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Can Diabetes Be Treated?

Preventing And Treating Canine Diabetes

Preventing And Treating Canine Diabetes

The growing diabetes epidemic is not limited to people—diabetes mellitus is increasing among dogs as well. Researchers estimate that one in 200 dogs will develop the disease. Fortunately, treatment has made huge strides in recent years, and as a result, dogs with diabetes are living longer, healthier lives. The mechanism of diabetes is relatively simple to describe. Just as cars use gas for fuel, body cells run on a sugar called glucose. The body obtains glucose by breaking down carbohydrates in the diet. Cells then extract glucose from the blood with the help of insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas in specialized cells called beta cells. (The pancreas, an organ situated behind the stomach, produces several hormones.) In diabetes mellitus, cells don’t take in enough glucose, which then builds up in the blood. As a result, cells starve and organs bathed in sugary blood are damaged. Diabetes is not curable, but it is treatable; a dog with diabetes may live many happy years after diagnosis. Kinds of Diabetes Humans are subject to essentially three kinds of diabetes. By far the most common is Type 2, followed by Type 1 and gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes has typically been a disease of middle and old age (though it is being seen increasingly in young people), and has two causes: The beta cells don’t make enough insulin, or muscle cells resist insulin’s help and don’t take in enough glucose (or both). As a result, blood glucose levels climb. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs when the immune system attacks and destroys the beta cells, cutting off insulin production; the reason for this attack is thought to be a combination of genetic predisposition plus exposure to a trigger (research into possible triggers is ongoing). Glucose then stays in the blood and, aga Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your blood glucose levels. One medicine (usually metformin) is used first but two or even three medicines may be needed. Most of the medicines for type 2 diabetes are given in tablet form. However, some people with type 2 diabetes need insulin injections to help control blood glucose levels. Some people gain a great deal of benefit from insulin injections and these are sometimes used fairly soon after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes has been made. Insulin injections can be used in combination with other medicines to further improve glucose control. Lifestyle - diet, weight control an Continue reading >>

Medications To Treat Diabetes

Medications To Treat Diabetes

It's very important to take diabetes medications as directed by your doctor. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to serious, even life-threatening complications—other diseases or conditions that are related to diabetes. Complications can lead to loss of vital functions (such as with your kidneys), blindness, amputation of lower limbs, and even death (especially from cardiovascular disease). By taking your medications as directed, you greatly reduce your risk of getting complications. Treatment depends on the type of diabetes you have. There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas stops making insulin. It is usually seen in children and teens, but may occur later in life. People with type 1 diabetes need insulin to survive. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin and it becomes resistant to insulin’s effects. It occurs in adults and elderly patients, many of whom are overweight. Younger people can also develop type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that occurs only during pregnancy. It usually goes away after the baby is born. Women who have had gestational diabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life, however. Treatment includes changes in lifestyle (diet and exercise), plus medicine (if needed): oral medicines (pills), insulin, and/or other injected medicines. People with type 1 diabetes always need insulin. People with type 2 diabetes usually need treatment with oral medicines for several or even many years but may eventually need insulin to maintain glucose control. Insulin helps you manage your blood glucose levels by "unlocking" cells so that they can access your blood glucose for the energy they need. Without su Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment (type 1 And Type 2 Medications And Diet)

Diabetes Treatment (type 1 And Type 2 Medications And Diet)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 treatment facts Controlling blood sugar (glucose) levels is the major goal of diabetes treatment, in order to prevent complications of the disease. Type 2 diabetes may be managed with non-insulin medications, insulin, weight reduction, or dietary changes. The choice of medications for type 2 diabetes is individualized, taking into account: the effectiveness and side effect profile of each medication, the patient's underlying health status, any medication compliance issues, and cost to the patient or health-care system. Medications for type 2 diabetes can work in different ways to reduce blood glucose levels. They may: increase insulin sensitivity, increase glucose excretion, decrease absorption of carbohydrates from the digestive tract, or work through other mechanisms. Medications for type 2 diabetes are often used in combination. Proper nutrition is a part of any diabetes care plan. There is no one specific "diabetic diet" that is recommended for all individuals. Pancreas transplantation is an area of active study for the treatment of diabetes. What is the treatment for diabetes? The major goal in treating type 1 and type 2 diabetes is to control blood sugar (glucose) levels within the normal range, with minimal excursions to low or high levels. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is treated: Oral medications are prescribed when these measures fail to control the elevated blood sugars of type 2 diabetes. If oral medications become ineffective treatment with insulin is initiated. Adherence to a diabetic diet is a critical aspect of controlling blood sugar in people with diabetes. When considering an ideal diabetic diet, a number of factors must be taken into consideration, including the amount and type of carbohydrates consumed as well as the amount of fib Continue reading >>

Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments

Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments

Taking insulin or other diabetes medicines is often part of treating diabetes. Along with healthy food choices and physical activity, medicine can help you manage the disease. Some other treatment options are also available. What medicines might I take for diabetes? The medicine you take will vary by your type of diabetes and how well the medicine controls your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar. Other factors, such as your other health conditions, medication costs, and your daily schedule may play a role in what diabetes medicine you take. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin because your body no longer makes this hormone. You will need to take insulin several times during the day, including with meals. You also could use an insulin pump, which gives you small, steady doses throughout the day. Type 2 diabetes Some people with type 2 diabetes can manage their disease by making healthy food choices and being more physically active. Many people with type 2 diabetes need diabetes medicines as well. These medicines may include diabetes pills or medicines you inject under your skin, such as insulin. In time, you may need more than one diabetes medicine to control your blood glucose. Even if you do not take insulin, you may need it at special times, such as during pregnancy or if you are in the hospital. Gestational diabetes If you have gestational diabetes, you should first try to control your blood glucose level by making healthy food choices and getting regular physical activity. If you can’t reach your blood glucose target, your health care team will talk with you about diabetes medicines, such as insulin or the diabetes pill metformin, that may be safe for you to take during pregnancy. Your health care team may start you on diab Continue reading >>

Prevention & Treatment Of Diabetes

Prevention & Treatment Of Diabetes

If you have a family history or other risk factors for diabetes or if you have been diagnosed with prediabetes, there are a number of healthy living tips you can follow to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes, these same tips can slow the progression of the disease. Many studies show that lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, eating healthy and increasing physical activity can dramatically reduce the progression of type 2 diabetes and are important to controlling type 1 diabetes. These lifestyle changes can help minimize other risk factors as well, such as high blood pressure and blood cholesterol, which can have a tremendous impact on people with diabetes. In many instances, lifestyle changes must be complemented by a regimen of medications to control blood glucose levels, high blood pressure and cholesterol as well as to prevent heart attack and stroke. By working with your health care team, you can set personal treatment goals, monitor your critical health numbers, and successfully manage diabetes while preventing complications from diabetes. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

Treatment for diabetes aims to keep your blood glucose levels as normal as possible and control your symptoms to prevent health problems developing later in life. If you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your GP will be able to explain your condition in detail and help you understand your treatment. They'll also closely monitor your condition to identify any health problems that may occur. If there are any problems, you may be referred to a hospital-based diabetes care team. Making lifestyle changes If you're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you'll need to look after your health very carefully for the rest of your life. This may seem daunting, but your diabetes care team will be able to give you support and advice about all aspects of your treatment. After being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, or if you're at risk of developing the condition, the first step is to look at your diet and lifestyle and make any necessary changes. Three major areas that you'll need to look closely at are: You may be able to keep your blood glucose at a safe and healthy level without the need for other types of treatment. Lifestyle changes Diet Increasing the amount of fibre in your diet and reducing your sugar and fat intake, particularly saturated fat, can help prevent type 2 diabetes, as well as manage the condition if you already have it. You should: increase your consumption of high-fibre foods, such as wholegrain bread and cereals, beans and lentils, and fruit and vegetables choose foods that are low in fat – replace butter, ghee and coconut oil with low-fat spreads and vegetable oil choose skimmed and semi-skimmed milk, and low-fat yoghurts eat fish and lean meat rather than fatty or processed meat, such as sausages and burgers grill, bake, poach or steam food instead of frying Continue reading >>

Treating Diabetes With Diet And Exercise

Treating Diabetes With Diet And Exercise

Recently, I was reading some of the readers’ postings on this Web site. Some of these postings expressed fairly strong opinions about how one should best manage his or her diabetes. Of course, one of the many good things about living in the United States is our right to freedom of speech, and postings such as these certainly get people thinking. However, it’s all too common for misconceptions about diabetes to abound. Whether it’s the belief that eating sugar causes diabetes, or that starting on insulin can make you go blind, or that having to start taking diabetes pills or insulin means that you’re a “bad diabetic,” as a dietitian and diabetes educator, I feel compelled to set the record straight whenever I can. So, what’s the best way to control diabetes? When it comes to Type 1 diabetes, which accounts for 5% to 10% of all diabetes cases, that’s a no-brainer. A person with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin to survive. His pancreas has—to put it simply—”pooped out,” meaning that it no longer makes enough insulin. Of course, a person with Type 1 diabetes has choices as to how he takes insulin. The choices nowadays range from the traditional vial and syringe to an insulin pen to an insulin pump to an inhaler. The future holds more possibilities for insulin delivery as well. People with Type 1 diabetes must still incorporate meal planning and physical activity into their daily management. About 90% to 95% of people with diabetes have Type 2. But Type 2 diabetes is a little less clear-cut in terms of how it’s best managed. The reason is that Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition. When someone is first diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, the cornerstones of management are often, initially, what many health-care professionals term “diet and exer Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Treated?

How Is Diabetes Treated?

The goals of diabetes treatment are to control your blood glucose levels and prevent diabetes complications. Your diabetes healthcare team will focus on these three areas to help you achieve optimum health: Nutrition When you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you need to be very aware of not only what you eat, but also when and how much you eat. A Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) at Joslin can work with you to develop a healthy meal plan that fits your lifestyle. Following a meal plan can also help you lose weight and lower your risk of developing complications. Physical Activity Physical activity is an important part of controlling diabetes and preventing complications such as heart disease and high blood pressure. "We know that exercise is a very effective way to help bring blood sugars under control for someone with type 2 diabetes," says Kenneth Snow, M.D., Acting Chief, Adult Diabetes, Joslin Clinic. Try for 30 minutes of moderate exercise, like brisk walking, on most days. Joslin's Why WAIT? and Easy Start exercise programs are great resources for developing a safe weight loss program. Medications If you have type 2 diabetes, sometimes eating healthy and engaging in physical activity is not enough. Your doctor may give you oral medication to help control your blood glucose levels. For people with type 1 diabetes (and some people with type 2 diabetes) this means taking insulin. People with type 1 diabetes must take insulin to control diabetes--and this can only be done through multiple injections or by an insulin pump, a small device that delivers insulin continuously throughout the day. For more on medications and diabetes, click here. To make an appointment with a Certified Diabetes Educator at Joslin, please call 617-732-2440 Continue reading >>

Acupuncture For Diabetes

Acupuncture For Diabetes

More than 3,000 years ago, ancient practitioners of Chinese medicine pioneered what we now call acupuncture treatment. In acupuncture, practitioners stimulate specific activation points on your body to treat different medical conditions. This is most commonly done by inserting tiny, sterile needles into those points. Modern acupuncture is becoming more and more popular to treat a variety of health conditions. The World Health Organization recognizes acupuncture as effective in treating more than 100 conditions. These conditions include chronic pain, migraine headaches, and even diabetes. There’s still a lot we don’t know about how effective acupuncture is for treating diabetes symptoms. But some of the newest research seems to confirm that it’s at least safe and somewhat effective. One laboratory study indicated that acupuncture could help regulate your pancreas function and insulin levels. And clinical trials imply that the anti-obesity effect of acupuncture could work with traditional diabetes treatment to reduce the impact of some diabetes symptoms. The acupuncture techniques recommended to treat type 1 and 2 diabetes vary dramatically, just as the treatments of Western medicine differ. These are two different diseases within the diabetes spectrum. Methods are prescribed according to which diabetes symptoms you wish to treat. There are acupuncture techniques to help with weight loss, metabolism, organ function, and nerve pain. One of the more vigorously studied acupuncture techniques that addresses diabetic neuropathy is the wrist-ankle treatment. The treatment involves deep stimulation of the wrist and ankle nerves. May reduce feelings of pain If you have diabetes, you probably know that the condition stems from your endocrine system. These are the hormones th Continue reading >>

This Researcher Says Diabetes Is Not Always Chronic. Here’s How To Cure It

This Researcher Says Diabetes Is Not Always Chronic. Here’s How To Cure It

If you Google type 2 diabetes, reliable sources—like the National Institutes of Health website—will tell you that it’s a chronic condition. But Newcastle University researcher Roy Taylor, M.D., begs to differ. His research finds that some people are able to reverse their diabetes by going on an ultra low-calorie diet. For Dr. Taylor’s new study, 30 diabetic people ate just 700 calories daily for two months. They lost 31 pounds on average. Related: THE 21-DAY METASHRED—One Guy Lost 25 Pounds In Just 6 Weeks! Twelve of those subjects’ blood sugar levels fell below the threshold for diabetes, 126 milligrams per deciliter, as a result. Some of their levels were completely within the normal range, Dr. Taylor says, but the average fell within pre-diabetic parameters. Afterward, the researchers gave the study participants guidance on portion size to help them return to a normal diet while maintaining their new, lower weight. Six months later, all of those people were still diabetes-free. That means that as long as they keep their weight down, they no longer need to take insulin or constantly monitor their blood sugar. They’re no longer at risk for premature heart attacks and strokes, or diabetes complications that can damage their eyes, kidneys, and feet, says Dr. Taylor. Plus, they just feel better—poor blood sugar regulation can zap your energy. How does a diet cure type 2 diabetes? It comes down to weight loss, he says. Diabetes is caused by a buildup of fat in your pancreas, Dr. Taylor says. The extra fat screws with your organ’s ability to make insulin, the hormone that controls your blood sugar. Related: Does Sugar Really Cause Diabetes? But when you lose fat, the first bit to go is the fat in your organs, says Dr. Taylor. “In the first 10 to 14 kilog Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

Treatment For Diabetes

Treatment For Diabetes

Tweet Successful treatment makes all the difference to long-term health, and achieving balanced diabetes treatment can be the key to living with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Treatment varies for each individual, not simply on the type of diabetes that they have, but also more individual-specific diabetic treatment differences. Treating your diabetes Your diabetes treatment and management strategy should be agreed between you and your health care team. The aim of diabetes treatment is to keep, within reason, blood glucose levels as near to normal as possible. Training in self management of diabetes forms an essential part of diabetes management. Treatment should be agreed on an individual basis and address medical, psychosocial and lifestyle issues. Balanced diabetes treatments A variety of different factors have a role to play in treating diabetes, but the importance of balanced, co-ordinated diabetes treatment for all diabetics cannot be underestimated. Regular and successful treatment decreases the risk of each patient developing diabetes complications. The basics of diabetes treatment are broken down into each diabetic type below. Treatment of Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes treatment is a daily task. Lack of insulin production by the pancreas makes Type 1 diabetes is particularly difficult to control. Treatment requires a strict regimen that typically includes a carefully calculated diet, planned physical activity, multiple daily insulin injections and home blood glucose testing a number of times per day. Treatment of Type 2 diabetes Treatment typically includes diet control, exercise, home blood glucose testing, and in some cases, oral medication and/or insulin. Approximately 40% of people with type 2 diabetes require insulin injections. Tweet Type 2 diabetes m Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes can’t be cured, it can be managed very successfully. Diabetes mellitus, or “sugar diabetes,” is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs. It is a metabolism disorder. Metabolism refers to how the body converts food to energy. To understand what diabetes is, it helps to understand some of this process. The conversion of food nutrients into energy to power the body’s cells involves an ongoing interplay of two things: • Glucose: essential fuel for the body’s cells. When food is digested, the body breaks down some of the nutrients into glucose, a type of sugar that is a vital source of energy for certain body cells and organs. The glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, which then transports the glucose throughout the body. • Insulin: in charge of fuel delivery. Meanwhile, an important organ next to the stomach called the pancreas releases the hormone insulin into the body. Insulin acts as a “gatekeeper” that tells cells to grab glucose and other nutrients out of the bloodstream and use them as fuel. What is diabetes? With diabetes, the glucose-insulin connection isn’t working as it should. Diabetes occurs in dogs in two forms: • Insulin-deficiency diabetes—This is when the dog’s body isn’t producing enough insulin. This happens when the pancreas is damaged or otherwise not functioning properly. Dogs with this type of diabetes need daily shots to replace the missing insulin. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. • Insulin-resistance diabetes—This is when the pancreas is producing some insulin, but the dog’s body isn’t utilizing the insulin as it should. The ce Continue reading >>

Control Or Reverse Diabetes Naturally

Control Or Reverse Diabetes Naturally

Can you control diabetes? Reverse it? Absolutely. We can beat diabetes. The disease process associated with diabetes (which leads to heart attacks, strokes, and other crippling illnesses) can be slowed and even partially reversed by controlling blood glucose and other cardiovascular disease risk factors. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce and/or properly use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas. When there are troubles with insulin, glucose builds up in the blood. A fasting glucose level below 100 is considered normal. A fasting glucose between 100 and 125 signals pre-diabetes. A fasting glucose of 126 or higher means you have diabetes. Though “silent,” at least at first, diabetes can turn into a horrible disease. It can greatly increase our risk of heart attacks, strokes, peripheral arterial disease, erectile dysfunction, blindness, diabetes neuropathy, poor wound healing, and kidney failure. There are two main types of diabetes – Type 1 and Type 2. At least 90% of diabetics in America have Type 2 diabetes. Studying the evolution and lifestyle habits of humankind, we can confidently assert that Type 2 diabetes is virtually entirely preventable. Worldwide, many populations are now suffering epidemic rates of Type 2 diabetes because many populations live in a “food toxic” environment and exercise little or not at all. All this suffering, all this early death, is preventable. It is the direct result of the way we live – by our sedentary habits and our Western-style diets, bereft of whole, fiber-rich foods and full of fast foods and other calorie-dense junk. Type 2 diabetes usually starts after the age of 40. But because of America’s childhood obesity epidemic, more and more of our youth are being diagnosed with the disease, including Continue reading >>

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