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Can Diabetes Be Self Inflicted?

Diabetes Type 1 And Type 2: How To Tell The Difference

Diabetes Type 1 And Type 2: How To Tell The Difference

The number of people living with diabetes in the UK has tipped over the 4 million mark for the first time, according to 2016 figures released by Diabetes UK. [Read more: Could you have diabetes? 5 hidden symptoms of diabetes that could mean you're suffering] But the good news is that because most of the 59.8% increase in diagnosis is in type 2 diabetes cases, simple diet and lifestyle changes can help reverse the trend. Diabetes UK says there are now a total of 3.6 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK, compared to nearly 2.1 million in 2005. However, many cases are type 2 diabetes, which is the form often linked to diet and obesity. And that means for some people, a diabetes-healthy lifestyle can control the illness, which is thought to be on the rise because of increasing obesity levels. Such a lifestyle includes losing weight if you're overweight, eating a healthy diet including lots of fruit and vegetables, and exercising. These measures can help reduce blood-sugar levels, and either reduce or even stop any diabetes symptoms. And while some people with type 2 diabetes need to take medication, making these healthy diet and lifestyle choices can mean they don't need to take their tablets any more. People with type 1 diabetes, however, will always need insulin injections. What's the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? While both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterised by having higher than normal blood-sugar levels, the cause and development of the conditions are different. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that means sufferers are unable to produce the hormone insulin, which helps the body use glucose in the blood to produce energy. The immune system attacks insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, and people with type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

Gene Abuse – The Self-inflicted Path To Type Ii Diabetes

Gene Abuse – The Self-inflicted Path To Type Ii Diabetes

New diabetes-related gene research on humans has shown for the first time that the over-consumption of calories resulting in being overweight induces changes in gene expression in your muscles that result in a decreased genetic ability to burn calories. Unfortunately, this is incredibly bad news. And on the other hand, it can be viewed as self-empowering. While it takes tens of thousands of years for true genetic adaptation to take place, it is also clear that genes are very pliable over the shorter duration. Any person should strive to maintain optimal health so as not to manifest genetic weak spots. The field of epigenetics deals with the changes in gene expression based on environmental influences. In the case of obesity and type II diabetes, we already have data that the health of grandma (which influences egg-related gene programming in all the eggs of her daughters) and the mother's nutritional status during pregnancy (now called fetal programming), have profound influence on software-like gene programming. These setting of the gene switches can readily influence the risk for later life obesity and type II diabetes in anyone. This new study is the first to show that your own overeating can actually change gene settings in your muscles so that you don't burn calories properly or at an optimal rate. The researchers found evidence that the epigenetic changes were taking place in pre-diabetics and were worse in diabetics. The researchers found that higher circulating levels of the inflammatory signal TNFa and increased levels of free fatty acids, both common in people who are overweight, act to change the gene settings that lock in poor calorie burning. Changing gene settings is a serious problem, as these programs control how your body works. It is obvious that this Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Predominatly Self-inflicted?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Predominatly Self-inflicted?

In one sense it could be regarded as self inflicted but in another sense you have a population who eat what society regards as a good diet. Another argument is that people don’t care for their health and yet there are acres of health care products in supermarkets which suggests that they do care. People don’t follow their doctor’s orders but PHCUK a non profit charity says that people were not only eating as per the recommendations but were eating slightly less. I think it is self inflicted but by society. We have processed foods. go large in takeaways, added sugar in our drinks, bad advice from the health care professionals and so on and so forth. One of the things that entertains me is the advice to eat healthily. No-one knows what that means. It is most often spoken by health care professionals to make you feel guilty and get you out of the office. There was a questionnaire by Credit Suisse which asked things of doctors and although most of them gave out the advice to eat oily fish, a large percentage of them couldn’t name one. I answered a question by one young man where he said he always ate healthily and he had eaten a pizza and a cheesecake for his evening meal. What makes that healthy??? So, is it self inflicted? Yes possibly but not without help. Continue reading >>

Calling Diabetes ‘self-inflicted’ Is Misleading

Calling Diabetes ‘self-inflicted’ Is Misleading

As vice president of health care and education of the American Diabetes Association, I am deeply concerned with your Health section headline on Aug. 6, “Diabetes a self-inflicted disease.” This gives the impression that we should blame people for developing type 2 diabetes. This headline is misleading and does little to help stop diabetes. I appreciate that the article did bring forward several very important aspects of diabetes prevention and diabetes control. Type 2 diabetes is epidemic and a major public health concern in the United States, which is leading to an unhealthy population with high medical and social costs. While it is true that overweight, obesity and sedentary lifestyle are risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes, there are other non-modifiable factors such as genetics and aging involved. Unfortunately, too many people disregard these other risk factors for diabetes and think that weight is the cause of type 2 diabetes. Most overweight people never develop type 2 diabetes, and many people with type 2 diabetes are at a normal weight or only moderately overweight. Type 2 diabetes is not a self-inflicted disease. Here are the facts: ♦ 25.8 million children and adolescents in the United States have diabetes, with 7 million of them not knowing they even have it. ♦ 79 million people in the United States are estimated to have pre-diabetes, a condition that can develop into type 2 diabetes. There is scientific evidence that a 5 percent to 7 percent weight loss and 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week can delay the onset or prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle changes that incorporate healthy eating with regular daily physical activity and less sitting can definitely improve health. People should know their risk factors, be te Continue reading >>

“fat And Lazy,” Or Type 2 Diabetes—which Came First?

“fat And Lazy,” Or Type 2 Diabetes—which Came First?

One of my ongoing freelance projects is writing a monthly series for my local newspaper about the top 10 killers in our area. It pretty much follows national trends, and I’ve already done the top four: heart disease, lung cancer, stroke, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Next up is number five: diabetes. Last week, I went to interview one of the local endocrinologists, and the first thing I said to him was: “I’m a new patient. What’s the first thing you’re going to tell me?” Doc immediately began a long litany involving diet and exercise. I listened (and listened, and listened) and finally halted his dissertation. “Do you realize,” I asked, “that you have yet to say anything about helping me get my blood glucose under control?” But that’s what he was saying, he insisted. He may have thought so, but it wasn’t what I was hearing. “My A1C is 10.5%,” I said. “I’m tired and hungry all the time. Besides, diets haven’t worked for me in the past, so all you’re doing is setting me up for failure.” Ah, wouldn’t it be nice if the conversation went more like: “My, your sugars are high: You must feel terrible! We’re going to get those down and you’ll feel much better.” And then maybe explain what helps lower blood glucose? And tell me that getting my blood glucose under control will alleviate the hunger and give me back some of that old zip? I remember when I first began taking insulin and the lethargy went away. It was a miracle drug! Energy in a bottle! I couldn’t wait to give myself the next injection! “Heh,” said my boss, who had Type 2 diabetes and knew what was happening. “You just thought you were getting old, didn’t you?” The whole scenario made me think about Type 2 diabetes, attitude and reality. F Continue reading >>

Diabetes – Self Inflicted?

Diabetes – Self Inflicted?

This article is a strange one. Despite being blunt about why we have a diabetes epidemic – we do it to ourselves, partially because we did what the government and medical authorities told us to do – the author then wanders off into what policy changes would help. I hope the government will just wise up and stay out of this, it’s done enough damage already. Lastly, the author’s paper thin analysis of the calories in/out issue is not helpful. Calorie restriction works in a lab, but in the wild, humans have to eat the right food to get and stay lean for long. The author’s reliance on expert opinion, as if that really matters, shows how weak the research is. We listen to “experts” but I don’t know why – they are 50-50 at best. But the stats … “Slender joggers, hardly typical people with type 2 diabetes, laud their glucose-reading meters and test strips to evening network TV news viewers, typically middle-age and older, prime type 2 targets. Friendly older gentlemen speak of their “diabeetus” medication in other commercials as if the deadly disease is a pal who stopped by to shoot the breeze. “Don’t be fooled: Diabetes kills. And maims. This year alone it will kill 3.2 million people worldwide. It’s the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. As many as 80 percent of people with diabetes will die from heart attack or stroke. Half will likely experience damage to the nerves in their limbs. Diabetic foot disease, caused by changes in blood vessels and nerves, often leads to ulceration and eventual amputation. In fact, diabetes is the leading cause of non-traumatic lower-limb amputation. Ditto for kidney failure. One of every 50 people with diabetes will become blind within 15 years. “The World Health Organization (WHO) calls diabe Continue reading >>

It Happened To Me: I Got Diabetes Type 2

It Happened To Me: I Got Diabetes Type 2

The other week, when my doctor told me bluntly, "You're not going to like this, but you should be taking a diabetes drug and a statin," she was correct. I didn't like that one bit. And it's exactly why I skipped an appointment over two years ago and didn't return. At least this time I wasn't hearing anything that surprised me. When I was told four years ago at 35 that I was diabetic, it was a jolt, though definitely not a clichéd wake up call. Yeah, I might talk about pork belly or fried chicken more than the average person -- I'm a food blogger, and not an obnoxious one, I swear -- but I also eat plenty of vegetables and work out regularly. Then again, I figured diabetes would catch up with me eventually , but you know, when I was old, old, like my dad when he was diagnosed closer to age 50 (OK, that seemed ancient when I was a teen). Little did I know that six days after my recent doctor's visit, the whole world would become an expert on the disease. Did you know that you can cure insulin resistance by simply getting your lard ass off the couch and take a break from shoving deep-fried Twinkies in your face? (Deep-fried Cadbury Eggs are way better than crispy Hostess treats, by the way.) Who I haven't a peep from is anyone who actually has diabetes, and type 2, the one for poor, fat, lazy people, not the good one you're born with. I guess no one wants to cop to an obviously self-inflicted disease that only mouth-breathing blobs who probably live alone (in red states, of course) with obese pets that don't even love them, get. Up until Paula Deen, the only face of diabetes, or rather, diabeetus, was walrusy Wilford Brimley. Not exactly a role model for non-elderly women -- or for them either. The first funeral I ever attended was for an uncle who I barely knew a thing a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Self-inflicted That Can Be Tackled By Applying Common Sense

Diabetes Is Self-inflicted That Can Be Tackled By Applying Common Sense

Home Diabetes is self-inflicted that can be tackled by applying common sense Diabetes is self-inflicted that can be tackled by applying common sense Shobha Shukla, Citizen News Service - CNS So said Freddy Svane, Ambassador of Denmark in an interview given exclusively to Citizen News Service - CNS, during his recent visit to Lucknow. He rightly believes that, Diabetes is a non- communicable disease that is self-inflicted. It is generally not something that we inherit, but something that we inflict on ourselves mostly by adopting an unhealthy life style. Dealing with it is all about applying our own common sense to change our mindset. Of course some will have to be assisted to do this, and so it calls for education. It should definitely be part of school programmes, because that is the time the kids start aping all the bad habits that we have in the western culturemore junk food and less exercise, lots of cars and less of walking. The most important thing is to raise awareness and I have the firm belief that one needs to start from a very early stage. Prevalence of diabetes is increasing globally and as per the updated 5th diabetes atlas of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), more than 371 million people were living with diabetes globally in 2012 out of which nearly 63 million were in India. The World Diabetes Foundation (WDF) estimates that globally one in ten pregnancies may be associated with diabetes, 90% of which involve gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as a transient abnormality of carbohydrate/ glucose intolerance of variable intensity - a condition in which women without previously diagnosed diabetes exhibit high blood glucose levels during pregnancy and it usually disappears after pregnancy. But if left untreated and Continue reading >>

Chronic Disease: A Self Inflicted Pandemic?

Chronic Disease: A Self Inflicted Pandemic?

Harvard School of Public Health recently developed this handy & insightful infographic titled, The Dollars and Sense of Chronic Disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly one out of every two Americans suffers from a chronic disease, defined as a noncommunicable disease (NCD) prolonged in duration, including cancer, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Chronic diseases are the number one cause of death in the U.S. The World Health Organization estimates that 80 percent of all heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes, as well as more than 40 percent of cancer, would be prevented if Americans would stop using tobacco, eat healthy, and exercise. Honestly, this is where the world is mostly wrong. I applaud WHO’s recognition blaming diet as the primary source for disease, however, 40% is way too low for the cancer number. Very little Cancer today is genetic, maybe 10%, so let’s assume 90% of cancers is caused by diet, lifestyle & environmental factors. Yes, you are what you eat as the adage goes. How is this possible and what are people doing to cause such a self inflicted pandemic? For starters, Diet. Let’s take a look at the 50 Jawdroppingly Toxic Food Additives we highlighted recently. Sodium nitrate for example is the worst offender and linked to cancer in humans. It’s added to processed meats to stop bacterial growth. Artifical sweetners such as Saccharin is a carcinogen found to cause bladder cancer in rats, also a worst offender. Artifical food colorings is another one to avoid. Red #40 is found in many foods to alter color. All modern food dyes are derived from petroleum. A carcinogen that is linked to cancer in some studies. Also can cause hyperactivity in children. Banned in some European countries. Blue #1 is commonly us Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Myths Busted

Type 2 Diabetes Myths Busted

90% of diabetics have Type 2 Diabetes, yet this condition is often maligned and misunderstood. Here, we expose some of the myths that surround Type 2 Diabetes, and reveal the facts behind them. When you tell your friends that you've been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes, you may notice their eyes glaze over. It has seeped into public consciousness that Type 2 Diabetes is less serious than Type 1, a simply self-inflicted illness that can be entirely prevented (even cured) by eating fewer sweets and snacks. Here, we examine some of the most common and harmful myths and misconceptions of Type 2 Diabetes, and explore the truth. Is Type 2 Diabetes a big problem? It's estimated that of the 415 million diabetics worldwide, 90% are Type 2. One in two is undiagnosed, presenting a massive potential health problem for years to come. If you have the following diabetes symptoms, see a doctor: Increased thirst Blurred vision Tiredness Cuts that are slow to heal Now let's examine the harmful myths that surround Type 2 Diabetes. Myth 1: Type 2 Diabetes isn't that serious All diabetes is serious and will lead to serious complications - including kidney disease, eye problems, and foot ulcers which may lead to amputation - if improperly managed. Additionally, having diabetes (regardless of whether it's Type 1 or Type 2) almost doubles your risk of heart attack. Myth 2: Type 2 Diabetes is a fat-person disease Obesity is a risk factor in Type 2 Diabetes; however it is not the only cause. Genetic and environmental factors are also to blame. Many adults are a normal weight or only slightly overweight when diagnosed, while many obese people never develop the disease. Other risk factors include age, ethnicity (African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, and Hispanic Americans seem at es Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And The Shame Game

Type 2 Diabetes And The Shame Game

The somewhat tenuous division between people with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes has always existed, but it's been more in the public eye lately after being discovered by mainstream media (see the November Chicago Tribune article, 'Diabetes' Civil War'). Just last week, the Globe and Mail published an article on whether or not type 1 diabetes should be renamed to distinguish it from type 2. We thought it would be nice to ask at least one person with type 2 diabetes for the perspective from their end of the story — aiming to break down some of the stereotypes and myths and hopefully bring the larger diabetes community a little closer together. Alan Shanley is an Australian blogger living with type 2 diabetes. He also authored a book on nutrition and type 2 called "What on Earth Can I Eat?" A Guest Post by Alan Shanley, author of Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey Ignorance may not be bliss after all, and there are occasions where it can be downright dangerous to a type 2 diabetic. But there are some times in life when it can be useful. For me, one of those occasions was April 2002 when my doctor advised me of my diagnosis with type 2 diabetes. At that time I was blissfully ignorant of diabetes in all its forms. So I never suffered diagnosis guilt. Sure, I was overweight, but in my country at that time we weren't bombarded with commercials earnestly and incorrectly telling us "for our own good" that diabetes is caused by obesity. Just as importantly, the lack of that media barrage meant none of my relatives or friends or any of the type 1s I met at my local support group sneered at me for causing my own condition. I never wasted any time or effort on guilt or recriminations. I didn't realize it at the time, but I had a major advantage over my American friends, wh Continue reading >>

In What Ways Is Type 2 Diabetes A Self Inflicted Disease

In What Ways Is Type 2 Diabetes A Self Inflicted Disease

In What Ways Is Type 2 Diabetes A Self Inflicted Disease Many people suffer from type 2 diabetes and most of them ignore their health in spite of having a threatening condition. Diabetes is not a terminal illness and most people underestimate its gravity and the kind of bodily damage it can cause to a person. A person may not get affected by diabetes on a day to day basis and it lies dormant most of the time. However, it can cause an attack of severe order if neglected and the person can be hospitalized several days due to the attack. Daily management of the disease is very crucial to have a healthy and long life. It has been noticed that several people who have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are actually obese and the over weight is due to their irregular and unhealthy food habits. Many of them eat fast food on an everyday basis and also consume alcohol. By comparing the life style and habits of several people who have been diagnosed with diabetes type 2 a common factor observed was food habits. It is a person’s own neglect of health that causes this type of diabetes ad it can be avoided by starting to have good habits early in life. Sometimes this type of diabetes is also referred to as a self inflicted disease or a self caused disease. Today even children who are obese are being diagnosed with the disease. There is a direct relationship between obesity and diabetes and both are a result of bad food habits and lack of exercise. More Articles : Continue reading >>

Type 2 Do You Think It Is Self Inflicted?

Type 2 Do You Think It Is Self Inflicted?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 do you think it is self inflicted? My daughter believe type type 2 is Self inflicted because you are over weight I tried to explain that even slim people have the disease. To top it all After 11 years I no longer take medication I control my life by what I eat so now she thinks I no longer have diabetes what complicated minds some people have. Type 1 can start early is that NOT self inflicted if not what is it? Please help. Hi. I would challenge the view that slim people can have T2. There will always be exceptions, but many of the 20% of slim T2s I'm sure would be found if tested properly (not guessed) to be late onset T1; I'm one of those. The latest NICE T1 guidelines have moved towards that view. T1 at any age, and it can occur at any age, is not self-inflicted. Yes, T2s can often make their T2 go into remission but as you imply they still have diabetes but it is controlled. I am a type 2 so when I say that type 1 is an autoimmune disease I have learned that rather than experienced it. I understand that your own body destroys things that it thinks are alien to it and in type 1's it destroys the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. In my opinion type 2 is caused/aggravated by visceral fat. Subcutaneous fat can also be present but if you are an individual not predisposed to obesity then you can be a thin diabetic. Fatty liver disease is what it is necessary to do something about in order to control your blood sugar. You can get Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease by drinking too much alcohol (ethanol) too often. You could get Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease by eating lots of fructose. Fructose forms part of ordinary table sugar and High Fruct Continue reading >>

Think Skinny People Don’t Get Type 2 Diabetes? Think Again.

Think Skinny People Don’t Get Type 2 Diabetes? Think Again.

In the last article we discussed the complex relationship between body weight and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We learned that although obesity is strongly associated with T2DM, a subset of “metabolically healthy obese” (MHO) people have normal blood sugar and insulin sensitivity and don’t ever develop diabetes. In this article we’re going to talk about the mirror reflection of the MHO: the “metabolically unhealthy nonobese” (MUN). These are lean people with either full-fledged type 2 diabetes or some metabolic dysfunction, such as insulin resistance. You might even be surprised to learn that skinny people can and do get T2DM. They are rarely mentioned in the media, and there isn’t much written about them in the scientific literature. Perhaps these folks have been overlooked because type 2 diabetes has been historically viewed as a disease of gluttony and sloth, a self-inflicted outcome of eating too much and not and not exercising enough. But the very existence of the MUN phenotype proves that there’s more to T2DM than overeating and a sedentary lifestyle. Remember that one in three type 2 diabetics are undiagnosed. It’s possible that a significant number of these people that are lean. They don’t suspect they might have T2DM because they’re under the impression that it’s not a condition that affects thin people. This is one of the biggest dangers of the myth that “only fat people get diabetes”. It’s well-known that high blood sugar can precede the development of T2DM for as long as ten years. It is during this time that many of the complications associated with diabetes – nerve damage, retinal changes, and early signs of kidney deterioration – begin to develop. This is why it’s just as important for lean people to maintain healthy blood s Continue reading >>

'if Only Everyone Could Have This Level Of Care': Readers On Living With Type 2 Diabetes

'if Only Everyone Could Have This Level Of Care': Readers On Living With Type 2 Diabetes

Readers say they felt guilt and shame on finding out they had type 2 diabetes. The stigma around the disease – the sense of “having done it to yourself” because of bad lifestyle choices – still prevails for some. However, for others living with the disease can be a positive and life-changing experience – “a wake-up call” – with an added bonus of lifelong attention from the NHS. Here our readers tell us about what it felt like to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and their experiences of living with the condition. Jane, works in student services. Diagnosed aged 40, now 46 I just ignored it as I felt OK. I thought they may have made a mistake as I was just over the threshold. I had leaflets given to me and they told me to go on a two-day awareness course. The first day was a load of rubbish because it was such a very basic level, so I didn’t go back. Maybe the second day I would have learned more. Part of me was refusing to deal with it. I’ve never felt I had any support dealing with the psychological side of it. You get leaflets about not eating sugar but nobody ever asked, what’s this like for you? I found it very difficult. I try not to tell anyone. There’s an element of shame – my job at university is working with disabled students, I’m trying to persuade them there’s no stigma and to be as open as possible but then I’m hiding this. I was speaking to a colleague who offered me a cake and I said I’m avoiding that type of thing as I had been diagnosed with diabetes. She asked whether it was type 1 or the self-inflicted one. I almost burst into tears, it was really hurtful. I’d done it to myself – some people view it like that. Not having any symptoms made it easier to deny. I think the NHS is great, I’ve had fantastic treatment, b Continue reading >>

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