (oft Continue reading >>

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Relationship Between Blood Glucose Level and Self-Control Blood sugar can make people do crazy things. According to a recent scientific study on the link between low blood glucose level and relationship clashes (Bushman et al, 2014), being hungry makes an individual generally cranky and act more hostile to others. In the study, couples who are hungry tend to have a much higher tendency to exhibit aggression towards each other and become more impulsive in their reactions. This phenomenon is often referred to “hangry” (meaning feeling angry when you are hungry). If this irritable state can happen to any healthy person who experiences a change in their blood glucose level, imagine the ordeals individuals with diabetes frequently go through on a daily basis. However, do not jump to the conclusion that diabetes leads to aggression. In fact, scientists find a more direct correlation between blood glucose level and self-control. I recommend reading the following articles: In a way, you can visualize self-control as a muscle that requires a lot of energy to sustain so that it does not become ineffective quickly. This energy source comes from the glucose in the blood. So what kind of activities can wear out this “muscle”? Any daily activities that require self-discipline such as forcing yourself to get out of bed early to exercise, resisting from having a soda drink or another cookie with your meal, stopping yourself from smoking, dealing with stressful situations at work and at home, and abstaining yourself from road rage. As you can see, self-control plays a crucial part in restraining inappropriate and aggressive behaviors. So when people are low in glucose, the self-control mechanism cannot function properly to prevent these outbursts of hostile actions. In a researc Continue reading >>

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated With Psychotic Symptoms In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated With Psychotic Symptoms In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

Go to: CASE PRESENTATION A 36-year-old woman from an urban background presented with acute onset psychotic illness of 15 days duration precipitated by poor adherence to insulin therapy. The patient had a history of T1DM since the age of 12 years, with a well-adjusted pre-morbid personality and no family history of mental illness. Detailed exploration of the history revealed that she had experienced 3 to 4 similar psychotic episodes, each lasting for 7 to 10 days, over the last seven months, during which she would exhibit symptoms of persecution, delusion of grandiosity, smiling and muttering to herself, emotional liability, abusive behavior, angry outbursts, excessive grooming, increased religiosity, poor self-care, decreased sleep, and decreased appetite. During these episodes, there would be no clouding of consciousness, disorientation, diurnal variation in symptoms, or disturbance of other cognitive functions. All of the psychotic episodes had temporal correlation with poor adherence to insulin therapy and a rise in fasting blood glucose levels from normal range to 300mg/dL. The psychotic episodes had no associated histories of fever, infection, high caloric intake, or substance abuse. During the index episode, her fasting blood glucose levels were in the range of 300 to 515mg/dL and post-prandial blood glucose levels were 398mg/dL. All other lab work results, including those for ketoacidosis, were within normal ranges. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her brain and physical examination did not reveal any abnormality in the patient, and on mental status examination, she was well-oriented to time, place, and person; her mini mental state examination score was 27/30. She had increased speech output, labile affect, delusion of persecution, delusion of reference, dist Continue reading >>

Can Having Diabetes Cause Hallucinations? How Can These Be Prevented?

Can Having Diabetes Cause Hallucinations? How Can These Be Prevented?

While during “chronic” state diabetes may not directly related to hallucination, it is logical to think the acute conditions in diabetic patients as a precipitating factor to hallucinations. Hypoglycaemia, as well as hyperglycaemia may pose metabolic derangement and cause the fluctuating disturbance of consciousness, also known as delirium. Delirium presents with myriad signs and symptoms, including disorientation, cognitive impairments, emotional instability, delusion, as well as hallucinations. The hallucinations often described as visual, rather than auditoric type (which is often seen is psychiatric-state). Continue reading >>

Delirium In Diabetes -

Delirium In Diabetes -

That sentence, in all its simplistic glory, contains so much more than the five words visible. Being diagnosed at the age of 9, you would think that managing this disease would have gotten easier. Unfortunately, I fear that the opposite is true. For me, day to day life is a scary guessing game from the moment I wake until the moment I lay down to sleep.. and honestly, every second in between as well. During childhood years, I can remember waking up in the middle of the night with low blood sugars but cant exactly remember what the trigger was that woke me from sound sleeping. I cant remember if it was the shaky feeling that came along with low glucose, feeling like I was on fire and sweating through my sheets, or any other odd reaction. I know that sometimes I wouldnt entirely wake but would wander into my parents bedroom- seemingly sleep walking- mumbling gibberish over their sleeping bodies until theyd wake to realize something was awry and quickly rush downstairs to get juice and peanut butter crackers for me to inhale at the foot of their bed. As an adult, night time lows, while similar to those adolescent episodes, are much scarier and have morphed into much more than a physical response. Now, my mental state is being tested and stretched beyond where any one person should be capable of going. I have dealt with seizures, black outs, hypoglycemia induced vomiting.. but there is nothing that has ever come close to the newest diabetic nightmare I have come to know. Its name induces a physical response- a visible discomfort whenever I speak about it. A hellish vivid nightmare state that my glucose deprived brain works all too hard at convincing me is real. My first experience with diabetic delirium happened late last September. It started much like any other middle of Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Hallucinations

Symptoms Of Diabetic Hallucinations

Diabetes is a condition that develops when the body does not produce any or enough insulin, making it difficult to regulate blood sugar. Depending on individual cases, diabetes can be controlled through diet or medication, though complications do occasionally arise. Diabetics sometimes experience hallucinations, which are often an indicator of a more serious problem that may or may not be related to their diabetes. Identification According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetic hallucinations are frequently a result of a condition known as Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome, or HHNS. This condition is more common in people with type 2 diabetes, but can appear in people with type 1 as well. HHNS usually develops from an existing illness or infection, and can quickly escalate to become fatal. The hallucinations are caused by a rapid rise in blood sugar levels, which can lead to intense thirst and dehydration. Effects A person who is experiencing diabetic hallucinations is seeing or hearing things that are not actually there. They may hear music that no one else hears, or see creatures in the room that do not exist. This can be very upsetting for the affected person, as the sounds and images will seem very real to them. If you or someone you know is experiencing hallucinations, see a doctor immediately to figure out the best course of treatment. Prevention/Solution Diabetics should check their blood sugar regularly to avoid HHNS. Do this several times a day, before or after meals. A doctor should determine a target blood sugar range for each diabetic, and create a plan for what to do if the blood sugar level is out of range. When a diabetic person is sick, they should pay special attention to their blood sugar, checking the levels even more frequently a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Delusional Behaviour

Diabetes Delusional Behaviour

Posted on August 2, 2013 | No Comments on Diabetes Delusional Behaviour Delusions are beliefs that are untrue, unreasonable and sometimes bizarre. However, a deluded person is very convinced that his delusions are as real as what he actually perceives. Delusions in the medical sense refer to imagined or created visions or fantasy held by a person that suffers some sort of mental impairment. The occurrence of delusions however is not limited to people with mental disorders as well as people under the influence of drugs. Delusions also occur to some people suffering from diabetes because psychiatric can be a complication of diabetes. While no direct medical explanation is still available, research studies have shown that delusions can be related to diabetes or a family history of diabetes. Different studies have discovered that the risk for developing dementia is amplified for people who suffer from obesity in middle age and then diabetes the later age. While medical science has not yet established a direct and universally acceptable explanation, one theory is that the occurrence of diabetes puts a stress to people and the psychological demands of having such disease tend to increase the chances of people to develop psychiatric disorders such as suffering delusions. At the moment, antipsychotic medications for diabetics suffering delusions are ill advised because antipsychotics medications have been associated with an augmented risk of weight gain, and hyper-triglyceridemia. Thus, while they may temporarily control delusional behaviour, the medicine tends to complicate and worsen the diabetic condition of the patient. In lieu of this, antipsychotics medication is not given to diabetics suffering delusional behaviour. Instead, psycho analytic treatment and counselling is Continue reading >>

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory loss can be caused by a number of factors, from short term causes such as low blood sugar or medication side effects to long term health issues such as dementia. Treatment for long term memory loss will depend on what is causing it. Evidence from research suggests that good control of diabetes can help prevent memory problems developing over the longer term. Memory loss tends to become more prevalent as we get older. The NHS notes that around four in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. The NHS notes that around 4 in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. How can diabetes affect memory loss? Memory loss in diabetes can be a short term problem brought on by too low or high blood glucose levels. During hypoglycemia, for example, you may struggle to remember words. This is not necessarily a sign of a long term problem. In most cases, raising sugar levels over 4 mmol/l should get your memory back to normal. If memory problems happen at other times and this significantly affects your life, speak to your GP. Diabetes can increase the risk of developing long-term memory problems if blood glucose levels are less well controlled. High blood glucose levels, over a number of years, can damage the nerves, including those of the brain, which can increase the risk of dementia. Research shows that good diabetes management can help prevent memory problems from developing or advancing. Symptoms of memory loss Symptoms of memory loss could include: Not being able to recall an important event in your life Forgetting what you have just done Forgetting where things in your home are Forgetting the names of people close to you Some of these can happen to all of us from ti Continue reading >>

Will You Have Delusion With Diabetes? - Ehealthme

Will You Have Delusion With Diabetes? - Ehealthme

Delusion is found among people with Diabetes, especially for people who are male, 60+ old, take medication Metformin and have High blood pressure. This review analyzes which people have Delusion with Diabetes. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 65 people who have Diabetes from FDA , and is updated regularly. On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our original studies have been referenced on 400+ peer-reviewed medical publications, including: The Lancet, and Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 65 people who have Diabetes and Delusion are studied. Gender of people who have Diabetes and experience Delusion *: Age of people who have Diabetes and experience Delusion *: Top co-existing conditions for these people *: High Blood Cholesterol: 10 people, 15.38% Schizophrenia (a mental disorder characterized by a breakdown of thought processes): 9 people, 13.85% Bipolar Disorder (mood disorder): 7 people, 10.77% Agitation (state of anxiety or nervous excitement): 10 people, 15.38% Hallucinations (sensations that appear real but are created by your mind): 9 people, 13.85% * Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information. How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood. Share you experience to help people like you We suggest these affordable tests for self monitoring. You can order them and receive results on eHealthMe. No doctor referral or insurance necessary. Diabetes can be treated by Metformin, Metformin hydrochloride, Lantus, Januvia, Glipizide ( latest reports from 291,118 Diabetes patients ) Delusion (a false belief or opinion) has been reported by people with schizoph Continue reading >>

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