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Can Diabetes Cause Abnormal Periods?

Diabetes And Your Period

Diabetes And Your Period

My blood sugar had been running high all week. One morning it spiked to 300, and it took all day (and extra injections) before I could get it back down to “normal” levels. I was also crampy, bloated, and irritable and knew exactly why I was feeling this way. A few days later I got my period and my blood sugars returned to “normal.” I wrote about fluctuations during the menstrual cycle for a chapter in my book, The Smart Woman’s Guide to Diabetes, and yet every month I’m newly frustrated as if it’s happening for the first time. No woman enjoys having her period, but I’ve always felt that mine was particularly problematic. Not only do I get crampy and bloated, I also feel drained because of high blood sugars. In a 2003 study, women with Type 1 diabetes were shown to have more menstrual problems (long cycles, long menstruation, and heavy menstruation) before age 30 years than their peers without diabetes. These problems may indicate increased risk for osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. It was also shown that women with Type 1 diabetes got their periods nearly a year later than control subjects. I got my period the same year I was diagnosed with diabetes and never had regular cycles. I didn’t mind having irregular periods until I was trying to get pregnant and had to take Clomid to kick-start my ovulation. I bought countless pregnancy tests in hopes that the reason I wasn’t getting my period each month was because I was finally pregnant, but each test was negative. I’d heard so many discouraging stories and myths about fertility challenges for women with Type 1 (such as big babies and birth defects) that I was overwhelmed with worry. I made threats in the dark to the Diabetes Gods that if I couldn’t get pregnant, I would give up. I was tired of Continue reading >>

Abnormal Bleeding During Your Period

Abnormal Bleeding During Your Period

Please note: This information was current at the time of publication. But medical information is always changing, and some information given here may be out of date. For regularly updated information on a variety of health topics, please visit familydoctor.org , the AAFP patient education website. See related article on abnormal uterine bleeding . How do I know if my periods are abnormal? Periods are considered abnormal if they last more than seven days, have less than 24 days or more than 35 days between starting dates, or are very irregular or very heavy. Bleeding is considered very heavy if you have to change tampons or pads more than every one to two hours, or if you often pass clots larger than 1 inch. Vaginal bleeding in children or in women after menopause is always abnormal. Abnormal bleeding is common. Causes of irregular bleeding can include pregnancy, obesity, uncontrolled diabetes, thyroid problems, side effects from medicines, and cancer. Very heavy periods may be caused by thyroid problems, bleeding disorders, and noncancerous growths in your uterus. Many women have very heavy periods without a known cause. Abnormal bleeding can range from annoying to life-threatening, so talk to your doctor. He or she will ask you questions, do a physical exam, and perform other tests to try to find the cause. The most serious cause of abnormal bleeding is cancer. Bring a list of all your medicines and supplements. Also bring a diary of your periods where you track the start and stop dates, how heavy the flow is, and any associated symptoms. First, you may need a pregnancy test and a blood test. The two other most useful tests are endometrial biopsy and transvaginal ultrasound. An endometrial biopsy is when your doctor takes a small sample of the lining of your uterus to Continue reading >>

Diabetics' Irregular Periods Signal Excess Hormones

Diabetics' Irregular Periods Signal Excess Hormones

ASK OUR EXPERTS Using 0 of 1024 Possible characters Home » Women's Health » Diabetics' irregular periods signal excess hormones Women with diabetes have been shown to have more menstrual problems than other women and a recent study suggests that an excess of male hormones could be involved. Higher-than-normal androgen levels may increase the risk of heart disease in women, a condition that also strikes more commonly in diabetes. Women with diabetes have been shown to have more menstrual problems than other women and a recent study suggests that an excess of male hormones could be involved. Both acne and irregular periods in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes respectively, can be related to excess male hormones, or androgens. Higher-than-normal androgen levels may increase the risk of heart disease in women, a condition that is more common in diabetics. Excess androgens in women with diabetes could be one reason for why they are at higher risk for heart disease. Previous research has shown that women with diabetes are more likely to show a range of menstrual irregularities. For instance, studies show that women with type 1 diabetes appear to be more likely to report having long and heavy periods, and also tend to begin menstruating at a later age and go through menopause relatively early. In addition, investigators have shown that young women who have long or irregular menstrual cycles may have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes by middle age. In type 2 diabetes, the body no longer responds properly to insulin, the body's key blood sugar-regulating hormone. In the current study researchers, from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pennsylvania, collected data from to 28 women with type 1 diabetes and 32 women with type 2 diabetes, and from 32 wom Continue reading >>

Your Menstrual Cycle And Blood Sugar Levels

Your Menstrual Cycle And Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes can affect a woman's reproductive health because the hormones that control menstruation can cause changes in blood glucose levels. Learn to monitor patterns in your blood glucose changes that correlate to your menstrual cycles. Hormones and blood glucose levels The hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle, estrogen and progesterone, interact with the insulin hormone and may make your body more resistant to its own insulin or injected insulin. Because of this, either before, after, or during menstruation you may experience a rise in blood glucose levels for three to five days. These effects might be consistent from month to month, or they might vary, making them more difficult to monitor. An increase in your levels of progesterone can also trigger food cravings that can make diabetes management more difficult. Diabetes and your menstrual cycle Just as your menstrual cycle affects your diabetes, your diabetes, in turn, affects your menstrual cycle. Women with type 1 diabetes, on average, start menstruation a year later than women without diabetes, and they are more likely to have menstrual problems before age 30. Diabetes also increases a woman's chances of having longer menstrual cycles and periods, heavier periods, and earlier onset of menopause. Managing diabetes and your cycle The key to knowing how your menstrual cycle affects your diabetes and vice versa is careful monitoring. Track menstrual cycle changes that relate to your diabetes as closely as you would your blood sugar levels. Using a period tracker app can help you keep track of your cycle and clue you into when you might start experiencing high blood sugars. Compare your cycle with your blood glucose levels and note any trends that you see so you can be prepared for diabetes management changes in Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes

Signs Of Diabetes

What Are The Symptoms Of Diabetes? Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms The following is a list of the main warning signs associated with type 1 diabetes: Need To Urinate Often As the body can't absorb the glucose in your bloodstream (as it should), it is excreted by the kidneys with your urine. This results in a high concentration of glucose in the urine. In response the body draws water out of the blood to lower the concentration. All this extra fluid builds up in the bladder necessitating the need to urinate more frequently. Increased Thirst As you urinate more often, this means there is less fluid in your body so you become dehydrated. This causes you to become extra thirsty. Have Excess Weight or Obesity? - FDA- Approved Treatment Read About Weight-Loss Medicine That May Help You Lose Weight. Prescription treatment website Increased Hunger Although there is plenty of glucose in the body - because you lack insulin - the cells of the body can't access the glucose to use as energy. As a result they become malnourished and send hunger signals to the brain. The body experiences a sensation of hunger, even though there is a plentiful source of food. It just can't access it. Weight Loss As your body cannot utilize the glucose in your blood for energy it starts to break down muscle and stored deposits of fat instead. This can result in sudden weight loss. Weakness You may feel weak and easily fatigued as your body is not getting enough sources of energy. Irregular periods If the body is poor nourished it cannot function efficiently. This can affect your menstrual cycle and lead to irregular periods and even missing periods. Fatty Deposits Around The Eyes Xanthelasmata (picture) is where fatty deposits collect around the eyes. Doctors used to think it was a sign of heart disease, but t Continue reading >>

Missed Or Irregular Periods - Topic Overview

Missed Or Irregular Periods - Topic Overview

Missed or Irregular Periods - Topic Overview Most women have between 11 and 13 menstrual periods each year. You may be different: You may have more or fewer. Missed or irregular periods must be looked at in terms of what is normal for you. Menstrual periods are often irregular during the first few years after menstruation starts . It may take several years for the hormones that control menstruation to reach a balance. Menstrual periods also may be very irregular at the other end of the menstrual years. Many women realize that they are approaching perimenopause and menopause when their otherwise regular periods become irregular. Menopause occurs when it has been 12 months since you had a menstrual period. Pregnancy is the most common cause of a missed period. If you might be pregnant , treat yourself as if you are pregnant until you know for sure. Use a home pregnancy test as the first step to finding out whether you are pregnant. If you are not pregnant, other causes of missed or irregular periods include: Excessive weight loss or gain. Although low body weight is a common cause of missed or irregular periods, obesity also can cause menstrual problems. Eating disorders , such as anorexia or bulimia . For more information, see the topic Anorexia Nervosa or Bulimia Nervosa . Increased exercise . Missed periods are common in endurance athletes. Medicines such as birth control methods , which may cause lighter, less frequent, more frequent, or skipped periods or no periods at all. Hormone problems. This may cause a change in the levels of the hormones that the body needs to support menstruation . , such as imperforate hymen , polycystic ovary syndrome , or Asherman's syndrome . Breastfeeding . Many women do not resume regular periods until they have completed breastfeeding Continue reading >>

Irregular Menstruation In Teenagers May Be A Warning Sign

Irregular Menstruation In Teenagers May Be A Warning Sign

Irregular Menstruation in Teenagers May be a Warning Sign A recent study indicates that irregular periods in teenage girls are linked to obesity, and girls suffering from irregular periods may also present early warning symptoms of diabetes, reproductive issues, and heart disease. "There may be a misconception in adolescent medicine...that it 'takes a couple of years after menarche to get the engine running' and hence one might not want to be concerned about irregular adolescent menstrual cycles until much later," said Charles Glueck, one of the study's authors, from the Cholesterol and Metabolism Center at the Jewish Hospital of Cincinnati. "That's clearly wrong," he stated, adding that even in younger teenage girls, exceedingly irregular menstruation is not typical and should not be disregarded. The research performed by Glueck and his colleagues was a part of a larger study initiated by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, and is published in Fertility and Sterility . The researchers studied 370 teenage females, starting at age fourteen, who all had begun menstruating prior to the commencement of the study. Once per year, the girls were interviewed and asked how long it had been since their last period. Researchers also measured the girls levels of sex hormones, glucose and insulin, and blood pressure at different points in the study, as well as collected data concerning the girls' height, weight, and waist circumference. The authors classified irregular menstrual cycles as enduring for more than forty-two days, which, according to Glueck, is a criterion that's meant to catch the 2% of girls with the least regular periods. Between age fourteen and nineteen, 269 of the girls reported regular periods at every annual visit. Another seventy-four of them had onl Continue reading >>

The Facts About Irregular Periods

The Facts About Irregular Periods

Everyday Health Women's Health Premenstrual Syndrome If your menstrual cycle is irregular from time to time, it's probably no big deal. But do you know how to tell if you have reason to be concerned? Sign Up for Our Women's Health Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Your menstrual cycle isnt always like clockwork. While some women get their periods right on schedule every 28 days, other womens cycles arent so predictable. At least 30 percent of women have irregular periods during their childbearing years, says Amy Autry, MD, a clinical professor of obstetrics-gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of California, San Francisco. While an irregular cycle is not usually a problem, it can occasionally signal health complications. A normal menstrual cycle lasts 28 days, plus or minus seven days. Menstrual bleeding is considered irregular if it occurs more frequently than every 21 days or lasts longer than 8 days. Missed, early, or late periods are also considered signs of an irregular cycle. To determine whether your menstruation schedule is irregular, count from the last day of your previous period and stop counting on the first day of your next. Repeat this for three months. If the number of days between stopping and starting your period is significantly different each month, you have an irregular cycle, says Dr. Autry. In many cases, irregular periods are related to a condition called anovulation. This means that ovulation hasnt taken place during your menstrual cycle, usually due to severe hormonal imbalances, says Autry. Sometimes an irregular period may be due to subtler hormone imbalances. You may still be ovulating, but the timing of your ovulation can vary Continue reading >>

Women And Diabetes | Diabetesnet.com

Women And Diabetes | Diabetesnet.com

Mon, 11/15/2010 - 11:33 -- Richard Morris Fluctuations in hormone levels occur through the menstrual cycle and these fluctuations can affect blood sugar control. When estrogen levels are naturally high, your body may be resistant to its own insulin or injected insulin. Many women find their blood sugar tends to be high 3-5 days before, during or after their periods. Since everyone is different, the only way to manage blood sugars in a setting where sensitivity to insulin changes is to test and record blood sugars four or more times a day the week before, during and after your period for at least 2 or 3 months to find your own pattern. This allows you to adjust your insulin doses and carb intake both before and during this time to better control your blood sugar. Premenstrual symptoms (PMS) can be worsened by poor blood sugar control. It helps to chart your feelings such as tenderness, bloating, grouchiness for a week before, during and after your period. Charting will help you know when your PMS reach their peak during your period so that before your PMS is most severe, you can check your blood sugar more often and take extra insulin or exercise to bring high blood sugars down. Food cravings during PMS are triggered by an increase in progesterone and can make it more difficult to control your blood sugar. Usually the craving is for chocolate or sweet foods. Give in to your cravings by trying sugar-free and fat-free versions, such as chocolate pudding. Take extra insulin or increase your exercise to compensate. You may feel less like exercising during your period. If so, extra insulin may be a good choice for keeping your blood sugar from rising. The extra insulin needed to overcome insulin resistance during this time will not cause weight gain. Treat yourself well duri Continue reading >>

Are Irregular Periods A Symptom Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Are Irregular Periods A Symptom Of Type 2 Diabetes?

> Are Irregular Periods a symptom of Type 2 Diabetes? Are Irregular Periods a symptom of Type 2 Diabetes? Some of the symptoms of diabetes mellitus are commonly known and can help alert you to get the right diagnostic tests done. However, diabetes is an endocrine condition that may lead to complex interplay with other hormones, especially the female reproductive hormones. In diabetes, the body cannot utilize glucose to produce energy adequately, which means that the body is not nourished properly. This can affect the menstrual cycle, making it irregular i.e. delayed or even missed periods. In fact, research conducted by the Journal of the American Medical Association says that unusually long, extremely irregular, or infrequent menstrual cycles may be linked to insulin resistance and thus may be one of the early symptoms of diabetes. Some researchers have hypothesized that irregular periods are indicative that the ovaries are responding to changes in metabolism and hence cannot function normally. These metabolic changes gradually increase a womans risk of insulin resistance, which over time may lead to type 2 diabetes. Period cycles of 40+ days or less than 21 days. Often,we tend to brush off such prediabetes symptoms as stressful times or just a miss.It is therefore important for women to know their menstrual cycle well and look out for unusual aberrations. The first step is to be armed with the knowledge about how diabetes and your menstrual cycle are related. A woman sees great ups and downs in reproductive hormones through the month. These hormones also serve to control the blood glucose levels along with insulin. Typically, most women undergo a rise in blood glucose level the week prior to menstruation, just after ovulation. The blood sugar levels then tend to drop Continue reading >>

Researchers Discover Link Between Irregular Menstrual Cycle And Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers Discover Link Between Irregular Menstrual Cycle And Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers discover link between irregular menstrual cycle and type 2 diabetes Some medical experts believe that type 2 diabetes is a preventable disease in many cases. One key to addressing risk factors before a person develops the condition is to recognize the signs that he or she may be likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. According to a recent study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility, irregular periods during adolescence may be one of these risk factors. The researchers explained that some physicians or parents may disregard irregular menstrual cycles as a sign of coexisting medical conditions. However, although there is no clear cause and effect between this type of problem and obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes, the investigators warned that their study's results show a connection that should not be ignored. You may be interested in these related articles: The investigation involved 370 girls starting at the age of 14. One time each year, the participants were asked to report on whether they had experienced irregular menstrual cycles, and they were also tested for levels of sex hormones, blood glucose and insulin. The study's results showed that subjects who reported the most instances of irregular periods were, on average, severely obese, compared to those who experienced this problem the least and were only slightly overweight. Moreover, reports of abnormal periods coincided with high blood sugar and insulin levels by the time the participants were 25. The researchers hypothesized that one reason for this connection may be that irregular periods are a sign that the ovaries are responding to changes in metabolism. "These relationships which we see so clearly in adolescence and see prospectively into young adulthood are the same Continue reading >>

Can Type 2 Diabetes Lead To Irregular Periods For Teen Girls?

Can Type 2 Diabetes Lead To Irregular Periods For Teen Girls?

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / can type 2 diabetes lead to irregular periods article Can Type 2 Diabetes Lead to Irregular Periods for Teen Girls? Want More News? Sign Up for MedicineNet Newsletters! WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As if coping with type 2 diabetes as a teenager isn't tough enough, it turns out that many girls with the metabolic disorder also have to deal with irregular periods. And menstrual cycles that stray from normal can lead to very heavy bleeding and cause extra cramping, said Dr. Megan Kelsey, lead author of a new study. She's an associate professor of pediatric endocrinology at Children's Hospital of Colorado and the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora. In the long-term, irregular periods can also increase the risk of endometrial cancer , the researchers pointed out in the new report. In the study of young teen girls , "menstrual irregularities affected about one in five girls with type 2 diabetes ," Kelsey said. Those girls had irregular periods even though they were all receiving a treatment for type 2 diabetes called metformin . Kelsey noted that even in girls who made lifestyle changes or took another diabetes medication, menstrual irregularities persisted. "They may need hormonal treatments for their menstrual dysfunction," she said. It's likely, she explained, that a hormonal disorder called polycystic ovarian syndrome ( PCOS ) is the underlying cause of the menstrual abnormalities. The study data was drawn from a large study of type 2 diabetes treatments in children. Researchers in that study looked at use of metformin ( Glucophage ) -- a drug that makes people more sensitive to the effects of insulin . Insulin is a hormone that helps usher sugar from foods into cells to be used as fuel. Peopl Continue reading >>

Irregular Menstrual Cycles May Predict Diabetes

Irregular Menstrual Cycles May Predict Diabetes

Irregular Menstrual Cycles May Predict Diabetes Not all women have a regular four-week menstruation cycle; cycles can range from between 20 to 40 or more days, and in some women the cycle length changes regularly. Diabetes, a condition in which a person has higher than normal blood sugar, can cause damage to the heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and other organs. Unusually long, extremely irregular, or infrequent menstrual cycles may be linked to insulin resistance and the development of type 2 (or adult-onset) diabetes. To assess the risk for type 2 diabetes in women with a history of irregular menstrual cycles, the authors of a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association followed over 100,000 women who had reported their menstrual cycle patterns from 18-22 years of age. A "usual" cycle was considered to be 26 to 31 days; weight, race, family history, cigarette use, and other factors were also examined. Women with long (40+ days) or irregular menstrual cycles were more than twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes over the 10-year study period than women with usual cycles. Women with very short cycles (21 days or less) were 1.5 times more likely to develop the condition than those with normal cycles. Overweight women had a significantly increased risk for type 2 diabetes as well, but obesity could not account for the increased risk in women with irregular cycles. Unusual menstrual cycles may indicate metabolic changes that increase a woman's risk for insulin resistance. Insulin resistance hinders a woman's ability to process sugars and can cause type 2 diabetes over time. If you typically have very long or short menstrual cycles, especially if your menstrual cycle is highly irregular, take extra precautions to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Ta Continue reading >>

Long Menstrual Cycle Is Associated With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Korean Women

Long Menstrual Cycle Is Associated With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Korean Women

Long Menstrual Cycle Is Associated with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Korean Women Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. Corresponding author: Jee-Young Oh. Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, 911-1 Mok-dong, Yangcheon-gu, Seoul 158-710, Korea. [email protected] Received 2010 Oct 4; Accepted 2011 Jan 19. Copyright 2011 Korean Diabetes Association This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( ) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Long menstrual cycle is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in women. We aimed to evaluate the association between existing type 2 diabetes and oligomenorrhea before diagnosis of diabetes, and to observe the differences in this association among obese and non-obese Korean women. Patients with type 2 diabetes (n=118) and without any clinical evidence of abnormal glucose regulation (n=258) who attended the outpatient clinic of a university hospital and were over age 30. Patients self-reporting a menstrual cycle over 40 days during their 20s were defined as oligomenorrhea before diagnosis of diabetes. Obesity was defined as having a body mass index (BMI) over 25 kg/m2. The frequency of oligomenorrhea before diagnosis of diabetes was almost two-fold higher in women with type 2 diabetes than in the control group (16.1% vs. 8.5%, P=0.03). Oligomenorrhea was associated with type 2 diabetes after adjusting for age, BMI, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, and high density lipoprotein ch Continue reading >>

Medical Conditions That Can Affect Your Period - Health

Medical Conditions That Can Affect Your Period - Health

You know how its supposed to go: A normal menstrual cycle is around 28 days, give or take seven days, and usually the bleeding lasts for up to seven. This system works most of the time, for most of us. But there can be glitches, whether its a missed period , a shorter than usual cycle, or an oddly heavy flow. Usually, those hiccups are no big deal. I tell women that one to two abnormal cycles or missed cycles a year is probably okay, says Mary L. Rosser, MD, PhD, director of obstetrics and gynecology at Montefiore Health System in New York City. If its persistent or consistent, meaning three months or more, then you do need to seek a visit with a healthcare provider. In many cases, simple lifestyle tweaks can help. Being underweight, overweight, or exercising really rigorously can all mess with your period . But in other instances, there may be an underlying medical condition affecting your cycle. Periods that come less than every 21 days, more than every 40, or last more than eight can signal trouble. If youre sure youre not pregnant (the most common reason for missed periods), one of these conditions may be to blame. As many as 10% of women of reproductive age have PCOS , a complicated disorder that affects hormones and metabolism. Hallmark symptoms include irregular periods (cycles of at least 35 days for adults and 45 days for adolescents), no periods at all, or lighter or heavier periods. PCOS is not only a leading cause of infertility ; it can also mean other problems down the line. Theres a real red flag raised when we see someone with PCOS, as it may lead to diabetes and heart disease, says Dr. Rosser, who is also assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology and womens health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Fortunately, there are medications to trea Continue reading >>

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