This is the third of a four-part piece exploring the impact of chiropractic care on diabetics. ASIDE from drugs to lower blood sugar, many physicians will advise diabetic patients to take a statin cholesterol-lowering drug to lower heart d"> This is the third of a four-part piece exploring the impact of chiropractic care on diabetics. ASIDE from drugs to lower blood sugar, many physicians will advise diabetic patients to take a statin cholesterol-lowering drug to lower heart d"> This is the third of a four-part piece exploring the impact of chiropractic care on diabetics. ASIDE from drugs to lower blood sugar, many physicians will advise diabetic patients to take a statin cholesterol-lowering drug to lower heart d"> This is the third of a four-part piece exploring the impact of chiropractic care on diabetics. ASIDE from drugs to lower blood sugar, many physicians will advise diabetic patients to take a statin cholesterol-lowering drug to lower heart d"/>
diabetestalk.net

Can Diabetes Be Terminal?

Type 2 Diabetes Is Not Terminal

Type 2 Diabetes Is Not Terminal

Ask Your Chiropractor&body=Link: | Jamaican News Online - JamaicaObserver.com"> This is the third of a four-part piece exploring the impact of chiropractic care on diabetics. ASIDE from drugs to lower blood sugar, many physicians will advise diabetic patients to take a statin cholesterol-lowering drug to lower heart disease risk. This is wrong on many levels (not the least of which is the fact that cholesterol is not the cause of heart disease), including the fact that statin drugs may actually contribute to diabetes. A meta-analysis, published in JAMA, concluded that those taking higher doses of statins were at increased risk of diabetes compared to those taking moderate doses. Statins appear to provoke diabetes through a few different mechanisms, the most important being that they increase your insulin levels, which can be extremely harmful to your health. Statins also increase your diabetes risk by raising your blood sugar and robbing your body of certain valuable nutrients, which can also impact your blood sugar levels. Two nutrients in particular, vitamin D and CoQ10, are both needed to maintain ideal blood glucose levels. It's important for awareness of this connection because GlaxoSmithKline, the maker of the prescription-strength fish oil medication, sold under the name Lovaza, has a new combination statin-fish oil drug which reportedly passed the required FDA testing. While high-quality, animal-based omega-3 fats are essential for preventing type 2 diabetes, prescription-strength fish oil combined with a statin drug is not. Please don't let anyone tell you that type 2 diabetes has no cure, as this is not true. What they mean is that medicine has no cure or is not willing to cure this condition. Type 2 diabetes is not terminal. Most type 2 diabetics can be succ Continue reading >>

Late Stage Complications Of Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

Late Stage Complications Of Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

1Department of Microbiology, Chaitanya Postgraduate College, Kakatiya University, Warangal, India 2Department of Biotechnology, Presidency College, Bangalore University, India *Corresponding Author: Department Of Microbiology, Chaitanya Postgraduate College affiliated to Kakatiya University, Warangal, India E-mail: [email protected] Citation: Soumya D, Srilatha B (2011) Late Stage Complications of Diabetes and Insulin Resistance. J Diabetes Metab 2:167. doi:10.4172/2155-6156.1000167 Copyright: © 2011 Soumya D, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism Abstract Diabetes mellitus is considered one of the main threats to human health in the 21st century. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder or a chronic condition where the sugar levels in blood are high. Diabetes is associated with long-term complications that affect almost every part of the body and often leads to blindness, heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputations, and nerve damage. Also it is associated with significantly accelerated rates of several debilitating microvascular complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as atherosclerosis and stroke. In the present article it has been discussed about the resistance of insulin and its consequences in diabetic patients. Insulin resistance results in various disorders. Metabolic syndrome is predicted to become a major public health problem in many developed, as well as developing countries. Keywords Diabetes; Complications Continue reading >>

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is Worse: Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes? Late Update: To be completely clear, the goal of this post is to point out how unproductive this question is. It comes up from time to time in the forums, but only leads to division. We all, regardless of type, have plenty to share with each other. Now, on to the original article. On our Facebook page , we discussed the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In the process, some type 1s and type 2s both suggested that they had it worse. Before we look at this question, lets review the difference between the two types. Imagine insulin is the key that opens your cells and lets sugar enter. If sugar cant enter, it builds up in the blood, makes you hungry and thirsty, and causes your body to turn to fat for energy. The symptoms of diabetes. In type 1, your pancreas stops making keys. You need to put keys in your body (i.e. inject insulin) or sugar cant get into your cells. In type 2 diabetes, the keyhole is rusty. You have keys, but they have trouble opening the cells. You either need more keys or a way to make the lock work better. You can take a little rust off the lock by exercising, losing weight, or taking medication. This is an imperfect analogy, but hopefully it highlights the basic difference. This is a maddening question. Every person is unique, and neither type is a cake walk! Type 1s need insulin to live but type 2s can require enormous amounts of insulin as their resistance to it increases and their insulin production declines. Type 2s can walk around undiagnosed for 5 years and have complications when diagnosed. People with type 1 usually get diagnosed quickly and can take immediate action. But dont type 1s live with diabetes for a longer period of time? Not always! Some type 1s, like Diabetes Dailys co-founde Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetes In Terminal Illness Related To Cancer | Qjm: An International Journal Of Medicine | Oxford Academic

Management Of Diabetes In Terminal Illness Related To Cancer | Qjm: An International Journal Of Medicine | Oxford Academic

The management of diabetes during terminal illness is complex, with lack of agreement and consensus among physicians and multidisciplinary teams. Despite the plethora of guidelines available for the management of diabetes, there exists no agreed, evidence-based strategy for managing diabetes during terminal illness and at the end of life. A number of physiological factors may influence glycaemic control during terminal illness. These include anorexia, cachexia, malabsorption, renal and hepatic failure. Furthermore, controversy exists on the frequency of blood glucose monitoring, the optimum blood glucose range and how to achieve this. We review the factors influencing blood glucose during terminal illness and provide a suggested approach to managing patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during the early and late stages of terminal illness. Diabetes mellitus is a common and increasingly prevalent condition, with a prevalence of 45% in the UK. 1 Furthermore, estimates suggest that there is one person with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2DM) for every two patients with a diagnosis. 2 The Health Survey for England 2003 suggests that 3.1% of men and 1.5% of women over the age of 35 years have undiagnosed diabetes. 3 T2DM, like other chronic conditions, such as degenerative diseases and cancer, becomes more prevalent with age. 46 In the population over 65 years of age, the prevalence of T2DM is 10% 1 and in patients with newly diagnosed cancer the prevalence of T2DM is between 8% and 18%. 7 Furthermore diabetes is associated with certain cancer types. 810 Therefore, it is likely that there will be an increase in the prevalence of diabetes and cancer as the older proportion of the population increases. Traditionally, these two conditions have been managed by different speci Continue reading >>

[life Expectancy Of People With Type 1 Diabetes In The Past And Today].

[life Expectancy Of People With Type 1 Diabetes In The Past And Today].

Abstract The life expectancy of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) dramatically improved after the discovery of insulin in 1922, but was still 25 years shorter than that of non-diabetic population. Some people with T1DM, however, lived to the same age as a non-diabetic population and had no late complications of diabetes. They began to be awarded medals in appreciation of their long life with diabetes. They also became the subject of a research examining why they lived so long and what was the difference between them and those patients with T1DM, whose lives were much shorter. The paper deals with the differences observed in the ´medallists´ and discusses various hypotheses that might account for them. It seems that reliable control of diabetes within the first 20 years following the diagnosis is very important, in relation to the existence of "glycemic memory" which may significantly affect life expectancy in the following years. Human lifespan in general has been linearly extended since the early 19th century and the same holds for lifespans of people with T1DM. This is due to the higher quality control of glycemia on the one hand, and a better prevention and treatment of complications. It is observed that the incidence of terminal stages of diabetic nephropathy has been dropping, the primary as well as secondary prevention of cardiovascular complications, cardiological treatment and heart surgery have been improving. Manifest proteinuria, diabetic neuropathy and hypertension appear to be major prognostic factors of increased mortality. If these indicators are not present, the life expectancy of patients with T1DM does not significantly differ from that of the non-diabetic population.Key words: diabetic nephropathy - glycemia - glycemic memory - ICHS - late complicatio Continue reading >>

Palliative Care And Advanced Terminal Illness Care For Patients With Diabetes

Palliative Care And Advanced Terminal Illness Care For Patients With Diabetes

Monika contacted TheDiabetesCouncil requesting information about diabetes management for patients who are in palliative care. Monika’s husband is in Memory Care for Alzheimer’s disease, and the staff was only checking his blood sugars two times per week for his Type 2 diabetes. They were not giving him his metformin anymore either, and they had started him on once daily injections of long acting insulin. Monika wasn’t sure if the steps taken by the staff to manage his diabetes were enough. His blood sugars were going up to 200 mg/dl, and sometimes even higher. She did state that he wasn’t having any low blood sugars. This was comforting to her because he gets more confused when his blood sugar goes low. They were also giving him desserts, and other unhealthy things, like fried chicken, on his tray. Was this ok, she asked? We decided to look into this for Monika. We found that the guidelines are less stringent in palliative care, and it was not so important to avoid long term complications for her husband. However, if Monika is uncomfortable with the palliative care, she should speak with the palliative care team at her husband’s Memory Care facility. They will usually work with the family to provide care that is more in line with what the family would want for the patient in palliative care. We hope this article on palliative care for those with severe illness, and those who are terminally ill, will help family members and patients alike. Now let’s take a closer look at what to expect in palliative care if you or your family member has diabetes. Distribution of Adults in need of palliative care The difference between palliative care and hospice Unlike hospice, a person can receive palliative care at any age, and you do not need to be in the terminal phase of Continue reading >>

People With Type 1 Diabetes Are Living Longer

People With Type 1 Diabetes Are Living Longer

Better blood sugar control may be the key to longer survival Ninety years ago, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence: half of people who developed it died within two years; more than 90% were dead within five years. Thanks to the introduction of insulin therapy in 1922, and numerous advances since then, many people with type 1 diabetes now live into their 50s and beyond. But survival in this group still falls short of that among people without diabetes. A Scottish study published this week in JAMA shows that at the age of 20, individuals with type 1 diabetes on average lived 12 fewer years than 20-year-olds without it. A second study in the same issue of JAMA showed that people with type 1 diabetes with better blood sugar control lived longer than those with poorer blood sugar control. Types of diabetes There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas that make insulin. This usually happens before age 20. Insulin is needed to get blood sugar (glucose) into cells for energy. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. This damages cells and tissues throughout the body. People who develop type 1 diabetes need to take insulin via shots or a pump for life. Type 2 diabetes tends to occur later in life, usually among individuals who are overweight or inactive. It accounts for about 90% of all diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes often make enough insulin, at least at first, but their cells don’t respond to it. As with type 1 diabetes, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, damaging cells and tissues throughout the body. Type 2 diabetes is initially treated with lifestyle changes such as weight loss, more exercise, and a healthier diet. Medications that make the Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune condition in which the immune system is activated to destroy the cells in the pancreas which produce insulin. We do not know what causes this auto-immune reaction. Type 1 diabetes is not linked to modifiable lifestyle factors. There is no cure and it cannot be prevented. Type 1 diabetes: Occurs when the pancreas does not produce insulin Represents around 10% of all cases of diabetes and is one of the most common chronic childhood conditions Onset is usually abrupt and the symptoms obvious Symptoms can include excessive thirst and urination, unexplained weight loss, weakness and fatigue and blurred vision Is managed with insulin injections several times a day or the use of an insulin pump. What happens to the pancreas? In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach, stops making insulin because the cells that make the insulin have been destroyed by the body’s immune system. Without insulin, the body’s cells cannot turn glucose (sugar), into energy. People with type 1 diabetes depend on insulin every day of their lives to replace the insulin the body cannot produce. They must test their blood glucose levels several times throughout the day. The onset of type 1 diabetes occurs most frequently in people under 30 years, however new research suggests almost half of all people who develop the condition are diagnosed over the age of 30. About 10-15% of all cases of diabetes are type 1. What happens if people with type 1 diabetes don’t receive insulin? Without insulin the body burns its own fats as a substitute which releases chemical substances in the blood. Without ongoing injections of insulin, the dangerous chemical substances will accumulate and can be life threatening if it is not treated. This is a condition call Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetes In The End Stages Of Life

Management Of Diabetes In The End Stages Of Life

The purpose of this web page is to give all carers and health professionals information and points to consider that will enable the patient with diabetes to die with dignity and without suffering the more severe symptoms of uncontrolled diabetes. Diabetes management during terminal illness may be complex from a physiological, clinical and ethical perspective. The management of diabetes during the last few weeks of life may pose some problems for patients and for those caring for them. There is no agreed, evidence based guideline for end of life diabetes care. A number of physiological factors may influence glycaemic control during terminal illness. These include anorexia, cachexia, malabsorption, renal and hepatic failure. Drugs used in palliative care such as corticosteroid can have an impact of glycaemic control and monitoring will be required to assess their effects. The sedative effect of pain relief medication, for example opiates, can affect the patients ability to safely self manage their diabetes medications. Insulin omission can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis in people with Type 1 diabetes Aims of Management Provide the appropriate level of support to patients and their carers to: Avoid unpleasant osmotic symptoms of hyperglycaemia Avoid treatment associated hypoglycaemia Provision of quality care to manage and alleviate distressing symptoms Those in the early stages of palliative care should maintain their routine diabetes care. Those entering the later stages of their illness may need to have their diabetes medications adjusted to reduce the risk of hypoglycaemia but avoid symptomatic hyperglycaemia. Blood glucose monitoring Blood glucose monitoring is a useful tool to assess the efficacy of treatment regimens. There are no agreed target blood glucose levels a Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2. Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs. Causes In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. These cells are destro Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes A Terminal Illness?

Is Diabetes A Terminal Illness?

No, but the complications can become terminal. There are a few main types of diabetes. Type 2 is generally a lifestyle disease where patients are generally older or obese. Sometimes T2 can be controlled by diet and exercise, sometimes medications such as metformin or insulin are needed. Gestational diabetes appears during pregnancy. I know about Type 1 so I'll answer in regards to that kind of diabetes, which accounts for around 10% ish of all diabetes patients. Type 1, formeraly known as juvenile diabetes, is an autoimmune disease that usually (but not always) presents at a younger age (I was just 13 at my diagnosis). Type 1 patients must have insulin injected into their body by syringe, pump, or pen in order to survive. There is no way around it. Lack of insulin means a T1 will get very sick very very quickly. Unless insulin and medical attention is administered quickly the patient will die. Now, it's easy for (uninformed) people to say “well, just take insulin problem solved!” - but they don't understand how acting like your own pancreas 24/7/365 is an impossible task! Things like illness, hormones, stress, exercise, and even the wind blowing a different direction cause fluctuations in blood sugar, the way food is metabolised, and the way injected insulin behaves. The same food in the exact same quantity with the same insulin dose can result in different glucose readings on different days. It's easy for people to say “just control your blood sugar and you'll be fine” but they have no concept how difficult this is to do all of the time. This can mean a fast descent into diabetic ketoacidosis (where the blood literally becomes acidic and is easily the worst illness I've ever experienced). A person can die quickly if help doesn't reach them in time. DKA clouds j Continue reading >>

Thinking About Diabetes With Every Bite

Thinking About Diabetes With Every Bite

Well | Thinking About Diabetes With Every Bite When I look at food, I dont see food. I see sugar in the form of carbohydrates plotted on a multidimensional graph with proteins and fat and serving sizes and sickness and exercise and times of day. I didnt always do this. Before I received the diagnosis that I had Type 1 diabetes, I saw food as food, and ate it as such simply, casually, with no real thought attached. The winter of my senior year of college, after a bad cold and painful breakup, I began eating more not to cope, but to feel full. I was hungry, always hungry. Hungry and thirsty and tired, piling my tray in the dining hall with pasta, cheese, dessert, getting up in the middle of the night to slurp water from my dorms bathroom faucet. I gorged myself and yet my pants were looser, my arms thinner, my stomach flatter. One afternoon I threw it all up, convinced I had food poisoning. My stomach eventually settled, but my mind did not. The world swirled. I couldnt stand without stumbling. On Feb. 17, 2001, I entered the hospital, and since that day, food has never been the same. To live with Type 1 diabetes means to be aware, constantly aware, of insulin a hormone produced in the pancreas that unlocks your cells so they can use the energy in your food, which circulates in your blood as glucose. A healthy persons pancreas pumps out insulin in exact, perfect doses, masterfully managing the level of available glucose so that it never rises too high, which could lead to complications, or too low, which could kill you on the spot. My pancreas, however, doesnt make insulin. It cant. For reasons no one can fully explain, my own immune system killed off the cells that produce it. Thats what Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which your body turns against itself. I Continue reading >>

Living Well With Type 1 Diabetes Over Four Decades…

Living Well With Type 1 Diabetes Over Four Decades…

In July of 1972, I was on vacation with my family for a few weeks, camping in Florida. That’s when the symptoms came on. Somehow we rationalized away the thirst (it was hot in Florida), the weight loss (I was swimming every day and walking around Disney World), and the frequent urination (caused by all the water I was drinking to combat Florida’s heat). My mother had to set up a pail outside the trailer, since it was too long a walk to the camp restroom during the night. Near the end of vacation, I was feeling quite unwell, and deep down I wondered if I had a terminal illness. Upon my return home from vacation, my mother made an appointment to see my pediatrician immediately. My pediatrician called an endocrinologist when the urine test for sugar (Clinitest) done in her office, produced a bright yellow bubbling liquid in the test tube. I was driven to the hospital, where the diagnosis of “juvenile diabetes” (the old-fashioned term for type 1 diabetes) was confirmed by a blood test. The endocrinologist looked very somber when he came in to give me the bad news that I had an incurable, chronic illness. He warned me that my life was going to be very different from then on. I actually was very relieved deep down because I knew I wasn’t going to die. In the hospital I was given a book which explained that prior to the discovery of insulin in the early 1920’s, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence. Starvation diets had been prescribed as a way of prolonging life back then. I realized how fortunate I was to have been diagnosed after the discovery of insulin. I vowed to think of every day beyond the day of my diagnosis as a gift. In those days, there were no blood glucose meters, so doctors in the hospital (where I remained for about 2 weeks) determined my twice-dail Continue reading >>

Caring For Someone With Diabetes At The End Of Life

Caring For Someone With Diabetes At The End Of Life

Caring for someone with diabetes at the end of life Caring for someone with diabetes at the end of life Please be aware - thisinformation is for healthcare professionals Diabetes is a serious life-long health condition. It occurs when the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood is too high because the body cant use it properly. If left untreated, high blood glucose levels can cause serious health complications. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. Theyre different conditions and need to be treated and managed differently. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition where the beta cells (insulin-producing cells) in the pancreas are destroyed. The cause is partly genetic, and Type 1 diabetes is not preventable or related to lifestyle factors. Type 2 diabetes is a condition where glucose levels rise due to the bodys insulin not working properly (insulin resistance), or because the body produces less insulin, or a combination of both. Type 2 diabetes is associated with lifestyle factors such as obesity and physical inactivity, as well as genetic factors such as family history and ethnicity. Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin via injections or an insulin pump. Type 2 diabetes treatment can include changes to diet, physical activity, weight loss (if indicated), oral medications, as well as insulin and non-insulin injectable medications. If a person has Type 2 diabetes and goes on to require insulin this does not mean they now have Type 1 diabetes. The general aim of treatment of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes is to maintain blood glucose levels as close to the non-diabetes range as possible. This reduces the risk of the person developing diabetes-related complications. Diabetes UK has more information about target blood glucose levels. At the end of l Continue reading >>

More in diabetes