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Can Diabetes Cause Blisters?

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

Diabetic Blisters: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Blisters: What You Need To Know

People with diabetes can sometimes experience blisters on their skin. These are known as diabetic blisters, bullosis diabeticorum, or diabetic bullae. Although more than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, diabetic blisters are relatively rare, affecting just 0.5 percent of those with the condition. The blisters typically occur in people with uncontrolled diabetes. They are painless and tend to heal on their own without the need for medical intervention. This article looks at the causes and symptoms of diabetic blisters and lists several ways to treat and prevent them. Contents of this article: Causes The exact cause of diabetic blisters is not known, but several factors are thought to play a role in blister development. The blisters may result from: wearing shoes that do not fit properly reduced circulation a fungal infection called Candida albicans other injury or irritation to the feet or hands Furthermore, certain people with diabetes are more at risk of developing diabetic blisters than others. People at risk of developing diabetic blisters include: people whose blood sugar levels are not under control people with sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) light men, as research reveals men are twice as likely as women to have diabetic blisters Symptoms Diabetic blisters most commonly appear in people who have had uncontrolled diabetes for several years. In some cases, however, they may be the first indication of diabetes or even prediabetes. Blisters are usually clear bumps that typically appear on the legs, feet, and toes, as well as the arms, hands, and fingers. They may be: irregularly-shaped up to 6 inches across clustered or, less commonly, occurring as a single lesion filled with a clear fluid itchy The skin around diabetic blisters will usually look Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Protecting Your Outermost Layer The phrase “feeling comfortable in your own skin” is usually used figuratively to describe a level of self-confidence or self-acceptance. But when your skin itches, hurts, flakes, breaks out, changes color, or just doesn’t look or feel the way you’d like it to, the phrase can take on a new, very literal meaning. Diabetes can affect the skin in a number of ways that can make a person feel less than comfortable. In fact, as many as a third of people with diabetes will have a skin condition at some point in their lifetime. While some conditions may appear uniquely in people with diabetes, others are simply more common in people with diabetes. The good news is that a fair number of these conditions are treatable or can be prevented by maintaining blood glucose control and taking good daily care of your skin. Dry, itchy skin Dry skin can occur as a result of high blood glucose. When the blood glucose level is high, the body attempts to remove excess glucose from the blood by increasing urination. This loss of fluid from the body causes the skin to become dry. Dry skin can also be caused by neuropathy (damage to the nerves) by affecting the nerves that control the sweat glands. In these cases, neuropathy causes a decrease or absence of sweating that may lead to dry, cracked skin. Cold, dry air and bathing in hot water can aggravate dry skin. Dryness commonly leads to other skin problems such as itching (and often scratching), cracking, and peeling. Any small breaks in the skin leave it more exposed to injury and infection. It is therefore important to keep skin well moisturized. The best way to moisturize is to apply lotion or cream right after showering and patting the skin dry. This will seal in droplets of water that are present on t Continue reading >>

How To Determine Whether Foot And Leg Blisters Are Related To Water Retention Or Diabetes

How To Determine Whether Foot And Leg Blisters Are Related To Water Retention Or Diabetes

Leg and Foot Health Issues A number of medical patients confuse the symptoms of water retention (also known as fluid retention or edema) with the appearance of chronic diabetic skin blisters. Misunderstandings about the differences between the two conditions can cause undue anxiety in patients and their caregivers. In simple terms, water retention happens inside the body cavities and tissues to cause swelling of such areas as joints and limbs. In contrast, diabetic blisters occur on the outside surface of the body to cause raised areas filled with liquid. Disclaimer: The following information is intended to provide a general overview. It should not be used for official diagnosis or substituted for the expertise of a licensed healthcare practitioner. Please see your medical provider for complete diagnosis and treatment. Click thumbnail to view full-size Foot, leg, and ankle swelling are the painless swelling of the feet and ankles as a common problem, especially among older people. — US National Library of Medicine; Medline Plus, Article 003104 What is Water Retention? Fluid retention, or edema, and diabetic blisters are different in a number of ways. The first difference is that edema occurs inside body cavities or tissues, while diabetic blisters appear on the skin, outside of the body where you can see them. Edema does not cause blisters on the skin, but it can cause swelling below the skin layers, inside other tissues and body cavities. This swelling can stretch the skin above the edema and make it look shiny (please see photos above). Patients can confuse edema with blisters associated with untreated and uncontrolled or poorly controlled blood glucose levels in the chronic varieties of type I and type II diabetes and even hypoglycemia. Pre-diabetes and gestational Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

Chronically high blood sugar (glucose) levels can be associated with serious complications in people who have diabetes. The feet are especially at risk. Two conditions called diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can damage the feet (and other areas of the body) in people who have diabetes. What is diabetic neuropathy? Chronically high sugar levels associated with uncontrolled diabetes can cause nerve damage that interferes with the ability to sense pain and temperature. This so-called "sensory diabetic neuropathy" increases the risk a person with diabetes will not notice problems with his or her feet. Nearly 10% of people with diabetes develop foot ulcers due to peripheral vascular disease and nerve damage. People with diabetes may not notice sores or cuts on the feet, which in turn can lead to an infection. Nerve damage can also affect the function of foot muscles, leading to improper alignment and injury. What is peripheral vascular disease? Diabetes is associated with poor circulation (blood flow). Inadequate blood flow increases the healing time for cuts and sores. Peripheral vascular disease refers to compromised blood flow in the arms and legs. Poor blood flow increases the risk that infections will not heal. This, in turn, increases the risk of ulcers and gangrene, which is tissue death that occurs in a localized area when there is an inadequate blood supply. What are common foot problems of people with diabetes? The following images show common foot problems that anyone can get; however, those with diabetes are at increased risk for serious complications associated with these conditions, including infection and even amputation. Athlete's foot Fungal infection of the feet is called athlete's foot. Cracked skin, itching, and redness are associated w Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

1 / 11 Are You Suffering From a Diabetes-Related Skin Complication? About a third of people with diabetes will develop skin problems at some point. In fact, some skin issues can be warning signs of diabetes. The good news is that most skin conditions can be treated easily if they’re caught early. Keeping proper control of your blood sugar (glucose) can prevent skin problems and many other diabetes symptoms from happening in the first place. “For the most part, control of diabetes can help with related skin issues,” says Justin Ko, MD, the medical director and service chief of medical dermatology at Stanford Health Care, in Redwood City, California. “I’m always adamant that my diabetic patients take aggressive care of their skin and health in general. For the skin, moisturization, checking feet and legs daily for any blisters, sores, and skin breaks (especially between the toes), and nail care is extremely important. Nail and foot fungus can lead to skin cracks and breaks, allowing bacteria to enter and cause infection.” Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. Many people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In some cases, skin problems can be the first sign that a person has diabetes. In some cases, people with diabetes develop skin conditions that can affect anyone. Examples of these conditions include bacterial infections, fungal infections, and itching. However, people with diabetes also are more prone to getting certain conditions. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, and eruptive xanthomatosis. Some common skin conditions in people with diabetes: Acanthosis nigricans This is a condition that results in the darkening and thickening of the skin. Often, areas of tan or brown skin, sometimes slightly raised, appear on the sides of the neck, the armpits, and groin. Occasionally, these darkened areas might appear on the hands, elbows, and knees. Acanthosis nigricans can affect otherwise healthy people, or it can be associated with certain medical conditions. It is frequently found in people with diabetes. Allergic reactions Allergic reactions to foods, bug bites, and medicines can cause rashes, depressions or bumps on the skin. If you think you might be having an allergic reaction to a medicine, contact your health care provider. Severe allergic reactions might require emergency treatment. It is especially important for people with diabetes to check for rashes or bumps in the areas where they inject their insulin. Atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis is the narrowing of blood vessels thickening of the vessel walls. While atherosclerosis most often is associated with blood vessels in or near the heart, it can affect blood vessels throughout the body, including those that su Continue reading >>

Blisters & Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Blisters & Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Living With Diabetes Starts With Proper Management Blisters & Diabetes: What You Need to Know As atype 1diabetic for the past 8 years, Im always trying to stay on top of the latest news and trends when it comes to diabetes complications. Did you know that every 30 seconds, somewhere in the world, someone loses a lower limb as a result of diabetes. Thats because diabetes and wounds are a dangerous combination. If you have diabetes, theres no such thing as a minorwoundto the foot even small blisters or foot sores can turn into anulcerthat, if not properly treated, can lead to amputation. The rate of amputation for people with diabetes is 10 times higher than for those who dont have the disease. There is no single known cause for diabetic blisters. Many of those who have diabetic blisters may also tend to suffer fromneuropathyandnephropathy. Some researchers think that a decreased ability to sustain an injury may play a role. Also in people with heart failure, the swelling that can result from that condition may be enough to cause the blisters.Many people who develop the diabetic blisters have had diabetes for many years or have several complications from the disease. Symptoms of diabetic blisters include intenseitchingandburningsensation of the skin. When the mucous membranes of the mouth are affected, it can cause pain, burning, peeling away of affected inner lining tissues, and sensitivity to acidic foods. Eating can be difficult, and involvement in the deeper areas of the throat can cause coughing. Involvement of the inner nose can cause nosebleeds. The disease typically worsens (exacerbates) and improves (remits) over time. It is crucial that you report any slow-healing blisters to your doctor because if infection occurs it can threaten the well-being of your entire Continue reading >>

Bullous Disease Of Diabetes

Bullous Disease Of Diabetes

Author: Maureen B Poh-Fitzpatrick, MD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD more... Bullous disease of diabetes (bullosis diabeticorum) is a distinct, spontaneous, noninflammatory, blistering condition of acral skin that is unique to patients with diabetes mellitus. Bullous disease of diabetes tends to arise in long-standing diabetes or in conjunction with multiple complications. Prominent acral accentuation of bullous disease of diabetes lesions suggests a susceptibility to trauma-induced changes, but the definitive explanation awaits elucidation. In the United States, bullous disease of diabetes has been reported to occur in approximately 0.5% of diabetic patients. Male patients have twice the risk as female patients. [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 ] Kramer first reported bullous-like lesions in diabetic patients in 1930 [ 6 ] ; Rocca and Pereyra first characterized this as a phlyctenar (appearing like a burn-induced blister) in 1963. [ 7 ] Cantwell and Martz are credited with naming the condition bullosis diabeticorum in 1967. [ 8 ] It is also termed bullous disease of diabetes and diabetic bullae. While lesions typically heal spontaneously within 2-6 weeks, they often recur in the same or different locations. Secondary infections may also develop; these are characterized by cloudy blister fluid and require a culture. [ 9 ] The clinician should consider direct immunofluorescence studies to exclude histologically similar entities (eg, noninflammatory bullous pemphigoid, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, porphyria cutanea tarda, other bullous porphyrias). Pseudoporphyria blistering due to photosensitizing drugs, chronic dialysis regimens, or ultraviolet A tanning devices should also be considered. Specific treatment is unwarranted unless secondary infections (eg, staphylococcal) occur Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Blisters

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Blisters

If you have diabetes and experience the spontaneous eruption of blisters on your skin, they may well be diabetic blisters. These are also called bullosis diabeticorum or diabetic bullae. Although the blisters may be alarming when you first spot them, they’re painless and normally heal on their own without leaving scars. A number of skin conditions are associated with diabetes. Diabetic blisters are fairly rare. An article in the International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries notes that in the United States, the disorder occurs in only 0.5 percent of people with diabetes. Diabetic blisters are twice as likely to be found in men than in women. Diabetic blisters most often appear on your legs, feet, and toes. Less frequently, they show up on hands, fingers, and arms. Diabetic blisters can be as large as 6 inches, though they’re normally smaller. They’re often described as looking like blisters that occur when you get a burn, only without the pain. Diabetic blisters seldom appear as a single lesion. Rather, they are bilateral or occur in clusters. The skin surrounding the blisters isn’t normally red or swollen. If it is, see your doctor promptly. Diabetic blisters contain a clear, sterile fluid, and they’re usually itchy. Read about the eight best remedies for itching. Given the risk of infection and ulceration when you have diabetes, you may want to see a dermatologist to rule out more serious skin conditions. Diabetic blisters usually heal in two to five weeks without intervention, according to an article in Clinical Diabetes. The fluid in the blisters is sterile. To prevent infection, you shouldn’t puncture the blisters yourself, though if the lesion is large, your doctor may want to drain the fluid. This will keep the skin intact as a covering for Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetic Blisters?

What Causes Diabetic Blisters?

ANSWER People with diabetes can develop skin problems, including blisters that resemble burn blisters. These blisters can occur on the fingers, hands, toes, feet, legs, or forearms. Diabetic blisters usually are painless and heal on their own. These skin problems often occur in people who have severe diabetes and diabetic neuropathy. Bringing your blood sugar level under control is the medical treatment for this health condition. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Skin Problems And Diabetes Rash [and How To Treat Them]

Diabetic Skin Problems And Diabetes Rash [and How To Treat Them]

Skin complications in diabetic patients are extremely common. They may even be the primary reason for the diagnosis determination. About 33% of diabetics will have skin changes caused or complicated by diabetes during their lives. Some of these changes may occur in people who are not affected by diabetes but are much more common in those with diabetes mellitus. Such conditions provoke itching, fungal and bacterial infections. There are other characteristic conditions of diabetes only. Typical skin changes for diabetes patients Diabetic dermatopathy The condition is also known as “shin spots”. Diabetic dermatopathy is the most common skin pathology in diabetes mellitus and is considered to be a pathologic sign of diabetes. It is presented with small round or oval brown spots on the skin, which are very similar to the age spots. Usually, they are found on the front surface of the legs, the affected areas are often asymmetrical. These spots do not cause itching or pain. Generally, they do not require therapy. They are due to changes in the small blood vessels of the skin – diabetic microangiopathy. It is a skin disease that is often, but not always, associated with diabetes mellitus. Due to the strong relationship between diabetes and this particular disease, many studies have focused on diabetic microangiopathy as the leading etiological factor. Clinically, necrobiosis lipoid is characterized by one or several soft yellowish-brown plaques that slowly develop in the anterior surface of the lower legs for several months. They can continue to exist for years. Some patients also have lesions on the chest, upper limbs and torso. The lesion begins as brown-red or body-colored papules that slowly develop into a “wax” plaque of varying size. The slightly raised border r Continue reading >>

What To Do If You Have Diabetic Blisters

What To Do If You Have Diabetic Blisters

People with diabetes can sometimes develop blisters on their skin, also known as diabetic bullae or bullosis diabeticorum. Even though diabetes blisters are not a pleasant sight, they are usually painless and will heal naturally, without leaving scars. Still, when it comes to diabetes, its always better to treat wounds with quick and proper care. This is because ordinary foot sores or blisters in a person with diabetes can sometimes turn into an ulcer which if not properly treated can lead to amputation. These blisters are a rare symptom of type 1 diabetes, but sometimes they can even appear in those with type 2 diabetes. According to the International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries , they appear only in 0.5% of U.S. diabetes patients. Also, men are more prone to this skin disorder than women. The most common places where diabetes blisters appear are feet, legs, and toes, but rarely can they show up on arms, hands, and fingers. Diabetic blisters usually look like those when you get a burn, except that they are painless. They can reach up to 6 inches, usually in clusters. They are itchy, and the skin around them is swollen or red. These blisters are filled with clear, sterile fluid and rarely appear as a single lesion. Even though the exact reason for the development of these blisters is not known, a lot of scientists believe its the reduced ability of a diabetic organism to sustain an injury. Moreover, these people usually suffer from nephropathy and diabetic neuropathy . In some cases, the swelling caused by heart failure in people with diabetes might be reason enough to cause their appearance. Also, diabetes patients whove experienced several complications from their diabetes through the course of several years might experience diabetic blisters. Another Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

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